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The Voice of Palos - Orland Since 1941

Your Independent Community Newspaper Named best small weekly in Illinois — five times

THE 72nd Year, No. 52

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

2 Sections

Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities.

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Thursday, December 26, 2013

To brighten hard times, Orland Lions deliver by Tim Hadac staff reporter     Twenty local families in need are enjoying a brighter holiday season, thanks in large part to

the 20 Orland Park Lions who purchased, wrapped and delivered gifts to them on Christmas Eve.     “Some of these people — especially the kids — if they weren’t

Photo by Tim Hadac

Orland Park Lions Steve and Gail Anton pause for a photo just after they loaded several gifts into a plastic bag.

unwrapping these gifts, they’d get bupkis, nothing, this Christmas,” said chapter President Jack Sans as he and others wrapped gifts last Saturday morning at Paddy B’s restaurant and pub 11969 W. 143rd St., a favorite meeting place of the group.     While the work was important, the mood was festive, with members occasionally breaking into song as they wrapped.     The 20 families — all but two in Orland Park — were paired with the Lions by the Orland Township Food Pantry. “These are needy families that are down on their luck, so we’re going to make their Christmas a little brighter, give them a Christmas they’ll remember,” smiled Jim Smith. “This is the kind of thing we do as Lions.”     “Seven of us went shopping Thursday morning and [with club funds] bought the things that were on the [families’] request (See Orland Lions, Page 4)

Photo by Tim Hadac

Sandra Jankowski shows a modest toy destined for a local child as her brother, James, continues wrapping.

Couple allegedly stole $352,000 from Palos Heights Fire District     A former Palos Heights Fire Protection District administrative assistant was arrested last Thursday after an investigation found that she had taken more than $350,000 from her former employer, according to Cook County Sheriff Thomas J. Dart.     Michelle Sopko, 45, of Oak Forest, was arrested on a $400,000 cash warrant after an investigation by the Cook County Sheriff’s Financial Crimes Unit and the Palos Heights Police Department. Her husband, Charles Sopko, 47, an Oak Forest Fire Department deputy chief, was also arrested on a $400,000 cash warrant.     Michelle Sopko and Charles Sopko have each been charged with one count of theft of governmental property over $100,000, a

class X felony. They were scheduled to appear for a bond hearing Monday in court in Bridgeview.     Sheriff Dart said that earlier this year, newly-appointed Palos Heights Fire Protection District Chief Timothy Sarhage requested the assistance of the Sheriff’s Office and Palos Heights Police to investigate discrepancies in the district’s financial records that had occurred prior to his arrival.     According to Dart, the joint investigation found that from May 2009 to December 2012, Michelle Sopko diverted a total of approximately $352,000 of the fire protection district’s funds to a joint bank account she shared with her husband.     Michelle Sopko had worked as a part-time administrative assis-

tant for the district from October 2008 until December 2012, when she was terminated for unrelated reasons, Dart said. As part of her job duties she prepared and issued payroll checks and paid district expenses.     In response to the allegations, the district’s Board of Trustees issued a statement last Friday that reiterated what the Sheriff’s Office said, and added a few details.     The statement alleged that in December, 2012, Chief Sarhage discovered that Sopko had signed the name of district treasurer Sheila Corrigan “on a check without the treasurer’s knowledge or consent.”     Investigators soon found that Sopko “had devised a method of manipulating the district’s secure payroll and accounts payable ac-

counting systems. The manipulation of these systems allowed [Sopko] to prepare false payroll reports, false monthly accounting reports, false financial statements, and the possible theft of district funds through this manipulation,” the statement read.     The board statement also claimed that the alleged manipulation began about 20 months prior to Sarhage’s arrival, “during the term of former Fire Chief Jack Nagle” and that routine annual audits did not detect any inconsistencies because “the secure payroll and accounts payable system had been corrupted and false reports were generated.”     During the investigation, Sarhage “discovered payroll and vendor payments being directly

Michelle Sopko

Charles Sopko

deposited into the accounts of [Sopko]. Chief Sarhage immediately notified the Palos Heights Police Department,” the statement continued.     “At the present time, there is no evidence of any other employee being involved in the theft,” the statement added.     Board members refused comment beyond the statement, saying they have been “instructed not

to discuss this matter, as it is an ongoing criminal investigation.”     Also weighing in with a statement was the Palos Heights Police Department. “Although the Palos Heights Fire Protection District is not a city of Palos Heights agency, we are saddened that someone who was put in a position of public trust would violate that trust,” said Chief George L. Yott Jr. in the statement.

Dist. 230 mulls new college, careers exam by Tim Hadac staff reporter     In a time of growing criticism about the amount of standardized tests that children take in school, District 230 officials last Thursday discussed the new Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) tests set for implementation in the 2014-15 academic year.     “Boy, it just seems like we do a lot of testing,” said board Vice President Patrick O’Sullivan, in reaction to a presentation made by Dr. Kim Dryier, the district’s assistant superintendent for instruction. “I think a lot of that is not our doing, it’s kind of forced on us. But boy, you take these PARCC tests, these pre- and postassessment tests, your ACT, your ACT prep, and it’s almost like

you’re being tested as much as you’re learning. It’s like there’s a kind of test overload.”     The discussion took place at Sandburg High School, before an audience of fewer than 10 people.     The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), as described on its website, “is a consortium of 18 states plus the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands working together to develop a common set of K-12 assessments in English and math anchored in what it takes to be ready for college and careers. These new K-12 assessments will build a pathway to college and career readiness by the end of high school, mark students’ progress toward this goal from 3rd grade up, and provide teachers with timely information

to inform instruction and provide student support.”     PARCC plans to “create highquality assessments that measure the full range of the Common Core State Standards, support educators in the classroom, make better use of technology in assessments, and advance accountability at all levels.”     Exactly what that will mean at the classroom level is something that school administrators and faculty, both locally and elsewhere, have grappled with for the last year, as the effort takes shape slowly.     “This seems to be extremely confusing. I’d hate to be a kid right now,” said board member Tony Serratore, who wondered aloud if the coming PARCC method of student assessment will differ significantly from the well known

ACT test, and if that difference will affect students’ ability to get into the college of their choice.     Echoing what many have said in districts across the U.S., Dryier acknowledged that there are still “uncertainties and variables” associated with PARCC implementation and described aspects of the process as “frustrating” and “trying” for administrators and faculty alike.     She encouraged board members to take a longer view, saying that the district’s goal remains to “prepare kids the best way that we can. We truly believe that good instruction, good critical thinking skills will help kids solve problems, regardless of what [those problems] look like,” she said.     “The good news is, we do good instruction here,” she added. “We have good school improve-

ment plans. We are focused on student achievement, regardless of what the [type of] test is. We fully believe that our students will be well prepared for any assessment that may show up on our doorstep next year.”     Dryier added that basic information about PARCC and what it will mean for students in the district will be posted soon at d230. org, but she, and that information may change over time.     A big-picture view of PARCC is available at parcconline.org.     In other matters, board members congratulated and thanked district staff for their handling the Dec. 4 evacuation of Stagg High School, 8015 W. 111th St., Palos Hills.     “We tested before school, during school, after school, outside, inside, in spaces near the boiler,”

stated district Superintendent James M. Gay. “We had an outside contractor — White Environmental — come in to help.”     Gay said there is no evidence to suggest any kind of environmental health concern at the school, but that steps have been taken to prevent a re-occurrence of the strange odor that led to the evacuation and to about a dozen students and teachers transported to local hospitals as a precaution.     School officials have said they believe that unusual weather conditions to a high amount of vehicle exhaust to be pulled into the building’s fresh-air intake vents.     The new, preventive steps will be announced at the next board meeting, set for 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 30 at Sandburg, 13300 S. La Grange Road. The public is encouraged to attend.

Dist. 218 hears ‘huge culture shift’ by Jessie Molloy Correspondent     The Community High School District 218 school board approved the 2013 tax levy at its meeting Dec. 16 and discussed the most recent results of its new district wide assessment system.     With the first semester drawing to a close, the board’s director of data, assessment, and evaluation, Kathleen Gavin, gave a lengthy report on the results of the common unit assessment system.     Although the system has been put in place gradually for the past Photo by Jeff Vorva four years, and district-wide semester finals have been in use since 2008, this is the first school year during which it has been    Blackhawks legend Bobby Hull spent four hours at Kenwood Liquors in Oak Lawn Dec. 18 signing fully implemented across all grade autographs, posing for photos and talking with fans. Proceeds from his appearance went to the Park levels and subject areas. The comLawn Residential Center. Park Lawn’s Margaret Propoegil and Mudiwa Judalani pose with Hull. mon assessment system goes hand    A big group of Park Lawn representatives wanted their picture with Hull and he obliged but first in hand with the district’s new wanted photos with the females in the group. “I like the girls better!” he bellowed with a hearty laugh grading policy and has been “a as the photo was shot. huge culture shift,” according to    For more photos, see page 11. Gavin.

‘I like the girls better!’

    The new system was designed to equalize the learning of students at all three district schools by having the teachers and curriculum directors collaborate on universal tests for use in each unit of the class. The new tests are a mix of multiple-choice and written exams which test both student knowledge and more practical applications of the material. Under the new grading system these tests represent 52 percent of students’ semester grades. An additional 20 percent of the grades is represented by the semester final, with the remaining 23 percent being made up by homework and additional assignments given by each individual teacher.     This switch in focus by the district to a more unified curriculum was made, according to Gavin, “in anticipation of the switch to the common core standards and PARCC assessment tests [which will be given to freshmen and sophomores to determine No

Child Left Behind funding] in Illinois.”     In her report to the board, Gavin said that some areas are performing significantly better than other across the district. Some of the strongest areas of performance across the district were Honors English and all levels of Algebra, the latter of which she said makes sense. Freshmen math was one of the first subjects to be switched to the system and has had time to work out the problems other subjects are still facing. Despite less than spectacular results in some subject areas, Gavin was optimistic about the progress the system is making and praised the teachers and curriculum directors for their work creating and implementing the new tests.     Gavin also said that an advantage of the system was its ability to target trouble areas across the curriculum and at specific schools (See Dist. 218, Page 4)




The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013

View from Trinity by Dr. Steven Timmermans

Happy New Year!     At the beginning of a new year, we’ve come to expect greetings and wishes for a future yet unknown. However, as a parent, psychologist, and college president, I frequently rely on the phrase the past predicts the future, since it so often unfolds that way. So, as I think of the year ahead, I think back to the past, thereby providing my predictions for the new year.     1. Trinity graduated its first students with master’s degrees at our December commencement. Given the great start to our two master’s programs in Counseling Psychology and Special Education, I predict these programs will continue to grow and flourish.     2. Lake Katherine’s summer gala, Evening Under the Stars, was a hit. I predict that, more and more, Lake Katherine will be an integral site in our city, not just for enjoying nature but also for gathering people together for celebrations.     3. I’ve been part of volunteer work crews preparing the way for the installation of the CalSag Trail, and I predict that we’ll be able to bike and walk along this incredible new community asset.     Undoubtedly you’ve noticed that my predictions are only a small step ahead of reality — making them safe and not at all surprising. Yet, there’s a much larger future of uncertainty for all of us in the new year.     It seems that the economy continues to gather strength, yet none of us knows for sure what lies ahead. While Wall

Street seems bullish and events across either the Atlantic or Pacific seem far away, we know, too, that tremors in one place shake the entire global economy. Will there be surprises in the new year?     We’ve been watching the drama of financial challenges in Springfield and Washington. Recently Springfield came up with a pension fix, and the two parties in Washington came together with little noise and media attention and produced a two-year budget. Yet we wonder — are these measures what’s truly needed for long term, sound financial government functioning? What will the new year bring?     Much closer to home, we know we’ve lost a major local grocery store. None of us will go hungry because of its departure, but we will have a vacant store and less choice. Will the site find a new purpose in this new year?     Yes, we can rely on age-old truisms such as the past predicts the future, but that’s just a minor crutch when facing the future. The reality is that we face a new year — like this time every year — not knowing what lies ahead. Yet, we hope, for as Cicero of old has said, where there’s life, there’s hope. The question we each face in this new year is in what or in whom do we place our hope. May our answers to that question spur us on to a profoundly happy new year! Steve Timmermans, Ph.D., is the president of Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights.

Paragraphs From This Old Stump by Carl Richards (1906-1988)

(From Dec. 25, 1980)     The battle to incorporate Palos Heights was mentioned in two recent issues of the Regional.     If you haven’t lived here more than 20 years you wouldn’t know about the intensity of feelings about proposals to incorporate the Heights. The community was divided about equally, pro and con. Few residents were neutral on the subject.     The Regional consistently urged a yes vote in favor of incorporation before each of the four attempts. No mental torture for us at the Regional was ever devised by man to equal that of an incorporation election.     The proposition was defeated three times before it finally passed on April 11, 1959. Even at that time it did not amount to a Reagan landslide. The exact count was 850 to 684, a majority of only 166 votes.     A few weeks before that, in another election, the proposition was defeated by only 22 votes. The totals were 871 to 849.     The official birthday of the city was recorded in the history book as Noon on April 16, 1959, when Judge Otto Kerner issued a proclamation declaring the election official.     Now let’s back up and talk a little about the previous elections

in which the issue was defeated.     At each election we were on the wrong side of the fence and recommended that citizens should vote to incorporate, We weren’t very popular at any of those times.     When the issue was defeated the second time the group quickly formed a victory parade and used this poor editor as a target of ridicule by driving around and around our home and the old Regional building honking horns, beating drums and shouting words of “endearment” at us. Fortunately, no rotten eggs or rocks were thrown. Or, as said in the little poem, “sticks and stones might break our bones, etc., etc.”     Shortly before the next election an anti-group organized, raised money and published another newspaper which was to compete with the Regional. The publication died after only one issue after the group got a bill from the printer.     This same group planned a campaign to get people to cancel their subscriptions to the Regional but it was not successful.     The third attempt at incorporation was the one that failed by only 22 votes. Then Erol Smith and a small group decided to make another try which proved to be the winning one.

Readers Write Opposition to same-sex away after a difficult, painful marriage won’t ‘fizzle’ and protracted struggle with

dementia and failing health. Dear Editor:     The very next day my     An Associated Press report husband and I left on a longclaiming that the challenge to anticipated trip to the Holy Illinois House incumbents who Land, our gift to each other in voted for marriage redefinition celebration of our 35th wedding has fizzled is utterly misleadanniversary. Just days prior, ing. According to our informaduring my personal devotions, tion, eight of the nine Chicago I felt the Lord had led me to a Democrats challenging Demovery special promise pertinent cratic incumbents would have to my particular situation. I voted no or present on SB 10, read in Isaiah 66:13: “As one the same-sex “marriage” legiswhom his mother comforts, so lation sponsored by homosexual I will comfort you and you will state Rep. Greg Harris (D-Chibe comforted in Jerusalem.” cago). I clung in desperation to that     This is an astounding fact verse. I needed comfort, for I that should not be lost on was feeling the fragility and readers. Not one, not two, not deep sadness that comes with three, but eight pro-marriage fresh, raw grief. Chicago Democrats are chal    Arriving in Israel, I was lenging Democratic incumbents drawn into the excitement of in the March 18, 2014 primary being in the land of the Bible. election. It is an amazing country with     Fizzled? Hardly. amazing people. In our pilgrim    Marriage redefinition didn’t age to places of significance, a month ago and still doesn’t we of course had to visit Bethhave the support that the lehem. Our group gathered one dominant media wants you to starlit night on a hill overlookbelieve it does. It is evident in ing the town, much larger now the fact that Speaker Michael than in ancient times, but still Madigan (D-Chicago) had to nestled in a valley, surrounded twist arms to get SB 10 to pass by shepherds watching their in his chamber and by the fact flocks, and still full of wonder. that a good number of ChiOne of our guides read Micago Democrats are running as cah 5:2: “But you Bethlehem pro-marriage Democrats. That, Ephratah, though you are however, is not the narrative little among the thousands of the media wants to promote. Judah, yet out of you shall He They choose to frame it as a come forth unto Me that is conservative-cup-half-empty to be Ruler in Israel, Whose story. goings forth have been from     Compound these facts with of old, from everlasting.” We the fact that all three of the then sang the beloved carol weak-kneed Republicans who about that decidedly important voted for SB 10 have primary location. The lyrics touched challengers who are pro-marmy heart in a captivatingly riage, and it adds up to anyfresh, new way. When Jesus thing but a “fizzle.” was born there, truly all the David E. Smith hopes and all the fears of all Executive Director time did meet — He is the One Illinois Family Institute that was promised so many years before and He was the One who would fulfill all hopes Comfort and joy beyond understanding and banish all fears. “Come to us, abide with us, our Lord Dear Editor: Emmanuel.” Emmanuel...God     Charles Dickens certainly with us. When we are sad or grasped the complexity of life lonely or fearful or in grief, when he stated, “It was the we need comfort and we need best of times — it was the someone who will be with us worst of times.” in our pain. When life is dark     I came to understand this in and hopeless, we need light and a poignant way a few weeks encouragement. When the evil ago. We mourned and burand sin of this old, fallen world ied my mom who had passed seem to overtake and overrun

all that is good, we need someone strong and powerful to come and rescue us. On that long ago night in Bethlehem, God did invade our earth and delivered the best blessing we could ever imagine. The first Advent brought Jesus to our world as the baby Who would grow up to be our Savior. He came with one intent — to pay the impossible debt for our sin so He could be with us and we could be with Him throughout all eternity.     It was at another key destination — the Garden of Gethsemane — that I received not only greater insight into the magnitude of the special Gift God sent that first Christmas, but what the implications of receiving that Gift really mean. I thought, “What agony Jesus must have suffered as He poured out His heart in tearful supplication to His Father-He knew what horrors faced Him. Why would He go through with it? He could have refused. He could have turned and gone straight back to His Home in Heaven. Yes, He could have, but He didn’t.” And then I sensed Him gently saying to my heart. “I came and I faced the cross because I love you. I have always loved you and I want you to be with Me forever. This was the only way to make that happen. I did this for you.” God so loved the world, He so loved me and He so loved you, that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him will not perish, but have eternal life. I realized as never before that it is God’s love and forgiveness that provide the best and the deepest comfort we could ever desire and truly all we ever really need. And just as He had promised, He did comfort me that day in Jerusalem.     What difficulties, pain or sorrow are you facing this Christmas season? Do you need some comfort in your heart? Have you received His gifts of love and forgiveness and everlasting life? Jesus loves you and He is patiently waiting for you to receive Him, the Gift too wonderful for words! Susan Tesauro Palos Heights

Inside the First Amendment

‘Ho Ho’ or ‘Humbug’? Let’s celebrate and protect our basic rights by Gene Policinski’     Tis the season to be jolly and of good will, right?     Responding to holiday cheer with a well-voiced “Bah” or “Humbug?”     Well, it’s our right under the First Amendment to speak and write in ways that are naughty

or nice. Let’s stick with that seasonal theme as we move from the Christmas season into resolutions and forecasts for the New Year, and consider the past year and what’s ahead.     For both this year and next, the controversy over the National Security Agency and its electronic surveillance programs

Letters Policy

The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your address and telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. Mail or bring Readers Write letters to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463, or e-mail us at theregional@comcast.net

THE

REGIONAL NEWS

An independent, locally-owned community newspaper published weekly Regional Publishing Corporation 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Voice (708) 448-4000 Fax (708) 448-4012 www.theregionalnews.com TheRegional@comcast.net Office Hours: Mon.- Fri. - 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday - 9 a.m. to noon

Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jack Murray Sports Editor Ken Karrson Advertising Sales Val Draus Phone: 448-4001 Classified Manager Debbie Perrewe Phone: 448-4002 Graphic Design and Layout Rebecca Lanning Jackie Santora Deadlines: Editorial: Noon Saturday Advertising: 5 p.m. Monday Subscription rates: Local, delivered by mail, $45 a year in advance. Out-of-State, $55 a year. Single copies, $1.00. Postmaster: Send address changes to THE REGIONAL NEWS, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932. The Regional News cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material. USPS 419-260 Periodical postage paid at Palos Heights, IL 60463 and additional post offices. Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Palos Heights, Illinois, 60463 and additional post offices under the Act of March 3, 1879. (©Entire contents copyright 2013 Regional Publishing Corp.)

will be the “gift that keeps on giving.”     With regular revelations of top-secret details, and a federal district court decision just days ago declaring some elements of the NSA programs unconstitutional, the top story of 2013 in the area of privacy, press and individual rights most likely

will be the top story for at least the first six months of 2014.     A presidential advisory board examining NSA policies recommended on Dec. 17 that the agency be blocked from storing massive amounts of data on Americans’ telephone records, and that court orders be

required to conduct individual searches. But officials charged with preventing terror attacks said such restrictions will seriously slow efforts to prevent such attacks. And on Dec. 19, veteran national security writer Walter Pincus of The

Sandra Jankowski, Orland Park     “Being more selfless and putting others before myself more. So far, so good. It’s turning out pretty good.”

Jim Smith, New Lenox     “I was going to eat healthier this year. I’m still eating healthy, just not as healthy as I was. I still drink two smoothies a day. I went to the gym for four months, but then slacked off.

Gail Anton, Orland Park Steve Anton, Orland Park     “Try to be a good mother-in-law.     “Lose weight, and I did, just not I kept it because my daughter, who as much as I wanted to.” I love dearly, lives out of state.”

(Continued on page 3)

This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and however it may be threatened.

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What is a New Year’s resolution you have made in the past? Did you keep it? (Asked last Saturday morning at Paddy B’s restaurant and pub, 11969 W. 143rd St., as the Orland Park Lions wrapped Christmas gifts for the needy.)

Photos by Joan Hadac

Laura Guzzino, Orland Park     “I resolved to let everyone in the family know how I felt about them all year long. Did I keep it? Well, I kept it in January.”


The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013



Warner Bros. says ‘That’s all, folks’ to locales using ‘Polar Express’ name by Kelly White Correspondent     For years, communities in the south suburbs have been using “Polar Express” to mark a train ride to visit Santa Claus.     But 2013 may mark the last year the coined name of the Polar Express can be used.     Warner Bros. is having some issues with towns using that name.     The Polar Express events, based on the Christmas book by Chris Van Allsburg, may be changing their name in the coming winter seasons, according to Mike Leonard, Director of Parks and Recreation for the City of Palos Heights.     “Each agency that holds such an event (Polar Express event) received an email from the Warner Bros Anti-Piracy Department back in October concerning the name of the ‘Polar Express,’ ” Leonard said.     Warner Bros. is the owner of copyright, distribution and certain other intellectual property rights in and to the motion picture “The Polar Express” and related elements, and is the exclusive licensee of the underlying book property in relation to themed events based on it.     Because of these rights, no one is authorized to utilize Warner Bros.’ Intellectual Property without their express written permission.     Susan K. Proctor, Director of Anti-Piracy sent letters on behalf of Warner Bros. saying: “It has come to our attention that the several park districts are offering a ‘Polar Express’ themed train ride excursion using the title ‘Polar Express,’ and/or recitations of the book and/or other elements thereof.     “It is our belief that your train ride event will erroneously lead consumers to believe that these

park districts are licensed by, sponsored by or authorized by, Warner Bros., when in fact that is not the case. In addition, your use of Warner Bros.’ Intellectual Property dilutes the distinctiveness of The Polar Express Property by trading upon the goodwill and reputation which the public associates with the Property. Warner Bros. considers such conduct to be a serious violation of its rights and to be damaging to its business and reputation.’’     The Polar Express Train is advertised that it brings the classic children’s story to life with a real train ride that departs from the Palos Heights Metra Station, 11451 South Hwy. The trip continues on to the North Pole (otherwise known as Union Station in Chicago) to pick up Jolly Old St. Nick, who takes the train ride back home as a passenger.     Riding along the train in pajamas, families are able to enjoy hot chocolate and cookies while singing Christmas carols and taking turns telling Santa what they want most for Christmas. There are also readings from the “Polar Express” book. And, just like the book, Santa gives each child the gift of a bell from Santa’s sleigh.     Communities participating in the holiday train ride experience

were given the option by Warner Bros. to license the rights to the Polar Express to keep the name, for future events, or to change the name entirely.     “The event is expected to continue on in the future, but under a different name, because the company that owns the rights to the name has forbidden communities that sponsor this event from using it,” Alderman Martin Kleefisch (1st Ward) stated on behalf of the Palos Hills City Council.     In November, ABC7 News did a story on how Clarendon Hills Park District changed the name to “Santa Train.” They quoted a man who plays Santa on the train, John Sullivan, as saying that the ride won’t be the same without the “Polar Express” name.     “This is Scrooge in action not letting the kids have the ‘Polar Express’ trip,” he said.     Changes to the name of the event have not yet been discussed by Palos Hills. While past Polar Express events have been very successful with the limited space filling up quickly, cities plan on carrying on the tradition. Mary Jo Vincent, Commissioner at Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Department, has confirmed the event will still take place next Christmas season.

Photo by Tim Hadac

Lynn Sutter accepts her flowers and is congratulated by members of the District 230 Board, including Secretary Kathy Quilty, Susan Dalton, Kate Murphy-Peterson, President Rick Nogal, Vice President Patrick O’Sullivan, Melissa Gracias, Superintendent James M. Gay and Tony Serratore.

Secretary to Dist. 230 board honored for outstanding service     School secretaries are often overlooked and taken for granted, but Consolidated High School District 230 Board members did not forget Lynn Sutter at last Thursday’s meeting.     Minutes before the board adjourned to executive session, district officials surprised Sutter with a bouquet of flowers for her service.     Officials noted that Sutter — secretary to the board and Superintendent James M. Gay — was nominated for the Illinois Association of School Boards’ Holly Jack Outstanding Service Award. The award recognizes staff members who serve the School Board secretary role for their outstanding performance, initiative,

innovation, staff development, self-improvement, passion and dedication.     Gay and School Board President Rick Nogal nominated Sutter, an Orland Park resident, for the award, along with past presidents Frank Grabowski and Patrick O’Sullivan and long-time board member Kathy Quilty. While Sutter did not win the award this year, officials praised her performance.     “Lynn is one of the hardest working and most dedicated school district employees with whom I have ever worked,” wrote Nogal in the nomination. “She puts in long hours, arriving early and is usually on the job past 6 p.m. Lynn is ac-

cessible to board members. She forwards her business phone to her cell phone after working hours and constantly checks and responds to email at all hours of the day and night, weekends included.”     “At all times, Lynn is a consummate professional,” wrote Gay. “She manages numerous responsibilities flawlessly and always assures that the School Board and I are well prepared with the information and materials we need. She foresees potential challenges, suggests solutions and makes course corrections without missing a beat. She brings a special kind of expertise, precision and humor to a very challenging role.”

Orland reports cost savings from electrical aggregation Apply for heating assistance     Village of Orland Park residents who participated in the village’s Electric Aggregation savings program have enjoyed savings on their ComEd bills since the program’s inception in 2012.     Residential accounts received a fixed rate of 4.823¢ per kWh (4.85¢ for small commercial retail accounts) for a two-year term with Nordic Energy — a significant savings versus the ComEd rate which adjusts monthly, and as of December 2013, was 6.005 cents per kWh (a 20 percent reduction).     “We’ve heard from a number residents praising the village’s Electrical Aggregation Program,” said Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin. “It’s even better to see the numbers, to know how much this program is saving our residents,” he said.     In the program’s first 16 months, participating Orland Park households saved on average, $292 in electric supply costs, for a cumulative village-wide savings of $5,575, million. The program includes Renewable Energy Certificates representing 25 percent of the village’s electric energy use.     New residents are not automatically enrolled in the program, but all are welcome to join at any time by calling Nordic Energy at 877-

808-1022. They must give their ComEd account number, service address and specifically request the Orland Park fixed rate of 4.823 cents. There is no fee to join or to leave the program. Those enrolled with other suppliers should first check with their current supplier to determine if they are subject to any early termination fee before joining the village’s program.     “We encourage everyone to look at the numbers. During the first 16 months the village offered the program, residents saved an average of $292 in electric supply costs,” McLaughlin said, adding, “New residents are strongly encouraged to call to enroll in the program.”     To determine who an electric supplier is, residents should check their ComEd bills and look one-third down the page for the bold header “Electricity Supply Services.” Those in the village’s aggregation program will see “Nordic Energy” and a rate of $0.04823. If not, customers are either enrolled with another supplier or are receiving the ComEd “default” rate that is stated as three separate charges: Electricity Supply Charge, Transmission Services Charge, and Purchased Electricity Adjustment.

    The Orland Park Village Board chose a 24-month term with Nordic Energy at what was a very opportune time in the electric market. Prices have since climbed.     The ComEd supply rate (actually a rate established by the Illinois Power Agency) is expected to rise in June 2014 from the current 6.005 cents per kWh due to known increased capacity charges (which are included in the ComEd supply rate).     The village of Orland Park’s program rate will remain fixed at 4.823 through July 2014. Those increased capacity charges will not be passed through to Orland Park aggregation program participants. At the end of the two-year term, the village may again seek competitive rates to renew the program.     Residents continue to receive one monthly bill generated by ComEd and continue to receive delivery services from ComEd. Any outages should be reported to ComEd. Residents with issues with supply or enrollment are encouraged to leave any questions and callback numbers with the village’s consultant, NIMEC at (800) 727-3820. — Village of Orland Park

First Amendment

between top news media representatives and White House Press Secretary Jay Carney, they agreed to continue talks in January about access for photo journalists to President Obama’s public events and appearances.     Not much under the First Amendment holiday tree for Freedom of Information (FOI) advocates — who see little in the way of major changes in laws to encourage “transparency” in government, but also continued problems in getting open access to officials who can interpret or explain policies, or parse increasing amounts of raw data available on government Web sites.     And then there’s an issue highlighted by — but not limited to — the NSA disclosures: The huge amount of data about us held by “third-parties” — private companies ranging from retailers to phone companies to internet providers. Not subject to FOI laws like government data bases, but vulnerable to government subpoenas or secret agreements with agencies, these information icebergs sail along like their real-world counterparts — with much of their bulk generally out of sight. Santa may reside in a toyshop at the North Pole, but deep details of our daily routines live in these private sanctorums-incyberspace.     FoxNews.com reporter Jana Winter got the best gift of all — freedom — on Dec. 10 from the New York state Court of Appeals. It ruled she did not

have to comply with a subpoena that would have forced her to choose in a Colorado court between going to jail and revealing confidential sources. The New York court said Winter was protected by that state’s “absolute” shield law — and not subject to Colorado’s significantly weaker law — from having to identify the sources of a story about a revealing notebook kept by accused Aurora, Colo., movie theater gunman James Holmes.     As we head into 2014, ultimately the best gift we can present to ourselves is continued vigilance about our First Amendment rights. And with that thought, to all a good night.

(Continued from page 2) Washington Post wrote that “the vast majority” of 1.7 million classified documents that former NSA contractor Edward Snowden took with him in fleeing the U.S. have not yet been “leaked.”     Free press advocates supporting a federal shield law — protecting journalists from being compelled in court to disclose sources — got an early present from President Obama. In June, he responded to a controversy over Justice Department seizures of press telephone records of The Associated Press, and phone and e-mail records of a Fox News correspondent by throwing administration support behind the bill. In 2010, following disclosure of U.S. secret cables and reports by the group Wikileaks, Obama opposed a similar bill.     Still, the Grinch that is Congress pushed any chance of opening that gift to a free press into the New Year, as the Free Flow of Information Act languished in the Senate in December — though some forecast a floor vote on the bill as early as January.     News photographers reporting on the President ended the year battling administration policies they say freeze out news media lenses in favor of the official White House camera. At a Dec. 17 meeting

at CEDA event at Orland Twp.     Orland Township will host an opportunity for eligible residents to apply for energy assistance on Wednesday, Jan. 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Township Office, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland Park.     Southeast CEDA will be on site to provide information and applications for its LIHEAP Direct Vendor Payment (DVP) and LIHEAP Furnace programs.     The LIHEAP DVP program exists to assist income-eligible households with one-time benefit payments to utility companies during the winter months. Payments are applied directly to the household’s energy bills and amounts are determined by income level, household size and fuel type.     CEDA’s LIHEAP Furnace pro­gram is only available to ho-

meowners or landlords residing at a property with an inoperable heating system. Applicants may apply to this program every year as long as the heating system is nonfunctioning.     In order to apply for either program, residents must bring Social Security cards for all household members, proof of gross income from the last 30 days for all household members 18 and older and a current gas and/or light bill. Applicants whose utilities are included in the rent must bring proof of the rental agreement stating that utilities are included, monthly rental amount and landlord contact information. Applicants applying for the LIHEAP Furnace program must also bring a current mortgage statement or current property tax bill.

    CEDA is one of the largest non-profit Community Action Agencies in the country, serving more than 500,000 Cook County residents annually. With over 30 programs and services offered, CEDA works with communities to empower families and individuals to achieve self-sufficiency and improve their quality of life. (Source: cedaorg.net.)     This event is sponsored by Supervisor Paul O’Grady and the Board of Trustees, who would like to encourage all eligible residents to apply for these assistance programs.     For more information on events like this, follow Supervisor O’Grady and the Township on Facebook, facebook.com/ supervisorogrady or call 4034222.

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Gene Policinski is chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute and senior vice president of the Institute’s First Amendment Center. He can be reached at gpolicinski@newseum.org.

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Pam Merritello Christmas Greetings for 2013




The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013

Palos Chamber shares holiday cheer

A parking lot that is normally quiet and nearly empty on a chilly weeknight sprang to life last Thursday, as dozens of members of the Service organizations play an important role in local chambers of Palos Area Chamber of Commerce gathered in a vacant storefront commerce, as Tom Crowhurst of the Palos Lions Club reminded evat 12224 S. Harlem Ave. to attend the group’s holiday party. eryone as he spoke with Susan Withers of Standard Bank & Trust.

North Central College freshman Cora Georgiou, daughter of Computer Greeks owner and chamber Vice President Steve Georgiou, added a note of inspiration to the gathering when she delighted chamber members with her version of “Ave Maria.” She also will perform at the chamber’s annual banquet, set for Jan. 31

While the venue lacked glitz, there was no shortage of cheer and Bridget Sullivan of Waddell & Reed (left) welcomes Tim and Kath- optimism for a brighter 2014, agreed Bridget Sullivan of Waddell & leen Fitzgerald of A Relaxed You therapeutic massage and day spa, Reed (from left), Steve Georgiou of Computer Greeks and chamber planned to open in 2014 at 12100 S. Harlem Ave. President Susan Withers of Standard Bank & Trust.

Sharing a bit of food and fellowship are Deanna Skeels of Nerium skin care products (from left), Lorie Murtland of Essential Chiropractic and Health Center, and Marty Linderborg of Great Harvest Bread Co.

Photos by Tim Hadac

Parking fees at Orland train stations to increase

Orland Lions (Continued from page 1) lists, filled it up with some gift cards, and now we’re wrapping and getting ready to deliver,” he added.     The gifts were not at all extravagant, but reflected the need of the recipients. “Some of the gifts are just basic household products — kitchen, bathroom products — the simplest stuff they need, the necessities, plus a few smaller things like toys for children,” added Sandra Jankowski. “It’s what they asked for, and a little more.”     Sans said the people on the receiving end of the Lions’ benevolence “didn’t ask for a lot. They asked for a hoody, a shirt, simple things. They didn’t ask for name brands or an Xbox,” he said.     Pulling together the effort was “a no-brainer for us,” he continued. “We’ve done this on and off over the years, but we never did it to this scale. We never took on 20 families [in years past], maybe just five. We always kept it small.”     “We went into the township office and said, ‘Give us 10 families,’ and they gave us 10 senior citizens. These seniors, all they were asking for were gift cards to Walgreens. And we thought, a $25 gift card to Walgreens — well, there’s not a lot you can get for $25 anymore, so we increased it, we said you’ll get your $25 gift card, but [also] here’s a toaster or whatever, we’re going to make it nice for you,” Sans said.     In addition to the seniors, the food pantry tacked on 10 younger households — most headed by single moms who are unemployed or underemployed.     The Lions took care to wrap the gifts carefully in paper every bit as bright and festive as what

    The daily parking fee for the three Southwest Service Orland Park Train Stations will increase from $1 to $1.25 effective Jan. 1.     The monthly commuter permit fee will also increase Jan. 1, from $25 to $30.     “The last time we raised the daily parking fee was more than 20 years ago,” said Director of

Finance Annmarie Mampe. “And, the last increase in commuter permit fees was about 15 years ago.”     The increase in fees will fund the higher cost of operations for the three stations along with paying for improvements to the stations that are maintained by the village of Orland Park.

Top 10 snow tips Photo by Tim Hadac

Herb Zimmermann and Jim Smith are focused on their tasks as they wrap a gift for a needy family. they used at home. “We could have done this cheap and easy, put it in gift bags, but we said no, we’re wrapping,” Sans said. “There’s nothing better than seeing the faces of the kids as they unwrap the gifts.”     “Hey, I hope we didn’t get anyone underwear,” he called out jokingly to his fellow Lions wrapping gifts at other tables. “I had enough of those Christmases when I was younger — underwear and socks.”     The Orland Park Lions Club, 54 strong and nearly 50 years old, has a long record of service to the community. Nonetheless, the group occasionally struggles to find volunteers to staff events.     Saturday was an exception.     “This turnout is like, holy shmokes,” Sans said as he looked at the 20 volunteers working like elves on deadline. “Some of these

[Lions] already do quite a bit and give of their time to other [Lions] projects So to see them here today when they could have been doing other things, that’s a great spirit.”     Sans acknowledged that the words “Orland” and “poverty” are typically not uttered in the same breath, yet said everyone should be aware of the need in the community.     “Orland’s outer shell is pretty and prosperous, but when you dig down, you’ll find need — single moms, people going through rough times, being laid off, Christmas doesn’t make it any easier. People are hurting,” he said. “That’s where we [and other organizations] come in. That’s what the Lions do. We serve, we help the less fortunate.”     “If you want to help other people, being a Lion is the best thing in the world.”

    “We jump in feet first,” added Steve Anton, a past president of the club and a past Lions Club International district governor. “I think it’s a great organization. Every fundraiser we do puts money in the coffers, so we can do things like this.     “We support the Orland Township Food Pantry. We support the blind and the deaf, but we also help people who are a little down on their luck and maybe need a little help with their rent or something,” he added. “But [the Lions’ charitable acts] are kind of done on the quiet, as they should be. So it’s a challenge for us to conduct fundraisers and yet make people aware that what they contribute flow right back to the community.”     Those interested in becoming Lions or assisting in other ways are encouraged to visit orlandparklionsclub.com.

    1. Orland Park village ordinance prohibits parking on village streets once 2 inches of snow have fallen.     2. Parked vehicles must be kept off of the streets for 10 hours after it has stopped snowing.     3. When clearing the driveway, residents should place snow on either side of the driveway — on the lawn — and never in the street.     4. Residents should keep garbage cans and recycle bins from rolling into the street on garbage pick up day.     5. Designate curbs with five free stakes available from the Public Works Department, 15600 S. Ravinia Ave.     6. Digging from the street, clear out hydrants so that fire personnel can easily access them if necessary.     7. Do not clear your driveway at the curbline until the

Dist. 218 (Continued from page 1) to determine which topics may need more focus or to be re-taught before moving on. This, she said, will be particularly useful in the math and science curriculums where they have already been used to try uniting the teaching of overlapping pieces of the subject areas such as in physics and algebra.     On average, each subject has taken four or five common exams so far which had its data analyzed so far. Results of the district finals will further add to the analysis when they come in next semester.     After the curriculum discussion, District Business Manager Joseph Daley presented the resolution for the new levy which the board ap-

snowplow driver has made his last curb pass in front of your residence.     8. Be patient. Every storm is different with many variables. Streets may have to be plowed more than once.     9. Communicate with the Public Works Department. Report any ice formations on the street so that they can be salted. Clear the snow from storm sewers in front of your home so melting snow can easily drain, preventing ice patches.     10. Mailboxes should be kept in good repair and be placed at least one foot behind the curb to avoid damage. It is the residents’ responsibility to clear a safe path around mailboxes to ensure delivery. Homeowners’ associations are responsible for clearing the area around cluster mailboxes.     For more, call Public Works at 403-6350.

proved. The proposed new levy would total $79,607,426. This accounts for $3 million in new property and is 4.9 percent (approximately $3.7 million) higher than last year’s levy of $75,888,873. The fund receiving the largest piece of this increase is the education fund, which will be allotted $59,840,075. This represents a $2.8 million increase over last year’s levy.     In his report to the board, Daley also said the board’s bond issue for the science wing expansion currently underway at Shepard High School raised $9.7 million dollars. The funds will be immediately sent to the working cash fund then to the construction budget. Although no estimated date of completion was stated at the meeting it was said that the construction at Shepard has been further delayed due to the extreme cold and snowy conditions.

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Photo by Tim Hadac

All 20 Orland Park Lions who wrapped gifts last Saturday pose for a victory photo as they prepare to make the holidays more cheerful for 20 local families in need.


The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013



Coyote mating season brings annual reasons to take precautions     The Animal Control Unit of the Orland Park Police Department reminds residents to not leave family pets unattended outside because of the increase in coyote activity in the

area.     “We’re reminding pet owners to be careful when they’re outside with their family pets,” said Animal Control Officer Steve Stronk.     Pet owners are warned to be especially cautious during coyote mating season, January through March. During this time, coyotes travel long distances to find suitable mates and require extra calories to carry them on their journey. They then expend extra energy to build dens for pregnant females, who will need to stock up on additional meals. Studies show that coyotes are particularly aggressive during this time.     Residents should not feed any wild animals such as raccoons or deer. Food left for any animals encourages coyotes to remain in the area. Trash cans should be well secured and residents should never add meat scraps to compost piles.     “Feeding wild animals disrupts the course of nature because these animals become dependent on humans,” Stronk said. “They need to forage for themselves and find their own food. That’s how nature works,” he added.     Outside animal feeding containers are discouraged. Coyotes will prey on small mammals that are attracted to birdseed and pet food.     “Don’t leave your dog’s bowl of food outside. You’re asking for visitors when you leave easily acces-

sible food outside,” Stronk said.     Family pets should never be allowed to run free, especially at night. Dogs running free attract the attention of coyotes. They should be walked on a leash and an adult should be outside with them. Cats should be kept indoors, especially at night.     “Even if you have a fenced yard, you should still be outside with your dogs. Turn on the lights. Make noise and let any coyotes in the area know that you’re there,” Stronk said.     According to the Cook County, Illinois Coyote Project, 60 percent of recent attacks were on smaller breeds such as Yorkshire Terriers, Shih Tzus and Jack Russells.     “While you’d think that small dogs would be easy targets for coyotes, they have attacked larger breeds like Labradors and German Shepherds, especially if they’re traveling in a pack,” Stronk said.     The Cook County, Illinois Coyote Project researched animal attacks on humans and found almost half of the attacks occurring in California with a large portion in Arizona. The project did not find any records of attacks on humans within the Chicago metropolitan area or within the State of Illinois.     “Coyotes are most active in the dawn and dusk hours,” Stronk said. “We encourage people to reinforce the coyotes’ natural fear of humans,” he said. “Turn on outside lights. Make loud noises, throw rocks and so forth. You want to be aggressive in your actions so the coyotes run away,” Stronk said.     Further information about the Cook County Coyote Project can be found at urbancoyoteresearch. com.

Submitted photo

Safe Ride Home returns this New Year’s Eve. Revelers who have had too much to drink are strongly encouraged to call for a free limo ride home in any of the participating municipalities. Here, John Gordon of the Michael P. Gordon Foundation presents the foundation’s contribution to Safe Ride Home to Orland Park Police Commander Laura Guerra. Shown are Palos Heights Deputy Police Chief William Czajkowski (from left), Tinley Park Deputy Police Chief Lorelei Mason, Gordon, Guerra, New Lenox Police Officer Aurena Davis and Mokena Community Relations Officer Dennis Boardman.

New Year’s Eve safe rides home return     Orland Park and Palos Heights are among five south suburbs again joining forces to reduce the number of drunken drivers traveling on New Year’s Eve.     Orland Park has offered the Safe Ride Home Program for 20 years, with Palos Heights, Mokena, Tinley Park and New Lenox all coming on board over the last several years.     The program is funded by each of the participating municipalities and with a grant from the Michael P. Gordon Foundation.     Chicago Police Officer Michael Gordon, age 30, was on patrol on August 8, 2004 when, at 5:45 a.m., at the intersection of Jackson and Sacramento Boulevards in Chicago, his squad car was hit by an intoxicated, unlicensed driver who ran a red light, killing Officer Gordon and seriously injuring his partner.     Free rides home from establishments within the participating towns will be available beginning at 11 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 31 until 4 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 1. Drivers will transport revelers

home and not to other establishments.     Last year, nearly 200 people took advantage of this free service, said Orland Park Village Trustee Dan Calandriello, chair of the village’s Public Safety Committee. “People who know that they’re too impaired to drive on New Year’s Eve should leave their cars where they are and call for a ride,” he added.     Residents of the participating towns may call Stretch Limousine at 1-844-230-1637 to arrange for a free ride home during the designated hours on New Year’s Eve.     “If you’ve had too much to drink on New Year’s Eve, Safe Ride Home will do just that — safely get you home,” said Orland Park Police Chief Tim McCarthy.     The chief added, “Plan ahead now. Designate a driver for your holiday celebrations or if you know you’re not able to drive on New Year’s Eve, call the tollfree number. No questions asked. Just don’t get behind the wheel of a car.”

Palos Park police offer revelers rides home, too From Palos Park Police Chief Joe Miller     Palos Park Police again this year will offer rides home from a party on New Year’s Eve.     The concept of the program is simple. Palos Park police offer rides to residents who have had too much to drink, thereby avoiding an accident, arrests or other alcohol-related tragedy.     Palos Park officers and cadets will be on duty and on call that night to transport people home. Commissioner Dan Polk said, “This absolutely reduces the risk of people driving when they shouldn’t be. We want impaired drivers off the road and home safely.”     The cost of the program to the village is minimal as it is

an alternate use of resources. The Park typically schedules additional police personnel for duty on New Year’s Eve. Palos Park Police invite people to call for a ride on New Year’s Eve between the hours of 10 p.m. and 4 a.m. The boundaries are confined to the village of Palos Park, although officers will go a bit beyond the village proper to get somebody home.     For a ride call the Palos Park police directly at 448-2191, or call Chief Miller’s cell directly at 259-1035.     In addition to the Safe Ride program, Palos Park is joining law enforcement agencies throughout the state in roadside safety checks and safety belt enforcement zones throughout the holiday season.

Driver charged with cannabis Cook Forest Preserve District soon sells 2014 picnics permits PALOS PARK POLICE

II, 19, of Chicago, with driving on a suspended license and improper display of registration (no front license plate). His vehicle was curbed by police in the 11900 block of South La Grange Road at 10:44 p.m. on Dec. 9. He is scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview on Jan. 7.     Michael C. Kelly, 38, of Chicago, was charged DUI and improper lane usage. Police stopped his SUV in the 11100 block of South La Grange Road at 1:21 a.m. Dec. 7 after they reportedly saw him driving erratically. His court date in Bridgeview is Jan. 7.     A catalytic converter was stolen from a vehicle parked in the 12300 block of South 86th Avenue on the afternoon of Dec. 14. The victim, an employee of a nearby business, made the discovery when she left work at 5 p.m.     A resident of Ramsgate Drive reported that an unknown motorist had hit his mailbox, knocking

it off its post and breaking it in half. The incident occurred between 8 a.m. and noon Dec. 12, the man told police.     A bicycle was stolen from a shed in the 12500 block of South 89th Avenue some time during the day on Dec. 11, police were told by the victim, who gave police the name of someone he suspects of committing the theft.     Police charged Jose D. CarreraMaldonado, 26, of Chicago, with speeding and driving without a license. Police curbed his car near Woodland and Route 7 at 12:37 a.m. Dec. 8 after they reportedly spotting him traveling at 58 miles per hour, well over the speed limit of 40, according to the police report. He is scheduled to appear in court on Jan. 7.     Jesus A. Castillo, 32, of Mokena, was charged with DUI, driving without a valid license and improper lane usage. He was stopped by police near Wild Cherry Lane and La Grange Road 9:04 p.m. Dec. 5. He is set to appear in court on Jan. 7.

    The Forest Preserves of Cook County will begin selling 2014 picnic permits online and in-person next Thursday, Jan. 2.     In-person sales will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Forest Preserves of Cook County General Headquarters, 536 N. Harlem Ave. in River Forest.     Regular hours are Mondays through Fridays from 8:30 a.m.— 4:30 p.m.     Returning this year are extended peak hours. From May through August, hours will be Mondays through Fridays from 8:30 a.m.— 6:30 p.m., and Saturdays from 9 a.m.—1 p.m.     The forest preserve district will debut a new online permitting system in 2014. This new system, called ActiveNet, will allow residents to apply online for a variety of permits, including family and corporate pic-

Woman accused of disturbance in Orland McDonald’s drive-thru     Orland Park police arrested Dina M. Ramahi, 25, of Orland Park, at 10:03 p.m. Nov. 27 and charged her with disorderly conduct. Ramahi created a disturbance in the parking lot of McDonald’s, 14445 La Grange Road when she confronted two people while in the drive-thru line, police said. She allegedly pounded on the window of a vehicle driven by a Cook County Sheriff’s police officer and swore at him and his female passenger, a Cook County corrections officer. When Ramahi opened the driver’s-side door, the officer exited his vehicle and detained her until Orland Park police officers arrived, police said. She had a court date of Dec. 20 at the 5th Municipal District Cook County Courthouse in Bridgeview.     In other Orland Park police news, Kenisha M. Cotton, 28, of University Park, was arrested at 9:24 p.m. Nov. 28 and charged with retail theft and possession of drug paraphernalia. Cotton took clothing items with a total retail value of $245 from a store in the Orland Square shopping center, police said. An officer then found a cannabis grinder in her purse, according to the police report. Cotton has a court date of Jan. 10 in Bridgeview.     Cody D. Fenn, 18, of Mokena, was cited with disorderly conduct — breach of the peace and unlawful consumption of alcohol by a minor at 12:56 a.m. Nov. 29. Fenn created a disturbance at the Orland Square shopping center when he ran yelling in the mall, bumped into shoppers and knocked down an advertisement, police said. Fenn did not comply

    Maria C. Escobedo-Hernandez, 40, of Orland Park, was arrested at 4:22 a.m. Nov. 29 on an outwith police commands and it took standing Cook County Sheriff’s several attempts to handcuff him, Police warrant on a charge of police said. He later told an of- driving without a valid driver’s ficer he’d drank four double shots license, police said. Escobedoof Jagermeister, according to the Hernandez has a court date of police report. Fenn had a hear- Dec. 27 at the 6th Municipal Dising date of Dec. 10 at the Civic trict Cook County Courthouse in Center in Orland Park. Markham.     Rungrawan Charbonnier, 37, of Lahaina, Hawaii, was arrested at 1:31 a.m. Nov. 28 and charged with speeding and failure to yield to an emergency vehicle. A patrol officer saw a vehicle driven by Charbonnier swerve over lane lines and exceed the speed limit near 159th Street and Harlem Avenue, police said. According to the police report, Charbonnier did 14934 S. La Grange Road 708-364-9860 not stop immediately when the officer deployed his emergency Orland Park (in Park Pointe Plaza) www.kriskringlehaus.com overhead lights. The officer had Hours: Monday - Friday Saturday Sunday to activate his siren and shine 10 am 8 pm 10 am 6 pm noon - 5 pm his spotlight to get her attention, police said. She drove as pecializing in European made Christmas decorations. much as 25 mph over the speed limit, police said. Charbonnier We import direct from Ireland, Germany, Poland, Italy, has a court date of Dec. 27 in Bridgeview. Austria, Russia and the Czech and Slovak Republics.     Robert A. Rodriguez, 18, of Frankfort, was cited with retail theft at 5:54 p.m. Nov. 14 after he took a tool with a retail value of $15 from a store at the AFTER CHRISTMAS Orland Square shopping center, police said. A loss prevention agent told police Rodriguez hid the tool up the sleeve of his shirt and walked out of the department EVERYTHING ON SALE and store with his arms folded, according to the police report. He was then confronted outside the store, police said. Rodriguez Sale ends January 5, 2014 had a hearing date of Dec. 10 in Orland Park.

nics, walk-a-thons and much more. To reserve picnic groves and request event spaces either online or in-person, you must first set up an account at www.fpdcc.com/permits.     Online sales will also open at 8 a.m. on Jan. 2 at www.fpdcc.com and will remain available 24 hours a day.     A picnic permit must be obtained by groups of 25 or more. Only two picnic permits per person or organization are allowed per year. Permit prices vary based on the size of the group and the amenities brought into the groves.     Requests for permits for groups larger than 399 people will now be available online as of January 13, 2014 and may still also be purchased in-person at the River Forest General Headquarters location.     The Forest Preserve District of Cook County sold 9,207 permits

in 2013 (up from 8,446 permits in 2012.) 905 (approximately 9.8 percent) were issued on the first day.     The most popular groves for picnics in 2013 were Dan Ryan — Chicago; Schiller Woods — Chicago/Schiller Park; Bunker Hill — Chicago/Niles and Busse Woods — Elk Grove Village/Rolling Meadows/ Schaumburg. A drunk driver ruined something precious. Amber Apodaca. Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.

Photo by Michael Mazzeo

    Palos Park police arrested Hasan A Hadid, 20, of Orland Park, and charged him possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, resisting arrest, no proof of insurance, and failure to obey a traffic signal. Police stopped his vehicle near Windsor and Somerset at 9:03 a.m. Dec. 8 after he allegedly ran a red light at 123rd and La Grange Road. Police said that inside the vehicle they found a black sock containing cannabis and a grinder. His vehicle was towed, and he is scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview on Jan. 7, according to police.     In other Palos Park police news, Angel Rangel, 22, of Alsip, was charged with driving on a suspended license and improper passing. His vehicle was stopped by police in the 8100 block of West Route 83 at 2:50 p.m. Dec. 17, when they reportedly saw him use the shoulder to pass a police vehicle. His court date in Bridgeview is Jan. 7.     Police charged Robert L. Sisson

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The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013

Dist. 128 previews preschool at Indian Hill Fridays in Jan.     Palos Heights District 128’s Indian Hill School offers Preschool Preview on Friday mornings in January.     Parents and preschoolers are

invited to visit on Fridays, Jan. 10, 24 and 31, from 10 to 10:30 a.m.     For more information, call 5971285 or visit indianhill.palos128.

org.     Registration for fall 2014 opens Feb. 5.     Indian Hill School is at 12800 S. Austin Ave. in Palos Heights.

Submitted photo

The senior Mosaic Leaders take a break between lunches: President Kyla Mitchell (from left), Grace Ige, Priscilla Hassien, Mrs. Cristin Lenters, Amber Hunt, Ashley Holmes and Lindsey Wright.

Diversity club holds lunch mixer     Students at Chicago Christian High School walking into the cafeteria knew right away that this lunch would not be a typical Thursday lunch.     For starters, Christmas music greeted them as they walked through the doors. They were then presented with a card by students dressed like reindeer, and encouraged to find their assigned table for the meal. Today was Mix-It-Up Lunch.     Mix-It-Up Lunch was created by the Mosaic Diversity Club at CCHS. “We have hosted a variety

of programs to improve diversity awareness for our students,” said Mosaic sponsor Cristin Lenters. “This experience helps students embrace the diversity within our school.”     Students were given a card directing them to a corresponding table in the cafeteria. The random assignment guaranteed that any given table would be a mix of grades, gender, ethnicity and social groups. “It is pretty easy to stay in your social bubble for four years. Mix-It-Up Lunch helps students get to know new

people,” stated Mosaic President, Kyla Mitchell.     To ensure that everyone had something to talk about, cups filled with holiday-themed questions were on every table. A volunteer leader at each table made sure everyone was introduced and had a chance to answer the questions. Many teachers also participated and were randomly assigned a table. “We focus on community as a school. This lunch helps people get connected and have a little fun before Christmas,” explained Mitchell.

Catholic high school entrance exam date set for Jan. 11     Catholic high schools across the Archdiocese of Chicago will administer the annual placement tests for 8th-grade students on Saturday, Jan. 11, at 8 a.m.     Most of the 37 Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese administer the test; however, there are a few exceptions.     Check with the individual school to confirm when its test is being given. To find contact information for Catholic high schools, visit the High School Locator (http://schools. archchicago.org/schools/High schoolsearch.aspx) at http:// schools.archchicago.org.     Catholic, public or private Submitted photo school students interested in atMembers of The Grinch table are all smiles during their lunch. Shown are Luke Rattler, of Chicago (from tending Catholic high schools in left), Christian Clark, of Country Club Hills, Kiril Nikolovski, of Burr Ridge, Maya Cain, of Harvey, Jim Chicago, Cook County or Lake Hoefler, of Chicago, Nathan DeRuiter, of Crestwood, and Megan Rapacki, of Orland Park. County in the fall of 2014, should

report to the high school they wish to attend to take the test. It is not necessary to register for the test in advance. Students are asked to bring two No. 2 pencils and cash or check made payable to the school for the $25 exam fee. Test results will be mailed to students on Feb. 14.     Catholic high schools use a number of different standardized tests to provide a common measure of academic achievement. Some schools use different tests because they are designed to provide slightly different information for program and course placement decisions. Tests are selected that match the mission, educational philosophy and student body of a particular Catholic high school.     Each Catholic high school has its own procedures for using test

results. Generally, high schools use test scores in conjunction with other information about a student’s academic record when making placement decisions. Other considerations could include: report cards, previous test results, classroom and homework assignments, and teacher recommendations.     In 2013, Catholic high school students who took the ACT test showed gains in nearly every testing area, and in the composite score. The average composite score for Catholic high school students in the Archdiocese is 23.1, which is a 0.2 point improvement over students’ performance last year, and 2.5 points above the state of Illinois’ average. All scores continue to be above the average for the state of Illinois and the nation.

Student News     Bailey Coyne, a sophomore from Palos Heights, has been named to the high honor roll for the fall term at The Loomis Chaffee School.     The Loomis Chaffee School, located in historic Windsor, Connecticut, is an internationally recognized college preparatory school for grades 9-12. ***     The following local residents recently were initiated into The Submitted photo Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines.    Orland Park Mayor Daniel McLaughlin shares a lighter moment with teachers Kathryn Sulkowski (from left), Amy Kenny, Nancy Ermel     Jessica Altshul, of Orland and Eryn Blaser moments after he described them as “four of the best teachers in Illinois” and gave them Community Pride Awards at Park, initiated at Bradley University; and Patrick Kelly, of the Village Board meeting on Dec. 16.    Sulkowski, a resident of Orland Park and a teacher at Lincoln-Way Central High School, recently won the Educationis Lumen Award Palos Park, initiated at Elmhurst from Lewis University’s College of Education, which salutes her “Catholic and Lasallian values” and “evidence of excellence in teaching, College. *** commitment to the finest Christian ideals of education and dedication to the teaching profession.”    Kenny, an instructor at High Point School, was named “A Day Made Better Teacher” by OfficeMax, saluting her passion, innovation     The following local students at Augustana College in Rock Island and dedication to teaching.    Ermel, who teaches at Jerling Junior High School, was honored in October as a Hero in the Classroom by the Chicago Bears and were named to the Dean’s List for the 2013 fall term. Students Symetra Financial Services, for her years of dedication to her students.    Blaser, a teacher at Meadow Ridge School, was recently named Elementary Art Teacher of the Year by the Illinois Art Educators As- who have earned this academic honor have maintained a gradesociation.

Community Pride in teachers who excel

point average of 3.5 or higher on a four-point scale for courses taken during the term.     Quinn Foley, of Orland Park, a sophomore majoring in accounting.     Daniel Huff, of Orland Park, a sophomore majoring in undecided.     Timothy Panega, Orland Park, a senior majoring in sociology-social welfare.     Stephanie Pereiro, of Orland Park, a sophomore majoring in history.     Margaret Richardson, of Palos Heights, a junior majoring in geography and anthropology.     Kristen Yerkes, of Palos Heights, a senior majoring in communication sciences and disorders. ***     Colin Monnier, of Palos Heights, graduated from the University of Dayton with a bachelor of science in pre-medicine. A commencement ceremony was held Dec. 14.

New Moraine fitness center sells memberships; opens this spring

Submitted Photo

Moraine Valley Community College’s Health, Fitness & Recreation Center is scheduled to open in late March.

    Moraine Valley Community College’s newest building is in the final stages of construction before doors open in early spring to offer a wide array of health and fitness programs and services, not only for students, faculty, and staff but also the community.     The Health Fitness & Recreation Center is the 14th building to be constructed on the main campus—the fourth in the past four years. The 113,000 squarefoot fitness center and field house includes three full-size basketball courts, four fitness studios, oneeighth mile jogging track, fourlane lap pool, whirlpool, steam rooms and locker facilities. Construction began in December 2012, and a grand opening and ribbon cutting are scheduled for March 25, 2014.     A strong component of the new center is student employment. Campus Recreation plans to hire

over 100 student employees before the center opens. With approximately 19 different positions, the HFRC is a great developmental and learning environment for the MVCC student body.     There will be a host of free fitness classes, functional training classes, and specialty classes such as boxing, cycling, yoga, Pilates, and multiple types of dance. Personal training packages will be available for purchase. Members will be able to swim laps in the four-lane pool and/or take aqua classes and swim lessons. Babysitting services will be optional for members as they workout. During the summer, children’s camps will be offered for a variety of ages. In addition, the Bean Café will provide a variety of food and beverage options. Special deals with the Bean Café are going on right now for members who sign up early.

    Hours of operation in the HFRC will be flexible to accommodate members’ busy schedules: Monday-Thursday, 5:30 a.m. — 11 p.m.; Friday, 5:30 a.m. — 10 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m. — 8 p.m.; and Sunday, 8 a.m. — 8 p.m.     Financial support for the project comes from the sale of bonds and student and membership fees. The Chicago Blackhawk Charities also donated $250,000. Negotiations to add a health partner continue.     A membership drive is well underway. There are a variety of monthly fees for members of the community, ranging from a $49 monthly rate for a single membership to $100 per month for families. A guest pass is $12 per day. For the current promotional prices and additional membership rates, call 708-608-4015 or stop by Building P on the Moraine Valley Community College Campus.


The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013



Recreation Roundup Heights Rec. New Year celebration

ages 3 to 8 will search for candy canes.     After participants collect all the     Join in ringing in the New Year various candy canes, they will at noon instead of midnight on head into the Recreation Center Dec. 31, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 for hot chocolate and cookies, p.m. holiday music, and make a candy     The Palos Heights Recreation cane craft. Center and park behind will be     Registration is required by transformed into a miniature Tuesday, Jan. 7. Fee is $3 for Times Square, complete with mu- Palos Park residents, $3.75 for sic and a “countdown to noon” unincorporated Palos Park resiballoon drop. There will be a pizza dents and $4.50 for non-residents. lunch and fun New Year’s activi- (671-3760; palospark.org) ties for families with children 10 and under. Free. Orland Sportsplex

Candy cane hunt in Palos Park

winter-break programs

    The Orland Park Sportsplex is offering a number of programs and     The Palos Park Recreation specials during winter break. Department, 8901 W. 123rd St.,     • Skyhawks Multi-Sports School will hold a candy cane hunt on Winter Break Camp — MultiTuesday, Jan. 14, from 4:15 to 5 sports camps are designed to inp.m., on the Village Green. troduce young athletes to different     It will be transformed into a sports in one camp. The Winter candy cane forest where children Break Camp includes baseball,

basketball, football, soccer and volleyball. Classes are held at the Sportsplex on Dec. 30, Jan. 2 and 3 from 9 a.m. to noon for ages 8 to 14. Cost is $65 for residents and $98 for non-residents.     • Holiday Student Membership Special – A 10-day Fitness Center Membership is available during winter break with a student schedule required at time of purchase. The cost is $25 for residents and $35 for non-residents.     • One Month Fitness Center Membership — A 30-day pass can be acquired for a cost of $36 for residents and $53 for non-residents. This is a great option for both residents as well as out of town guests that want to continue their workout routine throughout the holiday season.     Registration and more information is available at the village of Orland Park’s Sportsplex offers a variety of winter fitness programs and classes. Orland Park Sportsplex, 11351 W. 159th St. Questions may be directed to 645-PLAY.

Submitted photo

Work to get firefighter fit Orland Senior American Idol in new class at Sportsplex plans auditions for local talent     Orland Township’s Senior American Idol auditions soon open for the second season of the fundraiser for the Orland Township Scholarship Foundation.     Auditions will be held on Thursday, Jan. 23, at 6 p.m., in the township Activity Center, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland Park.     Check in on Jan. 23 is at 5:45 p.m. Auditions are open to seniors age 55 and require participants to perform a song of their choice (no more

than two minutes long) acapella in front of a panel of judges.     Auditions are free. If chosen to be a Senior Idol Contestant for the show in May, participants will be required to pay the contestant fee of $30. Call Orland Township at 403-4222 to register for auditions.     The township’s Senior American Idol live show will be held at Georgio’s Banquets, 8800 W. 159th Street, Orland Park, from

Senior Notes New Year’s Eve senior dinner dance

by Mr. and Mrs. O and their five-piece band, raffle tickets for gift baskets and split-the-pot. Participants will also partake in a festive New Year’s Eve countdown, with noisemakers and a champagne toast.

    Ring in the New Year with Orland Township at the annual New Year’s Eve senior dinner dance on Monday, Dec. 30, from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Orland Chateau, 14500 S. La Grange Road. Grandparents raising     Tickets for residents ($17) and grandchildren non-residents ($22) can be pursupport group chased at Orland Township, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland Park.     PLOWS Council on Aging will     The evening will include a full- host a grandparents raising grandcourse meal, live entertainment children support group beginning

Library Notes Heights library children’s programs     • Holiday thank you notes — All ages are invited to stop by the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave., on Thursday, Dec. 26, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and make some special thank you notes to send to friends and family.     • LEGO Builders — Children ages 4 and up can get creative with LEGOs at a bonus LEGO builders this Friday, Dec. 27, from 10 to 11:30 a.m.     • Teen Gaming — Start off your

weekend with some Wii and Xbox fun with friends. Gaming takes place every Friday from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. for children in grades 6 and up.     • Happy Noon Year Party — On Monday, Dec. 30, at 11 a.m. children ages 3 and up can say goodbye to the old year and welcome the new one with stories, games and more. Registration is required.     • Guitar Hero Tournament — Children in grades 6 and up can show off their shredding skills and compete against their friends on Monday, Dec. 30 from 7 to 8:30

    Firefighters and non-firefighters alike can take part in the new 5 to 10 p.m. on Tuesday, May firefighter fitness program at the 6. Tickets will be sold starting Orland Park Sportsplex. Feb. 6.     The class includes strength and     “Orland Township’s Senior conditioning, mobility training, American Idol was not only a core training, TRX Suspension terrific event for our seniors,” Training, and functional fitness said Supervisor Paul O’Grady, training. “but it also benefitted the Orland     Fitness Trainer Adam HoornTownship Scholarship Founda- aert will instruct the class. Hootion, making it a victory for the rnaert has been leading a similar Orland Township community as class in Romeoville for over a a whole. We’re looking forward to year that is a mandatory fitness another success this year.” program for the Romeoville Fire Department.     “I thought that this would be a great program to bring to Orland Park,” said Hoornaert. “It’s a good opportunity for area firefighters that are looking to improve fitness Wednesday, Jan. 15, at 11 a.m., at the Palos Township office, 10802 S. Roberts Road, Palos Hills.     Each of the 10 sessions will focus on a specific topic, including financial and legal assistance, technology     Area fitness enthusiasts are inskills, and self-care. Knowledgeable vited to keep fit over the winter and experienced guest speakers will months. The village of Orland be invited to provide additional in- Park Sportsplex offers a number formation and guidance. of programs designed to help stay     For information and registra- in shape for the upcoming sports tion, contact Maria or Amanda season. C. at PLOWS, 361-0219. Do not     Speed and Agility is designed to contact Palos Township regarding cover all aspects of athletic developthis program. ment. It includes strength training, power, plyometics, as well as speed and agility training to maximize athletic performance. The program runs from Jan. 7 to Feb. 20 and again from Feb. 25 to April 10. Classes are held on Tuesdays from 4:30 to 5:25 p.m. and Thursdays p.m. Snacks will be provided. from 7 to 7:55 p.m. Cost is $78 for     • New Year’s Closing — The residents, $117 for non-residents Palos Heights Public Library will and $73 for members. Ages 9-18. be closed Tuesday, Dec. 31 and (No class March 25 and 27.) Wednesday, Jan. 1, for the New     Weight Training 101 helps parYear holiday.

for their demanding jobs.”     “This class is a preparatory course to get current firefighters into shape or to get future firefighters ready to take the physical tests to become a firefighter,” Hoornaert explained.     The program is being offered on Tuesdays from Jan. 7 to Feb. 25 from 7 p.m. to 7:55 p.m. for ages 18 and up. (No class March 25.)     Pre-registration is required with a cost of $65 for village of Orland Park residents; $98 for non-residents and $60 for members. The class is limited to 10 participants.     “We will be building this class around the current fitness levels of participants and will be looking to make this program work to

improve each attendee’s personal needs to get them in the best possible condition to be a firefighter,” explained Hoornaert.     “This program can be a life saver to anyone who is a fire fighter or wants to be a fire fighter,” Hoornaert said.     “The leading cause of death among firefighters is heart attacks. The job is very physically demanding and my goal is to put a program together that gives firefighters the best opportunity to be successful in their jobs and to remain healthy and injury free.”     Registration and further information is available at the Sportsplex, 11351 W. 159th St. Questions may be directed to 645-PLAY.

Sportsplex offers winter workouts

Comedy films     The Movies to Make You Laugh series will show “Red” on Dec. 26, “Bernie” on Dec. 27, and “Out to Sea” on Dec. 30. All films will begin at 2 p.m. at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave.     All programs are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.

ticipants learn the basics of weight training to maximize on the benefits of the exercises. This class will provide detailed training on how to perform the most common barbell and dumbbell exercises. The class is held Jan. 8 to Feb. 26 and again from March 5 to April 30 on Wednesday from 5 to 5:55 p.m. Ages 14 and up. Cost is $65 for residents, $98 for nonresidents and $60 for members. (No class March 26.)     Kettleballs and More utilizes one of the Village or Orland Park Sportsplex’s newest tools, the kettleball. The purported benefits of kettlebells appeal to people of all fitness levels, ages and genders. This new program will involve training the body with functional movements in timed intervals. Class is held

Jan. 7 to Feb. 25 from 6 to 6:55 p.m. for ages 14 and up. Cost is $72 for residents, $108 for nonresidents and $67 for members. (No class March 25.)     “These programs are designed for our local athletes or those that want to be better at their sports,” explained Sportsplex Fitness Manager Deborah Geghen. “Residents and members get a great deal on our speed and agility class. Our class is designed by a personal trainer to fit the needs of those in the class. Participants will increase strength, speed and agility by the end of the classes.”     Registration and more information is available at the village of Orland Park Sportsplex, 11351 W. 159th St. Questions may be directed to 645-PLAY.

Orland indoor duathlon signup begins

    Athletes of all skill levels may she added. Office at 14600 S. Ravinia Avenue participate in the Village of Orland     Pre-registration is required. and at the Sportsplex. Park Recreation Department’s an- Cost is $20 for Sportsplex mem-     A training camp is held on Satnual Indoor Duathlon on Satur- bers, $25 for Orland Park resi- urday from Jan. 11 to Feb. 22, day, March 1. dents; $31 nonresidents. from 8 a.m. to 8:55 a.m. for ages     The competition will begin at     Pre-registration is required. 12 and up. Fee for the camp is 7:15 a.m. at the Sportsplex, 11351 Heats will be assigned the week of $45 for members, $50 for residents W. 159th St. Feb. 24. Registration is available and $75 for non-residents. Call     The 13-mile duathlon consists of at the Recreation Administration 645-PLAY to register. a 1.5-mile run, a 10-mile stationary bike ride, and ends with a second Heights library 1.5-mile run. Medals will be awarded When you give a child a newspaper, you’re giving a world of wisdom. featured database to the first and second place finishNewspapers are a part of your child’s road to learning. Newspapers are     PDRhealth, from the publishers ers, both men and women in each windows to the world. And the better informed our children of the Physicians’ Desk Reference, age category. Each participant will are about our world the more motivated they will become the leading drug resource for over receive a long-sleeve T-shirt. in our society. Open your child’s mind, share a newspaper 65 years, gives consumers plain-     “The village’s Indoor Duathlon today. Call Today For Your Mail Subscription! English explanations for the safe is a great way to stay competitive and effective use of prescription and fit during the winter months,” and nonprescription drugs. said Sportsplex Fitness Manager     In addition, articles on health Deborah Geghen. “You don’t have conditions are written and re- to lose that competitive spirit just viewed by physicians and other because it’s single digits outside,” clinical professionals to give users a comprehensive overview of health conditions — from symptoms to diagnosis and even selfcare. The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider. • Diamonds & Precious Stones • Coin Estates & Collections     Access is available in the library • Sports Cards & Related • All Silver & Gold Coins or online at palosheightslibrary. org/services/online-databases. Memorabilia • Silver & Gold Jewelry html by clicking “Alphabetical • Collectibles of All Kinds • Flatware & Antique Items List.” Scroll down and click on “Physicians’ Desk Reference • Pocket & Wrist Watches • All War Relics PDR” to begin. Use your Palos • Quality Costume Jewelry Heights library card number to login; the password is your last name.

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Submitted photo

Orland Fire talks up cardiac care to Rotary    Orland Fire Protection District Battalion Chief Raymond Kay (left) and Orland Park Rotary Club President John A. Bibeau pause for a photo after Kay made a presentation last Thursday to about 30 Rotarians at Silver Lake Country Club.    Kay spoke about the OFPD’s Community CARE Program, which is designed to saving victims of sudden cardiac arrest, which affects an average of 1,000 people a day across the nation.    While the national average rate to save sudden cardiac arrest victims is about 10 percent, the “save” rate in the OFPD is approximately 46 percent, due to prompt and correct administration of CPR and use of automated external defibrillators (AED), Kay said.    The Community CARE program works with schools, community organizations, retail establishments and others to share the message about sudden cardiac arrest, AEDs and how to sign up for free CPR classes. For more information, visit orlandfire.org.

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The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle “Ghood Ghrief!”

1

Across 1. Billiards tactic 6. Smooth 11. Clothing chain, with “The” 14. Former Defense Secretary Les 15. Religion of Ramadan 16. Doctors’ assn. 17. San Francisco square, or a brand of chocolate 19. Goddess of the dawn 20. “___ the ramparts we watched...” 21. Blow it 22. Petrol amount 24. “Hold on!” 26. Faked, as in boxing 28. Five Norse kings 31. Japanese leader in WWII 32. “Yes, We’re Open” and “Sorry, We’re Closed” 35. Razor brand 37. German word for “one” 40. Reverberating sound 41. Evil spirit 42. Former Russian ruler 43. ___ and tear 44. “American ___” (singing show) 45. Parts of wineglasses 46. 12 o’clock, if it’s not midnight 48. Flood blocker 50. Shocks 53. Owing 57. Idaho’s capital 58. Leisurely stroll 61. In the style of 62. “___ little teapot...” 63. Autobiographer, often 66. Spy novelist Deighton 67. Largest artery 68. “___ we all!” 69. ___ Angeles 70. ___ Hall (New Jersey university) 71. Hourglass fillers

14

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2. Pale 3. Church’s peak 4. Knight’s title 5. Tooth covers 6. Vicious and Caesar 7. Not new 8. ___ a sudden 9. Kilmer of “Top Gun” 10. Estevez of “The Breakfast Club” 11. Restrict to a section of town 12. “That’s ___” (Dean Martin hit) 13. Sat for the sculptor 18. Costa ___ 23. Employed a syringe 25. Resonant 27. List-ending letters 29. Saudi king 30. Barfly’s perch 32. Keep in stitches? 33. Cubes in the freezer 34. Residents of a certain African nation 36. Law

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38 “Platoon” locale, for short 39. Some high school students: abbr. 41. Actress Lollobrigida 45. Ladies of La Paz 47. Alphas’ opposites 49. Penthouse feature 50. Government issue 51. Casanova 52. Curling, say 54. Devoured 55. Mix 56. Fruit pastries 59. Regarding 60. “The Man” Musial 64. Gardener’s tool 65. Lyricist Gershwin

From Dec. 25, 2003

10 Years Ago This Week    Santa Claus listens intently as Clare Kownacki, 3, tells him what she wants for Christmas at the Orland Park Recreation Department’s preschool recital and holiday party held at the Orland Park Civic Center.

(Answers on page 12)

The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9. (Answers on page 12)

From Dec. 25, 2003

10 Years Ago This Week    St. Alexander students make big drop to Help Fill Santa’s Bag: Eighth-graders at St. Alexander School Matthew Mulcahy (from left), Greg Bennett and Sean Hamman show some of the presents for needy children that they bought with money originally designated for a three-day class trip to Washington, D.C. The toy drive was begun six years ago by Melissa Phillips-Feczko, of Palos Heights.

Pleased to meet these 10 people in 2013

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT?    Ahhhhhhhh, shadddup.    Long before Bears coach Mike Ditka uttered those words to a heckling fan, a cartoon character by the name of Foghorn Leghorn said it many times moments after terrorizing a barking dog.    Most of you, I say, most of you guessed correctly that last week’s photo is a Foghorn Leghorn ornament on the shutterbug’s tree. The shutterbug steadfastly believes Mr. Leghorn is the most underrated of the Warner Bros. cartoon characters, beating out the lame Daffy Duck and lamer Porky Pig. Those two are more famous on the Loony Tunes food chain and that’s a crime.    Anyway, some doo-dahs go out to Evergreen Park’s Henrietta Mysliwiec, Jan Merchantz, Kerrie Stone, Jim Long and Vince Vizza, plus Chicago Ridge’s Dana Oswald, Kathy Higgins, Patty Vandenberg and Dan Higgins.    That’s a joke, sons go to other correct guessers that include Palos Heights’ Crystine Busch, Orland Park’s Lisa Keysboe, Oak Lawn’s Jane Foley, Hickory Hills’ Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis and Thomas McAvoy and Palos Hills’ Mike McKinney and Marlena Compton.    Affectionate shadddups also go to Worth’s Robert Solner, Theresa and George Rebersky, E.J. Oahueke, Celeste Cameron and Donna Hirsch.    Willow Springs’ Harrison Debre also guessed right on ol’ Foggy and guessed the Christmas bras two weeks ago but was wiped out by a faulty e-mail system. Worth’s Sandy Joiner also guessed Mr. Leghorn and said she got the drumsticks right from weeks ago when the email system really went haywire.    Nice people who were, as Foghorn would say “as sharp as a sack of wet mice’’ guessed Frosty the Snowman, Bugs Bunny and the Stay Puff Marshmallow Man.    This week’s clue: This is on a local restaurant wall but you wouldn’t want to step in it.    Send those guesses to thereporter@comcast.net with WHATIZIT? in the subject line and your name and hometown by SUNDAY night (holiday deadlines will not make for a happy start of the New Year for us).

    One of the rewards of this racket we call journalism is the people we meet.     I could never be able to accurately count how many people I’ve met through the job of being a writer, photographer and editor since I started in the business as a high school kid in 1977 in Joliet.     If it’s not in the 10,000 range, it has to be darn close. It could be a lot more.     I’ve met the famous — Michael Jordan, Muhammad Ali, Walter Payton, Sammy Sosa, Shaq and Eddie Vedder to name a few — and I have met the infamous — Rod Blagojevich, Barry Bonds, Dennis Rodman and Joe Paterno to name a few.     Jessie Jackson Sr. once slapped me on the back on a Father’s Day. The hated professional wrestler known as the Iron Sheik told me he helped coach United States Olympic wrestlers. This is the same guy whose gimmick was to spit on the American flag and sing the Iranian National Anthem and insult our country.     I once had to give directions to hard-hitting TV journalist Walter Jacobsen where a washroom was located. If not for me, he might have wet his pants that night!     I once cursed at then-WSCR reporter Mike Greenberg to pipe down when he was bellowing into the phone in the Packers press box in Green Bay. I guess my profane

admonishment didn’t derail his career as he is one of the Mikes in the nationally syndicated “Mike and Mike in the Morning” radio show on ESPN and has written a couple of books, to boot. He’s a big success, but hopefully, he’s not yelling into phones anymore.     The coolest celebrity I met was Mel Blanc — the voice of hundreds, including Bugs Bunny and the subject of last week’s WHATIZIT?photo.     Although I didn’t formerly meet them, I’ve shared the same breathing space with George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Donald Trump, Tiger Woods, Cyndi Lauper, Barbara Eden (Jeannie!), Jerry Mathers (the Beaver!) Rob Reiner (the Meathead!), Jesse Ventura, Jeff Gordon, A.J. Foyt, Bobby Knight, Kobe Bryant and Hector “Macho” Camacho.     This is not name-dropping or bragging — it’s more of an appreciation for the wide range of people I’ve been able to get close to for even a few minutes. And that doesn’t even scratch the surface of all the athletes, politicians, cops, firemen, teachers, students and just plain everyday folks with wonderful stories whom I’ve met on the local level.     With that long preamble out of the way, I would like to say that next week, the Reporter will unveil its top 10 news stories of 2013 and the Reporter/Regional will run its top 10 sports stories

Notes north of the Cal-Sag by Jeff Vorva of the year.     For those who need their yearend list fix, I offer this one for ya. I submit the 10 people I’ve enjoyed meeting the most through my seven months as the Regional reporter and five as Reporter editor in 2013. In alphabetical order, they are:

Prestinario, has turned the half marathon into a monster.     Diab, who was running in the Boston Marathon and was miles away when explosions hit, killing and injuring athletes. He immediately went to work when he got back to town, hosting runs and selling shirts to benefit the victims.

Courtney Javorski

    This Worth resident participated in the Ironman Triathlon in Louisville in late August.     She did that not long after beating a cancer than in the past five years forced her to go through 33 radiation treatments and six weeks of chemotherapy.     She offers this great advice: Kent Carson “Don’t lie on the couch numbThis Oak Lawn resident lost his ing your situation. Get moving. left arm and both of his legs after Keep going.” he was diagnosed with Legionnaires Disease in August, 2012. Tom Mezyk He lost some pretty important     I met this 60-year-old Orland limbs but didn’t lose his optimism Park resident a few minutes after for life. he won the first Orland Township     “I came to the conclusion that Senior American Idol competition this is not going to change so I in May. He had just brought the need to make the most of what house down with his version of the I’ve got,” he said. Phillip Phillips hit “Home.’’     He was genuinely touched by Tim Cavanagh the reception he received from     I’ve seen this comedian perform the 900-plus in attendance at a few times over the years and Georgio’s Banquets. heard his funny songs on the Dr.     But in June, he and his wife, Demento radio show and enjoyed Pam, took a trip with a group to his work. I had no idea that he the Holy Land. On the final day lived in Orland Park. of the trip, he was at the Western     But when I found out, I imme- Wall, had a major heart attack diately set up an interview and and died. Apparently he had no spent some time laughing it up major health issues. with Tim and his wife, Chris, one     It was a shock for those who late afternoon last January. The were close to him, and I’ll admit I former teacher at all-girls Maria was pretty stunned when I heard High School started out writing about it and knew him for all of serious songs but that changed. about five minutes.     “My serious songs kind of sucked,” he said. “When I tried Alex Muller doing funny things, I was like     The four-year-old from Palos ‘OK, that’s acceptable.’ Having Heights suffered a stroke on people laugh at me — normally the plane ride home from Disthat’s something you don’t like ney World. He had to go through but in my case, I do like it.’’ five weeks of rehab at Advocate Children’s Hospital and wasn’t Mel Diab always the ideal patient but he Photo by Jeff Vorva     The Palos Heights running guru was pretty popular and likened Larry Thomas, known to many as the Soup Nazi from “Seinfeld,” is a popular and likable guy who, was in Orland Park to promote a local independent film. along with former alderman Jeff (Continued on page 9)


The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013



Pick of the Litter By John R. Fleming, DVM Dear Dr. Fleming:     I am one of those people who really don’t trust that large dog food manufacturers are not buying their vitamin and mineral premixes from China and want to feed my pets whole fresh food that I purchase in the local grocery store. My neighbor makes her own pet food and she also feeds raw meat to her pets. What are your thoughts on my idea? Jeanie, Palos Heights Dear Jeanie:     You probably should come by the office and sit down and have a cup of coffee and talk because there are many angles to your question, and I can only briefly give you my thoughts here and then recommend an article for you to read.     Large dog food manufacturers: From what I can glean from my sources I would suspect that most large pet food companies purchase their vitamin/mineral premixes from China.     Envision in your mind gigantic cargo ships docking in Los Angeles and offloading large drums of white powder destined to be trucked to our pet food manufacturing facilities. This white powder from China is supposed to be a mixture of vitamins and minerals to help make our pet foods “balanced.”     We now know what was in the white powder that was added to the baby milk formula in China and also into some pet foods in the United States and we now know how many babies and pets died from that melamine-tainted powder. Even though the Chinese government executed some of those people responsible for the scam (melamine was added to “fool” the protein-analyzing machines into reporting that the protein content of the powder was higher than it actually was so that more money could be charged per volume of powder sold) do you now trust the Chinese? I don’t. I did my own research and quit feeding my dogs Purina products and now feed Fromms foods, which I supplement with fresh whole food from my local grocer. Every day I am asked in the clinic about foods like Blue Buffalo or Ori-

Submitted photo

Meet Fran from Orland Park and her new baby Teddy. Teddy is a Great Pyrenees-poodle mix. gen and I simply have no answer. Just keep in mind that the larger the company the more likely they are to purchase ingredients from China.     As far as making your own food, this is a bold, time-consuming and commendable undertaking. It can be difficult to formulate a nutritionally-balanced home-prepared diet. Investigators have evaluated the nutritional balances of commonly available home-prepared diet recipes. In two studies on animals with medical conditions, 94 recipes were evaluated and none had adequate concentrations of all essential nutrients. In one study, investigators evaluated 200 recipes for healthy dogs and 190 (95 percent) had at least one essential nutrient below standards and 167 (84 percent) recipes had multiple deficiencies. We have a number of clients who make their own pet food and most sound inadequate to me. We have a list of veterinary nutritionists that will work with you via email. One that we have been using recently that our clients like is BalanceIt.com. Your mind and heart are in the right place.     Raw meat based diets (RMBDs): This is one of Pandora’s boxes. When I started my veterinary career 33 years ago I was a disciple of Dr. Randy Wysong, a pioneer

in good animal nutrition.     In the early 1980s I took a lot of flak from other local vets for recommending the addition of whole fresh foods to what was available commercially. I believe I even recommended raw meat back then. At that time the veterinary community, in my opinion, had been thoroughly brainwashed by the giant pet food industry and we, as veterinarians, were expected to parrot the company line, “I, Dr. So and So, hereby recommend you feed no table food, but only what comes from the food gods above in their bags and cans.”     I was a bona fide heretic for recommending fresh supplementation to the dry diets. Now any veterinarian who recommends only commercially prepared foods has the jaundiced eye looking at him or her. But, I am skirting the issue of raw meats. Thirtythree years later, I still do not have strong feelings for or against the feeding of raw meats to pets. Personally I do not feed my own pets raw meat because I am more aware of the dangers than the average pet owner.     There is very little data from high-quality studies on the risks and benefits of feeding RMBDs. Information on nutritional risk or benefit is often from low-quality studies (testimonials, cases series

or poor-quality cohort and casecontrolled studies. On the other hand, the health risks to people in contact with RMBD-fed pets are real. Raw meats, whether intended for consumption by humans or pets, are frequently contaminated with microorganisms. The most common of these are E.Coli, Salmonella, Clostridium Campylobacter and Listeria. In addition, raw meats frequently carry parasites such as toxoplasma gondii.     In her very fine article, Dr. Freeman makes a good point for practicing veterinarians when she says: “Veterinarians may wish to consider instituting procedures (sic — in the clinic) regarding pets that eat RMBDs to ensure the safety of other pets and the veterinary staff. These policies should take into consideration the potential legal implications, that there is a period of fecal shedding after eating a contaminated RMBD (up to 7 days), and that the common cleaning and disinfection practices do not eliminate Salmonella contamination from food bowls.” Yet another reason, my dear technicians, to maintain good hand-washing procedures between pet exams.     People don’t change. Those who feed RMBDs will continue to do so. However, anyone who does feed a RMBD, or anyone considering doing so, should educate themselves and read the article “Current Knowledge about the Risks and Benefits of Raw Meat-Based Diets for Dogs and Cats” by Dr. Lisa Freeman, et.al. (Journal American Medical Association, Vol. 243, No. 11, Dec. 1, 2013). Please feel free to drop by the office and pick up a copy. If you prefer, send a selfaddressed stamped envelope to us at Prairie State Veterinary Clinic 100 Ravinia Place, Orland Park, IL 60462 and we’ll mail one out to you. We don’t have time to fax a copy to you and we don’t do email. We are behind the times in this hyper-communication age and are happy that way.     From all of the staff here at PSVC we would like to wish everyone a happy continuation of the Christmas season and a very happy New Year’s.

LCM welcomes surgeon back from Afghanistan Submitted by Little Company of Mary Hospital

Dr. Nancy Taft, Lieutenant Colonel in the Army Reserves, has safely returned to Little Company of Mary’s Comprehensive Breast Center after serving our country and caring for our wounded soldiers in Afghanistan. In July 2013, more than 150 former and current patients, along with LCMH physicians, nurses and employees, joined together to wish Dr. Taft a safe journey. Little Company of Mary is proud to welcome Dr. Taft home with open arms. Dr. Taft grew up in the Springfield area and received her medical degree from Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. She completed her General Surgery residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin and her fellowship training in Breast Surgical Oncology at Northwestern

Notes north of the Cal-Sag

University and is currently a member of the American Society of Breast Surgeons and the Society of Surgical Oncology. Dr. Taft sees patients at the Comprehensive Breast Health Center at LCMH. Little Company of Mary is committed to improving women’s health in Chicago’s Southwest community through its Women’s Center of Life and Health, which is home to the Accredited Comprehensive Breast Health Center, located in the new West Pavilion. The Accredited Comprehensive Breast Health Center recently received its new designation as an Imaging Center of Excellence due to its excellent service, good quality and state-of-the-art technology. Little Company of Mary’s breast imaging services are fully accredited in mammography, stereotactic breast biopsy, breast ultrasound and

ultrasound-guided breast biopsy. Peer-review evaluations, conducted in each breast imaging modality by board-certified physicians and medical physicists who are experts in the field, have determined that Little Company of Mary’s Accredited Comprehensive Breast Center has achieved high practice standards in image quality, personnel qualifications, facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality assurance programs. This fully accredited center provides the latest technology and treatment approaches from an expert, caring medical team led by Dr. Taft. For more information on Little Company of Mary’s Nationally Accredited Comprehensive Breast Health Center or Dr. Nancy Taft, please visit LCMH.org/medicalgroup or call 708.229.4050. To schedule a mammogram, call 708.499.8550.

    That morphed into the Christmas Without Cancer charity and it has grown to help many families not just during Christmas but during the whole year as well.     “I’ve had many gifts from God,” she said about the ten-year tenure of the organization. “It has taken on a life of its own.”

City Thunderbolts in between cuts and landed a spot in the White Sox organization and was 6-0 with a 2.68 ERA in Class A ball.

Jim Sexton

    Ten years ago, the Evergreen Park resident and nurse at Christ Hospital felt bad for a young woman who had cancer and called some friends and loaded up three vans of stuff for the family for Christmas.

As this year comes to an end, Joy, Jim, Layla & Arnie would like to take this opportunity to say “thank you” for your continued support, business and friendship. We are very blessed to have another successful year in business thanks to all of our customers whom we call “Best Friends”. We wish you and your families

a very happy holiday. Stop in soon to see our new products! Just in are Spindrift Collars & Leashes Made in the USA! We carry a huge variety of all natural pet foods, treats & toys. Best Bites is located at 13034 S. LaGrange Road in Palos Park. 708-448-1515. Visit us online at www.joysbestfriends.com. Follow US on Facebook.com/JoysBestFriendsBestBites.

Health Beat Health screenings at Orland Twp.     Orland Township, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., provides free blood pressure screenings from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on the first Friday of the month. No appointment is necessary.     In addition to blood pressure screenings, on the first Friday of the month, VCP Home Health Care Inc. will conduct balance screenings, which can help prevent dangerous falls. Glucose screenings are also available on this day for $5 ($10 for non-residents) (403-4222).

    Orland Township Health Services offers a medical equipment loan program to all Township residents. The Nurses’ Closet allows residents in need to borrow a variety of medical equipment for a 60-day period.     For those in need of temporary equipment, including wheelchairs, crutches, canes, walkers, shower equipment and a variety of other items, the Nurses’ Closet is an option. Equipment is donated by members of the community.     To borrow an item or to donate, call Orland Township at 403-4222.

Immunization clinics at Orland Twp.     Orland Township will hold its monthly immunization clinic on Dr. Nancy Taft continued to show Saturday, Jan. 4, from 9 a.m. to her support from Afghanistan 11 a.m., Tuesday, Feb. 4, from during Breast Cancer Awareness 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday, Month in October 2013 March 8, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the township building, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave. was untied.     Vaccines are available to chil    “I notice those things now be- dren 18 and under who are either cause I see the floor a lot more uninsured, underinsured, Medicnow,” he joked. aid-eligible/All Kids (card needs to be displayed), Native American Larry Thomas/The Soup Nazi or Alaskan Native. Underinsured     When he came to Orland Park to means that the child has health promote the local independent film insurance, but it does not cover “You Don’t Say,’’ I was able to talk any vaccines, certain vaccines, or with him for a half hour or so on a snowy night in March about his career and it was a ton of fun.     Not many have gained as much recognition for so little screen time as the Soup Nazi character from “Seinfeld” and his “No soup for We believe that refinancing you!” line.

Rife & Associates Family Medicine

Gerri Neylon

Dog of The Week

Orland Twp. lends medical equipment

    The Evergreen Park Mayor survived the deadly West Nile virus and was presented with an award at Christ Medical Center for getMike Recchia ting through it all. (Continued from page 8)     The never-say-die professional     The virus took its toll on his pitcher from Worth had the disap- body, especially his shoulders and the kid to a super hero. pointment of being cut by the New neck area, and when I first met     “Alex’s great determination York Yankees and Baltimore Ori- him after the ceremony in Sepallowed us as therapists to ob- oles in the past couple of years but tember, he had a sense of humor tain goals,” his therapist, Diana toiled for the independent Windy about it. He noticed my shoelace Daniak said. “With Super Alex and his super suit and his cape, he literally soared and accomplished any tasks that were set before him. This hospital became and Healthcare For The Whole Family / Accepting New Patients an adventure of his imagination every day. Dr. Susan Rife Dr. Mark McKeigue     “Despite the hair-pulling, bitMarianne Laff, C.N.P . Lindsay Gnade, P.A. ing, kicking and punching, Alex was the highlight of our day and Joelle Rickey, P.A. always had a smile on his face,” she said. “And he always put a It’s time to say… smile on our face.” by Jeff Vorva

Submitted photo, sponsored by Joy’s Best Friends, Ltd. Best Bites

Happy New Year!

We look forward to seeing you again in the new year. But, until then, enjoy the holiday!

Submitted photo

it has a fixed dollar limit or cap for vaccines, and once that cap is reached a child is ineligible.     With valid proof of Orland Township residency, vaccines are free of charge. For children residing outside of the township’s boundaries, a $20 administration fee per vaccine will be collected. An up-to-date shot record is mandatory to receive any vaccine, and children must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.     Children’s vaccines that are available include DTaP, DTaPHep B-IPV, DTaP-IPV-Hib, DTaPIPV, Hep A, Hep B, Hep B-Hib, HPV, Meningococcal, MMR, IPV, Pneumococcal, Rotavirus, Tdap and Varicella. Adult vaccines that are available include HPV, Pneumococcal, Hep A, Tuberculosis, Hep B, Tdap, IPV, Meningococcal, Hep A-Hep B, MMR, Typhoid and Shingles. (orlandtwp.org)

Smith Village caregivers support group     Residents with family members or friends living with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia are invited to a free monthly meeting that will focus on “Taking Care of the Caregiver” at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 7, at Smith Village, a continuing care retirement community at 2320 W. 113th Place in Chicago.     That night Smith Village’s memory support coordinator Diane Morgan will be joined by Carly Carney, owner of the Beverly Yoga Center at 1917 W. 103rd St., to explore ways caregivers can take care of themselves by meditating. Carney will explore the process of developing a meditation practice through visualization and breathing exercises that can lead to a feeling of inner well-being.     Before the hour-long meeting ends, Morgan and Carney will be open to questions and comments from the assembled group and light refreshments will be served.     To reserve a seat, call (773) 4747300, or go to familyandfriends@ smithvillage.org.

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The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013

Submitted photo and text

50 years of wedded bliss

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Care from home for Christmas

   The children of Robert and Carol Ellsworth, of Palos Park, wish to announce the 50th wedding anniversary of the happy couple.    The Ellsworths were married on Dec. 28, 1963 at Most Holy Redeemer Church in Evergreen Park. They have eight children: Robert (Emilia), Christopher, Timothy (Laura), John (Olga), Michael (Caroline), Daniel (Dorian), Kathleen (Einar) Olsen, and Margaret (Adam) Pack.    They are the proud grandparents of 13 (soon to be 14) grandchildren: Charles, Andrew and Lucy Ellsworth, Kathleen, Madeline and Rosemary Ellsworth, Daniel, Elizabeth and Abigail Ellsworth, and Connor, Anne and Ella Olsen, and a newborn this week.    Congratulations and best wishes for continued health and happiness!

Death Notices

   As an Advent project this year, Incarnation School in Palos Heights collected stocking stuffers to bring some Christmas cheer to the men and women in the military serving our country in Afghanistan and Iraq.    Each grade was given a list of items to bring in including granola bars, oatmeal, beef jerky and playing cards. The students were encouraged to use their own money to purchase the stocking stuffers. They collected more than 10 boxes of goodies that were mailed in Regina G. Billo care packages to the troops.     Regina G. “Jean” Billo, née Chiaro, 88, of Orland Park, died Dec. 17. Visitation was held at Colonial Chapel Funeral Home in Orland Park on Dec. 21. A funeral Mass was offered at St. Elizabeth Seton Catholic Church in Orland Hills on Dec. 21. Interment was at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Worth.     Mrs. Billo is survived by her sons, Anthony Billo Jr. and Gregory; her brother, Vincent; and five grandchildren.     Mrs. Billo was born in Chicago. She was a homemaker.

Dana W. Forst

    Dana Wendell Forst, née Dromgold, 76, of Orland Park, died Dec. 17. Visitation was held at Colonial Chapel Funeral Home in Orland Park on Dec. 20. A memorial service was held at All Saints Lutheran Church in Orland Park on Dec. 20. Interment was private.     Mrs. Forst is survived by her sons, John, Jim and Danny Jacobsen; her daughter, Jan Jacobsen; and her brother, Jack Dromgold; and five grandchildren.     Mrs. Forst was born in Chicago. She was an airline attendant for Midway Airlines.

Those who serve Submitted photos

    Air Force Airman Patricia M. Sheehy graduated from basic    Dozens of area children got into the holiday spirit at Zion Lutheran Church in Tinley Park Dec. 14 as they made their own Christmas military training gifts for family and friends in the annual “Gifts from the Heart” program presented by the Beta Beta chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma, a at Joint Base San service society for educators. The organization provides the program for children of client families at Together We Cope. Antonio-Lack   Bonnie Ostarello of Orland Park helps 10-year-old Angel Anderson with a gift project (left photo). land, San Antonio, Texas.    Jean Keeney of Orland Park shows 7-year-old Arlet Rubacova the details of a craft project (right).     The airman completed an in   Kathryn Straniero, executive director of Together We Cope, said the “Gifts from the Heart” project is important because it teaches tensive, eight-week program that children how to give back to their families and friends. included training in military dis   Together We Cope is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit based in Tinley Park that assists families in temporary crisis from 22 south suburban com- cipline and studies, Air Force core munities.

Gifts from the heart

Houses of Worship

Bobcat rank begins Cub Scout ladder     The newest members of Orland Park Cub Scout Pack 383 participated in the first of many ceremonies of their scouting careers.     The Bobcat Ceremony is held for new pack members regardless of age, marking the completion of the Bobcat requirements of scouting. This year it took place on Dec. 13.     “These new Cub Scouts have learned and can say the Cub Scout motto, the Cub Scout Promise and the Law of the Pack,” explained Pack 383 Cubmaster Mike Carroll.     “For the last few months, these scouts have been demonstrating that they know and understand the importance of being honest Submitted Photo and trustworthy,” he said. Arun Sharma affixes the Bobcat patch and pin to son Amey’s uniform     During the ceremony, the newest during Pack 383’s Bobcat Ceremony. The patch and pin remain members of Pack 383 recited the upside down until the scout performs a good deed. promise and pledge, followed by

Submitted Photo

Orland Park Cub Scout Pack 383 Cubmaster Mike Carroll addresses some of the newest members of the pack at 383’s recent Bobcat Ceremony.

values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.     Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.     Sheehy is the daughter of Josephine and Thomas Sheehy, of Tinley Park.     She is a 2013 graduate of Sandburg High School, Orland Park.

Living Word their parents affixing their Bobcat pins and patches upside down on Lutheran Church their uniform shirts. Orland Park     “The pins are put on upside down until the boys perform good deeds,”     Learn God’s ways of handling said Pack 383 Committee Co-Chair money with Dave Ramsey’s FiTammy Muth. “They know that they have to help someone before LEGAL they can be turned right side up,” she added.     Part of the Boy Scouts of America, the family-oriented Cub Scout Program was created more than 80 years ago. Cub Scouts is open to boys in first through fifth grades or 7 to 10 years old.     Cub Scouts has 10 purposes related to the overall mission of the Boy Scouts of America — character development, spiritual growth, good citizenship, sportsmanship and fitness, family understanding, respectful relationships, personal achievement, friendly service, fun and adventure and preparation for Boy Scouts.     “The Bobcat Ceremony recognizes the scouts learning the basics as they begin their scouting careers,” said Pack Co-Committee Chair Gerry Klotz, scoutmaster for Orland Park Boy Scout Troop 383.     “These newest members of the pack will learn a lot as they move through the Cub Scout Program and the Boy Scouts in Troop 383 are excited to work with them as den chiefs, sharing what they can look forward to when they move onto Boy Scouts in fifth grade,” Klotz said.     The national award winning Orland Park Cub Scout Pack 383 serves boys from throughout the region in first through fifth grades. For more information about the pack, contact Klotz at gerryklotz@comcast.net.

nancial Peace University.     Nine-week course begins Tuesday, Jan. 14, at 7 p.m., at the church, 16301 S. Wolf Road, Orland Park. (403-9176)

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Cremation is one of those things some people just can’t see spending a lot of money on...

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The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013

Photo by Jeff Vorva

A mess of Muersches: From left, Rita Muersch, Ron Muersch, Tedd Muersch Jr., Tedd Muersch Sr. and Ron Muersch sit at one of the oak tree tables at Krapil’s, a restaurant that is family owned and run.

11

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Ron Muersch, Rita Muersh and chef Bill VonBruchhaeuser relax in the front and bartenders Christine Burch and Kim Galvin pose behind the bar.

Krapil’s Steakhouse still sizzles with the best for all these years by Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

for two. Prime rib, chops, ribs and chicken round out the varied selection of meat.     Krapil’s Steakhouse and Patio     An extensive selection of sandsits in a secluded location adjacent wiches, pasta and handmade pizza to 111th Street and the Tri-State as well as several appetizers and Tollway overpass, but the Worth sides also can be found on the restaurant relies on its reputa- extensive but extremely affordtion as a top-notch steakhouse able menu. to draw a loyal customer base     “We’ve expanded the menu,” that comes for quality food and said owner Ron Muersch, whose a unique atmosphere. family bought the restaurant in     The rustic eatery, which fea- 1996. tures an indoor/outdoor patio and     However, first-rate food is only a quaint indoor restaurant, offers part of the overall dining experisomething for every taste, includ- ence at Krapil’s. ing steaks, chops, prime rib and     Patrons who gather at the seafood. The indoor restaurant is indoor/outdoor patio step into a similar to a northern Wisconsin distinctive setting featuring small supper club complete with dark tables and a bar made from trees wooden walls and a fireplace with harvested in northern Michigan. a mounted deer head above. An outdoor stage plays host to a     Krapil’s is known for its wide ar- variety rock and country bands. ray of signature meats, including     A large, outdoor fire pit and dry-aged t-bone and strip steaks, big-screen televisions behind the filet mignon and a 48-ounce steak bar complete the scene. The in-

door and outdoor portions of the patio are separated by glass, retractable garage doors, which are raised or lowered depending on the weather. Large, heated tents on the outdoor patio are available for private parties.     “We built the whole place ourselves,” Muersch said. “It’s a whole different atmosphere.”     The restaurant owners think it is the perfect setting for corporate events, parties, business meetings and funerals. A full or partial menu or buffet is available for those events.     Muersch’s nephew, Worth Trustee Tedd Muersch Jr., also is involved in the operation of the restaurant and enjoys spending time with customers.     “I think it’s a very important part of the business,” he said, adding that gathering on the patio is similar to “sitting in the backyard” with family.

    The Muersch family purchased the restaurant nearly three decades after it opened. They made a commitment to serving quality food, but made changes necessary to make it a destination in

Financial resolutions for the New Year     About 45 percent of Americans usually make New Year’s resolutions, according to a survey from the University of Scranton. But the same survey shows that only 8% of us actually keep our resolutions. Perhaps this low success rate isn’t such a tragedy when our resolutions involve things like losing a little weight or learning a foreign language. But when we make financial resolutions — resolutions that, if achieved, could significantly help us in our pursuit of our important long-term goals — it’s clearly worthwhile to make every effort to follow through.     So, what sorts of financial resolutions might you consider? Here are a few possibilities:     • Boost your contributions to your retirement plans. Each year, try to put in a little more to your IRA and your 401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement plans. These tax-advantaged accounts are good options for your retirement savings strategy.     • Reduce your debts. It’s not al-

to pay for emergencies, such as a new furnace, a major car repair, and so on. You might not be able to finish creating your emergency fund in one year, but contribute Jim as much as you can afford. Van Howe     • Plan for your protection needs. If you don’t already have the proper amounts of life and disability insurance in place, put it on your “To Do” list for 2014. Also, if you ways easy to reduce your debts, but haven’t taken steps to protect yourmake it a goal to finish 2014 with self from the considerable costs of a smaller debt load than you had long-term care, such as an extended going into the new year. The lower nursing home stay, consult with your monthly debt payments, the your financial professional, who can more money you’ll have to invest suggest the appropriate protection for retirement, college for your chil- or investment vehicles. You may dren (or grandchildren) and other never need such care, but that’s a important objectives. chance you may not want to take     • Build your emergency fund. — and the longer you wait, the Work on building an “emergency more expensive your protection fund” containing six to 12 months’ options may become. worth of living expenses, with the     • Don’t overreact to market volamoney held in a liquid account tility. Too many people head to that offers a high degree of preser- the investment “sidelines” during vation of principal. Without such market downturns. But if you’re a fund, you might be forced to dip not invested, then you miss any into your long-term investments potential market gains — and the

biggest gains are often realized at the early stages of the rally.     • Focus on the long term. You can probably check your investment balance online, which means you can do it every day, or even several times a day — but should you? If you’re following a strategy that’s appropriate for your needs, goals, risk tolerance and time horizon, you’re already doing what you should be doing in the long run. So there’s no need to stress yourself over the short-term movements that show up in your investment statements.     Do whatever you can to turn these New Year’s resolutions into realities. Your efforts could pay off well beyond 2014. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones Investments, in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Hundreds have a Hull of a time at Kenwood

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Who is that young guy? Bobby Hull, who turns 75 in January, auBobby Hull spent four hours talking, signing autographs and posing tograph a book plus a photo of himself in his younger days during for pictures with hundreds of fans on Dec. 18. his appearance at Kenwood Liquors. Photos by Jeff Vorva

by Jeff Vorva Reporter Editor

didn’t just sign items and move on to the next fan. He talked with some at length. He posed for photos. He     Those standing in the cold seemed to enjoy the fact that after outside of Kenwood Liquors in all these years, people still love the Oak Lawn Dec. 18 for hours to man they call the Golden Jet. meet Blackhawks legend Bobby     “I’m here to see the legend,’’ Hull can blame Hull himself for said Oak Lawn’s Bill Carey, who prolonging things. had Hull sign his Blackhawks hat.     Hull, who turns 75 on Jan. 3, “I never met him before. I was a

little kids when he played but I love hockey and it’s great to get to meet him.’’     Hull’s NHL career spanned from 1954 through 1980. He played 15 years with the Blackhawks. He finished with 610 goals and 560 assists.     Donations were accepted for his signature and proceeds went to the

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Everything from pizzas to steaks are on the Krapil’s menu.

Park Lawn Residential Center.     Hull was the third legendary Chicago sports figure to appear in the area in recent weeks. Earlier in the month, former Bears tight end and coach Mike Ditka and Bears Hall of Famer Dan Hampton appeared during the grand opening week of Binny’s Beverage Depot in Evergreen Park.

the competitive restaurant scene that dominates the southwest suburbs.     “It’s a work in progress,” Ron Muersch said.     Krapil’s is located at 6600 W.

111th St. The dining room opens at 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 4 p.m. on Sundays. The patio is open daily. For information, or reservations, call 708-448-2012 or visit www.krapilssteakhouse.com.

Scam hirers using LinkedIn are preying on job seekers     If you are looking for a new job, the Better Business Bureau (BBB) warns job seekers to beware of growing LinkedIn scams. LinkedIn is an open communication website that has made it easy for scammers posing as job recruiters to take advantage of users looking for new opportunities.     More than other social media websites, LinkedIn is appealing to job seekers because it allows them to be contacted by potential employers or recruiters. Scammers create fake profiles disguising themselves as recruiters and send messages that contain a link to gather personal information. The website that the link goes to may look legitimate but often asks for financial information and personal identity. That Information is then used to steal your identity, access bank accounts or install malware on your computer.     “These scams will tempt many but it should be noted that legitimate recruiters will never ask you for any banking information,” says Steve J. Bernas, president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “An example of one of the most recent scams involves the use of attractive female recruiters pitching opportunities to bilingual job seekers.”     Bernas states, “Before working with a recruiter do some research to ensure you know who you are dealing with.”

    Avoid becoming a victim of a LinkedIn scam by following these tips:     • Do not add just anyone on LinkedIn. Before adding someone, check out their profile and connections. If you have doubts about their legitimacy, do not add them.     • Remember that you will never be asked to pay for a job. If a “recruiter” mentions an opportunity where you must pay for training, block them. A real job will never ask you to pay to work.     • Be wary of work-at-home jobs. Real work-at-home jobs are hard to acquire so be cautious when you find these postings.     • Search for the photo of the recruiter. Scammers usually use a fake, generic photo and you can most likely find the photo elsewhere.     • Ask to call them. If a recruiter contacts you via message, request to speak on the phone. If they seem to avoid a phone call, consider that a red flag.     • If you find yourself a victim of the scam, act fast. If a scammer was able to access your computer, they could have collected your personal information including passwords and banking information. Change your passwords immediately. If you see any strange banking activity, notify your bank.     For more tips on protecting your identity, visit bbb.org. — The Better Business Bureau

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Photos by Jeff Vorva

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Nicole Malozzi of Tinley Park introduced her four-month-old daughter Oak Lawn’s Bill Casey gives the thumbs up moments before meeting Madelyn to Bobby Hull as “the Blackhawks’ youngest fan.’’ Blackhawks legend Bobby Hull at Kenwood Liquors Dec. 18.

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The Regional News Thursday, December 26, 2013

Where has the wonder gone?

Virginia  Richards   (1914 1995) (From Dec. 26, 1985)     When I asked my daughter what she wanted for Christmas, she told me that the best present I could give her would be to take her drawer-full of pictures of the triplets and place them in albums. I have undertaken the task.     If there is anything calculated to soften an older woman right down to mush, it is running onto a picture of one of her children or grandchildren taken at toddler to first-day-of-kindergarten age.     There he or she is, looking out at the world. So fresh and starryeyed, so sure of the present and the future. So full of possibility, so eager to get on with the adventure

of life. So sweet and innocent.     Perhaps the photographer had induced the look by handing out a new toy, something to excite the curiosity and wonder which are the peculiar hallmark of young children — and which give the adults in their lives so many bad minutes.     Perhaps it was the novelty of being scrubbed up, inserted into best clothes and taken under stern duress to the “picture man.� Whatever the cause, wonder is written all over the young face.     But things do not always go smoothly for the photographer. I remember going with my daughter to have her triplets photographed when they were about 3. This skilled man had the three children all set. Then he decided to change the background. Scenes painted on large window shades behind the children formed the backgrounds. Presumably the shade slipped from the photographer’s hand. It flew up with a snap.

    Startled, the children jumped, scowled, cried. It took 15 minutes to get them back in pose. The picture didn’t turn out very well.     A photographer who is reputed to be “especially good with children� has a number of special tricks. Because of these tricks, his subjects view him and the new situation with awe.     Children find the whole scenario utterly fascinating. When most adults go to sit for a photographer, they are either bored or apprehensive. After all, most of us know that we are no great shakes to look at, and we’re have the picture made under some kind of duress.     We know all too well that while our family and friends will tell us

that the result is “an excellent likeness,� we ourselves will find that the same old lines, squinty eyes, and misbegotten nose will be staring out at us, even if a skilled handler of camera has focused it and posed us so as to minimize the defects.     But the child isn’t aware that he is being led along by the photographer to a goal which belongs solely to the adult world. All he is aware of is the wonders of the moment.     Perhaps that is what melts us oldsters down when we look at the pictures years later. We think of the person the child has become — estimable, law-abiding, doing the world’s work.     But where have the wonder and the shining eyes gone?

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The City of Palos Heights Mayor Robert Straz City Clerk Thomas Kantas Treasurer Frank Oswald Aldermen

Submitted photo

Donald Bylut and Jeffrey Key – Ward 1 Jack Clifford and Robert Basso – Ward 2 Alan Fulkerson and Dolores Kramarski – Ward 3 Michael McGrogan and Jerry McGovern – Ward 4

Decked the Lodge    The Christmas tree in the great hall of the Lodge at The Center in Palos Park is a 17-foot-tall balsam fir from northern Wisconsin, decorated with red ribbons, red straw garlands and pressed Queen Anne’s Lace from the fields.

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor

outhwest

sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, December 26, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

It’s one last ride for Dooley St. Xavier baseball coach will hang it up after 22 years and assistant will take over By Jeff Vorva     He has been a head coach for more than 20 seasons.     He has racked up more than 700 victories.     He helped send 20 players to the professional ranks and 17 were named national scholar-athletes.     Now Palos Heights resident and head St. Xavier baseball coach Mike Dooley will have one more ride before calling it a career. Dooley announced he will retire after the 2014 campaign — his 22nd year at the helm.     The SXU Athletics Department announced that current assistant coach Rocco Mossuto will take over for Dooley after July 1.     The Cougars program has been around 42 years and had just three head coaches — John Boles (197379), John Morrey (1980-92) and Dooley.     “After 42 years as an educator and 33 years with the Saint Xavier University baseball program, including the last 21 years as the head coach, I felt that at the end of the school year and

Rocco Mussoto baseball season was the right time to step aside,” Dooley said in a news release.     “I would like to thank the Sisters of Mercy and Saint Xavier University for giving me the opportunity to fulfill all my personal dreams and professional ambitions. I have formed many special relationships with my players and that is the thing I will miss the most about coaching. I would also like to thank my

wife, Barbara, and all of the guys who have coached with me over the years, especially John Morrey, Tony D’Anza, John ‘Happy’ Harasen and Tom Lyons.”     Under his direction, the Cougars amassed an overall record of 785-472-3 (.624 win percentage) since 1993. The program also won nine Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference titles, four regional titles and a NAIA World Series berth (2006).     In addition to his coaching duties, Dooley is also an instructor in the physical education department at SXU and serves as an assistant athletics director. On Feb. 1, he will be inducted into the Saint Xavier University Athletics Hall of Fame.     Mossuto is no stranger to the Cougars baseball program.     The Oak Forest resident played for SXU from 1999-2002 and has been an assistant coach since 2010. He has also had coaching stints for a number of other Chicago area institutions over the past decade, serving as pitching coach for Illinois Institute of Technology

from 2008-10 and for Dominican University from 2006-08.     Mossuto played one season overseas for the Lodi Old Rags Baseball Club out of the Italy Professional Baseball League in 2004. During his career as a pitcher at SXU, he was a two-time All-CCAC selection as well as a NAIA All-American Honorable Mention in 2002.     “This is a dream come true for me,” Mossuto said in a news release about the pending promotion. “As a former player here and a life-long baseball guy, this was a career opportunity that I’ve desired for a long time.     “Saint Xavier University has such a rich baseball history and I’m very humbled to continue its tradition of success. I love everything about this university, especially the players and coaches I have worked with over my career here. Cougar baseball has a special place in my heart, and I want to share that feeling with future generations of players and continue Submitted photos to build on the successes that this Palos Heights resident and longtime St. Xavier University baseball program has achieved.” coach Mike Dooley will call it a career after the 2014 season.

R and R against Richards Rice and Rubio knock off area’s last unbeaten team By Anthony Nasella

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Brother Rice’s Dan Scanlon plays towering defense against Richards’ Deon Alexander in the Crusaders’ upset victory over previously unbeaten Richards on Dec. 17.

    Sitting on a 3-4 record coming into a Dec. 17 showdown with Richards, Brother Rice was looking for an opportunity to bounce back from a tough loss in the previous week at the expense of an undefeated team.     Against the 7-0 Bulldogs, it didn’t take the Crusaders a lot of time to establish themselves offensively.     Brother Rice used a strong second quarter to establish a 12-point halftime lead and extended that lead to 23 points with 4 minutes, 15 left seconds in the third before eventually prevailing 78-67 in a nonconference game in Chicago.     Senior Ray Rubio led the Crusaders with 25 points and Quinn Niego added 19. Dan Scanlan had eight points but six came in the final 3:05. Richards was led Josh Meier’s 23 points, Spencer Tears’ 17 points and Dedrick Shannon Jr. nailed nine points in the final 2:16.     “It was a good win,” Brother Rice Coach Rick Harrigan said. “We want to protect our home court; it’s a tough a place for opposing teams to play. We came out with confidence. We had confidence that in our previous game against Fenwick where we got beat pretty good.     “So this was a good bounceback game for us. It was one that we responded to some adversity and a loss that left a bad taste in our mouths. When Ray and Quinn, our senior guards, play good, that’s usually when we’re at our best.”     After falling behind 23 points, Richards roared back and cut the gap to single digits with 4:01 left in the game but could get no closer than eight.     “Brother Rice had 32 rebounds, and that’s first time that we’ve been outrebounded in a game,” Richards Coach John Chapetto said. “They got a ton of secondchance points, and they were 20

of 21 from foul line; we were just 10 of 20. We had a difficult time guarding them.     “We couldn’t block them out. They were just so aggressive. They played to win, and we were on our heels most of the game against them When we needed a big rebound or turnover, they got all the loose balls. We could just never could get over the hump.” Richards 61, T.F North 56     After shooting just 10 of 20 from the free throw line in a loss to Brother Rice, Richards was looking for redemption from the charity stripe and in just about every other fact of its game Friday night against T.F. North.     The Bulldogs, to be sure, more than rebounded from foul line — going 30 of 39. Meanwhile, Josh Meier, who was 16 of 21 from

the charity stripe, had 30 points and 15 rebounds and Dedrick Shannon 14 points for Richards, which captured the five-point overtime South Suburban crossover victory over the Meteors in Calumet City.     “When you’re playing at T.F. North, you know you’re going to get to the foul line,” Richards Coach John Chapetto said. “We were much better from the foul line than we were against Brother Rice.     “For the kids, it was redemption time. We had a bad taste in our mouth from that last loss. The kids played like it was a must win game. And this win was a big one for us because we’re now 4-0 in conference.     For Richards, Shannon scored tne of his points in the fourth quarter and overtime. Thaer

Othman scored eight points, and Spencer Tears added seven points as Richards improved to 8-1 overall.     “We still have some issues with chemistry as far as shot selection,” Chapetto said. “It’s a constant work in progress.” St. Joseph 62, Br. Rice 54     In its win against Richards, Brother Rice was able to establish an offensive rhythm; however, against St. Joseph on Friday, it turned out to be totally opposite – and not in a good way for the Crusaders.     St. Joseph opened the game with a 19-11 first quarter and still held an eight-point lead at halftime. The Crusaders shot 48.6 percent from the floor (18-for-37) and were 7 for 15 from three(Continued on page 5)

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards forward Josh Meier shows his frustration in the fourth quarter of his team’s setback to Brother Rice.

In the Nick of time

Former Sandburg star returns to basketball with stint at SCC By Jeff Vorva     Sandburg graduate Nick Lehnerer doesn’t play much basketball for South Suburban College.     But the fact he’s on a team at all is a step in the right direction.     He’s back, one might say, in the Nick of time.     Close to two years ago, the Eagles senior popped in a careerhigh 27 points in a 68-57 win over Lincoln-Way East in a Southwest Suburban Conference battle. He had high hopes of finishing the season on a high note and pick up some college notice.     It didn’t work out that way.     Colleges weren’t knocking on his door.

    So last year at this time, he was out of the sport — a sport that he loved and played almost all his life. He played travel and AAU ball his final two seasons and he developed into a deadly 3-point shooter.     He attended Illinois State University as a student and thought his hoops career was over.     But he said family matters brought him home and he changed his outlook on a few things — including basketball.     Soon, the 6-foot-1 guard looked into the situation at South Suburban College in South Holland and is a walk-on at the two-year national powerhouse. He’s averaging less than two minutes a game and

averaging 2.1 points per contest but he’s not complaining.     “I get fired up every game,” he said. “You never know when you get your opportunity. You have to be ready to play.”     He hopes to get some time in at 3 p.m. Sunday when SSC, ranked third in the nation among Division II schools by the National Junior College Athletic Association, hosts the No. 1 team — Cincinnati State Technical and Community College.     The Bulldogs opened the season winning 12 of their first 14 contests and in early December were ranked No. 1 but fell after a couple of setbacks. They are hoping to climb back on top.

    Thornton guard Antonio Levy is averaging 19.6 points per game to lead the Bulldogs while four other players average 12.     One of the reasons that Lehnerer picked the school was because of the recent success the Bulldogs have enjoyed. They were 205-41 under coach John Pigatti in the past seven seasons and finished third in the nation in 2011-12. Last year, the team finished 33-4. The team entered the season with a 105-5 record at home under Pigatti.     Pigatti said Lehnerer should develop into a scholarship player next year. Lehnerer said he is taking this shot and hoping to parlay it into an opportunity to play for a four-year school.

Submitted photo

Former Sandburg High School basketball standout Nick Lehnerer is hoping his South Suburban College men’s basketball team can climb back to No. 1 in the national rankings. The team is ranked this and hosts No. 1 Cincinnati State in South Holland on Sunday.


2

Section 2 Thursday, December 26, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Follow the bouncing bikini — er, ball Bartosh (Reprinted from Oct. 11 2012)     Once and for all, we’ll learn the definitive answer to a longburning question:     Do those men claiming to like women’s sports truly admire female athletes or only the ones whose most notable statistics have no connection whatsoever with the games they play?     Guys preferring to share meals and other married activities with wives on a regular basis will, of course, tell their spouses exactly what the ladies want to hear. Those males will insist that watching Maria Sharapova in action is no different than following the exploits of Tom Brady or Alex Rodriguez, and that they’re attracted only to the beauty of tennis, not of the tennis player.     Funny, though, how watching that same sport wasn’t so high on men’s to-do lists when Martina Navratilova was the world’s best women’s player.     Let’s be honest, the sex appeal-sells method isn’t only used to market cologne, clothing and most other consumer products. Athletics also employ a similar tactic to draw notice if the opportunity presents itself, which it does every time females are part of the sports landscape.     And there’s nothing chauvinistic about that statement. The facts back it up.     No matter how good a pitcher she is, does anyone honestly believe Jennie Finch would be softball’s most recognizable face if that face weren’t pretty? Being a statuesque blond rather than the distaff equivalent of George Costanza doesn’t hurt her promotional appeal, either.     Let me say, on behalf of red-

blooded males everywhere, that I’m not voicing any complaints here. However, weak-willed as most guys are, it’d probably be better if the temptation to gawk didn’t keep popping up with so much frequency.     The latest example being placed in front of men is an entity called the “Bikini Basketball League,” which as the name suggests, isn’t some new NBA developmental offshoot. It will, however, give an entirely new meaning to the phrase “player development.”     The BBL is not scheduled to begin until the summer of 2013. The start date is important because it allows guys to breathe easier, knowing their heavybreathing sports moments won’t end with the Lingerie Football League season does.     What the BBL will be bumping scantily clad bodies with is the WNBA, which is what this column’s opening sentence was referencing. Will the BBL do what the WNBA hasn’t been able to yet accomplish in terms of establishing a larger male audience?     Hormonally speaking, that’s a no-brainer. Why else, for example, would women’s beach volleyball receive so much airtime during Olympic telecasts?     Ask most men about volleyball terminology and the replies would likely be something like this:     • “Dig? That’s what you do on the beach with a sand pail and shovel, right?”     • “Kill? Yeah, that’s what my wife will do to me if she catches me watching this.”     • “Libero? Isn’t that the South American dictator our military is trying to overthrow? No, wait a minute – it’s that new dance, isn’t it?”

    The BBL has borrowed a page from the Lingerie Football League and assigned steamy nicknames to a few of its franchises. My personal favorite is the Hollywood Hotties, although our own Chicago Desire is pretty good, too.     As to be expected, a representative of the Miami Spice who was quoted in a Miami New Times story downplayed the sexual aspect of the BBL — sort of.     “This is a competitive basketball league, so we are definitely looking for girls that can really play,” the rep told the New Times. “It is also a bikini league in which the girls will be playing basketball in bikinis, so looking good in a bikini is a must.”     Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett never had to deal with such a stipulation. Fact is, neither did Lisa Leslie, Cheryl Miller or Rebecca Lobo.     I would imagine those three ladies, along with every other WNBA player — past or present — resent the idea of the BBL horning in on their still-to-befully-conquered territory, especially since the latter will take attention away from layups and foul shooting and put it on legs and fannies instead. Consider this — if bikinis were acceptable attire for sportswomen, why do competitive swimmers always choose to race in onepiece suits?     If guys were smart, they would keep their minds on baseball when next summer arrives and realize that the BBL is nothing more than the latest shameless way to exploit women and appeal to men’s basest instincts. Males everywhere should completely ignore it.     At least until the BBL playoffs begin.

SXU women

St. Xavier women cruise in the Cruzin Classic By Anthony Nasella     As the St. Xavier women’s basketball team continues its winning ways, a positive trend is following the Cougars — as was the case in two big victories at this past week’s Cruzin Classic on the campus of Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.     In posting an 88-74 victory over No. 9 NAIA Division I-ranked Oklahoma Baptist University (Okla.) on Thursday and a 9372 win over No. 19 ranked Briar Cliff University (Iowa) Friday, the team got off to fast starts in both contests and received big contributions from starters and bench players alike.     Against Oklahoma Baptist, senior point guard Jordan Brandt went 6-for-8 from the field and hit all four of her three-point attempts scoring a game-high 21 points. In the win over Briar Cliff, red-shirt freshman guard Sidney Prasse came off the bench to hit five three-pointers (5-for-9) and tallied 19 points.     In both games, No. 8 Cougars (11-3) shot over 50 percent from the floor. They shot 52 percent against Oklahoma Baptist, establishing a double-digit lead ten minutes into the game. St. Xavier shot 57 percent against Briar Cliff, jumping out of the gate with a 20-6 spurt en route to a 57-34 halftime edge.     “It was a great trip all around for us,” Head Coach Bob Hallberg said. “The win over Oklahoma Baptist was big because they’re Division I NAIA and we’re Division II. So to beat a team that supposed to be a powerhouse school is a great win for us.     “What we’re currently doing well, which we weren’t doing earlier in the season, is shooting the ball well and getting off to a quick start. Compared to the lulls of the past, we’ve really come alive offensively and shot the ball very well over the past two games.”     Junior guard Suzie Broski was a big part of St. Xavier’s win big win as well, totaling 17 points on 7-for-14 shooting from the floor to go along with her four assists. Junior forward Morgan Stuut had a solid all-around effort with 14 points, seven rebounds and six assists, while sophomore forward Caitlin McMahon connected on

five of her six shot attempts for 13 points.     The Cougars shot 33-for-63 against Oklahoma Baptist, which came into the game with a 7-1 overall record. The Bison had already defeated four of the five Top 25 NAIA teams they had faced this season before Thursday’s meeting with the Cougars.     St. Xavier also connected on six of 11 three-point attempts and did a solid job of moving the basketball with half of its made baskets (17) coming off assists.     “We got out of starting block quickly and jumped on them quick. Even when our 13-point lead was cut to six, I don’t believe Oklahoma Baptist ever had the lead on us. The difference of the past two games is that we’re getting contributions to support Morgan and Susie.     “Besides Jordan Brandt, Caitlin McMahon shoots 5 for 6, on solid shots, from the floor and Maloree Johnson goes 4 for 7. We’re getting the ball distributed into several areas. Though Morgan and Susie are prime time targets, teams have to pay attention to the rest of our players who are shooting the ball well.”     Against Briar Cliff, Broski hit 10 of her 17 shot attempts for 21 points on the day to pace four Saint Xavier University players in double figures. The Cougars were 40-for-70 from the field, including an amazing 71 percent clip (25for-35) in the first half.     The big first half was the second time in the past three games that Saint Xavier has scored 57 points in a half. Stuut recorded a rare basketball feat notching a triple-double with 17 points, 16 rebounds and 12 assists.     Senior point guard Jordan Brandt chipped in 12 points along with five assists and four steals. St. Xavier had 11 of its 12 active players score in Friday’s dominant win. Briar Cliff finished with 28 turnovers in the game thanks in part to 20 St. Xavier steals. The Cougars also recorded 30 assists as a unit Friday.     “The amazing statistic was the team shooting 71 percent in the first half,” Hallberg said. “Again, we got off to another good start. Jordan Brandt hits a three from the far sideline to open the game, and she goes up the floor, steals the ball and lays it in the basket.

She has five points in the first 30 seconds of the ballgame.     “From there, confidence builds up and good shooting get contagious for the rest of the team.”     Even when St. Xavier suffered a setback against Briar Cliff, specifically when guard Maloree Johnson suffered a concussion early in the contest after taking an offensive charge, Prasse came off the bench and immediately found her outside groove and help propel the Cougars further ahead.     “Sidney Prasse, who really deserves more time than I can give her, steps up and bombs five three’s and scores 19 points,” Hallberg said. “That’s been our secret. When somebody is called upon, like Naira Harris has been in the past, that player immediately contributes big for us.     “And instead of getting points out of two players, we have four players in double figures. Everybody on our team got in the scoring column against Briar Cliff. Offensively, we’re operating on all cylinders. That makes you look good.”     And when the Cougars are receiving contribution beyond the ones that come from super-juniors Broski and Stuut, opposing coaches are on the defensive.     “It’s definitely tough for the opposing coach,” Hallberg said. “Prasse is our best three-point shooter, and Harris toughest driver. That makes us a little harder to defend than we were in early November. No team has played no tougher schedule in NAIA than us. That really has done nothing but helped us play better.”     The Cougars return to action on Saturday to host the two-day St. Xavier Holiday Classic at the Shannon Center. St. Xavier takes on Ashford University (Iowa) at 1 p.m. and then plays Lourdes University (Ohio) on Sunday at noon.     “We’ve been home just twice in a total of 14 ballgames,” Hallberg said. “As we get to the tough part of our schedule over the next 15 games, we’re home ten times. Our 11-3 record puts us in a very good position. The schedule favors us.     “Some felt we had a disadvantage in playing so many ranked teams all on the road — but with our record and a lot of home games ahead, we’re definitely now at an advantage.”

On the edge...and right on target! Straight talk from Bartosh in Sports Southwest

Submitted photo

A Perfect Season     The Southwest Christian sixth grade boys basketball team just completed a 15-0 season competing against schools from Illinois and Indiana. This is only the second undefeated basketball season in the history of the school at any level.     Pictured are: Front row left to right: Caleb Voogt, Ryley Bulthuis, and James Voss; back row David Falb, Joseph Kamp, Danny Bulthuis, Micah Schnyders, Ty Sperling, Dylan Kooiman, and Connor Hoops. Not pictured is Baelin Behringer.     Coaches for the team are Tim Schnyders and Fred Jacobeit.

Trinity Christian Roundup

Trolls not in partying mood after ringing up end-of-year setbacks By Tim Cronin     Trinity Christian’s men’s basketball team picked up the pace in its last game before Christmas, but could not pick up a victory.     The Trolls’ run-and-gun contest with Judson finished with the Eagles on the top side of a 98-89 outcome. That dropped Trinity to 4-11 for the season and 0-5 in CCAC competition.     In some categories, Trinity did everything right. The Trolls held a 42-31 rebounding edge on Judson, and shot 50 percent from the floor, compared to Judson’s 46.7 percent. But Eagles went to the free throw line more often than partygoers return to the buffet, and took advantage, hitting 35 of 42 free-throw attempts, with Turner Schwarz hitting all 13 of his attempts en route to a 31point game. In comparison, Trinity was only 17-of-26 from the line. Therein was the difference.     Judson (5-9, 2-3) had a 45-44 lead at the half — overcoming Trinity’s 14-point advantage in the last nine minutes of the half — and then led throughout the second half, though the Trolls were within two at one point. That came on Joe Hehir’s layup with 7:04 to play. It was 73-71, but Judson scored the next six points, and the Trolls could get no closer than four points in the final five minutes.     Jared Jones’ 19 points led Trinity, with Cody Rhorer adding 17.     Two nights earlier, the Trolls were dealt a 92-71 defeat at Cardinal Stritch, an outcome not entirely unexpected given Strich’s pedigree as the No. 3 team in NAIA Division II and the leader of the CCAC North. Stritch (112, 4-0) led all the way, paced by Derek Semenas’ 26 points.

    The two setbacks combined with the Christmas break mean Trinity will have to wait until Jan. 8 for its next shot at its first conference win of the season. The Trolls will visit fellow CCAC North foe St. Xavier (11-2, 4-1) on that evening, following a New Year’s Eve contest at Lewis — billed as an exhibition given Lewis’ NCAA Division II status – and a non-conference road game two nights later at BenedictineSpringfield. ***     Record: 4-11 overall, 0-5 CCAC, 2-3 home, 2-5 away, 0-3 neutral. Leaders: Jared Jones 14.8 ppg; Ezekiel Odonkor 7.9 rpg; Jones 43 assists; Cody Rhorer 11 steals; Odonkor 16 blocks.     Schedule: Tuesday, at Lewis (exhibition), 1 p.m.; Jan. 2, at Benedictine-Springfield, 7 p.m.; Jan. 8, at St. Xavier, 7 p.m.; Jan. 11, at Calumet-St. Joseph. Women’s Basketball     Trinity let one get away last Thursday afternoon. The Trolls opened a seven-point lead on Judson in the early going of their final game before the Christmas break, battled the Eagles through a contest with a half-dozen lead changes and nine ties, but ultimately dropped a 66-62 decision to the Eagles.     It was the second loss in succession, following a 66-38 whipping by Cardinal Stritch two nights earlier. It also dropped the Trolls to 4-10 for the season, and 1-4 in the CCAC.     Trinity was in the game against Judson despite shooting only 32.8 percent from the floor and being outscored 23-7 from the bench. Making seven more free throws than the Eagles aided the Trinity cause.     Judson (7-7, 3-2) led 48-39

before Caitlin Cody’s layup with 13:40 to play triggered an 11-point run that included a Holly Boetsma three-pointer and was capped by another Cody basket to give the Trolls a 50-48 lead. The advantage was built to five points on free throws — Trinity was 16 of 24 from the line — before Judson rallied, with a pair of Diamonds making it rough for the Trolls.     Judson came back on back-toback baskets by Diamond Williams, a timely three-pointer Kelli Ludwig, and a pair of baskets by Diamond Courts, the second of them from beyond the arc, giving Judson a 65-58 lead with 1:57 to play. There was no coming back from that.     Cody’s 20 points led Trinity. She and Brooke Bambrick (14 points) each pulled down nine rebounds. The Diamonds, Courts and Williams, scored 16 points each to pace the Eagles.     The trip to CCAC leader Stritch (12-1, 4-0), the sixth-ranked team in the NAIA, was in vain. Trinity trailed 35-16 at the half, shot only 26 percent from the field, committed 22 turnovers, was outrebounded 46-32, and only Cody, with 13 points, was in double figures. The only bright spot was an 11-of-14 performance at the free throw line. ***     Record: 4-10 overall, 1-4 CCAC, 1-4 home, 3-5 away, 0-1 neutral. Leaders: Caitlin Cody 12.6 ppg; Cody 7.4 rpg; Allie Paluchniak 28 assists; Paluchniak 19 steals; Brooke Bambrick, Cody, 9 blocks each.     Schedule: Monday, vs. Spring Arbor at Indiana Tech, 4:30 p.m. CT; Tuesday, vs. St. Francis (Ind.) at Indiana Tech, 1 p.m. CT; Jan. 8, at St. Xavier, 5 p.m.; Jan. 11, at Calumet-St. Joseph, 1 p.m.

SXU men

SXU men smash first two tourney opponents By Anthony Nasella     Led by another huge effort by senior guard Brad Karp, the No. 10 ranked Saint Xavier University men’s basketball team used a strong first half performance to take down No. 21 Saint Ambrose University (Iowa), 99-73, Sunday on the second day of the 2013 SXU Midwest Tournament on Bob Hallberg Court at the Shannon Center in Chicago.     The Cougars (12-2 overall) led nearly the entire game and used a 20-7 run to close out the final five minutes of the first half and build a 53-31 halftime lead. Hot shooting (57 percent) and strong defense (10 SAU turnovers) helped fuel SXU’s strong opening frame. Karp led all scorers with 38 points connecting on 10 of his 15 shot attempts (four three-pointers) and sinking all 14 of his free throw tries.     Junior guard Jack Krieger (Plainfield, Ill./Plainfield North) had a stellar all-around outing for the Cougars Sunday turning in 15 points, five rebounds and

five assists.     Karp had 31 Saturday in a 10879 victory over Goshen College (Ind.) to open the tournament on Saturday.     The Cougars (11-2 overall) were dominant on the boards Saturday totaling 48 rebounds, including 21 on the offensive end, to the Maple Leafs’ 28. With just over 12 minutes to play in the first half, SXU went on a 23-9 run over the game’s next five minutes to pull away for good     Before the tourney, things were a little tighter.     Even though the team missed 13 free throws in last Thursday’s Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference game against Roosevelt University, the Cougars excelled from the charity stripe when it counted in the closing seconds to emerge with a big road win.     Key free throws in the closing seconds by junior guard Jack Krieger and freshman point guard Kyle Huppe allowed the Cougars to hang on for a hard-fought 68-63 win against Roosevelt University

(Ill.) at the Goodman Center in Chicago.     Karp led the way for the Cougars finishing with 26 points and eight rebounds on the night. St. Xavier relied heavily on its defense to aid the victory after turning in its lowest scoring output of the season and holding the Lakers to just 63 points and helping force 18 turnovers behind nine steals.     Senior point guard Michael Simpson did a bit of everything for the Cougars Thursday recording 15 points, six assists and five steals. Krieger also scored in double figures posting 11 points, three rebounds and two steals in a reserve role.     “Those free throws at the end were the only time we got big free throws,” Cougars Head Coach Tom O’Malley said. “It wasn’t exactly great, but we made a few at the end — which it was good. It was a tough place play at; we had never played there before.     “Roosevelt had had won ten games and ran its offense well. We were little bit in a hurry, which (Continued on page 4)


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, December 26, 2013 Section 2

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Sandburg girls

Eagles have a wild time in their four-game stretch By Anthony Nasella     In the midst of a 2-2 week, the Sandburg girls’ basketball team played its most inspired basketball during a loss — against, arguably, one of the best teams in the region, in Oak Lawn.     The Lady Eagles held the explosive Spartans far below their normal offensive output in a Dec. 18 contest at the Oak Lawn Holiday Tournament and had the chance to push the contest into overtime at the buzzer but fell short 43-40.     Sandburg’s chance to tie came from a three-point shot by Victoria Stavropoulos, who had hit a big three earlier in the period. Unfortunately, it caromed off the rim. Sandburg was paced by Stavropoulos (12 points, seven rebounds), Sam Youngwirth (nine points) and Julia Ruzevich (eight points, 10 rebounds).     The Eagles hit for seven threepointers, the last coming from Stavropoulos early in the fourth quarter. Her swish made it 3633, but Sandburg missed its next five shots. Meanwhile, Oak Lawn guard LaTondra Brooks made life difficult down the stretch with her defensive intensity.     “We played hard and defended well,” Sandburg head Coach Chris Hellrung said. “The girls made some good adjustments at half-

time, but they also made a few too many mistakes that inevitably cost us the game.     “Overall, though, our effort was good, and if we had hit a couple more baskets, we could have been a line for a win. We had a wideopen three that just went in and out. That’s just the way the ball bounces sometimes. Our effort was good, and we showed a lot improvement by making adjustments at halftime.     Ironically, the potential gametying three was a play that the team had not previous ran     “It was a play that we just threw up at the last moment,” Hellrung said. “We never practiced it, and the girls executed it perfectly. The shot was a half inch off. We gave a good effort. LaTondra Brooks, by far, was the best player on the floor that night. She does a phenomenal job defensively for Oak Lawn.”    The Eagles started the Oak Lawn Tournament with a 5343 overtime victory over De La Salle. Behind Sam Youngwirth (21 points), Julia Ruzevich (12 points) and Victoria Stavropoulos led the way for Sandburg     “We came out with a lot of intensity, but we missed a lot of open shots early,” Hellrung said. “We played some really good defense and we rebounded well. They’re a good team. We outscored them 10-2 in overtime. It’s a good vic-

tory when you still win and not shoot the ball well against a quality team.”     After the Oak Lawn game, The Eagles got back in the win column with a 54-35 victory over Joliet Central in the SouthWest Suburban Blue contest on Friday. Despite getting off to a slow start, the team used a strong second half to take command. Ruzevich chalked up 16 points, and Youngwirth scored 13 to key host Sandburg (8-3, 1-1).     “We came out a little slow and led by just one at halftime,” he said. “We messed around with a lead and let them back in the game. In the second half we started moving the ball around better and started getting some easier shots. We played a good second half.” Photo by Jeff Vorva     The Eagles concluded the Oak Sandburg’s Victoria Stavropoulos reacts after her game-tying 3-point attempt at the buzzer fell Lawn Tournament with a 43-28 short against Oak Lawn. loss to Lincoln-Way north in a Saturday morning contest for third place. Ruzevich led Sandburg (8-4) with eight points.     “Lincoln-Way North played well, and I think we were a little tired from the previous night,” he said. “We didn’t come out with much enthusiasm, and they beat us by 15. We were hoping that we wouldn’t have to play a morning game after a night game.     “Mentally and physically, we just weren’t there.”

Oak Lawn girls

Lucky 13 after Oak Lawn wins its own tourney By Anthony Nasella     Oak Lawn’s girls basketball team won three more games this past week and extended its school record-setting start at 13-0 on its way to winning the Oak Lawn Holiday Tournament this past week.     The team began the week with a 75-38 victory over Romeoville on Dec. 16. The Spartans jumped out to a 28-8 lead in the first quarter, hitting 10 of its first 15 shots.     The majority of Oak Lawn’s scoring came in the posts. Jannah Mahmoud had 10 points, and Brianna Markusic had nine points. Brooke Annerino and LaTondra Brooks fed the post and combined for nine assists in the game, while also aggressively attacking the basket.     “One of our goals this year is to come out strong in every game, and we have been able to achieve that most of the time,” Oak Lawn Coach Janet Meyers said. “We did a great job defensively and forced several turnovers.     Over half of their possessions in the first quarter ended in a turnover. We did not turn the ball over in the first quarter.”     However, Romeoville adjusted and outscored Oak Lawn 14-12 in the second quarter to cut the lead to 40-22 at the half. The Spartans responded with a 28-9 third quarter, with Brianna Markusic and Brooks combining for 17 points in the period, for a comfortable 68-31 lead heading into the final quarter.     “We talked about coming back strong in the 3rd quarter and put-

ting this game away for good, and the girls did just that,” Meyers said.     Markusic finished with 20 points and 13 rebounds; Brooks tallied 20 points, seven steals, and five assists; Mahmoud scored 12 points and pulled down seven rebounds.     In the 43-40 win over Sandburg on Dec. 18, Oak Lawn jumped out to an early 10-2 lead, but Sandburg would respond with a run of its own and lead 11-10 at the end of the first quarter.     “We did not make good decisions offensively in the second half of the first quarter,” Meyers said. “Sandburg was playing good defense and forced us into make poor passing and shot choices.”     The Spartans, finally, settled down the second quarter and outscored Sandburg 16-11 to take the lead 26-22 at the half. Sandburg outscored Oak Lawn 11-7 in the third to tie the game at 33-all at the end of the third quarter.     LaTondra Brooks stepped up for the Spartans both offensively, five of the team’s ten points in the last three minutes of the game while providing smothering defense down the stretch.     With the game was tied 40-40 with 1:46 remaining, Sandburg called a timeout and came out in a delay of game. The Spartans put the pressure on defensively and got a few deflections but no steals. Sandburg called another timeout with 1:11 remaining.     Brooks, again, put the pressure on defensively and got a steal and a layup with 48.9 seconds remaining to for a 42-40 lead.

Sandburg turned the ball over on its next possession. From there, Oak Lawn was able to run some time off the clock before turning the ball over ourselves on a sideline inbound play with about 25 seconds to go.     Sandburg called a timeout with 18.2 seconds remaining. Brooks, again, stole the ball and was fouled by Sandburg. She hit 1 of 2 free throws to extend our lead to 43-40. Sandburg called a timeout with 10.2 seconds remaining before falling short on it last shot to force overtime.     Brooks led the way with 13 points, six steals, and three assists; Mahmoud recorded a double-double with 11 points and 11 rebounds; Markusic added nine points.     “This is the toughest team that we have played since we beat Downers Grove North in the Glenbard East Tournament,” Meyers said. “We did not have our best game offensively. Sandburg forced us into poor shooting and passing decisions, but we found a way to win.     “We stepped it up defensively when we needed to, especially LaTondra. Good teams find a way to win when they aren’t having a good game and we did that against Sandburg.”     In the championship Game on Saturday, a 66-36 victory over Rich East, Oak Lawn came out strong defensively in the first quarter and outscored the Rockets 12-2.     “We did not score on as many possessions as I would have liked, but we forced Rich East into turnovers and poor shots so we were

Sports wrap Young Shepard swimmers succeeding By Anthony Nasella     Last year’s Shepard boys swimming team was blessed with a large volume of senior swimmers that made for a fun and competitive season for the Astros and head coach Tricia Biedron.     And while this year’s squad is significantly younger, Shepard is still blessed with some talented swimmers who are finishing first in events and improving on their times in each meet.     During last Thursday’s meet against Reavis, the Astros received first place finishes from junior Sanders Yu (200 IM-2:12.94, 100 breast-1:07.50), sophomore Zach Sierzega (50 free-23.40, 100 free53.02), sophomore Jeremy Schultz (500 free-5:43.23), sophomore Hayden Wiest (100 backstroke59.57); and the 400 Free relay team of Schultz, Wiest, Yu, Sierzega (3:36.22).     In addition, Yu won the 200 IM and 100 breaststroke at Friday’s meet against Tinley Park, while Sierzega won the 100 free and Wiest captured the 100 back.     “Sanders is the older swimmer of the group because the team is

made up of mostly sophomores,” Biedron said. “We’re definitely on the young side, and Sanders is one of our leaders that is stepping up. He specialized in 200 IM and can swim the strokes quite well.     “He’s been a varsity member for three years. He’s doing a great job and is already at his times from last season. He’s progressing quite well.”     The coach said she’s very impressed with the commitment levels of Wiest and Schultz.     “We’re glad that Zach is committed to the short distance events,” she said. “Hayden also spent a lot of time training in the offseason; he’s really focusing on strokes as well. He’ll be stepping into the backstroke as well as butterfly events.     “Jeremy is in what was a pretty deep group of distance swimmers that have all graduated, and it’s a big role that he’s stepping into — but he’s doing it as a sophomore. He’s our No. 1 distance swimmer, and he’s consistently dropping time. I’m looking forward to seeing these kids progress in the next few weeks.”

Girls Bowling Shepard     The Astros were defeated by Oak Lawn 1,454-1,247 in the South Suburban Red dual at Centennial Lanes on Dec. 17. Miranda Lindgren had a 318 series for Shepard. Stagg     The Chargers dropped a 1,5251,307 decision to Lincoln-Way West in the SouthWest Suburban crossover at Palos Lanes on Dec. 16. Boys Bowling Shepard     Matt Shaw’s 256 game and Eric Walters’ 638 series aided Shepard in a 2,952-2,671 victory over Lemont in the South Suburban crossover at Strike N Spare II on Dec. 16. Wrestling Stagg     The Chargers were defeated by Lincoln-Way East 41-25 on Friday in the SouthWest Suburban Blue. Shepard     The Astros competed at the Reavis triangular on Friday and dropped a 45-15 decision to the host Rams in the South Suburban meet.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn’s Jannah Mahmoud looks to pass against Sandburg in a holiday tournament game against Sandburg on Dec. 18. able to maintain a 10-point lead at the end of the first quarter,” Meyers said.     Rich East came out in a boxand-1 defense against LaTondra Brooks. It slowed her a little, but she still scored five of the team’s 12 points in the first quarter. Annerino stepped it up in the second quarter, scoring nine points and helping Oak Lawn outscore Rich East 18-12 for a 30-14 lead at the half.     “We knew that Ashley Dennis was their main scorer,” Meyers said. “We wanted to try to stop her and force the other players to score. In an effort to do that,

our post players got in some foul trouble; Mahmoud and Markusic were on the bench with two and three fouls, respectively, for most of the second quarter.”     However, Annerino really picked it up for the Spartans when their posts were on the bench and Rich East was putting the pressure on Brooks with their box-and-1 defense. She scored 11 of her 13 points in the first half by hitting a three-pointer, driving the lane, and going 4-for-4 from the free throw line.     In the end, Rich East couldn’t hold LaTondra Brooks down for long. She exploded for 10 the

team’s 20 points in the third quarter. She was 5 for 5 on drives to the basket, and the Spartans were up 50-23 at the end of the 3rd quarter; Rich East would never get closer than that.     Brooks finished with 16 points, six steals, and three assists; Annerino tallied 13 points and eight assists; Markusic had eight points and six rebounds; Dee DeeShatat pitched in with seven points; Kelsey Luckett also scored seven points; Mahmoud had six points and nine rebounds.     “Everyone got to play, and all 11 players scored for us,” Mey(Continued on page 4)

Moraine athletics wrap

MVCC men make things right vs. Wright     Moraine Valley’s men’s basketball team played better basketball on Dec. 17, which showed in their 63-57 victory over Wilbur Wright College.     Although Moraine Valley had some dominating moments, they did let the Rams back into the game for a close finish. Denton Wallace led the way with 16 points and six rebounds followed by Johnte Shannon (15 points, five rebounds, three assists), Cameron Juillerat (11 points, three rebounds), Des’nique Harris (eight points, seven rebounds), and Kyle Ward (six points, 12 rebounds, three assists).     The Cyclones may have found their groove after earning a second consecutive win Dec. 19 over rival Joliet Junior College. It came down to the wire, but Moraine Valley pulled out a 72-71 victory in the final seconds of the game.     At one point the Cyclones were up by 12 points, but with 20 seconds left in the matchup they were down by one. Johnte Shannon made two free throws with six seconds on the clock to put the Cyclones ahead, and the Wolves ran out of time to score.     Des’nique Harris had a doubledouble on the night with 15 points and 11 rebounds. Kyle Ward had a big game with 11 points, seven rebounds, six assists, and

six steals. Paulius Otruskevicius was next with 13 points and five steals followed by Shannon (11 points, three steals) and Cameron Juillerat (10 points). Women’s basketball     In five out of their last six wins, the Cyclones have beaten their opponents by more than 12 points. This latest dominating victory was an 86-60 offensive barrage over Wilbur Wright College on Dec. 17.     Moraine Valley led 49-18 at the break and seemed to be on cruise control. The Cyclone pressure caused trouble for the Rams, forcing several turnovers and low percentage shots. However, in an attempt to pull the pressure back to start the second half, Wright subsequently went on a 14-2 run and cut the lead to 51-32. The Rams crept back to within 13 points even with the pressure, but the Cyclones hit a few threes and scored on break away layups to finish with a 26-point victory.     The Cyclones had 35 offensive rebounds to Wright’s 10 for a complete domination on the boards. Every player scored for Moraine Valley in the balanced attack. Nariman Jaber led with 14 points and eight rebounds. Sam Holler (Sandburg) scored 13 while Maggie Yandel (Stagg) finished with

12 points and six steals. Shavonne Lewis and Ashley Cunningham chipped in nine points each. Jamilla Jones was fantastic on the glass, pulling down 12 rebounds, eight from the offensive end.     It was a good way for the Cyclones to end the first half of the season on Dec. 19 in a decisive 61-47 victory over Joliet Junior College on their home court.     There was mostly back and forth action between the rivals for most of the game before Moraine Valley exploded offensively down the stretch. The first half was rough with the Cyclones scoring just 17, nine by Maggie Yandel, and trailing the Wolves by five.     After halftime, the battle was tight until the six-minute mark when a late 14-2 Cyclone run turned the game around. Moraine Valley found their offensive groove and nearly tripled their first half points, scoring 44 for the win.     Katie McGann amassed 21 points—18 of which came in the second half—going 5-for-11 from the 3-point line. She also had three steals. Yandel finished with 19 points. Nariman Jaber came off a 14-point effort from the floor, but dominated the paint with eight blocked shots and six rebounds. —Submitted by Moraine Valley Community College


4

Section 2 Thursday, December 26, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Vikings play best game of season despite loss By Anthony Nasella     Lacking a player taller than 6-foot-2, St. Laurence is definitely at a height disadvantage, which means the team has to make up its lack of inches with extra effort.     And while a notable effort in a Dec. 19 Chicago Catholic League crossover battle against a taller De La Salle squad didn’t translate to a victory, head Coach Mark Sevedge still liked what he saw from his scrappy Vikings team in a 55-48 defeat to the Meteors.     St. Laurence (1-7, 0-4) was behind just 14-11 after the first quarter and actually led 27-25 at halftime. However, De La Salle

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Brooke Annerino dribbles against Sandburg in a pool game in the Oak Lawn Holiday Tournament.

Oak Lawn (Continued from page 3) ers said. “This is only the second time in 13 years that we won this tournament — the last time being in 2003-2004. This is also the best start we have had in the school’s history with a 13-0 record so far.     “The girls are working hard and they are having fun. They are a great bunch of girls to watch play and coach. They are very unselfish and that has been a huge part of our success. We have a different person stepping up for us each game.”     Brooke Annerino and Jannah Mahmoud were named to the All-Tournament team. LaTondra Brooks was named Tournament MVP. Richards     The Lady Bulldogs went 2-2 this past week — losing contests to Rich East and Lincoln-Way North before bouncing back in victories over T.F. North and Romeoville.     In the 60-40 defeat to Rich East Dec. 16 at the Oak Lawn Holiday Tournament, Richards was down 14-11 in the first quarter, 32-20 at halftime and 47-34 at the end of the third quarter. Sydni Tears led the way with 21 points and nine rebounds, and Taylor Sonichsen added eight points, two assists, and two steals.     “Rich East is vastly improved,” Richards Coach Jeff Kortz said. “They have a nice team and a solid post player who took it to us down on the blocks. I thought we played hard — but could never get in a good rhythm.”     On Wednesday, the Lady Bulldogs lost to Lincoln-Way North at Oak Lawn 62-34; however, the final was deceiving as they were down just 9-8 after the first quarter, 23-20 at halftime and 3629 at the end of third quarter before finally succumbing in the final period.     Sonichsen paced Richards with 11 points, seven rebounds, and two steals. Tears added nine points and five rebounds, and Brianna Kuchenny pitched in with four points and three rebounds.     Richards, however, would bounce back for its next game — a 65-61 home double-overtime conference victory over T.F North. The Bulldogs were ahead 15-11 after the first quarter and 30-23 at halftime. The Meteors would

SXU (Continued from page 2) slowed us down from what we were able to do.”     St. Xavier came out strong in the first half, shooting 56 percent (14-for-25) in the frame en route to a 36-32 halftime lead. A lay-up by Simpson late in the half gave the Cougars their largest lead of the night, 34-25, with 1:17 remaining, but the Lakers closed out the final minute with a 7-2 run to narrow the gap.     “We shot 56 percent from the floor in first half, but just before the half we gave back four points,” O’Malley said. “We took a quick

cut the deficit to 40-38 after the third quarter before forcing overtime at 50-all.     Sonichen paced the Bulldogs with 22 points, 10 rebounds, and three steals; Tears also racked up a double-double with 18pts and 11 rebounds, while adding three assists. Carly Stazak chipped in with 12 points and five assists.     “What can I say: a Double OT game, four games in six days, and the girls never quit,” Kortz said. “They kept coming back and back. Sydni Tears made two boig clutch free throws with under two seconds left. I am very proud of every one of my girls for not giving up.”     The team concluded the week back at Oak Lawn, securing a 44-30 victory over Romeoville. Richards (5-7) was up 11-6 after the first quarter, 22-14 at halftime and 32-22 at the end of third. Tears led the way with 17 points, six rebounds and three assists. Sonichsen added six points and six rebounds. Andy Sonichsen pulled down nine rebounds and Kennedy Brister added seven rebounds. Stagg     The Lady Chargers split a pair of games this week: Losing to Lincoln-Way East 40-32 on Monday and defeating Queen of Peace 6226 on Saturday.     Stagg dropped a home Blue Division SWSC game to Lincoln-Way East on Monday, despite a strong defensive effort. Both teams had a difficult time generating any type of offense, and when they did, points were hard to come by.     Stagg led 8-6 after the first quarter and extended that lead to 16-9 at halftime. Three baskets were all the opposition could muster up against a tough aggressive man-to-man defense employed by the Chargers.     “I thought the girls’ did an outstanding job holding down a pretty potent East attack, especially in the first half,” Stagg head Coach Bill Turner said.     Hannah Henderson (seven rebounds, four assists, and three steals), Casey McMahon, and Mia DiGiacomo all played a solid game on both ends of the floor, and each scored eight points in the game. Megan Hearne (eight rebounds) and Kate Adams (six rebounds) effectively joined Henderson on the boards; each team racked up 30 rebounds.     The Lady Chargers discovered their missing offensive production on the Saturday morning trip to

Burbank to play Queen of Peace. Stagg came away with the victory against the Pride by playing well in all facets of the game.     Henderson (16 points, six assists, five steals) led the team in scoring, and got the team off to a fast start by nailing a pair three-point baskets in the first quarter. She triggered an 18-6 1st quarter lead, and she continues to be Stagg’s most consistent player so far this season.     Casey McMahon (15 points, 4 rebounds, three assists, and three steals) was right with her co-captain, in leading the Charger onslaught.     Four players — sophomore guard Noor Elmosa, Henderson, McMahon, and Hearne — did not commit a turnover in the game. The Chargers are now 4-5 on the season and will compete at the Hillcrest Holiday Classic (Dec. 2628) with a 1st round match-up against Bloom. Mother McAuley     The Mighty Macs improved to 9-2 and 2-0 in the GCAC Red with a 40-23 victory over St. Ignatius in conference action on Saturday. Elizabeth Nye contributed 16 points, four rebounds and four assists to lead host Mother McAuley. Evergreen Park     Megan Pfister’s basket in the final half-minute ignited the visiting Mustangs to a thrilling 38-37 victory over Lemont in the South Suburban crossover on Friday. Pfister and Nicole Larkin led Evergreen Park (8-6, 2-2) with 12 points apiece. Shepard     The Astros dropped an 84-36 South Suburban crossover defeat to Hillcrest on Thursday. Shepard (2-9, 0-4) was paced by Dae Jae Williams (13 points) and Courtney Dalton (five points, eight rebounds). Hillcrest jumped out to an early 17-1 lead, but the Astros made a spirited run at the end of the first period to close to within 21-14; however, that was a close as Shepard would get the rest of the game. Chicago Christian     Anica Pausma scored 15 points for the host Knights (2-8, 1-3) in a 47-39 defeat to St. Francis in the Suburban Christian Gold on Friday. Queen of Peace     The Pride dropped a pair of games this past week: a 49-25 setback against Reavis on Monday and a 62-26 defeat to Stagg on Saturday.

shot and they got a basket at the half, so we had to settle for a fourpoint lead instead of eight.”     A pair of free throws by Karp early in the second half extended the team’s lead to seven, 44-37, but Roosevelt did not go away. The Lakers rallied and either tied the game or took the lead two times down the stretch before a series of four straight baskets by Karp, all on lay-ups off offensive rebounds, that began in the final six minutes of regulation helped the Cougars take the lead for good.     “Brad Karp played exceptionally down the stretch when we needed him,” the coach said. “Whether rebounds or key baskets – he’s been outstanding all year for us. (Senior point guard) Michael

Simpson is our catalyst and has also played very well for us.     “He didn’t have good shooting night against Roosevelt, but he can still penetrate and make things happen.”     Roosevelt cut the lead to two, 65-63, on a lay-up with 27 seconds to play, but Huppe split his two free throw attempts on St. Xavier’s next possession and, after a failed three-point attempt by RU to tie the game, Krieger sealed the road win on two free throws with three seconds remaining.     “Jack is one of our best players,” O’Malley said. “He’s coming back from an ACL injury. Even though he played only 25 minutes against Roosevelt, he’s playing better all the time.”

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regained the advantage in the second half with an 18-12 third quarter and played just well enough down the stretch to preserve the victory.     “The loss tonight was definitely not for a lack of effort,” Sevedge said. “Despite the loss, I really felt like we played our best game of the year by far against De La Salle. We were on the road, and we were within four points with just two minutes left in the game.     “A late-three point basket didn’t fall; it just didn’t happen for us tonight. We’re a small team, and De La Salle is a not only a big team but also quick, athletic team. And they we’re just out jumping us on the boards too. We could

have done a better there.”     Rich Lamb scored 15 and Romelo Radford added 11 for the Vikings, who shot a solid 8-for-20 from three-point range.     “I was very happy with our effort tonight,” Sevedge said. “Hopefully, our kids can gain confidence from this game and feed off it.”

Statistics St. Laurence De La Salle

11 16 12 9 - 48 14 11 18 12 - 55

Scoring: Rich Lamb 15, Romelo Radford 11, Bob Kelly 8, Quentin Forberg 5, Dan Cummings 4, Tim Deleaney 3, Dan Curley 2. Rebounds: Radford 5. Assists: Forberg 3.

Despite big game by Fitz, St. Edward gives Knights fits By Anthony Nasella     With a 24-point, 11-rebound performance from Bradford Fitzpatrick, Chicago Christian should have been in a good spot to compete in Friday night’s Suburban Christian contest against St. Edward.     Unfortunately for the Knights, no other player score more than four points and the Green Wave rolled to an easy 63-44 victory.     St. Edward recorded 19 steals and used a full-court trap to lead from start to finish in Suburban Christian play. Overall, Chicago Christian committed 29 turnovers while only attempting 38 shots to the Green Wave’s 57.     “Even though we weren’t playing well early, I thought we were in striking distance if we had played better,” Chicago Christian

Coach Kevin Pittman said. “We actually outplayed them early in the third, but they outscored us 24-18 in third and then 14-10 in the fourth.     “It was so unfortunate because Bradford is really turning a corner for us [coming off a 14-point, 24rebound performance in a previous game]; now we need to get others to come alongside him. If you had told me he would score 24 points and we’d lose by 19, I would have said you were crazy.”     Pittman’s biggest frustration, beyond the lack of support for Fitzpatrick, is the team’s inconsistency in running the offense.     “It boggles my mind that we can’t get it to work consistently in the game,” he said. “The kids go way too fast, and they make poor decisions. When we ran it correctly, Bradford was making a

killing. Worse, we’re turning the ball over at an alarming rate.     “Our goal is 12 turnovers or less in a game, and we haven’t been close to that number this season. We need to fix that; St. Edward scored 15 to 20 points off those turnovers. It’s hard to come back from that. We have to take care of the ball better and work on our decision making.”

Statistics Chgo. Christian St. Edward

6 10 18 10 - 44 12 13 24 14 - 63

Scoring: Bradford Fitzpatrick 24, Nate Leo 4, Daylon Washington 3, Jay Spencer 3, Farrell Winchester 3, Marcus Parker 2, Blaine Wright 2, Tyrone Crider 2. Rebounds: Fitzpatrick 11. Assists: Wright 3, Parker 3.

Marist powers up for two wins By Anthony Nasella     Marist used two balanced scoring attacks in a pair of Marist Holiday Tournament victories.     The RedHawks beat Southland Prep, 74-51 on Dec. 17 and Power House 68-30 last Thursday.     In the Southland game, the RedHawks jumped out to an early 15-point first quarter lead and never looked back.     For players scored in double figures for Marist: Brian Berry (12), Nic Weishar (11), Brad Hill (10), and Brian Holland (10). Point guard Jeremiah Ferguson dished out seven assists with no turnovers.     “Offensively we definitely had balanced scoring,” Marist Coach Gene Nolan said. “It’s difficult to defend you when you have variety of ways of scorers. Balanced scoring was a key to our offensive success.     “Jeremiah Ferguson did an outstanding job from point guard position — not just running our offense but generating scoring for

our other players. It was a very well-played game both offensively and defensively. It was good right from the start with a solid overall team effort.”     The RedHawks continued their balanced scoring effort in a dominant tournament win on Thursday night.     However, the offense helped fuel the defense – as Marist (7-1) held Power House to just six points in first quarter and four in the second. Nic Weishar (15 points) and Ryan Tucker (11 points) led another balanced attack.     “We got off to another good start,” Nolan said. “We guarded well and defened well. Offensively, I felt we shared the basketball well. Both ends of the floor we really did a nice job. They played well together. It was a good week for our team.     “Defensive success often leads to offensive success. When you’re guarding, defending and rebounding well, you’re able to

play offensive transition with a numbers advantage. Offensively and defensively — we were really good at both on Thursday.”

Statistics Marist Southland

23 18 20 13 - 74 8 13 13 17 - 51

Scoring: Brian Berry 12, Nic Weishar 11, Brad Hill 10, Brian Holland 10, Romelo Burrell 9, Ryan Tucker 8, Ken Lerma 6, Chamar Hawkins 6, Ken Rivard 3, Andre Turner 2, Jeremiah Ferguson 0. Rebounds: Hawkins 6, Berry 5. Assists: Ferguson 7, Berry 6. Marist Power House

18 19 14 17 - 68 6 4 10 10 - 30

Scoring: Nic Weishar 15, Ryan Tucker 11, Ken Rivard 9, Andre Turner 7, Chamar Hawkins 6, Brad Hill 6, Jeremiah Furgeson 4, Brian Berry 3, Brian Holland 3, Romelo Burrell 3. Rebounds: Weishar 7, Burrell 6. Assists: Furgeson 5, Turner 3, Tucker 3.

Hot-shooting Hillcrest rolls over Shepard Hawks shoot 55 percent; Astros commit 24 turnovers By Anthony Nasella     When a team shoots more than 50 percent from the floor in a game, the opposition usually needs to counteract with something comparable to stay close.     In Friday’s South Suburban crossover match against Hillcrest, Shepard was unable to find an answer to the Hawks’ hot shooting. Worse, they sabotaged any chance of staying close due to a high amount of turnovers.     The Astros committed 24 miscues; meanwhile, the Hawks shot a sizzling 55 percent from the floor and 65 percent from threepoint land en route to an easy 79-40 victory.     Darren Cohen scored 18 points to lead Shepard (3-5, 2-2), which cut a 21-11 first quarter deficit

to 21-15 before Hillcrest (5-4, 3-1) rolled off four consecutive three-point baskets to take a commanding 33-15 lead and an eventual 51-24 halftime advantage.     “Hillcrest came out strong, and we just made too many turnovers,” Shepard Coach Tony Chiuccariello said. “Turnovers were the story of the game. Hillcrest shot the ball well. They were very good; they caused a lot of turnovers and had a rebounding edge.     “When combined with them shooting the ball well, it was just too much for us to overcome. Hillcrest played as well as I’ve seen them play this year. They have multiple weapons, are able to drive, and they have a 6-foot-8 kid in the post. They have a nice balance and executed well.”     Eight Hillcrest players had at least three points by the break.

The Hawks pressure defense forced 13 first-half turnovers, while Hillcrest shot close to 60 percent in the first half.     “We could have done some things better – like take care of the ball,” Chiuccariello said, “We didn’t shoot the ball well; we were just 35.6 percent for the night and nine percent from three-point land. We just didn’t compete like we’re capable of.”

Statistics Shepard Hillcrest

11 13 10 21 30 19

6 - 40 9 - 79

Scoring: Darren Cohen 18, Lawson 7, Jacob Littleton 6, Yakov Witherspoon 4, Smith 2, Kyle Longfield 2, Heidinger 1, Adebayo Ogungbemi 0, Cohen 0. Rebounds: Littleton 5, Cohen 5. Assists: Littleton 2, Cohen 2, Heidinger 2.

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, December 26, 2013 Section 2

Photo by Jeff Vorva

5

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Evergreen Park’s Issac Matthews lets a half-court shot fly at the buzzer in the third quarter in Evergreen Park players huddle before suffering another heartbreaking defeat this season – this time to Lemont Friday night.

Best 0-5 team ever? Evergreen Park makes a case By Anthony Nasella     While it might be hard to believe, Evergreen Park Coach Pat Flannigan is convinced that his Mustangs could be the best 0-5 team ever.     In its first four games, Evergreen Park had the chance to convert a game-winning basket to no avail. And even though the same opportunity didn’t present itself during Thursday’s 47-42 South Suburban crossover loss to Lemont, the Mustangs were

leading with 1:50 to play.     Junior Isaac Matthews had 15 points and Tony Weathersby added 14 for Evergreen Park, which didn’t help its cause by missing six free throws in the pivotal fourth quarter.     “We’re just not putting it all together at one time right now,” Flannigan said. “I still believe we’re going to be pretty good. We’ve been in four of five games and had it down to the last possession or two.

    “In our first four games, we lost by five points. Each game we had the shot to win it. It’s been a crazy start. I still believe in these kids, and I hope they believe in me. I believe we’re going to get things going real soon.”     Evergreen Park suffered from a slow start and an early 6-0 deficit, but from there the team outscored Lemont.     “We gave them an early sixpoint lead,” Flannigan said. “We suffered some mind cramps and

lost one of their better scorers twice. After that, we doubled down on him, and it was tough night for him scoring.     “We played them even, going back and forth, and we had our opportunities in the fourth quarter. We just didn’t take advantage of them. We had three bad spurts, and good teams are going to beat you when you have those spurts.”     If the Lemont game did anything, Flannigan said it forced

him to reconsider his some of his philosophies.     “When you give a team like Lemont opportunities, they’re going to take advantage of it,” he said. “We talked about how were going to start games and change our philosophy. In the first five games, we’ve given teams a head start.     “They come out on us, and we’re constantly playing from behind. We need a quick start. We have quite a few athletes, and we need

to start taking advantage of our athleticism.”

Statistics Evergreen Park Lemont

6 14 15 7 - 42 12 14 8 13 - 47

Scoring: Jacquet McClendon 7, Alex Cheatham 2, Issac Matthews 15, Tobi Oladaijo 2, Jordan Brown 2, Tony Weathersby 14. Rebounds: Weathersby 8. Assists: McClendon 2, Oladaijo 2.

Stagg, Sandburg roughed up By Anthony Nasella     There were numerous factors involved in the Stagg’s 71-61 loss in a Dec. 16 opener of the Addison Trail Tournament against the host Blazers.     Stagg turned the ball over 14 times and shot just 21-for-63 from the floor. Meanwhile Addison Trail found its offensive groove and never looked back — scoring the most points against the Chargers thus far this season while never trailing.     Max Strus scored 26 points and Jeff Goral added 13 for Stagg, which came into the game undefeated at 8-0.     “We had a hard time defending them,” Stagg Coach John Daniels said. “We were letting them have open shots, and they were getting baskets in transition. We played a poor defensive game. Addison Trail also had offensive put backs. It was a bad combination of a lot of things.     “We just didn’t play well.” Bolingbrook 49, Stagg 44     The Chargers rebounded defensively from the breakdown against Addison trail to limit the next night’s opponent, Bolingbrook, to less than 50 points of offense.     Unfortunately, it wouldn’t keep Stagg from suffering its second defeat in as many days.     Stagg struggled to get into a fluid offensive mode, especially Max Strus and Jeff Goral — who missed 19 of their first 20 field goal attempts. Down the stretch, Bolingbrook preserved the win at the foul line.     “We played great defense against Bolingbrook,” Daniels said. “We just found it hard to score offensively. We had only one basket in the third quarter; yet, we were still within three points with just four minutes to play.”     Stagg was 16 of 47 from the

field and 5 of 20 from beyond the arc. Strus, Sims and Gardner each finished with 14 points for Stagg. Stagg 58, Wheaton Warrenville South 37     If Daniels knows anything about his Chargers’ team, he knows that their ability to succeed with be in direct parallel with Strus’ ability to score.     And during Saturday’s thirdplace game of the Addison Trail tournament against Wheaton Warrenville South, Strus was doing plenty of that — and it definitely helped Stagg break a tough two-game losing streak.     Strus scored 29 points, and the Chargers prevailed 58-37 to close out the tournament. Stagg (9-2) also held Wheaton Warrenville South to single digit scoring in three of the four quarters.     “Any win is a good win, especially when you hold the opposition to 37 points,” Daniels said “We played good defensively and did a good job to holding their best player to two field goals. He only scored one basket in their half-court offense.     “Max Strus is a special player. In order to succeed, Max is going to have to score points for us. He definitely did that today.” Lockport 34, Sandburg 31     In another game involving an area District 230 team, the Eagles could never find their groove during the Dec. 17 SouthWest Suburban Blue defeat at the hands of the Porters.     Sandburg (3-5, 1-2) played close with Lockport in a low-scoring first quarter but found itself behind 16-8 at halftime. The Eagles held a 23-18 advantage in the second half, but it was not enough. They were also hampered by a 30 percent field goal percentage and 14 turnovers.     “They forced us into a little

more deliberate pace — kind of a slow-down tempo,” Sandburg coach Todd Allen said. “They were effective with their 1-3-1 zone. We missed some three-pointers early that had we converted them, maybe it would have changed the pace of the game in our favor.     “We ended up missing our first three 3-point baskets. That was an issue there. And they did a good job of being patient on offense. We wanted a more up-tempo game, and we weren’t able to get that established. We were within one point with 1:30 to go, and we just couldn’t fully take advantage of the opportunities that were given to us.”

Statistics Sandburg Lockport

3 5 11 12 - 31 4 12 8 10 - 34

Scoring: Niko Cahue 10, Niko Kogionis 10, Omar Mausour 4, Matt Piazza 3, Peter Paxinos 2, Eric Straka 2. Rebounds: Straka 8. Assists: Paxinos 3. Addison Trail Stagg

17 22 19 13 - 71 12 15 22 12 - 61

Scoring: Kevin White 8, Sebastian Kolpak 5, Brett stratinsky 2, Max Strus 26, Nick Sims 7, Jeff Goral 13. Rebounds: Strus 6. Assist: Sims 4. Bolingbrook Stagg

11 12 10 16 - 49 12 8 3 21 - 44

Scoring: Anthony Gardner 14, Sebastian Kolpak 2, Max Strus 14, Nick Sims 14. Rebounds: Reb Gardner 10. Assists: Strus 4. Stagg WW

15 7 13 23 - 58 8 8 12 9 - 37

Scoring: Max Strus 29, Derek Jordan 4, Sebastian Kolpak 4, Brett stratinsky 2, Nick Sims 10, Jeff Goral 17, Joe Zaremba 2. Rebounds: Kolpak 6. Assists: Sims 5.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards’ Dedrick Shannon tries to get by Brother Rice’s Ray Rubio in Rice’s upset victory on Dec. 17 in Chicago.

R and R (Continued from page 1) point land. They were 11 of 18 from the foul line compared to St. Joseph’s 16 of 27.     Brother Rice trailed by five after a Dan Scanlan steal and basket with 4 minutes, 31 seconds left in the third quarter. But in the next 90 seconds, the Crusaders committed two turnovers and were whistled for a technical foul on the bench and St. Joseph built a commanding 44-30 lead.     Brother Rice’s Quinn Niego had 25 points, including a banked

three-quarter court shot at the Scoring: J. Gallagher 5, J. Conlisk 8, buzzer to end the third period R. Rubio 25, Q. Niego 19, C. Finn 6, J. for the Crusaders (4-5, 1-3). Gorman 3, L. Mueller 4, D. Scanlon 8. Rebounds: Rubio 8. Assists: Scanlon 5.

Statistics Brother Rice St. Joseph

11 9 17 17 - 54 19 9 16 18 - 62

Scoring: J. Gallagher 3, J. Conlisk 0, R. Rubio 13, Q. Niego 25, C. Finn 5, J. Gorman 0, L. Mueller 2, D. Scanlon 6. Rebounds: Niego 10. Assists: Conlisk 3, Rubio 3. Brother Rice Richards

18 16 17 27 - 78 14 8 12 23 - 67

Scoring: Josh Meier 23, Spencer Tears 17, Dedrick Shannon 11, Angelo Anagnostopolous 7, Thaer Othman 5, Deon Alexander 4. Rebounds: Meier 9. Assists: Shannon 7. Richards T.F. North

11 12 8 18 12 - 61 9 4 18 18 7 - 56

Scoring: Josh Meier 30, Dedrick Shannon 14, Thaer Othman 8, Spencer Tears 7, Jordan Cottrell 2. Rebounds: Meier 15. Assists: Shannon 8.

Community sports news Rice to hold volleyball reunion matches

    Brother Rice will hold its annual reunion for former Crusaders volleyball players, as well as alumni matches on Friday, Dec. 27, at 7 p.m. in the school’s South Gym.     All Rice volleyball alumni are invited to play in the matches and attend a post-event reception. There is no need to RSVP.     “This event has been an annual tradition in our program for many years,” Crusaders coach Br. Paul Ickes said. “I always enjoy welcoming our alumni players back to campus, and I am really looking forward to showing them our new trophy cases.”     For more information on the reunion, contact Br. Ickes at (773) 428-1957 or pickes@brrice.org.

Hickory Hills, Palos Hills baseball programs merge

    After years of competing against

each other as local rivals, Hickory Hills Youth Baseball and the Palos Hills Baseball Association have merged into one organization.     The new entity will be known as “Hills Baseball Softball Association,” and provide baseball and softball at all levels for children aged 4-16. HBSA, which will conduct play on fields in both communities, will accept youngsters from throughout the southwest suburbs for recreational participation, as well as for its part-time and full-time travel teams.     Registration dates are Jan. 11 and Feb. 8 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. each day. Both Saturday sessions will be held at Conrady Junior High School, Roberts Road and 97th Street in Hickory Hills.     George Czarnik, of Hickory Hills, and Peter Donahue, of Palos Hills, will serve as HBSA president and vice president, respectively. For more information about the new organization or

how to become involved with it, contact Czarnik at 599-6983.

Two more baseball camps announced

    Chicago Christian and Lewis University in Romeoville will both host six-week baseball camps during the winter.     Lewis’ camp will begin Jan. 11 and be directed by Flyers coach Tim McDonough, while the one at Chicago Christian starts Feb. 1 under the guidance of Knights coach and school athletic director Eric Brauer. Both are being held in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy and are open to players in grades 1-12.     Sessions will be offered in advanced hitting, pitching, catching, fielding and baserunning. Registration is now underway, and classes are limited to six players per coach. Previously, a similar camp was announced for Oak

Lawn High School with a start date of Jan. 5.     For more information on any of three camps, visit www.USBaseballAcademy.com or call 1866-622-4487.

Diamond in the Rough

als — and two round-robin events. All positions will be considered, but specific needs include pitcher, catcher and infield/slapper. No practices are required.     For more information, contact Bill Lammel at 289-3438 or ditrfp73@aol.com.

    Diamond in the Rough fastpitch softball has player open- Openings for ings in its girls’ windmill pitch- Palos Park to host ing, beginner, intermediate and winter basketball league advanced levels.     For more information, call Bill     Palos Park, in conjunction with Lammel at 289-3438 or email the Palos Heights Recreation Department and Worth Park District, ditrfp73@aol.com. will host a winter basketball league for youngsters in grades 1-8 that Midwest Elite looking will play games each Saturday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. beginning Jan. 18 and for softball players     Midwest Elite Diamond 19-and- running through March 15. over women’s fast-pitch softball     Each child will have one practice club is looking for college-rostered and one game per week, with an players to compete in the sum- emphasis being placed on skills demer of 2014. velopment. Separate leagues will     The team will play in four local be formed for boys and girls, and tournaments — including nation- play will be conducted in a total

of four different age groups.     For more information, call 6713760.

Oak Lawn High School to host baseball camp in January

    Oak Lawn High School will host a six-week baseball camp, in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy, starting Jan. 5.     Former Spartans varsity coach Brian Clifton will direct the program, which has classes available for players in grades 1-12. Sessions will be offered in advanced hitting, pitching, catching, fielding and baserunning, but space is limited.     Registration is currently underway. For more information, visit www.USBaseballAcademy.com or call 1-866-622-4487.

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6

Section 2 Thursday, December 26, 2013 The Regional News - The Reporter

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�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� �������������� For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � HYANG S. CHUNG A/K/A HYANG SOON CHUNG A/K/A HYANG CHUNG, KEUN Y. CHUNG A/K/A KEUN YOUNG CHUNG A/K/A KEON CHUNG A/K/A KEON Y. CHUNG, FOSTER BANK D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 005579 10528 S. 83RD AVENUE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 11, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 3, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10528 S. 83RD AVENUE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-203-020. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-28426. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-28426 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 005579 TJSC#: 33-25648 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I576082

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOSEPH GUZOLEK, ANDREA FORTUNA A/K/A ANDREA GUZOLEK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 021044 12537 S. MASSASOIT AVENUE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 6 0 4 6 3 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 10, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 13, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 12537 S. MASSASOIT AVENUE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-29-404-011. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-37989. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-37989 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 021044 TJSC#: 33-23122 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I577998

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����������� ����������������� For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Wells Fargo Bank, NA P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � James Krol aka James F. Krol; Green Valley Estates Master Association; Green Valley Estates Master Condominium Association; Discover Bank; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 13189 Sheriff's # 130945 F13050016 WELLS Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on January 16th 2014, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 11012 South Theresa Circle Apt 2B and Parking Space G-8, Palos Hills, Illinois 60465 P.I.N: 23-14-302-014-1006; 23-14-302-014-1020 Improvements: This property consists of a Residential Condominium Unit with parking space. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of a condominium unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments as required by 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1) Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I575685

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � RAEDA SHEBAN; THOMAS CHARLES ESTATES TOWNHOUSE ASSOCIATION; DELL FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC Defendants, 13 CH 6651 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on June 6, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 8530 West Thomas Charles Lane, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 P.I.N. 18-35-307-035-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, One East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 651-6705. 1 2 0 3 1 5 6 5 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I576646

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION MOREQUITY, INC. P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ANDRZEJ KULIKOWSKI; RENETA KULIKOWSKI; P N C � BANK, N.A. S/I/I TO MIDAMERICA BANK, FSB; D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 5764 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on October 29, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, January 31, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-02-209-027-0000 Commonly known as 8115 WEST 90TH STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1300840. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I579998

Publisher’s Notice    All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.    This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is: 1 (800) 927-9275.

For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L P � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � EDWARD F. ANDJULIS A/K/A EDWARD FRANCIS ANDJULIS, GAIL E. ANDJULIS A/K/A GAIL ELIZABETH ANDJULIS A/K/A GAIL WALSHON D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 013891 10213 HIBISCUS DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 19, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 17, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10213 HIBISCUS DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-09-310-013. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-11834. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-11834 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 013891 TJSC#: 33-27083 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I580417

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST BY PURCHASE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK FKA WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA Plaintiff, -v.MARQUETTE BANK FKA MARQUETTE NATIONAL BANK, SUCCESSOR TO TCF BANK, SUCCESSOR TO BANK OF CHICAGO GARFIELD RIDGE AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF A CERTAIN TRUST AGREEMENT, DATED THE 14TH DAY OF MAY 1977, AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 77-5-5, ORLAND GOLF VIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 13 CH 09361 15703 Old Orchard Ct. #2N Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 28, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 29, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15703 Old Orchard Ct. #2N, Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14401-034-1021. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $145,325.95. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 09361 TJSC#: 33-24591 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I572521

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v . � RUSSELL W. NOWAK A/K/A RUSSELL NOWAK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 038382 8009 VALLEY DRIVE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 2, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 16, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8009 VALLEY DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-401-002-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-26825. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-26825 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 038382 TJSC#: 33-22578 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I578652

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, v . � ELIZABETH A. MERKLE A/K/A ELIZABETH ANNE MERKLE, WEST SUBURBAN BANK, THE VILLAGE SQUARE OF ORLAND CONDOMINIUM 1 ASSOCIATION Defendants 10 CH 21458 9304 WHERRY LANE UNIT 3 ORLAND PARK, IL 6 0 4 6 2 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 29, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 31, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9304 WHERRY LANE UNIT 3, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-15-303-010-1003. The real estate is improved with a townhouse; one car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in � AS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1004448. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1004448 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 10 CH 21458 TJSC#: 33-23936 I579727

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, SERVICING LP P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ADIB KITTANA; THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF ADIB KITTANA, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , � 08 CH 37727 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 24, 2009, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, January 20, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-23-111-091-0000. Commonly known as 19 COUR VERSAILLE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section IS� 18.5 of the condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 0821720. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I578317

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS S U C C E S S O R � IN INTEREST TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS O F � MASTR ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-5Plaintiff, v s . � UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF RICHARD F . � PASZKIET AKA RICHARD F. PASZKIET JR.; R I C H A R D � B. PASZKIET, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS I N D E P E N D E N T � ADMINISTRATOR FOR THE ESTATE OF RICHARD F. PASZKIET AKA RICHARD F. PASZKIET JR.; CHRISTOPHER M. PASZKIET; NICHOLAS J. P A S Z K I E T � UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S � D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 39561 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on October 10, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, January 13, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 18-35-409-028-0000. Commonly known as 8469 South 83rd Avenue, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo, Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F12070397 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I576584

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34

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L P � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ANNA MAREK, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, LAS FUENTES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 039155 9101 DEL PRADO DRIVE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 25, 2011, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 22, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9101 DEL PRADO DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10-200-058. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-21639. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-21639 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 039155 TJSC#: 33-25752 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I580444

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The Regional News - The Reporter

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Section 2 Thursday, December 26, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

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Out & About

7

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Videoview

Broaden Your Horizons This week Labyrinth     Group labyrinth walks will be held on New Year’s Day, Jan 1, at 10 a.m., and on Thursday evening, Jan. 2, 5:30 p.m. and Saturday morning, Jan. 4, 8 a.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     The labyrinth, a new large circu­ lar stone path for spiritual medita­ tion is located at the north end of The Center parking lot. In addi­ tion to the group walks focused on peace and fellowship, the labyrinth is available for individual walks at any time during the month.     There is no cost to those wish­ ing to walk the labyrinth and no reservations are necessary. The walks will take place rain or shine. For information, call Pastor Chris Hopkins at 361-3650.

New Year’s Eve party at Bridge Teen Center     The Bridge Teen Center will hold a New Year’s Eve party from 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 31, at the center, 15555 S. 71st Court, Orland Park.     It will offer live music from LNYX and free food from Famous Dave’s.

    Instead of paying admission, students can donate Clorox wipes, AA batteries, or paper towels that will help to support our free programs and events. Every student that attends will get a free T-shirt, prizes and midnight countdown.     RSVP is required. Sign up on­ line and pick up your ticket at The Bridge. This free event is for teens in 7th through 12th grade. For more information, call 532-0500, or visit thebridgeteen center.org.

Upcoming Lapidary classes     The Center offers new six week lapidary classes beginning Mon­ day morning, Jan. 6, from 9 to 11 a.m. and Wednesday evening, Jan. 8, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     Instructor Larry Rothenberg teaches students to use rock saws and water-cooled wheels for turn­ ing rough hunks of rock into pol­ ished gemstones. The Center’s lapidary program works in tan­ dem with The Center’s silver jewelry classes, which enable stu­ dents to set their stones into silver fittings. The six-week class costs $84 plus a $10 materials fee for

new students. Students purchase rocks for future projects.     Registration is required. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Silver jewelry classes     New afternoon and evening Silver Jewelry classes begin Monday, Jan. 6 at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     In the afternoon intermediate level class, from 2 to 4 p.m., in­ structor Dan Snyder helps stu­ dents design, saw, file, solder, and polish rough pieces of silver metal into beautiful sterling silver pins, pendants, brooches, bracelets and other jewelry.     Snyder also instructs the evening 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. class, in which students design, saw, solder and polish silver into beautiful sterling silver pendants containing rocks polished in The Center’s new lapi­ dary studio. Former lapidary stu­ dents should bring their polished stones to set into silver. Stones will be provided for those who haven’t previously made their own.     The class fee is $84 for six weeks for either class. Students should also expect to pay $40 to $50 in class for silver costs. Registration is required. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast by Jeraldine Saunders     ARIES (March 21-April 19): When you go along with the crowd you often get no further than the crowd. Being independent allows you to go places no one else has ever been before. This week, you should think for yourself.     TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Anyone can love you and it’s easy to show love toward others when the sun is shining. It’s when you must share an umbrella that love is tested. In the upcoming week, show your true colors.     GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The best diet for you is not prepackaged “happy” meals available 24 four hours a day at a fast food kiosk but happy thoughts. What you think about today sets the stage for tomorrow.     CANCER (June 21-July 22): Look on the bright side. Now that the shortest day of the year (Saturday) has past, every day this week will be fuller! Keep your positive attitude in full gear to cope with last-minute holiday crises.     LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the week ahead, devote more

energy to achieving your hopes and dreams and less energy to your fears. Try to be less defensive and more understanding if the holiday hustle and bustle becomes briefly exasperating.     VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Use logic to evaluate financial matters and imagination to consider ways to make improvements. You might see where changes are needed in the coming week, but wait until after the holidays to implement them.     LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the week to come, cuddle up with whatever and whoever makes you happy to be alive. There will be plenty of time for social activities, but remember to take care of necessary obligations before the holiday festivities begin.     SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Sometimes being tested doesn’t show your weakness, but proves your strengths. You may be challenged to find a last-minute gift in the week ahead, but will pass the test with flying colors.     SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): If problems crop up, the situation will change soon, but if you’re experiencing smooth going, things will simply get better. Put your networking skills to work with helpful new acquaintances this week.     CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): An edgy undercurrent may tempt you to take actions you might regret later. Be patient and abide by the rules during the week ahead, even if key contacts push your buttons or challenge your patience.     AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The itch to fight off what you consider to be senseless traditions could put you at odds with those in charge during the week to come. It might be wise to simply go along with the crowd and avoid confrontations.     PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Be glad you have some glad rags. There may be numerous occasions to dress up in the week ahead. You’ll also have plenty of opportunities to show off your sparkling personality and entertain others.

Top Pop Singles     1. The Monster, Eminem, Aftermath     2. Timber, Pitbull, featuring Kesha, Mr.305/Polo Grounds Music/RCA Records     3. Counting Stars, OneRe­ public, Interscope Records     4. Royals, Lorde, Lava Music/ Republic Records     5. Wrecking Ball, Miley Cyrus, RCA     6. Wake Me Up!, Avicii, Is­ land     7. Demons, Imagine Dragons, Interscope Records     8. Say Something, A Great Big World & Christina Aguilera, Epic     9. Let Her Go, Passenger, Nettwerk Records     10. Hold On, We’re Going Home, Drake, featuring Majid Jordan

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Submitted photo

Knitting classes at Log Cabin     The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, will offer six-week knitting classes on Monday evenings beginning Jan. 6, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., and on Friday mornings, beginning Jan. 10, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.     Master knitter Georgann Ring welcomes both beginners and experienced knitters to her classes. Beginners will learn to use the knit and purl stitches, to cast on and bind off, to manage simple increases and decreases, and to read a simple pattern while completing their first two knitting projects, a dishcloth and then a scarf. Ring will help those with experience to choose individual projects and to learn more advanced knitting skills.     The class fee is $84. Beginning students should bring a fall of Sugar n’ Cream yarn in a light solid color and a pair of size US 9/5.5mm, preferably aluminum, knitting needles to the first class. After the first project, students will purchase yarns and patterns after consultation with the instructor.     Registration is required. Call The Center at 361-3650.

    1. Blame it All on My Roots: Five Decades of Influences, Garth Brooks, Pearl Records     2. Duck the Halls: A Robertson Family Christmas, The Robertsons, Capitol Nashville (Universal)     3. Crash My Party, Luke Bryan, Capitol Nashville     4. Days of Gold, Jake Owen, SONY NASHVILLE/RCA     5. Here’s to the Good Times, Florida Georgia Line, Republic Nashville     6. Based on a True Story..., Blake Shelton, Warner Bros.     7. Red, Taylor Swift, Big Machine Records     8. Golden, Lady Antebellum, Capitol Nashville (Universal)     9. Danielle Bradbery, Danielle Bradbery, Big Machine Records     10. True Believers, Darius Rucker, 10 Spot

by Jay Bobbin     (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)     STARTING THIS WEEK: “INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2”: It’s not that the initial suspense film necessarily needed a second chapter, but the kind of boxoffice success it had usually spells “sequel.” Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne are back for director James Wan — who also guided Wilson in “The Conjuring” — as the couple who face torment from otherworldly forces again. Solid performances by the cast, also including fellow returnees Barbara Hershey and Leigh Whannell (who’s the screenwriter here as well), do much to help the familiar proceedings. DVD extras: two “making-of” documentaries. *** (PG-13: AS, V) (Also on Bluray and On Demand)     “THE BERLIN FILE”: Overseas action is bountiful in this tale of a possible double agent (Ha Jung-woo) whose presence at a covert arms sale in Germany alarms the CIA as well as North Korean operatives. They wonder about the exact nature of his involvement, leading to a probe that eventually implicates the spy’s embassy translator wife (Gianna Jun) in suspected wrongdoing. The adventure is from noted Korean director Seung-wan Ryoo (“The City of Violence”). DVD extras: “makingof” documentary; deleted scenes. *** (Not rated: AS, P, V) New releases are on the very light side this holiday week, so here’s a look at several seasonal classics:     “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Upon its release, this Frank Capra-directed 1946 classic had a lukewarm box-office performance upon its release that gave no indication it would become as popular as it long has been ... its plentiful television exposure being a huge factor. James Stewart makes the perfect George Bailey, the hapless Bedford Falls citizen whose experience of

seeing how life would be without him has been echoed by countless TV-series episodes. Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore and — as wingearning angel Clarence — Henry Travers lend great support. DVD extras (“Collector’s set”): theatrical trailer; “making-of” documentary; Capra tribute. **** (Not rated) (Also on Blu-ray)     “WHITE CHRISTMAS”: As comfortable as an active fireplace on a cold winter’s night, this tuneful 1954 retooling of the 12-years-earlier “Holiday Inn” makes great use of its Irving Berlin score. Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye are ideal as military veterans who become successful entertainment partners, then help their former commander (Dean Jagger) re-energize his failing resort. Rosemary Clooney — aunt of George — and VeraEllen are charmers as the siblings who distract the guys. DVD extras (“Anniversary Edition”): two theatrical trailers; audio commentary by Clooney; seven “making-of” documentaries. **** (Not rated) (Also on Blu-ray)     “A CHRISTMAS STORY”: There’s never a doubt this holiday favorite will come back around, thanks to its annual 24-hour marathon on television. Anyone who ever desired that one special holiday gift can empathize with Ralphie (Peter Billingsley), author-narrator Jean Shepherd’s young alias who desperately wants a Red Ryder BB gun - the one his mother (Melinda Dillon) warns will “shoot your eye out.” Always deserving of citing is Darren McGavin as the gruff dad who never actually curses, though it sure sounds like it. DVD extras: theatrical trailer; three “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by Billingsley and director and cowriter Bob Clark. *** (PG: P) (Also on Blu-ray)     “LOVE ACTUALLY”: Writerdirector Richard Curtis’ fabulous 2003 comedy-drama is all about the countdown to a British Christmas ... and also about a lot more, thanks to a labyrinth of characters with involving stories. Among the best: the new prime minister’s (Hugh Grant) attraction to an aide (Martine

McCutcheon); an art gallery manager’s (Andrew Lincoln, “The Walking Dead”) secret passion for his best friend’s (Chiwetel Ejiofor) new bride (Keira Knightley); and a faded music star’s (Bill Nighy) bid for a comeback with a seasonally refitted pop tune. DVD extras: deleted scenes; music video. *** (R: AS, N, P) (Also on Bluray)     COMING SOON: “DON JON” (Dec. 31): Joseph GordonLevitt is writer, director and star of this comedy about an amorous man who believes he’s found his ideal woman (Scarlett Johansson). (R: AS, N, P)     “THE FOLLOWING: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON” (Jan. 7): A former FBI agent (Kevin Bacon) tracks a familiar foe (James Purefoy) again in the Fox suspense series. (Not rated: AS, P, V)     “RUNNER RUNNER” (Jan. 7): A student (Justin Timberlake) who falls prey to an online gambling site tracks down its operator (Ben Affleck) in Costa Rica. (R: AS, P)     “THANKS FOR SHARING” (Jan. 7): A man (Mark Ruffalo) with an addiction he’s trying to overcome falls for a woman (Gwyneth Paltrow) who tries to understand it. (R: AS, P)     “ENOUGH SAID” (Jan. 14): In one of his final roles, James Gandolfini stars with Julia LouisDreyfus in this comedy about a new romance potentially thwarted by the past. (PG-13: AS, P)     “RIDDICK” (Jan. 14): The brawny antihero (Vin Diesel) is stranded on a dangerous planet where bounty hunters arrive to claim his head ... literally. (R and unrated versions: AS, N, P, V)     “THE SPECTACULAR NOW” (Jan. 14): A high-school student (Miles Teller) whose flights of fancy are fueled by too much drink falls for a straightlaced peer (Shailene Woodley). (R: AS, P)     FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic vio­ lence.

Wolfgang Puck’s Kitchen by Wolfgang Puck

Linzer bars make easy treats and gifts     Even though I am proudly an American citizen, as a native-born Austrian I feel that pastries and cakes are my birthright. Austria lays claim to some of the world’s most delicious baked goods, in­ cluding delicate, crispy strudels filled with apples, sour cherries, or curd cheese; the apricot jam-filled chocolate cake called Sachertorte; and what the French call Vien­ noiserie, treats made with a sweet, flakey, yeast-leavened dough that was adopted by bakers in Den­ mark and came to be known, inaccurately, as Danish pastry.     One of my favorites, however, is the Linzer torte. A centuries-old specialty of the northern Austrian city of Linz, this pie-shaped tart features a base made from a rich, crumbly dough of ground hazelnuts, flour, butter, sugar, and sweet spices, topped with raspberry jam and then covered with a pretty lattice pattern of the same dough, through which the deep-red topping glistens like stained glass or a jewel.     Store the bars stacked in single layers between sheets of waxed pa­ per in an airtight container at cool room temperature, where they’ll keep well for a couple of weeks. LINZER BARS Makes about 5 dozen bars, each 1 by 3 inches 1/2 pound shelled hazelnuts 1 cup cake flour, plus more for dusting 1/2 pound unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature 1 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 1 large egg 1-1/2 cups raspberry jam Confectioners’ sugar     Preheat the oven to 400 de­ grees F. Position the rack in the middle.     Spread the hazelnuts on a bak­ ing sheet and toast in the oven until golden, about 10 minutes. Turn off the oven.     Fold the warm hazelnuts in­ side a towel and rub to remove their skins. Carefully empty into a strainer held over a trashcan; then, transfer the nuts to a bowl and empty the skins into the trash. Leave the nuts to cool to room temperature.     Put the nuts in a food processor

with the stainless-steel blade. Pulse until coarsely chopped. Add the flour and process until the nuts are finely ground. Transfer to a bowl.     Put the butter, granulated sugar, lemon zest, cinnamon, and cloves in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle at­ tachment. Beat on medium speed until light and creamy. Turn off and scrape down the side. Add the egg and continue beating on medium speed for 1 minute longer. Reduce the speed to low, add the hazelnut-flour mixture, and beat until smoothly blended.     Divide the dough into 2 por­ tions, with 1 portion about 8 ounces or roughly a third of the total. Transfer the smaller por­ tion to a medium-sized pastry bag fitted with a number 1 plain tip; leave at room temperature.     On a lightly floured work sur­ face, form the remaining dough into a flat disc 1 inch thick. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.     Preheat the oven to 350 de­ grees F.     With a marking pen, draw a 16-by-13-inch rectangle on a sheet of parchment paper. Place the paper, marked side down, on a baking sheet. With the dough in the pastry bag, pipe straight

parallel lines about 1 inch apart, inside the rectangle parallel to its shorter side. Then, pipe a second set of lines at a 45-degree angle to the first to form a trellis pattern. Refrigerate until well chilled.     With more cake flour, lightly dust a work surface. With a rolling pin, roll out the disc of dough to a rect­ angular 15 by 12 inches and 1/4 inch thick. Transfer to a parchmentlined baking sheet and, with a knife, trim the sides even. Bake until the dough starts to color slightly, about 20 minutes. Remove and transfer to a rack to cool for at least 10 minutes, leaving the oven on.     Spread the jam evenly over the cooled dough. With the parchment paper, carefully invert the refrig­ erated dough trellis on top; peel off the paper. Return the baking sheet to the oven and bake until golden brown, about 20 minutes longer. Transfer to a rack to cool completely.     With a large, sharp knife, trim the edges again. Cut lengthwise into 4 parallel strips each about 3 inches wide. Then, cut crosswise at 1-inch intervals. Separate and lightly dust by holding a fine-meshed sieve over them, spooning in some confection­ ers’ sugar, and tapping the side. Store in an airtight container at room temperature.


10 Section 2

Thursday, December 26, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

national recognition extraordinary care Right in your own neighborhood. -JUUMF$PNQBOZPG.BSZ)PTQJUBMBOE)FBMUI$BSF$FOUFST IBTCFFOOBNFEPOFPGUIFOBUJPOTTop Performers on Key Quality MeasuresŽ CZćF+PJOU$PNNJTTJPOEVSJOH UIFDBMFOEBSZFBS-$.)XBTSFDPHOJ[FEGPSJUT BDIJFWFNFOUPOUIFGPMMPXJOHNFBTVSFTHeart attack, Heart Failure, Pneumonia, Surgical care and cHildren’S aStHma.ćF+PJOU$PNNJTTJPOBDDSFEJUBUJPOBOEDFSUJĕDBUJPO JTSFDPHOJ[FEOBUJPOXJEFBOEJTBTZNCPMPGRVBMJUZUIBUSFĘFDUTBOPSHBOJ[BUJPOT DPNNJUNFOUUPNFFUJOHDFSUBJOQFSGPSNBODFTUBOEBSET -JUUMF$PNQBOZPG.BSZIBTBSJDIIJTUPSZPGQSPWJEJOHUIFDPNNVOJUZ XJUIOBUJPOBMMZSFDPHOJ[FE IJHIRVBMJUZDBSFBOEDPOUJOVFTUPGPDVTPOJUT GBNJMZDFOUFSFENPEFMBOEUIFJSNJTTJPOUPDBSFBOEQSPWJEFUIFMBUFTU UFDIOPMPHZUPIFBM

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20131226 regional news  

72nd Year, No. 52 2 Sections Thursday, December 26, 2013.

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