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Gift y a d i l o h Guide Inside

The Voice of Palos - Orland Since 1941

Your Independent Community Newspaper

Named best small weekly in Illinois — five times

THE 72nd Year, No. 49

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

3 Sections

Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities.

1.00 per copy

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Thursday, December 5, 2013

Heights hikes water rate 15% Council blames Chicago for increase by Tim Hadac staff reporter     Palos Heights residents will see a 15 percent increase in water and sewer rates in 2014 that city officials are laying at the doorstep of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.     The hike was approved unanimously at Tuesday night’s City Council meeting.     “This increase from the city of Chicago — the first increase [in water rates] was 25 percent, and then there are three [annual] 15 percent increases after that,” observed Alderman Jack Clifford (2nd Ward) in an attempt to clarify. “This is the third of those increases. So we’re on the third leg of the four.”     “But then they’ll start over again,” quipped Alderman Michael McGrogan (4th Ward).     “With some more infrastructure repair,” added Mayor Robert Straz, “and they’ll charge us for it.”     Water rate increases have been a source of frustration for years for Chicago’s suburban customers, but more so since Emanuel took office in 2011. A number of suburban mayors and others have

Photo by Tim Hadac

Elaine Savage, administrative librarian at the Palos Heights Public Library, holds a proclamation and bouquet of flowers after she was honored Tuesday night by the city of Palos Heights for 25 years of service. Savage, who will mark her 26th anniversary in February, said she was pleasantly surprised by the honor and added that she enjoys working in a community that “uses, appreciates and supports” its public library. Sharing the moment with her are Library Board Trustees Tim Geary (from left), Frank Oswald, Beverly Meyer, Bill Poore and Patrick Hunt. chafed at the most recent hikes time that we’ve actually passed on and accused Emanuel of gouging the increase from Chicago to the his neighbors to raise revenue for residents [of Palos Heights], but the cash-strapped city.     “This is the first time in a long (See Heights, Page 4)

Submitted photo

On the Christmas Walk this Sat.     This charming Olde Palos Dutch Colonial two-story, with large family room addition, is one of five local homes decorated for the holidays that are featured on the Palos Heights Woman’s Club’s annual Christmas Walk.     It will be held this Saturday, Dec. 7, starting at 9 a.m., at Palos Country Club with a hot breakfast, boutique with various vendors, sale of homemade cookies and several raffles.     The club’s main ways and means project, House Walk proceeds are distributed to many local charities. If you still have not purchased a ticket, call Rose at 945-6254.

‘Palos Park’ pictorial history arrives on the verge of village’s centennial by Tim Hadac staff reporter     A new book chronicling the rich history of Palos Park—from its origins as a sylvan retreat for well-heeled Chicagoans in the 19th century to its present-day role as one of the area’s most attractive suburbs—debuted this week.

    “Palos Park” is part of the “Images of America” series of local history books published by the South Carolina-based Arcadia Publishing.     “This has been a challenging and rewarding experience, without a doubt,” said author Jeannine Kacmar, public services librarian at the Palos Park Public Library.

    The 127-page paperback, rich in vintage photographs as Arcadia titles tend to be, is a quick and pleasant read—filled with familiar Palos Park touchstones and sprinkled with a few surprises.     Kacmar will be on hand from 4 to 9 p.m. tomorrow (Friday) at Palos Park’s annual holiday market and tree lighting, available to autograph copies of the book.

Photo courtesy of Prairie Club Archives, Westchester Township History Museum, Chesterton, Ind.

Prairie Club members, known as hardy souls, hike up a steep ravine in about 1910.

The Christmas-themed event will be held at the Village Green and recreation center, 8901 W. 123rd St.     “This book attempts to tell to story of Palos Park by taking a look at the people who came to create a life for themselves, and in doing so created a community,” Kacmar said. “I hope the people of Palos Park will feel more connected not only to the history and lives of those who came before us, but also to the future and their place in it.”     The book’s publicity blurb states, “Wooded ravines, natural springs, and fertile farmland attracted the first settlers to Palos Park in the mid-1800s. With the Wabash Railroad expansion in the 1890s, Chicagoans seeking relief from crowded urban conditions traveled 20 miles for the great outdoors. The Sharpshooter’s Club opened in 1894 as the first recreational development in the area.     “Soon after, the village of Palos Park incorporated in 1914, and the forest preserves were formed, attracting weekend Prairie Club hikers and outdoor enthusiasts to the trails and the Swallow Cliff toboggan slides. Artists such as Claude Buck, Felix Russmann, sculptor Lorado Taft, and author Sherwood Anderson, along with his young protégé Ernest Hemingway, retreated from Chicago to summer cottages in Palos Park

Photo courtesy of the Palos Historical Society

The fabled Palos Spring Hotel in 1908, a saloon and hotel that once stood at 121st Street and 80th Avenue. seeking the beautiful, serene setting for their work. Many historic homes and buildings still exist, including the McCord House and the Plush Horse ice cream parlor.”     Kacmar is quick to point out that the book was a group effort. In fact, listed as co-authors on the book’s cover are the Palos Park Public Library and the village of Palos Park.     “Our bibliography goes like this,” she said earlier this week, smiling and stretching out her arms to indicate daunting length.     People and organizations contributed greatly to the book. Sources include museums, government agencies, academia, The Regional News, the Palos Historical Society, local clubs, private collectors and individuals from Palos Park and elsewhere. People from as far away as Wisconsin, Vermont, Florida and California

contributed photos and personal recollections to add richness to the book.     The book has been more than (See Palos Park, Page 4)

Photos by Tim Hadac

Lions Clubs’ Christmas trees benefit good causes     Orland Park Lions Club members Jim Jankowski (from left), Tom Bell, James Jankowski and Jim Smith sell Christmas trees with pride at their lot near 143rd Street and La Grange Road last Sunday. A bold sign reflects the Lions’ century-old mission to prevent blindness and improve sight for people around the world.     A shipment of 400 trees arrived Nov. 23, and another 160 arrived yesterday. The trees, balsam firs and Fraser firs from northern Wisconsin and Oregon, range in height from 5 to 14 feet.     Trees are priced at $12 a foot and will be sold at the lot until Dec. 17. Any unsold trees will be donated to local churches.

    Palos Lions Club members Roby Schrader (from left), Tom Crowhurst and Jim Welge show one of their best trees last Sunday at their lot.     Nearly 550 trees arrived Nov. 24. The trees, balsam firs, Fraser firs and Scotch pines, are from northern Wisconsin and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Trees are priced from $25 to $150. Proceeds help purchase Christmas baskets of food for needy local families.     Colored ornaments add a touch of Christmas cheer (right) to the Palos Lions lot, which moved this year from the Palos Heights Jewel/Osco to the south end of the parking lot at First Midwest Bank, 12600 S. Harlem Ave.




The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

Let me say this about that A personal commentary by Charles Richards, retired publisher, The Regional News     It looks like our President, B. Hussein Obama, is becoming less and less popular with the majority of American citizens. (Of course I mean legal citizens because the illegal immigrants, if granted citizenship would most likely vote for any Democrat on any ballot.)     Though Obama is smart, trim, handsome, a family man as well as an excellent speech “reader,” his sustained attempt to move America toward Scandinavian style socialism is beginning to falter. He revealed his total ignorance of how American business works when he stated, “If you own your [small] business, you didn’t build that business,” (the federal government built the roads and bridges that let you succeed.) Of course he didn’t mention that the taxes paid by the owners of small firms helped pay for these roads and bridges.     Our President also clearly didn’t understand big business when he announced that, under Obamacare, a number of health benefits would be added to your insurance policies and yet policy premiums would come down. Apparently he slept through his college class in economics.     His plan was also to subsidize the health insurance costs for poor people. Herein lies a semantic trick. All these “subsidies” will be paid for by the 49 percent of Americans who currently pay Federal income taxes. He failed to mention that! He was also going to “fine” the unions which were giving their members overly-generous “Cadillac” benefit plans. Obama dropped that funding source after being reminded of the union

support that helped put him in office. The second source of funding Obamacare was to cut the Medicare reimbursement to doctors by more than $700 billion. This has prompted some doctors to add a cash surcharge to each Medicare patient’s bill. Other doctors are refusing to take on new Medicare patients. Still others are simply retiring early, making the shortage of primary-care physicians even worse. I have heard a rumor that Obama has threatened in the future, to revoke the medical licenses of doctors who won’t take Medicare persons. I pray that is simply not true.     The third inaccuracy occurred when the President stated (and I don’t think he actually “lied” about any of his Obamacare promises) was that the addition of seven million newly-insured policyholders would lower costs to insurance carriers. The flaw is that the 7,000,000 goal is unrealistic and the persons who do sign up are more likely to be the old and sick rather than the young, healthy and unafraid of having major health issues. Frankly, they don’t want to subsidize the elderly as required by the socialist model (redistribution of income by the national government) as urged by Karl Marx.     A final promise by Obama (again not a lie) was that insurance carrier’s profits would be limited to 18 percent. What he failed to mention was the 18 percent only applies to the profits from policies which insured 1,000 persons or more. Profits from individuals or small companies’ policies could be unlimited.     There is nothing in the U.S.

Constitution that guarantees affordable healthcare for all citizens. In fact, the document clearly says that all items not specifically mentioned in our Constitution become the responsibility of each state. That explains why today each state has its own insurance commission.     Liberals may argue that the Declaration of Independence’s phrase that guarantees “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” promises government supplied healthcare for all. I can’t see that big a stretch. Can you? Remember that the Constitution always trumps the Declaration of Independence.     The founders of America were not interested in creating a socialist state. To the contrary they wanted individual liberty, the right to get ahead through hard work, careful saving and frugal spending. They believed in the free enterprise system. Foreigners don’t flock to America to become part of a socialized country. Our universities are not crowded with foreign students trying to learn how to bring socialism to America.     Yes, there are legitimate goals best met by the federal government. But, no, the government doesn’t always or even usually know what is best for its citizens.     You folks who voted for Obama voted for a dream. The dream is slowly becoming a nightmare. I guess you voted for a free lunch, but the food seems to have turned sour. Yes, America, there is no free lunch. If you pay taxes, you are picking up a lot of other people’s lunch tabs.

Readers Write Timely reminder to ‘Shop Local’ Dear Editor:     Your Nov. 28 issue sharing Marc Goldberg’s remarks on the importance and value of shopping locally was outstanding.     We have been Golden Shoes customers since setting into Palos Heights 43 years ago. Marc’s mother and father were part of the community from the beginning and Marc continued the family legacy despite a daily one-hour plus commute from his north suburban home. Despite the distance, Marc’s heart and pride made him a

very involved valuable citizen of our community.     His remarks on the obvious need to support our local retailers really hit a chord with me. While doing the easy convenient shopping stops i.e. Capri (the Palos “Cheers”), Jewel, Walgreens, Chalet Florist etc, I need to make a more concentrated effort to actively support our other retailers. All these retailers sale tax revenue subsidize our community’s infra structure along with our property tax base. This is not news, but Marc’s comments were a personal wake up call to do more then the easy choices.

Viewpoint

Virginia Richards

Look out for bullying at work

(1914 - 1995)

    There has been a lot of news coverage lately about bullying between teammates on the Miami Dolphins. And by all accounts, it’s an ugly situation—the team in disarray, sponsors canceling Mary, holding a life-size doll contracts, season ticket holders which represented the infant canceling tickets, the Dolphin Jesus. brand becoming a punch line for     The Magi (three members comedians’ jokes, and an overall of the church choir) marched loss of value for the franchise. down the aisle singing “We And that’s not even taking into Three Kings of Orient Are.” account the potential for destroyIt was an impressive scene, at ing careers. least to us youngsters.     “But to my mind, the real story     A tall Christmas tree stood is that so many people are surprised in a corner at the front of by it,” said Bill McBean, author the church. After the pageant, of “The Facts of Business Life: gifts were distributed to the What Every Successful Business children. There was candy and Owner Knows That You Don’t” nuts and always a gift from our (Wiley, October 2012, ISBN: 978Sunday school teacher. 1-1180949-6-9, $24.95, www.Fact    Back home that night, we sOfBusinessLife.com). “I’m not surhung our long black stockings prised, and neither should the NFL, over the back of a chair, confranchise owners, or their execufident that Santa Claus would tives be. The only thing that does come down the chimney and surprise me is that it took so long for fill them. a bullying story to become public.”     We didn’t have a Christmas     The fact is that bullying is a tree at home. Our parents real problem in business, and thought that the church tree can become a major issue if it’s should suffice. ignored or unchecked. It’s some    Sure enough, Christmas thing that can happen in any morning we would find our business, which successful ownstockings filled with oranges, ers understand and, when necesapples and stick candy. A little sary, take steps to overcome. necklace, or a ring or pretty (Interestingly enough, professionhanky might also be tucked al football players notwithstandinside. Larger gifts, such as a ing, not all workplace bullies are doll or a book, would simply be men. Women can be bullies as left on the chair. Santa Claus well, and are sometimes downnever wrapped gifts. right nasty to each other as well     One year my mother made as intimidating to men.) life-size rag dolls for my sister     “But regardless of who’s doing and I, and a third one for a the bullying, at the end of the cousin who was suffering a day it is the owner’s responsibillong illness. For our cousin’s ity to have the backbone, and doll, she bought new baby the guts, to stand up and protect clothes, a dress and a sweater his or her entire staff, even if it set. But she dressed our dolls means firing good individual peronly in our old baby clothes. formers, and, on occasion, good My sister and I never forgave customers,” McBean said. her.     “In fact, if you don’t own your     Christmas was the highlight own business but would like of our year and the few gifts to, and you don’t think your that we received were greatly personality is strong enough to appreciated and deeply treahandle bullies face to face, you sured. Christmas and birthdays might want to rethink becoming were the only times during the an owner,” he warns. “If you year that we received gifts. don’t, you may well find yourself     Sometimes I worry about my unable to control your business, grandchildren, growing up amid having to constantly face dissuch abundance. What if they gruntled employees, and feeling ever become poor? They won’t continuously frustrated.” know how to cope with poverty.     There are actually several

Christmas then and now (From Dec. 5, 1985)     The stores are full of Christmas merchandise. Christmas bells and streamers decorate the supermarket.     For several weeks now we have been receiving Christmas fliers and catalogs in the mail.     This year I am really on the ball. My Christmas cards are all signed and addressed. Yesterday I went to the post office and purchased a hundred Christmas postage stamps. They are decorated with poinsettias, very pretty.     What’s more, I’ve even purchased a few gifts, but I have a lot more to do yet on that score.     Come Christmas morning, my four grandchildren will be inundated with so many expensive gifts as to boggle their minds. They can’t possibly remember who gave them what.     Their homes will be decorated with expensive wreaths, candles, creches, and numerous floral pieces. In each living room a tree will reach almost to the ceiling. There will be turkey and all the trimmings for dinner.     All this opulence, this affluence, this over-abundance, is a far cry from the Christmases of my childhood.     In my time, Christmas centered around the church. On Christmas Eve, a pageant depicted the birth of Christ. A young girl portrayed the Virgin

Stand up and be counted! Stand up and be counted! Letters to the Editor in

Letters the Editor in ThetoRegional

News The Regional News

different kinds of bullying, and as an owner it’s essential that you know how to deal with all of them. Some of the most common forms are:     Customers Bullying Employees. Whoever said the customer is always right was full of it. Part of your job as an owner is to protect your employees, and that includes protecting them from abusive customers. What that means in practice is that if you see—or hear about—a customer who bullies a member of your staff, you have to step in and let the customer know that he or she is upsetting your employees as well as other customers. And if they continue to act that way, you can ask them to leave.     “It isn’t easy to fire a customer, especially the first few times, but once you’ve done it, it sends a message to your employees that you’re a leader they can count on to look after them,” McBean said. “It also shows any bullies on the staff that if you’re willing to fire a customer, you might be willing to fire them as well.”     Owners Bullying Employees. A skunk stinks from the head down, and if the owner is a bully, it sets the stage for the rest of the staff to act the same way. And they will.     “Whenever I’ve wanted to hire experienced employees, I’ve always found one of the most fertile places to look are companies where the owner is a bully, because good employees always want to escape,” said McBean. “So if you’re the bully, you need to realize that you’re the problem, and that if you don’t do something about it your business will never reach its potential. If you don’t feel you can change— and doing so is hard—you can replace yourself with someone who’s better suited to dealing with your employees or you can sell the business. It’s not an easy choice, but as the leader you’re the one who’s ultimately responsible for the company’s success.”     Managers or Supervisors Bullying Employees. Like the owner’s role, management’s role is to show leadership, create controls and processes, moti-

vate, educate, and develop an environment in which everyone can succeed. “If someone at the higher levels of your company is a bully, it usually means you have the wrong person in that position, and the sooner he or she is released the better,” McBean said.     Employees Bullying Each Other. As in the case with the Dolphins, owners and managers who allow their employees to bully other employees create a problem for the whole organization. It shows management weakness, and an uncaring attitude toward the staff that creates an environment where teamwork and safe working conditions are foreign concepts, dissatisfied employees are common, and success is uncommon. “As an owner or manager, it’s your responsibility to let bullies know that their conduct is unacceptable, and that if they don’t change they will be gone,” McBean said.     Employees Bullying Managers and Owners. This happens a lot more often than you might think. Management is often under pressure to produce results, and because of that, they sometimes allow high producers to dictate how a business is operated.     “But you can’t let the tail wag the dog, and if a company is going to be successful in the long run, you must have the courage to push back,” McBean says. “This is especially true of owners. As an owner, it’s essential that you remember it’s your company, and that what you want matters. And if your authority is challenged, you have to take swift and firm action.”     “This isn’t a complete ‘bully’ list—just some of the more common ways it can happen in your business,” McBean concludes. “And believe me, no one is immune to it. At the same time, the actions I’ve suggested aren’t always easy to do. But doing them is important, because it separates the great—and most profitable—owners from the average ones.” — Submitted by author Bill McBean

    My thanks and respects to the Goldberg family. Jim Keough Palos Heights

Letters Policy The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your address and telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. Mail or bring Readers Write letters to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463, or e-mail us at theregional@comcast.net

THE

REGIONAL NEWS

An independent, locally-owned community newspaper published weekly Regional Publishing Corporation 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Voice (708) 448-4000 Fax (708) 448-4012 www.theregionalnews.com TheRegional@comcast.net Office Hours: Mon.- Fri. - 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday - 9 a.m. to noon

Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jack Murray Sports Editor Ken Karrson Advertising Sales Val Draus Phone: 448-4001 Classified Manager Debbie Perrewe Phone: 448-4002 Graphic Design and Layout Rebecca Lanning Jackie Santora Deadlines: Editorial: Noon Saturday Advertising: 5 p.m. Monday Subscription rates: Local, delivered by mail, $45 a year in advance. Out-of-State, $55 a year. Single copies, $1.00. Postmaster: Send address changes to THE REGIONAL NEWS, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932. The Regional News cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material. USPS 419-260 Periodical postage paid at Palos Heights, IL 60463 and additional post offices. Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Palos Heights, Illinois, 60463 and additional post offices under the Act of March 3, 1879. (©Entire contents copyright 2013 Regional Publishing Corp.)

This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and however it may be threatened.

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What brings you to the library today? (Asked at the Oak Lawn Public Library)

Photos by Bob Rakow

Eileen Barkowski, Chicago     “I’m studying for my finals.”

Joe Falco, Oak Lawn     “I was picking up some Christmas music.”

Cindy Falco, Oak Lawn John Michalak, Oak Lawn     “I picked out a book on     I use the Internet. I don’t have disc.” a computer at home.”

Reese McGraw, Oak Lawn     “I’m studying.”


The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

Candidates file to run in March 18 primary election     Elected officials and those planning to unseat them have filed their nominating petitions for the March 18, 2014 Illinois primary election.     Filing began Nov. 25 and closed at 5 p.m. Monday. Objections to a candidate’s nominating petitions can be filed until 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9. The last day to register to vote in the primary is Feb. 18.     Up for grabs in the primary for nomination to run in the Nov. 4 2014 election are statewide offices, as well Congressional seats, state representative and senate posts, Cook County Board positions, seats on the bench, political posts, and more.     The candidates who have filed to run for the nominations of their respective parties in the PalosOrland area are as follows. Incumbents are noted as (inc.)     A full list may be viewed online at cookcountyclerk.com. 1st Congressional District     Bobby L. Rush, Democrat, Chicago (inc.)     Jimmy Lee Tillman II, Republican, Chicago 3rd Congressional District     Sharon M. Brannigan, Republican, Palos Heights     Daniel William Lipinski, Democrat, Western Springs (inc.)     Diane M. Harris, Republican, Joliet 18th Senate District     Bill Cunningham, Democrat, Chicago (inc.) 27th House District     Monique D. Davis, Democrat, Chicago (inc.) 28th House District     Robert “Bob” Rita, Democrat,

Blue Island (inc.) 35th House District     Frances Ann Hurley, Democrat, Chicago (inc.)     Victor C. Horne, Republican, Chicago 36th House District     Kelly M. Burke, Democrat, Evergreen Park, (inc.) 37th House District     Margo McDermed, Republican, Mokena     Gayla Smith, Republican, Frankfort     Arthur Lukowski, Republican, Mokena     August (O’Neill) Deuser, Democrat, Mokena     Nichole Serbin, Democrat, Mokena 6th District Cook County Board     Joan Patricia Murphy, Democrat, Crestwood (inc.) 17th District Cook County Board     Barbara Bellar, Republican, Burr Ridge     Elizabeth “Liz” Doody Gorman, Republican, Orland Park (inc.)     Jim Hickey, Democrat, Orland Park Orland Twp. Dem. Committeeman     Daniel J. McLaughlin, Orland Park (inc.) Orland Twp. GOP Committeeman     Elizabeth “Liz” Doody Gorman, Orland Park (inc.) Palos Twp. Dem. Committeeman     Robert E. Maloney, Palos Hills Palos Twp. GOP Committeeman

    Sean M. Morrison, Palos Park (inc.) Worth Twp. Dem. Committeeman     John O’Sullivan, Oak Lawn (inc.) Worth Twp. GOP Committeeman     Shaun Colin Murphy, Evergreen Park (inc.) Metropolitan Water Reclamation District Commissioner (three positions)     Tom Courtney, Democrat, Chicago     R. Cary Capparelli, Republican, Chicago     Herb Schumann, Republican, Palos Heights     James “Jim” Parrilli, Republican, Chicago     Adam Miguest, Democrat, Chicago     John S. Xydakis, Democrat, River Forest     Kathleen Mary O’Reilley, Democrat, River Forest     Frank Edward Gardner, Democrat, River Forest     Cynthia M. Santos, Democrat, Chicago (inc.)     Frank Avila, Democrat, Chicago (inc.)     Josina Morita, Democrat, Skokie     Timothy “Tim” Bradford, Democrat, Olympia Fields     Brendan Francis Houlihan, Democrat, Palos Heights     Karen Roothaan, Green, Chicago     George Milkowski, Green, Chicago     Michael Smith, Green, Chicago

Orland adopts 2014 tax levy of $13.4 million and budget New water pact OK’d by Tim Hadac staff reporter     With essentially no deliberation but with an added bit of congratulation, the Orland Park Village Board on Monday gave unanimous approval to its 2014 budget, tax levy, tax abatements on several municipal bonds, and a water agreement designed to serve the village for the next 40 years.     The 2014 levy remains level at $13.4 million, and the mayor and trustees praised what they called fiscally conservative management.     “This is a little bit of chest beating, but there are several taxes Orland Park does not have that a lot of [other] communities have, [like] the real estate transfer tax, utility tax, special gas tax, so there are some things we don’t have,” stated Mayor Daniel McLaughlin, “But in addition to the [property tax] rebate that we’ve been able to offer in some part or whole for nine of the last 12 years, every year we are abating taxes on different bond issues, and this year there are seven bond issues that have been issued over the years for different purposes, and the fact that we abating the taxes on those bonds is not only helping the homeowners — in addition to the rebate — but it’s also helping the business community. We don’t give a rebate to the business community, but they do benefit from these abatements that we do ever year.”     “I think we’re kind of proud of the financial record we’ve established here in Orland Park in the last number of years, and this is another example of that tonight,” he added.     The new water agreement with the village of Oak Lawn, outlined by The Regional News in a story

Photo by Tim Hadac

Trustee Patricia Gira takes a drink of water as Orland Park Village Board members offer congratulations to village staff for their persistence in negotiating a new water-supply agreement with the village of Oak Lawn. Looking on are Trustees Edward Schussler (from left) and James Dodge. published on Oct. 25, was negotiated in concert with officials in Tinley Park, Oak Forest, Mokena and New Lenox. The five communities together purchase about 80 percent of all water re-sold by Oak Lawn, which purchases it from the city of Chicago.     Orland Park officials have said the resulting agreement will mean a system with dual water mains rather than one, improved technology at pumping stations, and an overall greater capacity to deliver water on a daily basis.     The Oak Lawn-based water system can currently deliver up to 55 million gallons of water a day, officials explain on the village website, but peak demand is expected to surpass 100 million gallons a day by 2030.     Water system upgrades are expected to be complete by 2018 and cost about $171 million, which will be shared by Oak Lawn and its customer communities.     The new pact, negotiated over the past three years, “secures the long-term supply of Lake Michigan water for the village, maximizes the water system reliability, redundancy and efficiency, and minimizes the impacts on water rates and village finances,” commented Trustee Edward Schussler. “It’s a big deal.”     According to information pro-

vided on the village website, the infrastructure upgrade will add about $5 a month to the typical residential water bill.     In a related development Monday night, the board’s finance committee approved a water rate increase which, if approved by the full board later this month, will mean that the typical residential water bill in Orland Park will rise by about $50 in 2014. Trustees and village staff were quick to point of that more than half of the hike can be laid at the doorstep of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who has again raised the price of water that the city supplies to suburban customers.     In other board matters Monday night, trustees approved a 2 percent cost-of-living pay increase for non-union executive staff, after Village Manager Paul Grimes made the case by presenting a market review which, among other things, showed that salaries have remained flat in recent years while village employees represented by unions have received increases.     McLaughlin called the hikes fair and said that “given the size of Orland Park and the size of our budget, [the salaries] of our department heads and village manager are in the middle to the low side of compensation.”

’67 Buick raffle coupe rolls in

Photo by Tim Hadac

    A hot car on a cold day graced the front of The Regional News headquarters this fall, as Bob Starzyk of Palos Heights offered a sneak preview of the 1967 Buick Skylark convertible that will serve as the grand prize of the raffle at the 2014 Classic Car Event this summer.     Raffle tickets are priced at $20 each, six for $100, and will be go on sale before Christmas, Starzyk said. Details will be announced in the weeks ahead.     The Classic Car Event is an annual celebration of automobiles built mostly from the 1930s through 1960s. It is typically held along Harlem Avenue (from 122nd to 125th streets) in July, attracting thousands of auto enthusiasts from Palos Heights and surrounding areas.



Submitted photo

Holiday Shoppe glitters at McCord     McCord Gallery and Cultural Center has been transformed into a wonderland of fine arts and crafts all made by local artists.     Silk scarves, decorative picture frames, pottery, ornaments, baby clothes, and inlaid wooden stools are among the treasures.     McCord’s Holiday Shoppe is a place to shop locally while supporting the arts. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday.     McCord is located at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and La Grange Road), Palos Park. For more information, call 671-0648.

Lake Katherine upgrades website, will replace bridge, with grant funds by Tim Hadac staff reporter     Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens officials are touting a website — lakekatherine.org — that is more visually appealing, comprehensive and user friendly.     “We decommissioned the old website,” said Operations Manager Gareth Blakesley. “It needed an upgrade. We had a lot of information [on it] that wasn’t pertinent.”     The overhaul was funded by a $3,000 local tourism marketing grant received a year ago from the Chicago Southland Convention & Visitors Bureau.     The funds were used to hire J. Rudny Interactive Design Solutions to improve the outdated website “so it could better serve Lake Katherine’s supporters, as well as attract new visitors from outside the Chicago Southland region,” officials said in a statement.     “We were very excited to receive this grant as it enables us to more effectively fulfill our mission,” Blakesley said. “A good website is integral to reaching a wider audience and getting our message out to more of the public. We are very grateful to the Chicago Southland Visitors Bureau for this grant and what it enables us to do.”     He added that the new website is better from the back end, as well. “With this new website, [Lake Katherine staff] can add content in two shakes of a dog’s tail, as opposed to two days,” he noted, saying that quick website updates are especially important in cases of last-minute changes

that are occasionally made to Lake Katherine events.     The Chicago Southland Convention & Visitors Bureau distributes up to $66,000 annually to Southland municipalities and not-forprofit organizations to promote events designed to draw visitors into the Chicago Southland region for overnight stays.     “The Local Tourism Grant program is a way for the Bureau to extend its marketing reach,” said Jim Garrett, CDME, President/ CEO of the Chicago Southland CVB. “The marketing efforts by our communities — in addition to marketing efforts by the Bureau — help us better promote the many festivals and events and area attractions throughout the Southland to potential visitors.”     Lake Katherine officials also recently announced that the City of Palos Heights has received a $10,000 grant to rebuild the deteriorating entrance bridge at the nature center.     The funding comes from the inaugural Green Region grant program, a joint effort by ComEd and Openlands to fund municipal conservation and environmental projects. ComEd and Openlands recently awarded a total of $125,000 in Green Region grants to 17 municipalities and nonprofits throughout nine northeastern Illinois counties.     “As a company, we are dedicated to creating a more sustainable future, and our Green Region

grantees are key partners in that ongoing effort,” said Fidel Marquez, senior vice president of Governmental and External Affairs at ComEd.     Lake Katherine officials will use the Green Region grant to begin work described in the park’s Master Site Plan that was developed in 2012. The kick-off project of rebuilding the entrance bridge, which will likely take place during spring 2014, will improve access to the park and help protect natural resources at the site, officials said.     “We plan to re-build and re-orient the bridge,” added Lake Katherine Development Coordinator Cecilia Govrik, saying that the bridge’s location will be moved a short distance east to “improve access to natural areas.” Currently, the bridge leads directly to administrative buildings on site.     Govrik added that the rebuilt bridge will improve access for people with mobility limitations, noting that the surface of the current structure is uneven at points.     She predicted that the bridge project will help “kick-start our longer-term plans” at Lake Katherine.     More information on the Green Region program is available at openlands.org/greenregion, and details on Lake Katherine’s Master Site Plan can be found at lakekatherine.org.     Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens is at 7402 W. Lake Katherine Drive. Lake Katherine is owned and supported by the city of Palos Heights and managed by Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens, a nonprofit charitable organization.

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The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

Palos Heights and Park events usher in the yuletide season by Tim Hadac staff reporter     Christmas season celebrations are unwrapping this week in the area, offering holiday fun and fellowship for all.

Friday, Dec. 6     The city of Palos Heights’ annual tree lighting event is set for 6:30 p.m. tomorrow (Friday) at the Palos Heights Fire Protection District station at 12300 S. Harlem Ave.     Admission is free, and all are invited to sing Christmas carols, visit with Santa Claus, take a ride on a hay wagon, and more. Additionally, there will be a drawing for a giant Christmas stocking.     Also at the event, officials will announce winners of the annual tree decorating contest. Entries in

that competition have been placed in the city’s Art Park, located just west of the fire station.     The village of Palos Park will host its annual tree lighting ceremony and holiday market from 4 to 9 p.m. tomorrow (Friday) at the Village Green and Recreation Center, 8901 W. 123rd St.     The holiday market will feature food and refreshments, as well as local merchants selling their holiday-related gift items. Also on tap is the unveiling of the newly published “Palos Park” historical book.     Voting for the village’s tree decorating contest is set for 6 p.m., with musical entertainment around a bonfire, as well as hayrack rides following. Santa Claus is set to arrive at 6:45 p.m. and help light the village’s Christmas tree.

Saturday, Dec. 7

Sunday, Dec. 8

    The holiday festivities will continue Saturday at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. with a Christmastime in Palos celebration set for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event includes holiday music and entertainment, food, a book sale, face painting, arts and craft projects for children, and a visit from Santa.     Also on Saturday, the Music Department at Trinity Christian College will present its 12th annual Christmastide concert at 4 p.m. in the Ozinga Chapel on campus, 6601 W. College Drive. General admission tickets are $12; college students and children (2-18) are $6. Tickets may be purchased online by visiting trnty.edu, as well as at the door.

    The weekend will end with song, as the Musichorale community choir presents its annual Christmas concert at 3:20 p.m. Sunday in the Ozinga Chapel. Tickets are $14 at the door.

Ongoing     In the spirit of the season, Palos Heights officials are encouraging everyone to participate in the Christmas Care Program & Coat Drive, sponsored by the Worth Township Youth Commission. Donations of new toys and clothing for all ages can be dropped off through Dec. 21 and will be distributed to families in need. Coats, hats, scarves and gloves will be accepted through Jan. 31 and will be distributed to families in need. For more information, call 371-2900.

Submitted photo

Yuletide Art Park     The Palos Heights’ tree-lighting celebration at the firehouse on Harlem this Friday evening will include judging in the contest of trees decorated by schools and community groups at the Art Park.     Shown is the St. Alexander School tree at the Art Park, on 123rd Street behind the fire station. Several junior high students decked out the tree with hand-made ornaments created by students in art class.     The decorations feature a Nativity scene, an assortment of colorful angels, bedazzled ornaments and more. Mrs. Tierney, the art teacher, coordinated the all-school project instructing students in all grades to create the one-of-a-kind ornaments that adorn the Art Park tree.     Each class created an ornament that represents the true spirit of Christmas, a school spokesperson said.

Heights (Continued from page 1) it’s the kind of increase the city [government] just can’t eat [year after year], so we’re going to have to pass it along,” added Alderman Donald Bylut (1st Ward). “We’re kind of playing catch-up, but we’re still not increasing [water Photo by Tim Hadac and sewer rates] any more than Surprised by her library colleagues with a congratulatory cake on Monday morning, author Jeannine Kacmar (center) poses for a photo [the city of Chicago is increasing with Village Manager Rick Boehm and Administrative Librarian Sheila M. Sosnicki. Kacmar will sign copies of the book available for our rates].” purchase at Friday evening’s tree lighting and holiday market on the Village Green.     “This is probably a good time to remind our seniors age 65 and older that the city does provide a nice discount off of the water bills,” he added. “With [water] prices going up, it would be a good idea to take advantage of that. With the discount, seniors can wind up paying less for their water — even with the increase — than they did last year.     “I think a lot of our residents aren’t aware [of the price break for seniors],” Bylut continued. “I wasn’t aware of it until I got elected. You come down to City Hall with an ID, and they’ll discount [the water bill] right there, and the discount lasts forever. We want seniors to be aware of it and Courtesy of Jim Pavlatos take advantage of it.” One of many unique or historic homes in Palos Park whose stories     An explanation of the discount are told in “Palos Park.” is not posted prominently on the city’s website, but is found at the grew up here decades ago and bottom of the “City Services” moved away, there’s this same joy, page. It reads, “Residents, of at this same happiness over growing least 65 years of age, living within (Continued from page 1) up in such a beautiful place. Palos the corporate limits of the city are Park has been a great foundation eligible for a 25 percent reduction a year in the making, although for the lives of so many.” on their water bill portion only “work began in earnest in De-     “The pictures of the Prairie (not your sewer portion). A tax bill cember of 2012,” Kacmar said, Club are absolutely beautiful,” is required for proof of residency to meet an April 30 publishing added Sheila M. Sosnicki, adminand proof of age.” deadline. istrative librarian who was a driv    Also Tuesday night,     Some 700 photos were scanned, ing force in helping Kacmar pull     • Council members gave unaniwith about 200 making the final together the historical work. mous approval, without deliberation cut. To expand upon the book,     The book was the brainchild of or comment — and no comment Kacmar and library staffplan to Palos Park officials, who suggested from the audience — to a 2013 tax use a number of the unpublished it to the librarians as another way levy of $7.37 million for the city and photos in a public presentation to to celebrate the village’s centenpublic library, up from the $6.89 be held in January. nial in 2014. “It started with million levy passed a year ago.     In response to a question, Kac- [Village Manager] Rick [Boehm] mar said there is no one part of and Mayor Mahoney,” Kacmar Photo courtesy of UIC Library, Special Collections, _00_06_0006_0279) the book that she likes more than said. “They said they wanted to another. Instead, she talks about do something special, and I think Skiers make their way up the legendary limestone stairs at Swala common thread. that’s what all of us did, working low Cliff.     “One thing that was really evi- together.” dent in all the interviews, all the     Palos Park, $21.99, Arcadia emails, all the phone calls—I’m Publishing. Available at local telling you—was the strong sense retailers, online bookstores, or of pride people have in Palos through Arcadia Publishing at Park,” she said. “Whether they www.arcadiapublishing.com or have lived here all their life, all call (888) 313-2665.

Palos Park

    “In determining the tax levy for this year, several factors enter into the tax levy increase,” stated city Finance Director Jan Colvin. “First, the Consumer Price Index used to determine the overall increase from the 2012 extension is 1.7 percent. Second, we concentrated more on the limiting rate than the EAV (equalized assessed valuation) this year, due to the decrease in the library levy and in our EAV. We estimate the limiting rate to be 1.449 percent. Currently, our limiting rate is 1.42 percent.     “I know that the increases may seem large in a percentage format, but the overall [property tax] rate remains the same,” she added, in a brief public hearing held before the regular Council meeting.     Straz agreed and attempted to clarify. “This [new tax levy] doesn’t mean we’re going to have a 20 percent [property] tax increase,” he said. “I mean, obviously we tried to levy to catch the most [revenue]. Historically, we’ve never gotten close to what we levied.”     The city’s portion of a typical property tax bill is just 11 percent. Many factors beyond the city’s control affect what final tallies are, officials said.     • Council members, on a 4-2 vote, waived the rules and granted a 5-foot setback variance at 12503 S. 69th Court to enable construction of a single-family home on the site. As they have in the past with similar moves to waive the rules, Aldermen Dolores Kramarski (3rd Ward) and Robert Basso (2nd Ward) voted against the motion. Clifford, who introduced the measure, pointedly said he was not trying to circumvent the usual deliberative process or “fast track” anything, but rather offer a reasonable accommodation to a Palos Heights resident trying to improve his property before winter arrives.

Photo by Michael Gilbert

Honored for work with DEA task force     Palos Park police officer Bob Kotsianis (center) receives a plaque from Commissioner Dan Polk as Police Chief Joe Miller looks on at the Village Council meeting Monday.     The plaque was presented to Kotsianis to recognize his recent award from the Chicago Crime Commission for his excellent work as a task force officer with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, Polk said.     Kotsianis received the award from the Chicago Crime CommisPhoto courtesy of The Center Photo courtesy of The Regional News archives sion during an awards dinner at the Palmer House Hilton in Chicago The Children’s Farm at The Center has played an important role in A telephone operators works a switchboard during Palos Park’s on Nov. 6. Palos Park for decades, teaching boys and girls to be good stew- last night of crank-up telephone service in September, 1940, as the     “I’m honored to receive this award and I’m proud to represent the ards of nature. village switched over to battery-operated phones. village of Palos Park,” Kotsianis said.


The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

Burglars nabbed inside home in Heights: police     Two Chicago men are in custody and charged with residential burglary after they were apprehended at 1:39 a.m. Nov. 26 in a home in the 3900 block of Spyglass Circle.     Martel D. Curtis, 21, and Darnell M. Blackwell, 26, are held on $50,000 bond and set to appear in court in Bridgeview on Dec. 19.     Authorities were alerted to the situation at about 1:15 a.m. by the victim, who was out of state at the time, but was monitoring his home video cameras via a cell phone app. When he saw two men in the home, he immediately contacted Palos Heights police.     Police responding to the 911 call set up a perimeter around the residence and learned from the victim that the two men were still inside the home.     Minutes later, Curtis and Black-

Darnell M. Blackwell well were taken into custody without incident, police said.     Authorities noted that they were assisted by a canine unit from Palos Hills, as well as units from Crestwood, Palos Park and Chicago Ridge.

Martel D. Curtis     Police told The Regional News on Tuesday that Curtis and Submitted photo Blackwell entered the home via a window, but declined to say whether there was any sign of forced entry, since the case if still under investigation.     Orland Township Supervisor Paul O’Grady and the Board of Trustees thanked the boys of the Windy City Magic basketball team for donating what added up to four full shopping carts of food to the Orland Township Food Pantry.     Windy City Magic coach John Rost (shown above) dropped off the generous donation on the day before Thanksgiving.     The food was purchased with proceeds from the “Hoops Against Hunger� Basketball Camp held on Nov. 10, organized by Rost’s son Jake and other members of the team. “Hoops Against Hunger� benefited the Orland Township Food Pantry as well as Together We Cope in Tinley Park.     The food pantry is at the township office, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave.

Hoops against Hunger delivers

Woman charged with battery of employee at restaurant     Orland Park police arrested Deana M. Pepin, 23, of Chicago, at 8:15 p.m. Nov. 2 and charged her with battery. Pepin allegedly spit in the face of an employee at a restaurant in the 9200 block of 159th Street following a disturbance there. The incident began when an employee confronted Pepin and her group, which included other adults and small children, about filling their courtesy water cups with soda from the pop machine, police said. Pepin then allegedly refused to pay her bill and said she didn’t like the food. The restaurant manager issued a refund only for the uneaten portion of their order and then advised her to leave, or he would call the police, according to the police report. She then allegedly spit at the employee and left the restaurant. Pepin was arrested nearby a short time later, police said. She had a court date of Nov. 26 at the 5th Municipal District Cook County Courthouse in Bridgeview.     In other Orland Park police news, Michael J. McConville, 22, of Orland Park, was arrested at 8:55 p.m. Nov. 3 and charged with DUI, improper lane usage and illegal stopping/standing on railroad tracks. McConville was reportedly intoxicated when the vehicle he drove slid down an embankment and came to rest on the railroad tracks at 144th Street and West Avenue. McConville and two friends initially told police another man in their group man was driving and that they braked to avoid a deer, according to the police report. Eventually, the three changed their story and admitted McConville was the driver, police said. He has a court date of Dec. 11 in Bridgeview.     Scott J. Finlay, 21, of Orland Park, was arrested at 6:03 p.m. Nov. 4 and charged with possession of cannabis and possession

ORLAND PARK POLICE of drug paraphernalia. Police said Finlay was parked in an unlit section of a fitness center parking lot in the 15600 block of 94th Avenue when they approached him. An officer heard the sound of cellophane crinkling as Finlay exited the vehicle and tried to hide the bags of pot, according to the police report. Police then reportedly found 3.3 grams of cannabis and an apple that had been cored and used to smoke the pot and inhale the fumes, police said. Finlay has a court date of Dec. 11 in Bridgeview.     Risa T. Stanback, 35, of Orland Park, was arrested at 1:32 a.m. Nov. 4 and charged with driving while license suspended and driving with only one working headlight after she was stopped on 151st Street near 80th Avenue, police said. After police learned Stanback’s driving privileges had been suspended, she was also charged with possession of a suspended driver’s license. She has a court date of Dec. 27 in Bridgeview.     Manuel J. Cuzco, 68, of Palos

Heights, was arrested at 3:11 p.m. Nov. 1 and charged with felony unlawful possession of a license plate. A female caller told Orland police she saw a vehicle displaying an Indiana dealer listed registration plate that her husband, an auto dealer, had reported stolen. Police said they reviewed lot security video that showed Cuzco taking the dealer plate from a vehicle at the Matteson dealership. Cuzco had a court date of Nov. 2 at the George N. Leighton Criminal Court building in Chicago.     Eliot F. Range, 39, of Joliet, was cited with disorderly conduct at 10:18 p.m. Oct. 29 after he threw a large soda at a moviegoer at Marcus Cinema, 16350 La Grange Road, police said. Witnesses told police Range got angry because a group of patrons were talking during the upcoming movie previews, according to the police report. An argument then ensued: When one patron told Range he didn’t need to be so rude, Range threw the large, icy cola at him, police said. Range had a hearing date of Nov. 12 at the Civic Center in Orland Park.

Orland dropoff sites take lights, cords to recycle     Area residents are invited to recycle no-longer-needed Christmas lights and extension cords. The Village of Orland Park’s Smart Living Team is collecting lights and cords at four village locations.     Acme Refining is working with the village and will process all materials in the U.S. Plastics will be used for fuel and the copper in the pieces will go to a smelter.     Holiday lights and extension

cords will be accepted through Feb. 1, at the village’s Franklin Loebe Center, 14650 S. Ravinia; at Recreation Administration, 14600 S. Ravinia; at the Sportsplex, 11351 W. 159th St. or at the Frederick T. Owens Village Hall, 14700 S. Ravinia Ave.     Residents receive no reimbursement for lights and cords. For more information, call 403-7275 or visit smartlivingop. com.

Driver charged with DUI     Palos Heights police arrested David P. Hickey, 38, of Palos Heights, and charged him DUI and no proof of insurance. Police apprehended him in the 7000 block of West 127th Street at 7:35 p.m. Nov. 26 as they investigated an auto accident. Bond was set at $3,000, and Hickey is due in court on Dec. 31.     In other Palos Heights police news, Felipe Flores, 34, of Alsip, was charged with driving on a suspended license and failure to wear a seatbelt. His vehicle was stopped by police in the 6300 block of West College Drive at 2:42 p.m. Nov. 27. Bond was set at $1,500, and his court date is Jan. 9.     Police charged Filip Richweiss, 26, of Chicago, with driving on a suspended license and speeding. Police curbed his vehicle in the 6900 block of West College Drive at 8:42 p.m. Nov. 27. Bond was set at $1,500, and he is scheduled to appear in court on Dec. 16.     Jason K. Hook, 22, of Oak Forest, was charged with driving on a suspended license, illegal possession of an air rifle, and failure to dim headlights. His vehicle was stopped by police in the 13400 block of South Ridgeland Avenue at 12:37 a.m. last Friday. Bond was set at $1,500, and Hook is set to appear in court on Jan. 9.

and Ridgeland. Bond was set at $1,000, and he is scheduled to appear in court on Jan. 9.     Police charged William D. Svi-     Daniel J. Sechrist, 23, of Peotak, 28, of Crestwood, with DUI, tone, was charged with DUI and improper lane usage, and disobey- improper lane usage. His vehicle ing a traffic signal. He was stopped was stopped by police in the 12700 by police in the 12400 block of block of South Ridgeland Avenue South Ridgeland Avenue at 2:35 at 3:29 a.m. last Saturday. Bond a.m. last Saturday when he re- was set at $1,000, and his court portedly ran a red light at 127th date is Jan. 9.

PALOS HEIGHTS POLICE

Arson suspected in car fire in Heights     A car fire in Palos Heights early on Nov. 27 is being investigated as a possible arson, according to the Palos Heights fire protection district.     Firefighters responded to the suspicious fire at 3:23 a.m. near a drainage ditch in front of a home in the 12300 block of South 74th Avenue. The 1990 Oldsmobile was towed away later that afternoon. It appears not to have been registered at a local address in the neighborhood.     Palos Heights police had no report on the car fire still under investigation in its reports this week.     On Thanksgiving Day, Palos

Palos Park officer honored for homeland security work

    Palos Park police Sgt. John Saw- enhance decision advantage, and yer has been selected to receive increase information sharing and the Cook County Department of partnerships. To that end DHSEM Homeland Security and Emergen- created the Suburban Duty Officy Management Suburban Duty cer Program. John Sawyer’s dediOfficer Recognition Award. cation and energy to our region’s     Sgt. Sawyer was to be recog- preparedness and response efforts nized by the Cook County Board make our community and area on Wednesday for his work with better prepared!� the Cook County DHSEM in en-     Sgt. Sawyer’s participation in hancing collaboration with key the program reinforced the imporstakeholders, from local, state tance of training on the intelligence and federal agencies and juris- sharing, interoperability and operdictions. ational capabilities of DHSEM, as     Village Police Commissioner well as training with the DHSEM Trustees would like to send a Dan Polk said, “The goal of the Emergency Readiness Center, the special thank you to Mason for DHSEM program has been to regional Fusion Center and various this generous gift that is sure to improve situational awareness, federal agencies. bring cheer to many children in this time of need. Thank you, Mason, for your kindness and support! And thank you to all of those who have donated to Orland Township’s Supplies and Relief Drive — your help is greatly appreciated.     For more stories like this, follow Supervisor Paul O’Grady and the On Saturday, December 7 Karla will return to Kris Kringle Haus for her Township on Facebook, facebook. annual visit with all of her collectors. She will be here from 3:00 p.m. com/supervisorogrady, or visit the to 7:00 p.m. She is the head of Steinbach GMBH, the foremost German website at orlandtwp.org. manufacturer of wooden nutcrackers, smokers (incense burners), ornaments, and music boxes.

Orland youngster donates toys to township tornado relief drive by Megan St. John Orland Township

    “I’m going to miss my toys, but lots of kids got their toys blown away,� Mason said. “Those kids     As residents brought in bags need toys, too, so I thought they of toiletries, pillows, and clothes could have mine.� for Orland Township’s Supplies     Along with the stuffed animals and Relief Donation Drive for the and Mega Blocks, Mason donated tornado victims in Washington, a toy semi-truck with 24 Hot Ill., one resident’s arms were filled Wheels and one of his favorite with toys. items, Stinky the Garbage Truck.     Five-year-old Mason Thon, of Mason’s mother, Stephani Lewis, Orland Park, stopped by Orland also donated a box of new Barbie Township on Nov. 26 with a box dolls, coloring books, crayons, and full of new and used toys, a bag other various toys and supplies. full of stuffed animals, and a con-     Orland Township Supervisor tainer of Mega Blocks. Paul O’Grady and the Board of



Heights firefighters responded to a fire in a house in the 6200 block of West 128th Place at 9:36 a.m., Fire Chief Tim Saharge said.     No one was injured in the fire that was contained to one room, a bedroom used as an office, in the one-story home, Saharge said. Although the cause of the fire was still under investigation as of Monday, it appears to have been caused in a piece of office furniture in the room, he added. The house suffered smoke damage from the blaze.

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Submitted photo

Mason Thon, of Orland Park, is shown with the 24 Hot Wheels that he donated to Orland Township’s Supplies and Relief Donation Drive for tornado victims in Central Illinois.

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The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

Orland lights way into holiday season

Submitted photo

A sizable crowd gathered to help Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin and Santa light the village’s tree after sundown on Sunday. Revelers included many families, Scouts and local groups that created ornaments for the tree. Members of the crowd helped the mayor count down before the tree lights were turned on at 5:45 p.m., simultaneously lighting decorations down Ravinia Avenue, Orland Park’s Civic Center corridor.

Submitted photo

Santa and Mrs. Claus greeted a long line of children at the village Submitted photo of Orland Park’s annual Holiday Festival held Sunday at the Orland Young members of the village of Orland Park Theatre Troupe’s “A Simple Miracle” cast perform Christmas carols at the village’s annual Park Civic Center. The festival was followed by Mayor McLaughlin’s Holiday Festival held at the Orland Park Civic Center. The troupe’s holiday show will be performed Dec. 13 to 15 at the Civic Center. More annual tree lighting at the adjacent Village Hall. information is available at orlandpark.org.

School Notes Marist High Christmas celebration

providing music, themed rooms, raffles, split the pot, and live entertainment throughout the night.     Marist High School will hold its Marist’s Parents Club has been seventh annual Christmas celebra- planning this event for several tion, A Very Marist Christmas, on months. Saturday, Dec. 7, from 6 to 11     To purchase tickets, visit p.m., at Chateau Busché, 11535 maristinsider.net/maristchristmas S. Cicero Ave., Alsip. or call (773) 881-5300.     This popular event has undergone a few changes this year, Moraine Valley including a new venue and sevonline/hybrid courses eral activities. Tickets are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. Ad-     Moraine Valley Community Colmission includes a buffet dinner, lege offers online and Internet hyentertainment, wine and beer. A brid learning for college credit. cash bar for mixed drinks will be     More than 275 classes are ofavailable. This event is for adults fered during the 2014 spring se21 and over only. mester.     There will an interactive DJ     Online classes are taught pri-

marily over the Internet, while Internet hybrid courses are taught through a combination of classroom and Web-based instruction. Both types allow for students to attend all or part of their class via the Internet with the ability to access the instructor, classmates and course materials. Access to a Web-equipped computer is required.     Some of the online and Web-assisted classes this spring include Arabic, General Sociology, World Mythology, Introduction to Fiction, Beginning Algebra, Western Civilization I and II, Medical Terminology, Composition I and II, and General Biology, among others.

    A complete listing of credit and noncredit classes can be found in the spring 2014 class schedule or online at morainevalley.edu. Registration is ongoing. Tuition is $109 per credit hour plus fees and books. Students who have applied to the college can register in the Registration Office, located on campus in the Student Services Center (Building S), 9000 W. College Parkway in Palos Hills; by phone at 974-2110 (TTY for the hearing impaired 974-9556); or online at morainevalley.edu.

College can help students realize their educational goals, pursue an associate’s degree and prepare for a successful future. Registration is underway for the spring 2014 semester, which starts Jan. 13 with on-campus credit classes. Off-campus credit classes and on-campus continuing education classes begin Jan. 21, and off-campus continuing education classes begin Jan. 27.     Some of the college’s courses are offered in different formats to accommodate the needs of students, making it easy for people to fit college classes into their life. These Flexible Learning Options Moraine Valley include: spring registration     • Online and Internet Hybrid     Moraine Valley Community classes

Photo by Jeff Vorva

    • Short-Term Classes     • Weekend Classes     • Off-Campus Classes     • Evening Classes     • One-Day-a-Week Classes     A complete list of credit and noncredit classes can be found in the spring 2014 class schedule or online at morainevalley.edu. Registration is ongoing. Tuition is $109 per credit hour plus fees and books. Students who have applied to the college can register in the Registration Office, located on campus in the Student Services Center (Building S), 9000 W. College Parkway in Palos Hills; by phone at 974-2110 (TTY for the hearing impaired 974-9556); or online at morainevalley.edu.

Richards players accept the Class 6A second-place trophy after Saturday’s 34-14 setback to Batavia. Members of the Richards band jam during the state championship contest.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Doggone it

Batavia’s Bulldogs take a chomp out of Richards’ state championship dreams By Jeff Vorva Reporter Editor     A rabid fan base in the house?     Check.     A great, sunny afternoon for football?     Check.     A fired up football team?     Check.     All the pregame ingredients were there for a Richards football team that was four quarters away from winning an Illinois High School Association Class 6A state football championship against a team it beat in the second week of the regular season.     But it didn’t work out the way Richards wanted it to.     Batavia’s Bulldogs scored early and often and knocked off the Richards Bulldogs 34-14 Saturday afternoon at Huskie Stadium on the campus of Northern Illinois University in DeKalb.     Despite the thumping, the Bulldogs from the Oak Lawn school are setting their goals high for 2014.     Quarterback Hasan Muhammad Rogers, wide receivers Spencer Tears and Ryan Willett, safety/

running back Romanta Hill and a host of other underclassmen could be back, making anticipation high for another big run in 2014.     “This team was special,” Rogers said. “We had hard workers, and we had some phenomenal seniors. Romel Hill was the heart and soul of the team and played with so much passion. He has a little brother [Ramonta] and if we can get that same stuff out of him and me being a senior, we should have enough of experience. We know what it takes to get here.’’     Richards won back-to-back state titles in Class 4A in 1988 and 1989. The Bulldogs whipped Peoria, 40-6, in 1988 and nipped Morris, 12-6, in overtime in 2009. They finished second in Class 6A in 2001 and were beaten 41-0 by Providence Catholic in the championship game.     Since then, the Bulldogs qualified for the playoffs 11 of the next 12 years but had not gotten past the third round until this season.     Batavia won its first football state title. It’s only the second state title in the history of the school. It also won a basketball title in 1912.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

The Richards Bulldogs’ mascot (left photo) and junior wide receiver Ryan Willett (right photo) show their frustrations during Richards’ 34-14 loss to Batavia Saturday afternoon in the IHSA Class 6A state championship in DeKalb.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards fans go crazy during the early stages of Saturday’s state Richards fans enjoy a tailgating feast before the Bulldogs faced championship football game. Batavia in the Class 6A championship on Saturday.


The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013



Community Notes Palos 118 Santa’s Secret Shop

preserving American history, securing America’s future through better education, and promoting     The Palos 118 Parent Faculty patriotism. Association is sponsoring their     Membership in the DAR honannual Santa’s Secret Shop this ors one’s lineage and heritage as Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9 a.m. to a descendant of a patriot of the 2 p.m. at Palos West School. American Revolution.     Little ones can shop for special     Prospective members and gifts for their family, and after- guests are welcome. (swallow wards enjoy refreshments and cliffdar@gmail.com) meet Santa himself.     The community is welcome to Shepard Choir attend. Palos West is at 12700 S. spaghetti/pasta dinner 104th Ave. in Palos Park.     The Shepard High School Choir Department will serve its first spaDaughters of the ghetti/pasta dinner on Saturday, American Revolution Dec. 14, from 4 to 8 p.m., in the Christmas luncheon Alan B. Shepard main cafeteria,     The Swallow Cliff Chapter, 13049 S. Ridgeland Ave. in Palos National Society Daughters of Heights. the American Revolution, will     The dinner will include spahold its Christmas luncheon at ghetti/mostaccioli, tossed salad noon on Saturday, Dec. 14, at the and Italian bread with butter. The DoubleTree Hotel, 5000 W. 127th cost is $10 for adults and $5 for St. in Alsip. children 6 and under. Enter at     The cost is $24, and reservations Door 12 in the back of the buildare required by Dec. 4. It will be ing. Enjoy music from a DJ as a time to celebrate DAR through well as performances from choir the generations and to participate classes. in the annual silent auction.     Email absmusicaltix@yahoo.     The NSDAR is dedicated to com for more information.

Southwest Symphony Orchestra offers two Christmas concerts     Experience the wonder and story of Christmas when the Southwest Symphony plays its most popular concert, Home for the Holidays, at Sacred Heart Church, 8245 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, this Saturday, Dec. 7, at 7:30 p.m., and at St. Michael Church, 14327 Highland, Orland Park, on Friday, Dec. 13, at 7:30 p.m.     Joining the SSO for this magical evening of holiday favorites are the St. Michael and Sacred Heart

Submitted photo

The Center invites ladies to Christmas tea

    Ladies’ Christmas Teas will be served Thursday and Friday, Dec. 19 and 20, from 2 to 4 p.m. at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     Each tea includes a large buffet of Christmas punch, tea, cookies, cakes, tea sandwiches, and other goodies, plus an opportunity to make a bag of fragrant fresh Christmas potpourri of balsam, cinnamon, orange peel, hemlock cones and holly berries. A heartwarming Music Ministries and the Voices Christmas story is then read before the fire. of the Valley.     Pictured, Carole Cornelius, Kathy Mical and Jean Cornelius enjoy high tea at The Center.     Tickets, from $5 to $25, are     Tickets must be reserved in advance and costs $25 per person. Call 361-3650. available at the door, in advance by calling 802-0686 and online at southwestsymphony.com.     Children 12 and under are free. Instrumentalists wishing to audition for the Symphony, should call the number above.     This concert is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency. Heights Dist. 128 dles the penguin offer a free day     Noon Shepard High School 71st Ave. of holiday fun at Winter Won- Choir performs.     The festive event will feature Pasta with Santa derland on Saturday, Dec. 14,     12:15 p.m. Holiday games and holiday music, Santa and Mrs.     Palos Heights School District from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Palos refreshments. Claus, a magician and other en128 will hold its annual Pasta with Heights Recreation Center, 6601     12:30 to 1 p.m. Candy cane hunt tertainment, and a buffet table Santa event today (Thursday), from W. 127th St. in Myers Park. with holiday goodies. There will be 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., at Navajo School,     There will be holiday games,     During the entire event Santa special entertainment and crafts 7, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., in the 12401 S. Oak Park Ave. decorating cookies, decorating will be taking pictures with fami- for children and a book sale feaschool gym, 13049 S. Ridgeland     Barraco’s will supply the food. holiday decorations, a candy cane lies, decorating cookies, and mak- turing Christmas-themed books Ave., Palos Heights. Cost is $9 adults, $8 children; 3 hunt, entertainment and Santa. ing ornaments. and media for all ages.     More than 150 crafters, con- and under eat for free. The In- All will get the chance to meet     There will also be a silent auccessions available all day. dependence Band and choir will Santa himself and take a family tion of coffee table books which Christmastime     Entrance is at door in the perform. picture with him to. would be suitable for gifts to in Palos celebration back of the building. AdmisSchedule of events: friends. The celebration is presion $2.     10 a.m. Cookie and ornament     The ninth annual Christmas- sented by the Friends of the Palos Waddles Winter decorating. time in Palos celebration will be Heights Library and sponsored by Wonderland     11 a.m. Stagg High School Choir held thisSaturday, Dec. 7, from First Midwest Bank. It is open,     The Palos Heights Parks and performs. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Palos without charge, to all area resiRecreation Department and Wad-     11:30 a.m. Santa arrives. Heights Public Library, 12501 S dents.

Visits with Santa

Crafts & Bazaars Shepard Athletic Boosters crafts and vendors     Shepard High School fall arts, crafts and vendor bazaar sponsored by the Athletic Boosters will be held this Saturday, Dec.

Senior Notes Carpenters Christmas dinner trip

Benefits and Fundraisers

Library Notes Heights library featured database

Swallow Cliff’s Gloria Flathom is new DAR District IV director

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    Gloria Flathom, of Oak Lawn, is the new director for Illinois Daughters of the American Revolution’s District IV, which has 29 chapters in the seven counties of the Chicago area.     Besides presiding at district meetings, such as the most recent one held on Nov. 8 at the Carlisle Hotel in Lombard as shown above, part of her job includes visiting each of the chapters to present information about DAR.     She also provides support to chapters in their efforts toward increasing their membership and toward achieving the DAR objectives of education, patriotism, and historic preservation. Previously at the district level, she has served twice as an officer.     Gloria is a life member of DAR and has been active in this organization and several others connected to genealogy for the past 20 years. Within her local Swallow Cliff chapter, she has held several offices, is an honorary past chapter regent and is currently the registrar. She also serves as the chairman of the National Genealogical Records Committee and volunteer information specialist.     At the state level, Gloria has been on the state board of management, has had six state chairmanships, and just completed a 2-year term as state recording secretary and the editor of the State Biennial Proceedings. She now is involved with the sales of that publication.

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of the clutter on your computer. This class will also cover basic Buona restaurant security issues and how it affects     For more than 75 years Value speed. benefit day Line Research Center is one of     • Learn about the library’s for Crisis Center the most widely used independent ebook service Media on Demand investment information services and more available to you with     Area residents can help raise in the world. your Palos Heights library card, money for the Crisis Center for     Its up-to-date, weekly issues and including free music and magazine South Suburbia simply by purcompany reports are a comprehendownloads, and our huge suite chasing their lunch or dinner this sive reference tool that enables of databases on Wednesday, Dec. Friday from Buona in Orland investors to make timely, better 11, at 7 p.m. Park, at 9525 W. 131st St. informed decisions through its     • Bingo with a twist will be     Buona Restaurant is hosting a offered Thursday, Dec. 12, at 1 benefit day, and from 10:30 a.m. Heights library p.m. Wrap up a white elephant to 10 p.m., will donate at least upcoming programs item and bring it along. If you 15 percent of all sales directly to     The following will take place at win, you’ll get to choose one of the Crisis Center. To participate, the Palos Heights Public Library, the white elephant prizes. visit crisisctr.org or facebook.com/ 12501 S. 71st Ave.     Program registration is always CrisisCenterforSouthSuburbia to     • The Lunch Bunch on Mon- appreciated. Register online at download the flyer; the flyer must day, Dec. 9, at noon, will discuss palosheightslibrary.org, by phone be presented when ordering. “How to Win Friends and Influ- at 448-1473, or in person. All pro-     Buona is a family-owned and ence People” by Dale Carnegie, grams are free and open to the operated restaurant, to view their available for pick up at the library. public unless otherwise noted. menu visit buona.com. Bring your lunch; refreshments and dessert will be provided. SERVING OAK LAWN & THE SOUTHWEST SIDE FOR OVER 50 YEARS     • Needle Club will meet TuesCabinets, Windows, day, Dec. 10, from 10 a.m. to noon. Doors and more New members always welcome. Hours: Tues. & Thurs. 9-6; Wed. 9-7;     • Scrabble Club will meet TuesFri. & Sat. 9-5; Closed Sun. & Mon. www.bisonoutlet.com day, Dec. 10, from 1 to 3 p.m. New players always welcome.     • On Tuesday, Dec. 10, at 6:30 p.m., attend Clean Up Your ComKitchen, Bath & Building Products puter with Steve from Computer Greeks and learn how to get rid

Submitted photo

wealth of in-depth financial information, objective research and insightful commentary.     Access is available in the library or online at palosheightslibrary. org/services/online-databases. html by clicking “Alphabetical List.” Scroll down and click on “Value Line Research Center” to begin. Use your Palos Heights library card number to login; the password is your last name.

SERVING OAK LAWN & THE SOUTHWEST SIDE FOR OVER 50 YEARS

Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Parkway in Palos Hills. The production begins at     Join Palos Park Recreation for 7:30 p.m. dinner and enjoy A Carpenters     Register at the Palos Park RecChristmas on Saturday, Dec. 14, reation Center, 8901 W. 123rd St. at 4:45 p.m., at Ciao Restauran- Registration deadline is Wedneste, 10296 S. 78th Ave. in Palos day, Nov. 20. Make your dinner Hills. selection at registration. The fee is     Dinner options include: pasta $46 for residents, $61 for Unincorwith shrimp, artichoke and mush- porated Palos Park residents, and rooms, grilled salmon, homemade $66 for non-residents. There is a lasagna, or chicken pignollo, com- discounted fee of $37.30 for Palos plete with soup or salad, beverage, Park Senior Club members. dessert, tax and tip.     Transportation is not provided.     After dinner, meet at the Doro- For ages 50 and up. For more thy Menker Theater at Moraine information, call 671-3760.




The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle “Celtic Crosses”

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Across 1. Hazzard County police officer 7. Shocked sound 11. Size between small and large: abbr.. 14. Animal prized for its wool 15. Possessing power 16. Blvd. cousin 17. Toast-and-cheese dish 19. “___ the season...” 20. Prepares a fishing line 21. Money with interest attached 22. Marquis de ___ 23. Semicircles 24. Put on TV 25. Minnesotan 27. “Marble” bread 28. Little bear 29. Old-fashioned contraction 30. Verify, IRS-style 32. New Hampshire-born president 33. Certain Monopoly token 37. Participates in a summer camp activity 38. Banks of baseball 39. Signs of the future 40. Newspaper people, for short 41. Dollop 44. Makes good on one’s debts 46. They hook up IVs 47. Location 48. Dirt 49. Dante’s “Divine Comedy,” for instance 51. Some artists’ studios 52. Adam’s madam 53. Drink topped with whipped cream 55. “Just a ___” (“hold on”) 56. Slam ___ (impressive basketball feat) 57. “Murder on the ___ Express” 58. Prior to, in poems 59. Iowa State University’s town

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30. Hard to listen to, maybe 31. Most common English word 32. Awaits judgement 33. “Raging Bull” director Martin 34. Visited 35. Like some bathing suits 36. Long, narrow hole 41. Be unlike 42. Show up for 43. Harasses 45. Antitoxin 46. Puts on the line 47. Bulgaria’s capital 50. Tree with needles 51. Possibly apocryphal history 53. Journalist Tarbell 54. Kernel’s home

Down 1. One place for seafood 2. Mrs. ___ (owner of an infamous cow) 3. Do some genetic engineering 4. Fills roles for a movie 5. Newspaper publisher Adolph 6. Listening device? 7. Zsa Zsa or Eva 8. “Waterloo” singers 9. Injured arm’s support 10. Garfield or Marmaduke 11. Infamous Dutch spy 12. Proof 13. Person who’s way offbase? 18. Courtroom defenses 22. Ball 24. Autobahn vehicles 26. Brother and husband of Isis 28. Affectedly adorable

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From Dec. 5, 1963

50 Years Ago This Week     A few of the many Palos Heights Christmas Queen contestants, Gail Griffith (seated from left), Sharon Irving and Valerie Pichman, are shown with sponsors Harry Paetow, Palos State Bank (standing from left); Marie Misiorowski, Palos Royal Blue and Orville Schmaedeke, Schmaedeke Funeral Home.     Palos Christmas festivities will start Saturday when the Christmas Queen is announced and crowned on the parking lot of the Palos Regional newspaper.     The queen will be crowned by last year’s queen, Linda Slack.

(Answers on page 11)

The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9. (Answers on page 11)

From Dec. 4, 2003

10 Years Ago This Week     Winter Festival heralds yuletide in Orland: Amy Zuehlke (with microphone), a junior at Sandburg High School, led revelers in an informal caroling session. It was her third year as a volunteer at the holiday party. Mari White, another Sandburg junior, coordinated the sing-along.     Hundreds of families turned out for the village’s annual Winter Festival at the Orland Park Civic Center.

Toyota Park for football championships?

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT     You folks couldn’t wait to beat the drums and guess last week’s easy answer of drumsticks.     In the seven-minute span, Bella Fruendt of Hickory Hills, Harrison Debre of Hickory Hills and Steve Rosenbaum of Oak Lawn were the first to weigh in on Friday.     After that the floodgates opened. I think that so many people wanted to guess this one that you guys crashed our computer system. If you sent a guess in between Saturday night at 10 p.m. and Monday morning at 11 a.m. and you don’t see your name, let us know.     Other upbeat winners were Worth’s Carol and Jerry Janicki, Theresa and George Rebersky, Celeste Cameron, Gene Sikora and Robert Solner and Linda and Mike Martin, Palos Heights’ Crystine Busch, Marcia Bulthuis and Lynn TenKate, Evergreen Park’s Vince Vizza and Amanda Callas, Chicago Ridge’s Dana Oswald, Dan and Kathy Higgins and Joe and Marilyn Blackwell, Hickory Hills’ Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis and Janice Mastro, Palos Hills’ Marilyn Gutierrez, Bob Compton and Goldie Xirafakis and Evergreen Park’s Henrietta Mysliwiec.     A drumroll also goes out for a correct guess from far, far away with Steph Cap of Washington D.C. weighing in.     This week’s clue is look up in the sky — it’s not a bird. It’s not a plane. It’s only the beginning.     Send all guesses to thereporter@comcast.net with Whatizit in the subject line. Give us your name and home town by Monday night and please don’t crash our computer system again!

    That was fun.     Well, not the final score. That wasn’t so fun for Richards’ football fans.     The Bulldogs were beaten, 3414, by Batavia Saturday afternoon in the Illinois High School Association Class 6A State Championship game.     Their dreams of a state title were dashed and Batavia won the first football championship in the history of the school. The only other state championship for that school was a state basketball title in 1912. Even with the 101year gap, that’s still better than the Cubs.     Anyway, what was really special was the atmosphere of the game.     The state championships were held at the University of Illinois in Champaign since 1999 but were moved to DeKalb this year and the two sites will ping-pong back and forth through 2021.     Playing the games at the University of Illinois is pretty cool to a point. Memorial Stadium is historic and big. Way, too big.     You get 5,000 to 10,000 fans at the place and the 60,000-seat old joint swallows them up. Unless you are right in the middle of the crowd, it isn’t all that exciting.     At the 24,000-seat Huskie Stadium, Batavia filled about three quarters of west stands. The town is less than a half hour from DeKalb and there was a drive to bring 10,000 fans to the game. I don’t know if they hit that mark or not — the IHSA didn’t release attendance figures — but there were a lot of people in the stands wearing red and gold.     Richards’ crowd wasn’t too shabby either. The black and goldclad fans probably filled close to half of the east stands. They, too, had thousands of fans on hand. I’m not sure if they would have brought as many if the game was in Champaign.     Before the game, both fan bases were geeked up and made a ton of noise. I’ve covered quite a few state title games at the U of I

Notes north of the Cal-Sag by Jeff Vorva and never felt the excitement this intense.     Even with about 10 minutes left in the game and Batavia leading by three touchdowns, the Richards fans were making a racket when the team was on offense.     ‘’It was an awesome experience,” Richards junior quarterback Hasam Muhammad Rogers said. “It was a great atmosphere. The emotions were high. The stakes were high. The support we had from our parents, coaches, students and our nation … it was cool to see.”     The IHSA takes a lot of criticism for a lot of its decisions but bring-

ing the state championships up north was a pretty good idea.     An even better idea would have been Toyota Park in Bridgeview, which was considered by some to be a player in this mix. For whatever reason, the local field didn’t make the final destination.     Maybe when the DeKalb-Champaign-DeKalb-Champaign merrygo-round is over in 2021, Toyota Park could get back in the mix.     The place hosts the Chicago Fire and a variety of other events. Jimmy Buffett and his parrot-heads made it their home for a little while. Why not the IHSA?     More Chicago area teams tend to hog up the final slots in Classes 5A to 8A and would bring even bigger crowds if it was held there. This would make the atmosphere even better. Maybe there could even be a sellout or two, especially if Mt. Carmel was still a powerhouse.     I wouldn’t mind seeing a tradeoff of DeKalb and Bridgeview from year to year. Knocking Champaign

out of the mix wouldn’t break my heart.     It would be good for our area and good for the Chicago-area fans.     As for the players?     “Wherever they have it, that’s where I want to be,” Rogers said.

Ben there…     Binny’s Beverage Depot hosted Blackhawks player Ben Smith Monday night as a part of its grand opening week. Bears legend Mike Ditka was scheduled to appear Wednesday night and another Bears legend, Dan Hampton, is holding court from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday.     It appeared that Smith might be the weak link of the three as far as name recognition but Binny’s officials were happy with the crowd that showed up for him.     Maybe the fact that Smith’s 11th round shootout goal against the Dallas Stars Friday night in a thriller on the road helped bring a few more bodies to Binny’s.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Richards fans gather in the middle sections of Huskie Stadium during Saturday’s Class 6A state championship. The atmosphere at the facility was electric before and throughout the game.


The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013



Healthy Answers for Life by Carolyn Johnson

Immunity boosters: Stay healthy this winter Dear Carolyn:     I’m trying to stay healthy while it seems like everyone at my office is coughing and blowing their noses. Is there anything that can help me to avoid getting sick? Thanks, Kate Dear Kate:     Winter is the time for colds and flu, not that winter has any power over those microorganisms, but due to fact that we’re shut up inside without fresh air. In a place like an office, bacteria and viruses can spread like wildfire, since many people are touching the same things like a photocopier or coffee carafe, often infecting the entire office.     We’re bombarded with bacteria and viruses every day, but it’s our immune system that keeps us healthy. When you’re run down it’s much easier to get sick, since your body isn’t able to fight as hard to keep itself healthy. It’s important at the first sign of illness to rest and take care of yourself. In many cases resting and using immune boosting supplements when you experience early symptoms of sickness can stop an illness in its track and give your body the ability to fight it off.     The first recommendation would be to be to be very diligent in regards to hand washing. The Center for Disease Control recommends washing with soap and water for 15 seconds. Try to dry your hands with a paper towel or hand dryer rather than a communal hand towel, which are absolute breeding grounds for bacteria and viruses.     Another suggestion is to be careful about touching your eyes, nose and mouth, the three places where bacteria and viruses enter the body. You might also want to

skip the dips at holiday parties. A study published in the Journal of Food Safety, found that even with just three to six double dips in one bowl (double dipping is when someone takes a bite of a chip and then dips it a second time in the bowl) transferred about 10,000 bacteria from the eaters’ mouths to the remaining dip. An episode of the Dr. Oz show studied the bacteria in party dip and found the presence of Group B Streptococcus, a type of bacteria which is especially harmful to pregnant women and those with a weakened immune system.     Eating a diet with lots of fresh fruits and vegetables is great for boosting immunity. Cooking with fresh onions and garlic are also great for the immune system (and many other processes in the body). Both can work to kill bad bacteria in the body and are effective in treating infections. Garlic is also available in odorless capsules if you don’t want “garlic breath.”     Recent research has discovered one vitamin that trumps all others for cold and flu prevention. While vitamin C is the vitamin everyone thinks of when they get sick, vitamin D appears to have even greater benefits. Vitamin D can be synthesized in our skin from sunlight, but in the Midwest, particularly in the fall and winter months, sunlight is in short supply.     Many scientists are suggesting that the dramatic rise in the incidence of cold and flu in the winter months is directly related to vitamin D levels in the body, which rise in the summer and fall dramatically in the winter. Studies have found that people who did not supplement with vitamin D had 10 times greater

risk of flu during the winter than in the summer. In addition, those who did not take vitamin D had a nine times greater risk of winter flu than those who supplemented with vitamin D.     Research has uncovered at least one way that vitamin D protects against cold and flu viruses. It seems that T cells in the body (the cells which are activated to kill bacteria and viruses) are activated by vitamin D. If the body does not have adequate stores of vitamin D, it cannot effectively activate that part of our immune system which fights illness.     Studies have found that a great percentage of Americans are deficient in vitamin D, many critically so. Famous natural health physician Dr. Weil recommends that all of his patients take 2,000 IUs of vitamin D daily to stay healthy.     When looking for a vitamin D supplement, it’s important to look for the D3 form of the vitamin, which is the natural form of the vitamin. Many vitamins sold in supermarkets, especially vitamin D, are synthetic and aren’t absorbed as well by the body.     Good bacteria, known as probiotics, are also very helpful in the fight to stay healthy. Numerous studies have found that supplementing with probiotics help to both reduce the incidence of colds and flu, and also reduce the severity and duration of cold symptoms.     Elderberries, and elderberry syrup, are a great thing to have in your arsenal against viral illness. Studies have found it comparable in treatment of the flu to tamiflu, but without side effects. Elderberry syrup (which is the best way to take it) is delicious,

so it’s great for children or people who dislike pills.     AHCC, which is a special mushroom extract, is another fantastic supplement for the immune system. Over 700 hospitals in Asia prescribe AHCC to their patients as an immune enhancing maintenance regimen. AHCC has been studied extensively in regards to its benefits as a natural anti-viral and immune boosting supplement, with impressive results.     I could go on all day about immune boosting supplements, and these supplements are only a few of the very effective natural products available for winter wellness. We are only as healthy as our immune system is strong, so it is very important to take steps to make sure our body and its immune system is doing the best it can.    To submit a question to be answered in a future column send an email to healthyanswersforlife@ gmail.com or mail to Healthy Answers for Life c/o Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive, Palos Heights, IL 60463.    Carolyn Johnson is one of the knowledgeable associates at Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive. Feel free to stop by the store for more information or advice. passhealthfoods.com.    This column makes no claims to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure diseases with any advice or products. Any health related information in this article is for educational purposes only. The ultimate responsibility for your choices and their effect on your health are yours and before applying any therapy or use of herbs, supplements, etc., you should consult your health care provider.

Orland Township now makes children’s vaccinations available to the underinsured     Orland Township, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., has recently gained approval from the Illinois Department of Public Health to provide immunizations to local underinsured children at its monthly immunization clinic.     Vaccines are available to children 18 and under who are either uninsured, underinsured, Medicaid-eligible (includes All Kids), Native American or Alas-

kan Native. Underinsured means that the child has health insurance, but it does not cover any vaccines, certain vaccines, or it has a fixed dollar limit or cap for vaccines, and once that cap is reached a child is ineligible. With valid proof of Orland Township residency, vaccines are free of charge. For children residing outside of the township’s boundaries, a $20 administration fee

per vaccine will be collected. An up-to-date shot record is mandatory to receive any vaccine, and children must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.     Available children’s vaccines include DTaP, DTaP-Hep B-IPV, DTaP-IPV-Hib, DTaP-IPV, Hep A, Hep B, Hep B-Hib, HPV, Meningococcal, MMR, IPV, Pneumococcal, Rotavirus, Tdap and Varicella. Adult vaccines are offered to Or-

Submitted photo, sponsored by Joy’s Best Friends, Ltd. Best Bites

Dog of The Week I’m a Shetland Pony! Oh, that was a few weeks ago. I’m really a Shetland Sheepdog named Tara Rose and I own the Lyman Family of Palos Park. My favorite times are when I’m chauffeured to Joy’s Best Bites for my food and treats. Why my favorite? Because I get lots and lots of treats there on my visits.

They’re the best! Tara Rose is the 1st Dog of the Week in December. The Voting for December begins January 2nd IN-STORE ONLY. Receive 1 (one) Vote for Every Item purchased thru Jan. 25th. The Dog with the most Votes WINS $100 Gift Certificate to Best Bites! Ask us how your dog can win! Saturday, December 14th Santa photos 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Friendly, leashed dogs welcome. Photographer only accepts cash or checks. All photos must include a pet. Dress Warm – Photos are outside. Best Bites is located at 13034 S. LaGrange Road in Palos Park. 708-448-1515. Visit us online at www.joysbestfriends.com. Follow US on Facebook.com/JoysBestFriendsBestBites.

Bad Habits By Sneakers

land Township residents only and are available at a discounted rate. Adult vaccines include HPV, Pneumococcal, Hep A, Tuberculosis, Hep B, Tdap, IPV, Meningococcal, Hep A-Hep B, MMR, Typhoid and Shingles. Proof of residency is required.     For more information, or for upcoming immunization clinic dates, call 403-4222, or visit orlandtwp.org.

    My name is Sneakers, and I have some bad habits.     At least, that’s what my owner thinks when he shouts “Bad Kitty!” or “I’m taking you back to the shelter!” Speaking of my owner … shhhh. He is foolish enough to believe that he is my owner, and I am ‘sneaky’ enough to let him believe that. This way he supplies me with treats, toys, water, and lots of fun ways to be bad. Truth is, I am the boss! I am the Alpha male. I am the smart one! If you don’t believe me, just watch my human fumble around our house trying to find me when I’m hiding.     Although I have to admit he is right about me being bad. In my eight months as a kitten, I have acquired enough bad habits to last all nine of my lives. It’s not that I really mean to be bad. It’s just that it’s so fun to be bad. How can I resist climbing up the curtains so I snag them or pull them down? What could be more fun than unplugging my human’s computer, especially when he’s in the middle of a project? Let’s face it, any glass setting on the counter is just an invitation for me to whap it off with my front paw. Submitted photo     At the same time, some bad habAttendees learned about the warning signs of suicide at Orland its aren’t so fun. I got a scary shock Township’s suicide prevention and awareness workshop. Another when I chewed the electrical cord is planned in January. on the coffee pot. I felt really guilty when my owner started bleeding badly after I scratched him. One time, my catmate, Patience, wouldn’t play with me for two days after I lapped all the cream in her saucer. So, I started thinkinsured may receive a vaccina- of charge. A Medicare Part B ing … maybe it’s time for me to tion free of charge. Children 18 card must be presented at the grow up and start purr-ging my and under who are not eligible time of vaccination. Those with bad habits. Maybe I could keep a for a free shot can still receive an HMO/Medicare plan are not journal of my tails … um … tales a flu shot for a discounted rate eligible for a free vaccination and of $15. should visit their primary care     Residents 65 and over with physician. Medicare Part B are eligible to     Proof of township residency is receive the immunization free required.

Orland Twp. training seminars aim to prevent teen suicide through heightened awareness     Orland Township Youth and Family Services hosted a training seminar on suicide awareness and prevention last month.     The training was facilitated by a Riveredge Hospital staff member who utilized curriculum from the Jason Foundation, which cultivates awareness for youth suicide through various educational programs.     Participants who attended the training were from a cross section of various groups that have a major influence in the lives of young people, such as counselors, educators, social workers, police officers, parents and concerned citizens. They have joined in the battle against youth suicide by learning the warning signs as-

sociated with youth suicide and how to help those in need.     The Youth Services staff recognizes how important it is for the community to be educated about the dangers of youth suicide and continues to attempt to “link” the community to vital resources. The goal of the Orland Township Community Link is to convey information to perspective organizations in an attempt to raise community awareness on subjects like youth suicide.     The township plans to hold more suicide awareness and prevention seminars after the first of the year. For information, call Cheryl Kokaska, MA, LPC at 4034001. — Orland Township

Health Beat Last flu shot clinics of season at Orland Twp.     Orland Township offers three final flu shot clinics of the season at the township office, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., on Monday, Dec. 9 and Wednesday, Dec. 11, from 4:30

p.m. to 7 p.m., and Tuesday, Dec. 10, from 6 to 8 p.m.     Vaccines for residents 19 and older are available for $20. Children 18 years of age and younger who are either Medicaid-eligible (includes All Kids recipients), Native American (American Indian, Alaskan Native) or un-

Financing a home should be exciting and easy!

The Kid’s Doctor by Sue Hubbard, M.D.

Pay attention if your young athlete complains of lower back pain     I care for a lot of athletic teens, and while many of them participate in several different sports, more and more ‘tweens and teens now specialize in one sport. They may only play soccer or basketball, or be a gymnast, dancer or swimmer. In some cases, they practice or compete almost 365 days a year. (I think they often are only off on the 6 holidays per year that our office is closed!). They all work hard at their sport.     Recently, I’ve had more than a handful of elite athletes, especially girls who are gymnasts, cheerleaders and dancers, come to me complaining

of back pain. In most cases, lower back pain is musculoskeletal in nature and will resolve with antiinflammatories (like ibuprofen), alternating ice and heat on the back, and a few days of rest. In some cases, however, the pain worsens, especially with activity, and further work up is required.     In several cases, the ongoing back pain is due to a spondylolysis, a fracture of the pars interarticularis of the vertebrae. The injury is akin to a stress fracture in other areas. It’s most commonly found in the pediatric population and is thought to be due to mechanical stress of the trunk with repetitive flexion, hyperextension and trunk

rotation.     All of those maneuvers are the “usual” for a cheerleader doing back flips or a gymnast performing exercises with hyperextension. Young athletes who are into weight lifting (it seems they all do this now) and even children who carry heavy backpacks may be at risk for a “spondy.”     The spondylolysis may show up on a plain x-ray of the back or may require a CT scan to see the fracture.     In our community, there’s some difference of opinion on how best to treat the condition. Unfortunately, it seems that the best treatment is rest, which may be for weeks or

of bad habits, and how I tried to overcome them.     Unfortunately, one of my worst bad habits (procrastination) got in the way of writing. For weeks, I tried to pen a few stories, but something always got in my way. On sunny days, warm rays of sunshine beckoned me to enjoy a nice siesta. On cooler days, my appetite tempted me to ferret delectable left-over morsels out of the kitchen trash bin. In the morning, I would sneak in the cupboard to find the bag of catnip hidden inside. At night, I watched the TV Zombie shows my human was addicted to. Hoarding cat toys was a 24-hour pursuit. It was fun to watch my human spend a small fortune buying new cat toys because he could never figure out my hiding places.     In essence, my bad habits got in the way of my writing about my bad habits.     Then one cool, gray morning, the trash bin was empty, the TV was off, there were no toys to hoard, no catnip to be found. Very simply, there was nothing bad to do. So, I decided to spend five minutes on the laborious task of writing my story. I found a comfortable corner of the house, took a nice sip of water and started writing. Almost immediately, I became inspired. Before long, my five-minute task turned into 30 minutes. And I got a good start on my story.     I am now making the following promises to myself. Each month, I will write a bit of my story gradually. Each month, I will write about my experiences with one bad habit. Each month, I will write about the ways I tried to overcome a bad habit. Of course, that’s assuming that my bad habits don’t get in the way…

months. This is certainly not what a competitive young gymnast or star football player wants to hear.     Once the pain has resolved, a structured physical therapy program seems to be of benefit, as well. If conservative management for over a year doesn’t help, some orthopedists recommend surgery. Again, there are several different views as to the benefits of surgery in this age group.     If your child has persistent lower back pain that worsens with activity and hyperextension, you should think carefully about this condition and talk to your doctor. It’s becoming more prevalent as our kids compete at higher and higher levels.

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10

The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

Death Notices Delores A. McKeen

    Delores A. McKeen, née Hamelen, beloved wife of the late Charles A. McKeen. Loving mother of Garry (Julie), Jay K. and Mark C. (Anna Johnson) McKeen. Proud grandmother of Craig (Monica), Megan and Sarah McKeen. Great grandmother of William McKeen. Aunt of Kevin (Sally) Hamelen, Michelle (John) Wichert and Cindy (Mick) Yonker.     Memorial visitation will be held Saturday, Jan. 11, from 10 a.m. until time of service at 11 a.m. at the Zimmerman & Sandeman Funeral Home and Cremation Services, 9900 W. 143rd St. in Orland Park. Interment private.

    In lieu of flowers donations to a charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated.

Park. He worked in the HVAC, heating and cooling, trade.

John C. Shock

    Rosemary Stokes, 67, of Palos Heights. Loving sister of James (Nancy) Stokes Jr. and Patrick “Raymond” (Peg) Stokes. Also survived by loving nieces, nephews, great nieces, great nephews, relatives and friends.     A memorial Mass is to be offered Friday, Dec. 6, at 11:15 a.m. at Our Lady of the Woods Church, 10731 W. 131st St., Orland Park.     Mrs. Stokes was born in Chicago. She was a teacher with many years of service with the Chicago Board of Education.

    John C. Shock, 42, of Palos Heights, died Nov. 26. Visitation was held at Colonial Chapel Funeral Home in Orland Park. A funeral service was held at the funeral home on Nov. 30. Interment was at Chapel Hill Gardens South Cemetery in Oak Lawn.     Mr. Shock is survived by his sons Colton and Justin; his brothers, Dr. Frank Shock Jr. and Chelsea Shock; his sisters, Nola Noto, Pearl Pierik and Bertha White.     Mr. Shock was born in Evergreen

Rosemary Stokes

Houses of Worship Submitted photo

Nicholas Kapellas, managing partner at Bonefish Grill in Orland Park, samples the fare created by Good Home Cooking award winners Anna Piech and Liz Rice, both of Orland Park.

Culinary students cook 100 recipes using Together We Cope food pantry     What’s for dinner if you’re a food pantry client?     How about chicken tetrazzini?     Or gumbo?     Or fried ravioli?     Those dishes will be easy to make for clients of Together We Cope, thanks to the creativity of culinary students from Robert Morris University who competed in a Food Pantry Challenge Nov. 23.     Challenged to come up with interesting ways to make meals using only food pantry-supplied staples, meat and produce, the students created nearly 100 recipes that call for ingredients the Tinley Park-based agency is packing up for clients this month.     “Everyone who’s worked in the pantry has, at some point, come across a donation — it could be something packaged, or a vegetable, or meat — and we’ve asked each other, ‘What would you do with this?’” said Kathryn

Straniero, executive director at Together We Cope. To generate recipes, the agency hosted the Food Pantry Challenge, a contest that drew 28 student chefs from Robert Morris. They had 24 hours to come up with recipes and four hours to cook the food for a panel of judges to sample at the university’s Orland Park campus.     The winning menu included 14 dishes ranging from sausage/Ramen stroganoff, which includes a novel use for Ramen noodles, to a pork-and-bean dish featuring braised pig’s feet, an item that many cooks might find difficult to use. “You’ve made so many wonderful dishes using our food,” Straniero said before announcing the winners. “Your creativity is just amazing, and we are so grateful.”     Grand Prize winners were student chefs Timothy Beutel, of Joliet, Grant Duncan, of Joliet and

Our Lady of the     Cost is adults $5, children 6 photo with Santa, crafts, stoWoods Catholic Church to 10 $1. Under 5 free. Photos rytelling, puppets and enjoy a with St. Nicholas. pancake breakfast. Orland Park

    Knights of Columbus Crusaders Council 10151 will hold a pancake breakfast of pancakes, ham, sausage, potato Dillon Sandberg, of Libertyville. patties, juice, coffee and tea They were chosen by judges Nich- this Saturday, Dec. 7, from 8 olas Kapellas, managing partner to 11 a.m. at Our Lady of the at Bonefish Grill in Orland Park; Woods’ Finnegan Center, 10731 Donna Lorent-Migliorese, local W. 131st St. store marketer at Texas Roadhouse in Tinley Park; and José Torres, executive chef at Rock Bottom Brewery in Orland Park.     Additionally, longtime Together     Spiritual Companionship is We Cope volunteers John and Pat available each Tuesday at The Slack awarded the Good Home Center, 12700 Southwest HighCooking award to Liz Rice and way in Palos Park. Anna Piech, both of Orland     Spiritual Companion Kathy FonPark. taine guides a person in prayer,     Robert Morris University chef meditation and dialogue. Fontaine instructor Mark Wroczynski was proud of the way the students rose to the challenge. “They were really thinking way outside the box,” he said.     Recipes will be distributed to clients and also available on the agency’s website at TogetherWeCope.org. — Together We Cope

Faith United Methodist Church Orland Park     Santa’s Breakfast and Jamboree will be held this Saturday, Dec. 7, from 8 to 11 a.m., at the church, 15101 S. 80th Ave.     Visit with Santa, get a free

    Children who are preregistered will receive a gift from Santa. Register for photos at faithumcop.org/Jamboree2.php or call the church office at 4448560.     Breakfast tickets cost $5/ adults, $3/children and $15/families up to six can be purchased at the door. (444-8560)

Spiritual companionship offered at The Center has been trained at the Institute of Spiritual Companionship in Chicago and is known to the Palos community as a spiritual growth leader and former kindergarten teacher.     Fontaine calls spiritual compan-

ionship “holy listening.”     The cost of her one-on-one service is $20 per hour, which she donates to The Center’s camp scholarship fund.     For information on appointments, call The Center at 361-3650.

Simple Gifts Orland Twp. food pantry teams with Whole Foods     Orland Township Food Pantry is the donation recipient of Whole Foods Market’s “Feed Four More” holiday donation program through Dec. 6.     Money can be donated ($1, $5, $10 or any amount) at the registers at Whole Foods Market, 15260 S. La Grange Road, Orland Park, to purchase meals for families of four in need. All of the money collected this holiday season will be donated to the Orland Township Food Pantry to purchase food for needy families in the community.     In addition to “Feed Four More” Two Men and a Truck will be collecting non-perishable food donations all November for the Orland Township Food Pantry. The collection box for non-perishable food is located in the foyer of Whole Foods Market. (403-4222)

Palos Park food for fines     The Palos Park Police Cadets are working in partnership with the Palos Park Public Library’s Food for Fines program, which makes donations of nonperishable food to the library in lieu of fines for overdue materials.     Palos Park Public Library patrons are encouraged to bring undamaged and unexpired boxed or canned non-perishable food items to the library or the Palos Park Police Department. Canned items can include canned meat, peanut butter, canned fruit, canned vegetables, and boxed meals.

Orland Township holiday program     Orland Township’s holiday program is designed to provide food, new toys and clothes to families in need in Orland Township.     Donations will be accepted at the Orland Township office, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland Park, during regular office hours, MondayFriday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Donations will also be accepted during holiday hours, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 5 to 7 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 7, 9 to 11 a.m., Wednesday, Dec. 11, 5 to 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 12, 5 to 7 p.m.     Donations of non-perishable food as well as gift certificates, new clothes and new toys are accepted. Monetary donations are also welcome.     To see a list of suggested foods and toys to donate, visit the Orland Township website, orlandtwp.org.

Adopt-a-family     As part of the Holiday 2013 Program, Orland Township is also hosting the Adopt-A-Family Program, where sponsors select a small or large family to whom they can donate food, new clothes and toys.     The program is a popular choice among businesses, churches, schools and social groups. To adopt a family or for additional information on the program, contact Linda Bienias at 403-4222.     The township is also accepting applications for the above programs. If you are part of a family in need, consider applying today. Eligibility for the program is based on income guidelines, and applicants must show proof of residency and income. Applications are available at the Township Office located at 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland Park, Monday-Friday, 9 to 11 a.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.

Orland Scouts collecting toys for Washington tornado victims Dropoff Dec. 14 at Veterans Center

    Orland Park Boy Scout Troop 383 collected 10 cases of paper products, toiletries, non-perishable food items and gift cards for the Nov. 17 tornado victims at its pancake breakfast on Nov. 23.     The troop is now focusing on the children of Washington, Ill., wanting to make their Christmases a or in Worth, at 7026 W. 111th St. little brighter. Come in, enjoy a tour and meet     “A lot of people brought things other volunteers. to the pancake breakfast and we     For information, call the store took everything that we collected manager: Orland Park 364-7605, to the Orland Park Lions Club or Worth 361-6860.     All sales at Neat Repeats Resale benefit the clients served by the Crisis Center for South Suburbia, which provides emergency shelter and other services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence. — Neat Repeats

Neat Repeats recruits volunteers     Neat Repeats Resale stores are looking for volunteers to work in their stores with a boutique atmosphere.     Share your compassion, your talent and time. Give five hours a week and make a difference in the lives of victims of domestic violence. Join the Neat Repeats team, develop new skills and help a good cause.     Volunteer Recruitment Day is Saturday, Dec. 7, at the stores in Orland Park, at 9028 W. 159th St.,

Submitted photo

Bob Burns, Chris Pearson, Mitchell Kramer, Tim Klotz and JT Jakstavich, of Orland Park Boy Scout Troop 383, pack boxes of items donated for tornado victims at the troop’s Nov. 23 pancake breakfast. On Dec. 14, from noon until 3 p.m., the troop will collect new, unwrapped toys for the children of Washington, Ill. at the village’s Veterans Center, 15045 West Ave.

trailer that went to where the tornadoes hit,” said Senior Patrol Leader Tim Klotz. “When we were talking about what we collected, someone asked about the kids and what they’re getting for Christmas. That’s how we decided to collect new toys.”     The troop will collect new, unwrapped toys for children of all ages on Saturday, Dec. 14 from noon to 3 p.m., at the Orland Park Veterans Center, the George Brown Commons, at 15045 S.

Submitted photo

Will Davis and Steven Fechtner of Orland Park Boy Scout Troop 383 pack paper products donated for the victims of the Nov. 17 tornadoes at the troop’s recent pancake breakfast.

West Ave.     “We want to help the kids,” said Patrol Leader Jake Monnett. “They lost everything. Their houses are gone and all of their toys. They have to celebrate Christmas somewhere else. We want to try to make them a little happier.”     The troop is collecting with the help of its charter organization, the Village of Orland Park Veterans Commission and Modern Arnis Academy at 15252 W. 143rd Street in Homer Glen.     “Mr. Ken Smith at Modern Arnis Academy is accepting donations to go to Washington at his academy and he’s willing to deliver what we collect,” Klotz said.     West Avenue is four blocks west of La Grange Road and the Veterans Center is just north of 151st Street and West Avenue.     “We’re chartered by the Veterans Commission and they’re letting us use their building to collect the toys,” said Mitchell Kramer, the troop’s quartermaster. “And, Mr. Smith is going to take what we collect to Washington, which is sweet.”     The national award winning Troop 383 was formed in December, 2010 and is within the Nishnabec District of the Calumet Council of Boy Scouts. More information about the troop is available by sending an email to orlandtroop383@gmail.com.

Submitted photo

Golden Oaks hear Mashall Field lore     The Golden Oaks Seniors of Palos Park enjoyed a presentation about the history of Marshall Field and Company by Leslie Goddard at their November meeting.     An actor, historian and teacher, Goddard writes and lectures on American history in the 19th and early 20th century, with particular expertise in the areas of U.S. cultural history and material culture. She presents lectures and workshops for museums, community centers and civic organizations.     Shown with Goddard (second from left) are Golden Oaks members and former Marshall Field and Company employees: Jean Klier (from left), Patty Nemecek, Helen Wann, Ron Heitz and Rith Rohlfs.

Engaged? Getting Married? Share the Happy News! The Regional News invites couples or their parents to submit for publication engagement or wedding announcements. There is no charge for this service offered to community residents. The announcements must be typed, double-spaced and sent with a photograph of the couple. JPEGs or high quality photographs are preferred. (Sorry, photographs cannot be returned)

E-mail announcements to: TheRegional@Comcast.net Mail announcements to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463


11

The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

Time to check your progress toward your retirement goals     Now that another year is ending, it’s a good time to take stock of where you are on your journey toward financial security. Of course, you could find many different “measuring sticks” to assess your progress, but you can certainly gain considerable information just by asking yourself some basic questions.     Here are a few to consider:     • How close am I to my retirement goals? Your comprehensive investment strategy should include a reasonably good estimate of how much money you will eventually need to sustain the retirement lifestyle you’ve envisioned. At least once a year, you should evaluate how much closer you’ve gotten to your goals than the year before.     • Am I making sufficient progress toward my goals? When assessing your progress, try to determine if your portfolio is properly allocated between stocks, stockbased vehicles, bonds, government securities, certificates of deposit and other investments. If you’re “overweighted” in a particular asset class, such as cash, you may be impeding your ability to move toward your goals.     • Am I adhering to my investment strategy? To stick with your investment strategy, you need to invest at regular intervals and meet regularly with your financial professional to review your

marriage, new job, new home, etc. — and then try to determine what impact these changes might have on your long-term financial Jim strategy and if you need to adjust that strategy in response. Van Howe     • Have I changed my thinking on my retirement goals? Over time, you might undergo some changes in your thinking about retirement. For example, perhaps progress and make adjustments you’ve decided that you no longer — such as rebalancing your port- want to retire early and travel the folio — when necessary. Of course, world; instead, you’ve discovered even with regular progress re- a growing desire to open a small views and portfolio rebalancing, it business or do some consulting. can be challenging, psychologically Any significant changes you make and emotionally, to stick with a to your retirement plans will likely strategy. For example, during any have a big effect on your savings given year the financial markets and investment strategies, so could be down, and your results you’ll want to incorporate these might be disappointing. Nonethe- changes into your planning as less, if you have built a diversi- soon as possible. fied portfolio containing quality     By asking, and answering, these investments, and your portfolio questions at the end of each year, Photo by Bob Rakow is well suited to your own risk you should always have a good Adriana Aranda arranges a selection of cupcakes in the kitchen of Simply Sweet Creations. Aranda, tolerance and time horizon, you sense of where you are in pursuit who opened the business in September, specializes in a wide variety of bakery treats. don’t necessarily need to make of your long-term goals — and changes following a down year what you need to do to bring the in the markets. realization of those goals closer     • What aspects of my life have to reality. changed in the past year? Your investment strategy should be based Jim Van Howe is a financial adentirely on your individual needs visor with Edward Jones Investand circumstances — so if these ments, in Palos Heights. His office have changed during the past year, is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be you may also have to adjust the reached at 361-3400. This article way you invest. Consider any and was written by Edward Jones for by Bob Rakow all changes in your life — mar- use by your local Edward Jones from The Reporter riage, new children, divorce, re- Financial Advisor.     What started as a home-based business is flourishing in Oak Lawn as a specialty bakery.     Adriana Aranda recently opened Simply Sweet Creations, 5712 W. 95th St., after spending two years baking cakes, cupcakes and other delectable bakery items in the kitchen of her Hickory Hills home.     Making the jump from working out of her home to operating a full-time business wasn’t easy but she said she has no regrets.     “There’s never a right time to do it. “I’ve got this creative side and I’ve always wanted to unleash that,” said Aranda, who has a career in the financial industry.     Aranda looked at several locations for her business, which opened in September, and she’s pleased with the 95th Street site     “I underestimated the walk-in Photo by Bob Rakow traffic on 95th Street,” she said. Adriana Aranda stands next to a case featuring a wide selection of “Everybody loves cupcakes. It’s cupcakes at Simply Sweet Creations, 5712 W. 95th St., Oak Lawn. kind of gets people in the door.”     The shop is open from 10 a.m. religious events and weddings. ten can be found in the kitchen to 6 p.m. Thursday and Friday and     But Aranda’s shop offers more working on specialty cakes or 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, but than sweet treats. Bakery connois- other creations. Aranda plans to expand to full- seurs can take cake and cupcake     “It’s kind of been a team eftime hours soon, she said. decorating classes, which are de- fort,” she said. “No one has more     “Business has been great,” signed for both and children and passion than your family.” Aranda said. adults.     To place an order and inquire Submitted photo     The bakery specializes in a wide     Aranda is getting her business about classes, call 773-492-8151 or Smith Village trustee Bob Berghoff marks the naming of the con- variety of cupcakes, cake pops, off the ground with the help of visit www.simplysweetonline.com. tinuing care retirement community’s library to honor the memory cookies and cakes for all occa- friends and family. Her sister, You also can visit the bakery’s of Ruth O. Secord, D. Ed., who resided at Smith Village more than sions, including birthday parties, Claudia, and friend, Carmen, of- Facebook page. 10 years.

New Oak Lawn bakery is Simply Sweet indeed

Smith Village dedicates library to the late Ruth O. Secord     Smith Village Trustee Bob Berghoff recently marked the naming of the continuing-care retirement community’s library to honor the memory of Ruth O. Secord, D. Ed., who resided at Smith Village for more than 10 years.     Mrs. Secord’s estate donated more than $112,000 to the continuing-care retirement community, at 2320 W. 113th Place in Chicago’s Beverly neighborhood. The money goes to Emilie’s Fund, which provides for Smith Village residents who have outlived their means.     Prior to moving to Smith Village in 2000, Mrs. Secord resided for many years in Beverly. After retiring in 1976 from a distinguished career with Chicago Public Schools — which included serving as principal of Hurley Elementary School — Secord devoted her talents to several community organizations, including the local Protestant Cluster of Churches, Ridge Historical Society, Ridge Art Association and Trinity United Methodist Church. In 1991 she co-organized a series of seminars on “Issues in Aging” for the local community.     “Ruth always gave of herself to support lifelong learning for people of all ages,” Berghoff said. “Her generosity to Smith Village is greatly appreciated and will serve as inspiration for future

generations.     Mrs. Secord earned an undergraduate degree from University of Chicago and a doctorate in

Educational Psychology from the University of Southern California. She passed away in 2010 at the age of 98.

Deadline to apply for Orland property tax rebate Dec. 13     The deadline to apply for the village of Orland Park’s residential property tax rebate is fast approaching.     Eligible Orland Park residents must apply by 5 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13. The Village Board voted to rebate $2.2 million in residential property taxes as a result of the village of Orland Park’s strong financial position. This will mark a village tax rebate for nine of the last 12 years.     “We began rebating a portion of the property taxes that residents pay to the village in 2003, and despite a suspension of the program during the economic downturn, we’re pleased that the village is again in a strong financial position to offer the rebate,” said Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin.     The total amount rebated to Village of Orland Park residents from 2003 to 2012 was just over $30 million.     Consistent with last year, this year’s rebate will be evenly divided among eligible residents whose submitted applications and documentation are reviewed and approved by the village.     “Residents have three ways to apply for the rebate,” said Trustee Carole Griffin Ruzich, chair of the village’s Finance and Information Technology Committee.     “They can apply online at op-

taxrebate.com or residents can download a paper application and bring the completed application to the Village Hall or they can pick up an application at specific village buildings and apply in person or by mail.”     An instructional video of the online application process is running on the village’s cable television stations, Orland Park Comcast Channel 4 and A T & T U-Verse Channel 99 and on the village’s website at orlandpark. org. Residents who need additional assistance when applying online can also visit the village’s Finance Department Cashier’s Office in the Village Hall.     Paper applications are available at the Frederick T. Owens Village Hall at 14700 South Ravinia Avenue; the Recreation Administration Building at 14600 S. Ravinia Ave.; the village’s Sportsplex at 11351 W. 159th St. and at the Orland Park Public Library, 14800 S. Ravinia Ave.     Along with the required appli-

cation, an eligible resident must include copies of their 2012 second installment property tax bill, driver’s license and a utility bill. Those applying online can scan and upload copies of the documents or take a picture of them with a cell phone or tablet.     If a village of Orland Park water bill account number is provided during the online process or on the paper application, a copy of a recent utility bill is not required.     “The online process makes it more convenient for those who are familiar with computers and uploading documents,” McLaughlin said. “However, we have paper applications for those who don’t use computers,” he noted.     On Monday, the Village Board unanimously adopted the 2014 budget, maintaining a flat levy. This means no increase in village property taxes.     Questions about the Tax Rebate Program may be directed to the village’s Tax Rebate Hotline at 403-3086.

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Retire Smart by Jill Schlesinger

    How much money can you safely withdraw from your nest egg each year of your retirement? This is a most vexing question, because it depends on the answer to some tough questions. How long will you live? What is the expected return of your assets? Will your spending change during retirement?     To help retirees, many of whom were no longer eligible for standard pension plans, the academic community jumped in. The first study on the subject occurred in the 1990s. William Bengen published the earliest research in the October 1994 Journal of Financial Planning, “Determining Withdrawal Rates Using Historical Data.”     Bergen tried to determine what the highest withdrawal amount of money, as a percentage of retirement assets, would be over the course of 30 years. He also factored in inflation, so after the base line percentage was determined, retirees could receive a bit more in subsequent years. Assuming that retirement portfolios had a 50/50 allocation for stocks and bonds, Bengen found that 4.15 percent was the magic withdrawal rate.     Soon after, in 1998, the “Trinity

Study” tweaked Bengen’s model by using a different bond index. The Trinity Study used longterm high-grade corporate bond returns instead of Bengen’s 5-year intermediate-term government bond returns, which resulted in a slightly lower 4 percent withdrawal rate. Most advisors seemed satisfied with the round number of 4 percent, which meant they could tell clients that a portfolio of $1 million would support a first year withdrawal of $40,000.     There was almost universal agreement that 4 percent was the right number, all the way through 2007. But the financial crisis and recession blew up notions of the 4 percent rule, as investors faced plunging portfolios and a murky future. Academics soon worried that conditions under which the 4 percent rule was adopted no longer existed. After all, in the 1990s, when 4 percent became the de facto rule of thumb, investment returns were higher. At that time, balanced portfolios were earning about 8 percent annually. In the post-crisis era, those returns have been halved, which could spell trouble for retirees.     Earlier this year, a Morningstar report found that in order to

Mortgage Rates Around the Area

safely assume (with 90 percent probability) that you would not deplete your retirement nest egg over a 30-year time horizon, you would need to reduce the safe withdrawal rate to 2.8 percent from 4 percent.     That finding threw retirees and near-retirees into a tizzy, because a lower withdrawal rate meant that everyone would need a much larger nest egg. In fact, the seemingly innocent 1.2 percent drop in withdrawal rate “would require 42.9 percent more savings if the retiree wanted to pull the same dollar value out of the portfolio annually as he or she would get with a 4 percent withdrawal rate from a smaller portfolio.” Ouch!

Sudoku

(Puzzle on page 8)

3 2 7 8 6 5 7 2 9 1 3 4 6 9 5 8 1 4

1 4 9 6 2 8

6 7 5 3 1 9

RATES 4.375 3.375 3.125

APR 4.389 3.388 3.157

POINTS 0  0  0

Prospect Federal (as of Dec. 2) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES 4.500 4.250 3.500

APR 4.539 4.303 3.565

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

POINTS .25  .25  .25

8 9 6 1 4 2 5 7 3

4 5 1 9 3 7 8 2 6

9 3 8 2 5 6 4 1 7

7 6 2 4 8 1 3 5 9

5 1 4 7 9 3 6 8 2

© 2009 Hometown Content

Answer

(Puzzle on page 8)

United Trust Bank (as of Nov. 26) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

2 8 3 5 7 4

R A W B A R

O L E A R Y

S P L I C E

S C O R S E S E

C A M E O V E R

O N E P I E C E

C A S T S A T O N A L

O E G C A A H R A B S L O A I R C U B U D I T T I S H E S E S Y S R E P I I R I S D U N K A M E S

A B B A

T R E N C H

S L I N G P E N D S

P E T O S I R I S

L C O O R B E

S P H E R E S O F I A

M A T A H A R I

E V I D E N C E

D E S E R T E R

D I F F E R

A T T E N D

B E S E T S


The Regional News Thursday, December 5, 2013

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor

outhwest

sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, December 5, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

‘We did put the school on the map’ Despite state title loss, Richards looks ahead By Jeff Vorva    DE KALB — The expressions were grim.    When a handful of Richards football players were awarded the second-place trophy on a portable stage after finishing as state runner-up in Class 6A football, disappointment was etched in some of their faces.    The trophy was brought down off the stage to the rest of the team, but there was no hooting or hollering accompanying the act, nor was the trophy raised over players’ heads. It was merely a matter of quiet acceptance.    Batavia, a team the Bulldogs had defeated in Week 2 of the regular season, denied them a state championship by making off with a 34-14 victory Saturday afternoon at Northern Illinois University’s Huskie Stadium. Richards (12-2) was making its first state appearance since 2001 and was seeking its third-ever crown.    The Bulldogs captured back-toback titles in 1988 and ’89 while going undefeated both seasons.    While Richards’ present-day players fell just short of reaching the mountaintop and were understandably upset, junior quarterback Hasan Muhammad-Rogers

was able to reflect positively on a memorable campaign once the loss had soaked in.    “It was fun — it was really fun,” he said. “We had a lot of success during different points in the season. Everyone worked so hard.    “Coming off the field last year [following a 23-19 second-round loss to Lemont], we said this year that we didn’t want to end the season with a loss. We did end the season with a loss, but it was here in the championship and not the second round, like we usually did.    “I believe we did put the school back on the map. Everyone knows we can play football here, so we need to keep working hard and we’ll be there again.”    The Bulldogs’ stubborn defense was put to the test right away, as Batavia’s first five full possessions resulted in touchdowns. The only time Batavia didn’t reach Richards’ end zone during that stretch was at the end of the opening half, when quarterback Micah Coffey took a knee on his team’s lone snap of that particular series.    In its first 13 contests this season, Richards had posted six shutouts and held two other foes to six points. Only Evergreen Park had topped the 30-point mark against

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards receiver Tacari Carpenter finds himself in a sea of red as a horde of Batavia players celebrate the winning of a Class 6A football championship Saturday in DeKalb. Batavia avenged a regular-season loss to the Bulldogs with a 34-14 victory. the Bulldogs, doing so in Week 5 en route to a 35-34 win.    Four of Batavia’s TDs occurred before intermission, including a 96-yard Coffey-to-Michael Moffatt aerial strike that put the Bulldogs into a 14-0 hole. Batavia’s possession began at the 2 after Richards punter Shawn Chiaramonte had his kick downed there.    Also hurting the Bulldogs was

Hinsdale Central Tournament

their own failure to capitalize on a prime scoring opportunity late in the second period. Trailing 28-7 at the time, Richards drove down to the Batavia 3-yard line, but could not punch the ball across the goal line.    “I don’t know if that was deflating, but momentum-wise, if we scored we go into halftime down two touchdowns,” Bulldogs

coach Tony Sheehan. “But getting down there and not scoring really hurt us.    “Hats off to [Batavia] — they did a great job. We couldn’t make that play when we needed to.”    Despite the lopsided final score, Richards amassed 389 yards. Muhammad-Rogers threw for 226 yards on an 18-of-41 performance, which included a touch-

down toss to Dedrick Shannon. Shannon had eight catches in all for 112 yards.    Romeo Johnson paced the ground attack with 97 yards on seven carries, while MuhammadRogers added 65 yards on 16 totes and accounted for the Bulldogs’ other score. However, Muhammad-Rogers was also sacked three (Continued on page 3)

John McBride Classic

Bravura beginning Max-imum efficiency Eagles knock off De La Salle in opener

Strus carries Chargers to another tourney crown

effort paved the way for the Char- finale, for instance, his heroics gers’ 66-51 victory over Nazareth were supported by solid outings    It would seemingly be difficult Academy on Saturday night that from Kevin White (17 points,    A year ago, they simply hit the for a 6-foot-6 individual to stay locked up a third straight Thanks- six assists), Anthony Gardner ground. giving tournament title for the (10 points, eight rebounds) and hidden.    This time, the Sandburg Eagles    In John Daniels’ opinion, how- hosts. Jeff Goral (nine points, eight hit the ground running. ever, Max Strus has somehow    Strus earned tourney MVP hon- boards).    The Eagles eventually recovors for his weeklong performance,    While White’s abilities became managed to do that. ered from a disastrous start to    Daniels, who is in his 11th but he didn’t have to carry the recognized a year ago, guys like (Continued on page 5) the 2012-13 basketball season, coaching season at Stagg and Stagg load all by himself. In the enough to where they played plus21st overall, unabashedly refers .500 ball over the final 17 games to Strus, a still-growing senior, as and created a positive outlook for the best player he’s ever coached. the current campaign. And coach And the veteran leader insists “it’s Todd Allen hopes that last Monnot even close.” day’s unexpected conquest of De    “You know you have a Division La Salle was the first indicator I athlete when you have one,” that those feelings of optimism Daniels said. “He’s better than weren’t misplaced. some of the guys who have com   Sandburg didn’t make it mitted to those schools.”    By “those schools,” Daniels was referring to the mid-sized NCAA Division I universities in Illinois, none of which has approached Strus with a scholarship offer. The latter’s decision to eschew AAU basketball for baseball at Stagg has likely kept Strus a relatively unknown commodity to the collegiate basketball world. By Ken Karrson pair of projected reserves, coach ous reasons, its no-names stepped    “He wants to play college basJohn Chappetto’s hoopsters en- forward. Guys like Jaylan Cat- ketball,” Daniels said, “but Max    Football took center stage at tered the annual Thanksgiving- ledge Thaer Othman, Ameen decided to play baseball [last Richards last week, and some bas- week District 218 Tournament in Hussein and Greg Slaughter did spring]. He wanted to be out ketball players went along for the shorthanded condition. And the so well enough, in fact, to allow there with his friends and have ride to DeKalb. situation worsened when another the Bulldogs to gain four straight a good time.    That’s where the Bulldogs veteran, guard Deon Alexander, victories in the first week of the    “These [scouts] need to come see how good he is. He can handle sought to bring home the Oak missed the last two of Richards’ 2013-14 campaign. Lawn school’s first football state four contests for family-related    A second-half surge broke open the ball and he’s got 25-foot range, championship in 24 years. And reasons. a close game against the Red- but I can also post him up and among those individuals con-    Then, just to top off the mount- Hawks and sent Richards on its he can go to the rim. Max makes tributing to a season’s worth of ing unfavorable circumstances, way to a solid 59-40 triumph in me look really smart.” notable achievements were receiv- Bulldogs forward Josh Meier was the championship tilt at Eisen-    Strus did a little bit of everyers Dedrick Shannon and Spencer chained to the bench for all but hower. Earlier in the week, the thing for the Chargers during Photo by Jeff Vorva Tears, both of whom missed out a few minutes of the first half Bulldogs notched victories over last week’s season-opening John on preseason basketball practices of Friday’s meeting with Marist Shepard (83-55), Andrew (58-26) McBride Classic. He never scored Stagg’s Kevin White releases a shot close to the basket during because of their gridiron obliga- because of foul trouble. and Chicago Perspectives Charter fewer than 21 points in any of last Wednesday’s game against St. Laurence in the John McBride Stagg’s four encounters, and his Classic. White scored 20 points to help the Chargers register a    But while Richards’ bigger (67-58) at D-Wade Court. tions. 21-point, six-rebound, six-assist victory over the Vikings.    Minus those two, as well as a names were non-factors for vari(Continued on page 7) By Ken Karrson

through last week’s Hinsdale Central Tournament unscathed, but it did split four games. And, as Allen pointed out, the field was highly competitive.    “On the last day of the Hinsdale tournament, any team could have finished either first or last,” he said. “It was definitely not a cupcake tournament. It was a good test for the start [of the season], and hopefully that prepares us for the rest of the year because we do not schedule lightly.    “I love our group [of players]. We’ve got a lot of work to do, but I’m looking forward to the season. I think we’ll be pretty good.”    Not too long ago, Allen figured

on the Eagles being very good, thanks to the slated return of senior Malek Harris and the arrival of 6-foot-7 junior TJ Vorva from Marist. However, an injury has delayed Vorva’s introduction to the Sandburg lineup.    As for Harris, his career with the Eagles is over. Another schoolrules infraction saw to that.    “I’m still not over it [completely],” Allen said of the offseason turmoil. “But I have to be because I’ve got to get our team ready.”    He certainly had Sandburg adequately prepared for De La Salle, which entered its seasonopener owning a top-25 ranking (Continued on page 5)

By Ken Karrson

District 218 Tournament

Making a name for themselves New faces key Bulldogs’ sweep to tourney title

PLAYOFF FOOTBALL FORECAST    Jason Maholy should buy Tyler Oakley a nice Christmas present.

MVP

  Oakley ran for a touchdown and returned two fumble recoveries   for scores to help lead Lena-Winslow to a 28-21 victory over   Tri-Valley in the Class 1A state championship to help Maholy seal   the postseason MVP honors by one game over regular season King   Ken Karrson and also-ran Jeff Vorva. Overall, Karrson and Maholy   finished the season tied at 109-31. The five forecasters picked a   combined 700 games and finished 527-173, which is a 75.3   percentage. That rates about a “C” grade. We thank our contestants   — especially reader Wally Findysz — for playing and everyone for   reading and looking at our five (cough, cough) handsome mugs all   this time. Until next August ....

Last week: Final regular season: Postseason: Overall

Ken Karrson 4-5 73-14 36-17 109-31

Jeff Vorva 6-3 69-18 36-17 105-35

Anthony Nasella 6-3 64-23 34-19 98-42

Jason Maholy 5-4 72-15 37-16 109-31

Wally Findysz 5-4 72-15 34-19 106-34


2

Section 2 Thursday, December 5, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Drink to our health? Nah, they’ll toast their wealth

Bartosh (Reprinted from Oct. 20, about them after receiving a 2011) publicity email for the newest “next big thing” in sports    Is it just me, or are some of drinks. you also growing weary of con-    Once upon a time, athletes stantly being told what’s good drank water to quench their and not good for us? thirst, especially when liquor    I’m talking food and drink wasn’t readily available. Hey, here. Most of us are already anything that came from a tap aware that stepping in front was OK by them. of a speeding train, sticking a    And back in the olden days, fork into a plugged-in toaster there was no such thing as Gaand standing under a tree dur- torade, which wasn’t developed ing a thunderstorm are not ac- until the late 1960s and, for tivities undertaken with health years afterward, was only availconsciousness in mind. able in that kind of funky, some   The dietary police might not what unidentifiable flavor. be so bad if they arrived at an    Nevertheless, the old-timers opinion and then never wavered survived on the water-only forfrom it, but theories abound and mula, but that’s passé now, untend to change with the same less it’s the kind that comes in frequency as Jennifer Aniston’s bottles and isn’t charged for on love interests. Two items that a utility bill. Even Gatorade and seem to cause the most confu- its various offshoots are becomsion are eggs and coffee. ing yesterday’s news.    About 40 years ago, eggs went    That’s what a place called from being an accepted breakfast ChicExecs PR told me in so staple to an accelerated date- many words. The company maker with the Grim Reaper. is promoting a product called Eat too many egg yolks, we were “OXYwater” that “gives you a warned back then, and we might blast of healthy hydration, with as well just take a radio into none of the bad stuff.” the bathtub with us because    According to the ChicExecs either option was going to be press release, OXYwater is “the a quick killer. world’s first enhanced water    But then the poultry farm- to contain added oxygen, B ers must have donated money vitamins, trace minerals, antito a worthy cause because they oxidants and electrolytes.” It somehow ingratiated themselves then reported how this “groundto all the food-watchdog groups breaking drink” has even atand, lo and behold, eggs suddenly tracted the attention of star weren’t so bad after all — until athletes such as Eric Weems, that time when someone decided Kenny Gregory and Shaun they should be considered so Stonerook, and that got me to again. And back and forth it thinking some more.    What I thought about most has gone for decades.    I’ve kind of lost track of eggs’ was how Weems, Gregory and status these days and don’t re- Stonerook had raised themselves ally know whether they’re cur- up from anonymity with such rently on the eat-‘em-by-the-doz- rapidity. But I didn’t want to en or avoid-like-rat-poison list. belabor the point and wreck Maybe I’ll check on it while I’m ChicExecs’ high level of excitedowning my omelet tomorrow ment.    So I thought about OXYmorning.    Coffee falls into the same water’s ingredients instead. If pendulum-swinging category “water” is part of the name, — one minute it’s preventing then H2O would seemingly be heart disease, the next minute contained within the drink. it’s causing the illness. Creating    Now, as any of my past scia much bigger problem, though, ence teachers could attest from is these clowns whose main job their futile attempts to keep me is to befuddle consumers. awake in class through the years,    Why all the talk about digest- I’m no chemist. I am, however, ible products? I began thinking capable of tooling around the

Internet and locating scientific heads much wiser than mine, and a few of them pointed out that adding oxygen to the H2O formula could create hydrogen peroxide (H2O2).    Gee, no wonder the beverage would cleanse your system.    But let’s assume that doesn’t happen. That still leaves us with “trace minerals.” Sorry, but the word “trace” always conjures up images of something better off omitted from my diet.    Of course, since OXYwater comes in island citrus, passion berry and cherry pomegranate, we won’t notice anything but the taste. And supposedly, one drink will supply us with antioxidant power equal to five servings of fresh fruit, which would seem a good thing.    But does all this even matter to a real athlete? My son has been a runner for years, and I jokingly tell him that he’s the envy of every middle-aged guy I know because he can eat absolutely anything he wants and not suffer consequences for it because he burns off so much energy and is in peak physical condition.    I mean, the kid downs enough chocolate chip cookies to throw a half-dozen of those Keebler elves into sugar shock, and yet his body-fat percentage is about five. I have that much on my big toe.    The point is, let’s allow people to make their own choices. If OXYwater happens to be that choice, great, but I’m tired of feeling guilty if I don’t indulge in the latest eating or drinking craze.    And just remember that the cycle never ends. No sooner will OXYwater catch on than we’ll be presented with a newer sports-drink option, one that will undoubtedly try to convince us that consuming OXYwater is no different than drinking fluids drawn straight from beautiful Lake Erie.    It’s all part of the promotional game. We’ve all learned to live with it. I’ve also learned to live with something else.    But first I have to find my darn coffee cup.

Brimfield Tournament

Riding the roller coaster Knights live up-and-down existence in first week By Ken Karrson    Great America is closed for the winter, but Chicago Christian coach Kevin Pittman still managed to ride a roller coaster last weekend.    His youthful basketball team put him aboard it by living an up-and-down existence during a two-day stay at the downstate Brimfield Tournament. Even though they were forced to play four games over that short period, the Knights managed to gain a split, with both wins realized by double-digit margins.    A similar fate befell Christian, however, on the two occasions when it wound up on the short end of the final score. Therein lay the reason for the twists and turns in Pittman’s emotions.    “We talked about the rollercoaster ride earlier, and I was hoping for the sign that said I wasn’t tall enough to get on it,” he joked. “Inexperience and youth really make themselves evident at certain points of games.    “Talent can overcome some of that, but it really was a baptism under fire. We’re in a definite youth movement, and hopefully it’s going to make us better before very long.”    Pittman admitted his patience was sometimes stretched thin by the Knights’ bouts of inconsistency, but he just as quickly acknowledged that possessing such a trait is crucial when dealing with a roster featuring five sophomores and only two seniors who have any sort of previous varsity experience from which to draw.    “Patience is a virtue and I’ll have to have it,” Pittman said. “Watching [some of] that unfold wasn’t easy, but enough good things were interspersed with them to show it’s not hopeless.”    One area that pleasantly surprised Pittman was the Knights’ ability to score. The fewest points they accrued in any game was 45, and that particular contest ended in victory. Christian also demonstrated some offensive balance, as three different players topped the team in points over

the first three games.    In the opener against Tremont, that individual was senior Blaine Wright, who finished with 20 points, seven rebounds and five steals. Farrell Winchester tallied nine points and five other Knights reached the scoring column.    That was the good news. Not so good was Christian’s inability to successfully conclude promising possessions often enough.    “There were probably 10 shots in the paint that we missed,” Pittman said. “We noticed in practice we have a hard time finishing.”    Had more of those field-goal attempts fallen, the Knights probably wouldn’t have done so. But without the short-range shots being counted in the “baskets” category, Christian was forced to absorb a 61-51 setback.    The Knights went 19-of-56 from the floor, which was actually right in line with the Turks’ 20-of-55 showing. Little separated the two squads statistically elsewhere, either — Tremont had one more made free throw and two fewer turnovers, while Christian snared three additional rebounds.    However, the Turks grabbed 15 offensive boards, including four after missed foul shots.    “That was one that got away,” Pittman said. “You’re always disappointed when you don’t win, but we did some good things. We left too many of their shooters unaccounted for, but we never put our heads down and our kids fought back.”    Pittman was referring to a third-period sequence in which the Knights whittled a 15-point Turks lead down to six at one juncture. Tremont was back up by 10 at the quarter break and Christian could make no further inroads over the remaining eight minutes.    “We just didn’t have enough in the arsenal,” Pittman said. Chicago Christian 51 Princeville 36    The same wasn’t true in Friday’s second encounter, where the Knights outscored the Princes in every quarter and pulled away for a solid victory. Daylon Washington (15 points), Marcus Parker

(13 points, three assists), Trevor Wolterink (10 points) and Wright (six points, 10 rebounds, five assists, five steals) all played pivotal roles for Christian.    But while he had no complaints about the success itself, Pittman felt his guys had performed at less than peak efficiency. As proof, he pointed to a brief third-period span.    The Knights were ahead by 10 points, but then saw that advantage sliced in half in a matter of seconds. A Princeville field goal, free throw and putback came one right after the other and temporarily threatened Christian’s well-being.    “We were basically in control for most of the game, but could never get a [firm] handle on it,” Pittman said. “It should have been [a wider margin] than this, but every time we seemed to have a comfortable lead, something [negative] would happen. I’m hoping to live and learn from this.”    The Knights once again had to deal with errant marksmanship as they nailed only 1-of-9 3s and 22-of-51 shots overall. Christian was able to offset those difficulties with a defense that caused 25 turnovers and cowed the Princes into 12-of-41 shooting. Chicago Christian 45 Midwest Central 35    Defense was again the watchword in Saturday’s first contest, as the Knights held the Raiders to single-digit scoring in three of four quarters and used that as a springboard to another win.    Christian’s own attack wasn’t exactly sizzling, but Parker (14 points) and Wolterink (11) gave it some punch. Washington and Wright both delivered eight points, but only one other player tallied for the Knights.    “It’s a ‘W,’ but [it’s fortunate] they don’t put pictures in the box score,” Pittman said. “We looked OK, but we didn’t play extremely well. We didn’t make it any easier for ourselves.” Brimfield 72 Chicago Christian 49    Due to the logistical nightmare (Continued on page 4)

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist’s Brooke Wyderski smiles after getting back to her feet following a fall last Monday against South Shore. The Lady RedHawks didn’t slip, however, in their own Thanksgiving tournament as they downed the Lady Tars in the opening round.

Girls’ basketball roundup

Lady Spartans perfect through five By Anthony Nasella    Oak Lawn coach Janet Meyers can confidently say that the members of her Lady Spartans team truly enjoying playing basketball with one another.    And through the first five games of the 2013-14 season, her athletes are also winning.    That certainly was true at last week’s Glenbard East Tournament, where Oak Lawn captured a championship by triumphing four times in a row. The Lady Spartans edged Downers Grove North 60-58 in the title contest last Wednesday, one day after they slipped past Glenbard South 55-52 in the semifinal round.    Oak Lawn’s Brianna Markusic was named the tournament MVP, while LaTondra Brooks and Jannah Mahmoud joined her on the all-tourney team. By sweeping their tournament contests, the Lady Spartans are off to their best start to a season under Meyers.    “The girls are playing good ball,” she said. “We’ve beaten some good teams. Our opponents have gotten more competitive, so it’s great to see my girls step up to the challenge and succeed.    “Brianna really came up big for us. She played well in fourthquarter pressure situations, pulling down rebounds and putting herself into positions to score. LaTondra and Jannah not only played great, but they both did an excellent job getting Brianna the ball.    “In every game, we seem to have someone new stepping up for us. A lot of these girls have been together for several seasons, and they’re excited about the season, playing with each other and winning. This is a fun team to coach and to watch.”    Oak Lawn opened tournament play with a 59-33 victory over Glenbard West. The Lady Spartans jumped out to a 20-3 lead in the opening period and never looked back, as Mahmoud scored 12 of her game-high 18 points in that quarter.    Oak Lawn continued to build on its lead in the second stanza, except this time Brooks led the way

with nine points. By the end of the third quarter, the score was 53-20 in the Lady Spartans’ favor.    In addition to their points, Mahmoud snared six rebounds, while Brooks tacked on six steals and four assists. Also chipping in were Brooke Annerino (eight points, five steals) and Kelsey Luckett (five steals). ***    In its next game, Oak Lawn prevailed 59-40 over Glenbard East. However, the victory did not come without a bit of struggle.    The Lady Spartans, in fact, trailed 16-15 after one period, their initial first-quarter deficit of the young season. But after making some adjustments, Oak Lawn surged ahead and held a 30-26 halftime edge and then used a 13-4 surge in the third frame to seize control.    Mahmoud had another solid performance for the Lady Spartans as she notched a double-double of 20 points and 11 rebounds. Brooks backed her with 14 points, seven rebounds seven steals and six assists, Markusic finished with nine points and six rebounds, and Annerino tallied eight points.    In order to beat Glenbard South, Oak Lawn had to overcome a team that boasted a 6foot-4 center. It was when that center encountered foul trouble in the second quarter that the Lady Spartans began to make their move, which translated into a 32-21 halftime lead.    Glenbard South bounced back in the third period by outscoring Oak Lawn 13-5, which reduced the deficit to three points at the break. The Lady Spartans’ advantage had been built up to 53-43 with 2:10 to go on Markusic’s basket off a Brooks feed when Glenbard South made one final lunge.    The differential was just four with 50 seconds left, but Annerino’s pass to Markusic resulted in another bucket and that was enough to extinguish Glenbard’s last threat.    Markusic netted 13 of her gamehigh 20 points in the fourth frame, which were all but two of the points Oak Lawn garnered in the last eight minutes. She also had

nine rebounds in the contest. Annerino scored 10 points and was a perfect 6-of-6 at the free-throw line, while Brooks finished with nine points, six assists and four steals.    This was the first game in which the Lady Spartans encountered foul trouble. Brooks fouled out, and both Markusic and Mahmoud played with four.    “It was nice to see Brianna step up when we needed her to,” Meyers said. “She was solid under pressure in the fourth quarter. We also got some quality minutes from Dee Dee Shatat (six points), Alyssa Radoicic (four points) and sophomore Kellie O’Connor when the starters got in foul trouble.    “That game was our biggest challenge of the season so far.” ***    The championship-game clash with Downers Grove North was another tense affair. The Lady Trojans opened the game with a 3-point basket and extended the lead to 4-0 before Oak Lawn got into any sort of offensive flow.    Brooks scored on a driving layup and Shatat hit the first of her two 3-point baskets to put Oak Lawn up 5-4. Brooks extended the lead to 7-4 with a steal and a layup on the next possession, and the Lady Spartans held an 18-13 lead at the period’s end.    Downers Grove North outscored Oak Lawn 16-12 in the second quarter and trailed by just one at intermission. The Lady Spartans’ lead stood at only four points through three stanzas and never grew past seven.    “We got careless with the ball and made some turnovers that we were not making early in the game,” Meyers said. “Downers Grove then capitalized on those turnovers.”    However, Markusic once again stepped up big in the fourth quarter by scoring 12 of Oak Lawn’s 14 points. After the Lady Trojans cut their deficit to 57-56 with 1:04 to go, Markusic received a pass from Shatat, drew a foul and made one free throw.    Then after Downers Grove North pulled even at 58, Brooks (Continued on page 4)

Riverside-Brookfield Tournament

New day dawns brightly Crusaders solid in Harrigan’s debut week By Ken Karrson    A new day — actually four of them within the same week — dawned more brightly for Brother Rice than might have been expected.    The 2013-14 Crusaders, after all, bear little resemblance to last year’s 20-win contingent. Gone from that squad are Player of the Year Alex Majewski and other key contributors, not to mention coach Pat Richardson.    For the first time since the 198889 season, Rice’s hoops program is under the direction of somebody other than Richardson, whose teams won 433 games over 24 years. That alone would give the Crusaders a vastly different look, but one thing stayed the same when Rice got the current campaign underway at the RiversideBrookfield Tournament.    The Crusaders still know how to win.    Officially, they did so only twice, as they got the better of Kenwood Academy and Rich Central. But in terms of performance, new coach Rick Harrigan considered Rice’s opening week a successful one.    “Except for the first quarter of the Oak Park-River Forest game

and the last three minutes against Riverside-Brookfield, I think we had a pretty good week,” Harrigan said. “We were really close to being 3-1.    “I love the positive energy of our team and the enthusiasm. These kids know they have kind of a clean slate and an opportunity. At least for the first week, we played about nine or 10 guys to try to stay fresh.”    While Harrigan is undeniably turning a page in the Crusaders’ basketball story, he is mindful of what came before. That’s not surprising, given that he is a Rice alumnus who credits his studentathlete experience there for planting the seeds of successful college and post-collegiate careers.    “It all started at Brother Rice,” Harrigan said. “I learned hard work and discipline, and carried those with me into college and beyond.    “If I have half the success [Richardson] had, we’ll be in good shape. I want to appreciate the history and continue the tradition, but also lay some new groundwork by taking bits and pieces of what I’ve learned from some great coaches.”    Along with the new, the Crusad-

ers benefited from a bit of the old last week. Their two most experienced players, seniors Ray Rubio and Quinn Niego, showed up in a big way throughout Rice’s appearance at R-B.    They especially excelled in the Crusaders’ 65-58 victory over Kenwood last Tuesday. Each player scored 27 points, collected five rebounds and dished out an assist. Behind the Rubio-Niego duo, Rice tallied 48 second-half points to overtake the Broncos.    “I think they’re both college-caliber players, and they started out great,” Harrigan said. “They work hard and really care, and we’ll go as far as they’ll take us.”    That being said, Harrigan stated a preference for seeing the scoring load distributed among a greater number of people. He felt Niego was sometimes a bit too passive when dealing with teammates, while Rubio may have tried to do too much, but Harrigan isn’t worried that his other athletes will become overly deferential to either player.    “We don’t have 6-[foot]-7 shot blockers or guys that’ll get 15 rebounds, so we have to play [with balance among] five guys and (Continued on page 7)


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, December 5, 2013 Section 2

SXU sports summary

Football players receive postseason honors    The 2013 football season didn’t produce the kind of team accomplishments St. Xavier University has grown used to in recent years, but individual accolades were still plentiful in the postseason.    A total of 12 Cougars were recognized by the Mid-States Football Association as members of its AllMidwest League squad. Nine of those players were named to the first team, and two of them — junior Nick DeBenedetti and senior Spencer Nolan — were chosen in a couple of categories.    DeBenedetti copped first-team honors as both a receiver and return specialist, while Nolan was tabbed as the first-team punter and second-team place-kicker. Other first-team selections from SXU were senior running back Nick Pesek (Oak Lawn), senior offensive lineman Tim Ladd, senior linebackers Zach Dolph and Dave Marciano, junior defensive lineman Greg Hayward (Oak Lawn) and junior defensive back Jacob Ghinazzi.    Freshman receiver Stephen Simms was picked for the second team and the trio of redshirt freshman offensive lineman Luke Rowell, freshman offensive lineman Kevin Lonergan (Oak Lawn) and junior defensive lineman JD Barchard were all honorable-mention selections.    “Even though we didn’t have the kind of season we’re accustomed to having, it’s still nice that so many of our guys received individual recognition from the MSFA,” Cougars coach Mike Feminis said. “I’m particularly happy for our senior captains Dave Marciano, Zach Dolph, Jacob Ghinazzi, Tim Ladd and Nick Pesek, who were all voted to the first team.    “They were all great leaders and very instrumental in helping us win the NAIA national championship in 2011 and solidifying our program as one of the best in the nation. But as good as they were on the field, they’re some of the best character kids I’ve ever coached, and I know they will all find huge success in whatever they do.”    SXU finished 18th in the nation after posting a 7-4 record. It missed out on the NAIA national tournament for the first time since 2008. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL    For the third straight week, the Cougars were forced to make adjustments in the wake of a setback and then rebounded with a victory in their next game.    That was again the case last weekend, when SXU took part in the Siena Heights Tournament in Adrian, Mich. After being held to their lowest point total of the season in an 84-67 loss to the No. 16-ranked host school on Friday, the Cougars bounced back to notch an 82-70 triumph over 11th-ranked Shawnee State University on Saturday night.    Morgan Stuut, who was named to the all-tournament team, exploded for 30 points in the win over Shawnee State. Suzie Broski scored 17 points against Shawnee State and led SXU (6-3) with 13 points versus Siena Heights.    “Morgan and Suzie really had great performances in a game where we needed a win,” Cougars coach Bob Hallberg said. “We went with an eight-player rotation against Shawnee State, and that seemed to work for us.    “We beat a very good opponent in Shawnee State, and nobody has played a tougher schedule so far than we have. With nine games under our belt and just one home game — [and] six of our nine opponents ranked in the NAIA — we’ll definitely be benefiting by the time we reach our conference competition.”    SXU led Shawnee State most of the way after completing a 17-4 run with one of Stuut’s five 3pointers at the 12:50 mark of the first half. The Cougars took control of the game in the second half and built a double-digit advantage late to secure the victory.    In addition to their points, Stuut and Broski combined to pull down 13 boards for SXU. Sophomore forward Caitlin McMahon led the rebounding effort with 11, including seven on the offensive end. McMahon also chipped in seven points, while senior point guard Jordan Brandt totaled 13 points and two assists.    “I know I have to keep Caitlin out there because she is our tallest player and a big rebounding force for us,” Hallberg said. “She

needs more minutes.    “Jordan Brandt had a great tournament with back-to-back solid games. She was all over the floor in the win over Shawnee State with 13 points in 33 minutes.” ***    Siena Heights and SXU both shot 43 percent from the field on Friday, but the host Saints won the rebounding battle 42-33 and the Cougars committed 25 fouls, which sent Siena Heights to the line 36 times and resulted in 28 points off free throws.    Brandt also scored in double figures for SXU on Saturday with 11 points on 4-of-5 shooting. Stuut just missed another double-double outing for the Cougars with eight points and a game-best 11 rebounds while also supplying six assists and four steals.    Senior guard Niara Harris and McMahon each chipped in nine points.    SXU struggled to find its longrange shot, hitting just 1-of-11 3-point attempts in the game. The Cougars led 13-8 in the opening minutes, but the Saints tied the game shortly thereafter — one of 10 deadlocks in the first half.    Siena Heights took a 40-36 lead into intermission, saw SXU knot the score at 44 on Broski’s layup after play resumed and then responded with a 10-2 run that put it ahead for good. The Cougars got within three points multiple times, but critical turnovers and missed shots in the closing minutes sealed SXU’s fate.    While Hallberg admitted the Cougars simply didn’t play especially well against Siena Heights, he also realized something else about his team. This discovery concerned the number of players he should typically use.    “I played [all] 13 players in a very close game,” Hallberg said, “and I came to the conclusion that I had to make some adjustments, which really helped us out the next game. Everybody on the team are great players, but it’s hard to play them all in a game.    “We got out-rebounded, outshot and outplayed by a pretty good team on their home court. And when Morgan is only limited to eight points and not her normal 25-to-30 points, we’re just going to struggle.”    SXU returns to CCAC action this week with games against Roosevelt and Judson universities. The Cougars host the latter Saturday at 1 p.m.    “It’s been a while since we’ve had a home game, so that will be a nice change of pace for us,” Hallberg said. — Anthony Nasella MEN’S BASKETBALL    This Jack was also nimble and, much to the delight of everyone within the Cougars basketball program, very quick to return to the SXU lineup.    Unlike the character made famous in a children’s fable, however, this Jack — last name Krieger — proved himself in a man’s world. After undergoing ACL surgery in June, the junior guard figured to be idled for quite some time.    “I wasn’t even sure he was coming back at all,” Cougars coach Tom O’Malley said.    Krieger had no such qualms himself; in fact, he predicted a pre-Christmas return despite the severity of his injury. Various medical people recently agreed as they issued him a clearance to play, and by living up to his own ambitious prognostication, Krieger gave O’Malley “a Thanksgiving present and Christmas present all rolled into one.”    “He’s a kid that really worked hard [to come back],” the coach said. “He put a lot of demands on himself and nothing’s going to faze him. We only played him parttime [last Friday] and we didn’t expect him to come in and do a lot, but he was an important factor.”    Nine-of-17 shooting from 3point range in two games at SXU’s Thanksgiving tournament proved Krieger was ready to go. He nailed three of those treys and totaled 19 points in his debut, as the Cougars pinned a 91-78 defeat on Madonna University at the Shannon Center, then contributed six 3s and 24 points to SXU’s cause on Saturday.    The Cougars needed every bit of that latter input, too, as they narrowly escaped with a 98-96 triumph over Indiana-East. Perhaps appropriately, Krieger also played a major role at the end,

3

Sports wrap By Anthony Nasella

far. We’re 4-0 and showing really good signs.    “We’re really young, which is kind of fun. They’re young, but the kids are also talented and hungry. A little green and rough around the edges, but they have great attitudes and are really scrappy — that’s a hard thing to teach.    “We’re working on learning to become tougher. We want them to learn how to beat better wrestlers and better teams by buying into the Sandburg system. I think they’re doing that.”    Seniors Adrian Gutierrez (120 pounds), Moe Shuaibi (132), Brad Crnich (145), Mathew Drozd (195) and Nate Sonneveld (heavyweight) comprise the veteran core behind Pellegrino, and sophomore Christian Robertson (126) also gained experience last winter.    Newcomers of note include sophomores Louie Hayes (106), Kevin Stearns (113), Colin Glascott (120), Christian Robertson (126), Benjamin Schneider (138), Thomas Slattery (160) and Brian Krasowski (160). Also part of the youth movement are freshmen Cole Bateman (182) and Patrick Brucki.    Brucki and Robertson are younger siblings of former state champs CJ Brucki and Ricky Robertson, respectively.    The Eagles will definitely be tested in the weeks ahead, beginning with this weekend’s quad against Batavia, Lyons Township

and Naperville North. Also on tap are the 28-team Hinsdale Central Invitational, which will include Montini and Oak Park-River Forest in the field; The Clash, which is considered the toughest tournament in the country, on Jan. 3 and 4; and dual matches versus highly ranked Glenbard North and Lockport.    “We’re not so much worried about the wins and the losses right now,” Siebert said. “We feel we have a pretty solid bunch, and we think that we’re going to get considerably better as we go on in the season.    “We’re still figuring some things out, but our attitude and work ethic is great. We hope to be a contender by the end of the year.” ***    Shepard dropped a 43-27 match to Brother Rice last Tuesday. Reigning state champion Rudy Yates recorded a pin at 113 pounds to power the Crusaders.

   With 11 of 14 starters from last season’s state championship team having graduated in the spring, this year’s Sandburg wrestling as his steal and on-target pass squad is definitely younger. set Kyle Huppe up for the game-    The Eagles still have talent, winning layup with five seconds however, most noticeably with defending state champ Johnny remaining.    O’Malley felt SXU (6-2) should Pellegrino. But he’s not going it have been able to subdue the Red alone. Wolves with a little less difficulty,    It’s already evident that Sandbut he wasn’t going to complain burg’s youthful makeup isn’t hindering its performances. The Eaabout the result.    “We’ve still got work to do, gles opened their 2013-14 season but a couple wins make you feel last Wednesday with a dual-meet better than a couple losses,” said win over Homewood-Flossmoor, O’Malley, whose club had gotten then went 3-0 at their own quadtagged with consecutive setbacks rangular on Saturday. the week before by defending    And Sandburg wasn’t too sternNAIA Division II national cham- ly challenged over the weekend, pion Cardinal Stritch University as TF South (76-3), Class 2A No. and Arizona Christian, which is 4-ranked Lincoln-Way West (44currently ranked among the top 16) and No. 2-ranked Washington from downstate (46-20) all 20 teams in Division I.    “In this particular game [against fell hard. Pellegrino (152 pounds) Indiana-East], I felt we played and fellow senior Hunter Pindel BOYS’ BOWLING poorly on defense,” O’Malley said. (195) both pinned all three of their    Brandon Dietz rolled a 277 “They pretty much got whatever opponents on Saturday and are game and 483 series for Shepard, they wanted — there were a lot 4-0 for the year, and junior Matas the Astros defeated TF North of shots [taken] where our guys thew Frostman also won three 1,993-1,676 in a South Suburban didn’t get out on their shooters times in the quad. Conference crossover match at fast enough, and they made a lot    “We’ve come across some solid Castaways Bowl in Calumet City of 3-point shots in the second half. opponents, and so far we’ve fared last Tuesday. I think they were 11-of-20 [for pretty well,” Eagles coach Eric Siebert said. “John Pellegrino is *** the game].”    Stagg suffered a 2,047-1,616 set   The Red Wolves fired away at our leader and centerpiece, but back against Lincoln-Way North a 53 percent clip from the field we also have some young, scrappy, in a SouthWest Suburban Conferoverall, a figure the Cougars were hard-nosed guys who are eager to ence crossover match last Tuesday basically able to match. However, learn and who are going about at Tinley Park Bowl. SXU wasn’t as proficient from their business the right way thus long range and, as a result, there was “never a safety lead” for it, according to O’Malley.    The Cougars got things rolling their way right away, as they netted 13 of the contest’s first 18 points within the opening four minutes. But instead of being shaken by that early blitz, Indiana-East simply responded in kind.    The Red Wolves’ 11-2 tear expunged SXU’s lead, then the visitors rallied again after the Cougars had re-established a seemingly comfortable advantage with a 27-12 spurt before halftime. By scoring 24 points in the first six minutes of the second half, Indiana-East positioned itself right alongside SXU for the remainder of the game.    In addition to Krieger’s 24-point eruption, the Cougars benefited from a 30-point, five-steal effort by senior guard Brad Karp. Sophomore forward Josh Mawhorr delivered 12 points and a team-best seven boards, while senior guard Michael Simpson provided SXU with a double-double of 10 points and 10 assists. St. Xavier 91 Photo by Jeff Vorva Madonna 78    Whatever defensive deficien- Richards quarterback Hasan Muhammad-Rogers breaks free for a gain in Saturday’s Class 6A cies popped up for the Cougars state title game. Muhammad-Rogers rushed for 65 yards and threw for 226 more in the Bulldogs’ on Saturday were nowhere to be 34-14 loss to Batavia. found the day before. when we had to.”     BAT — Michael Moffatt, 96-yd. pass    The NAIA-ranked Crusaders    Lucas White and Romel Hill from Micah Coffey (Morgano kick) were completely shut down by both had eight tackles to lead the     HLR — Dedrick Shannon, 9-yd. pass SXU over the first 20 minutes (Continued from page 1) Bulldogs’ defense, and White also from Hasan Muhammad-Rogers (Shawn and slipped well in arrears of the Chiaramonte kick) hosts. Madonna hit only 11 field times and threw three intercep- intercepted a Coffey pass.     BAT — Rourke Mullins, 25-yd. pass goals before intermission and to- tions. from Coffey (Morgano kick) taled just 25 points.    Coffey’s 229 yards on 15-of-18 Statistics     BAT — Scaccia, 1-yd. run (Morgano    “Being up by 20 points on them passing led Batavia (13-1), which was fantastic,” O’Malley said. “We totaled 451 yards. Moffatt had Richards 0 7 7 0 - 14 kick) were playing at a quicker pace, six receptions for 127 yards. Run- Batavia 14 14 6 0 - 34     BAT — Scaccia, 12-yd. run (kick failed) and we were doing everything ning back Anthony Scaccia gave we wanted to do offensively and Batavia’s offense good balance by HLR BAT     HLR — Muhammad-Rogers, 4-yd. run defensively.” 18 21 (Chiaramonte kick) rushing for 189 yards and three First downs    Indeed, while their defense TDs on 33 carries. Yds. rushing 163 222 was hampering the Crusaders,    The setback Richards doled out Yds. passing 226 229 Richards Rushing: Johnson 7-97, Muthe Cougars’ offense also carried to Batavia in September featured Total yds. 389 451 hammad-Rogers 16-65, Carpenter 1-1. its fair share of the load. Joining the locals racing out to a 31-13 Att./comp. 41-18 18-15 Passing: Muhammad-Rogers 41-18-226. Krieger on the list of ringleaders lead and then hanging on for a Fumbles/lost 1-0 1-1 Receiving: Shannon 8-112, Willett 4-27, were Karp (27 points) and Simp- five-point triumph. Batavia’s loss Had intercepted 3 1 Tears 4-21, Carpenter 2-66. son (18 points, nine assists), and was its first in the regular season Penalties/yds. 6-40 4-29 SXU fired away at a 56 percent since 2010. Punts/avg. 1-31.0 1-29.0 Batavia Rushing: Scaccia 33-189, Coffey 8-20, Green 5-13, Moneghini 1-0. Passclip (32-of-57) for the game.    “They brought a little more ing: Coffey 18-15-229. Receiving: Moffatt    “We’ve [so far] played five pressure against us this time,” Scoring teams that are top-level teams,” Sheehan said “We kind of expected     BAT — Anthony Scaccia, 1-yd. run 6-127, Scaccia 4-33, Zwart 2-28, Green 2-16, Mullins 1-25. O’Malley said. “To be able to hold it. We just couldn’t make the plays (Howie Morgano kick) our own against them, and win a majority of the games, is pretty pleasing.”    One thing O’Malley desires to avoid is developing a case of amnesia in regard to some of his players. While he’s obviously happy to have Krieger back in the fold and already being a person of influence, O’Malley wants to make sure anyone who stepped forward in his absence doesn’t suddenly become an odd man out.    “You can’t play the season hoping he’s going to come back [when it wasn’t certain],” he said of Krieger. “Hopefully, he stays healthy from now on, but we’ve got guys with six full games under them while he was out. We can’t forget about them now just because he’s back.”    Two Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference encounters were on tap for the Cougars this week. Following a matchup with Trinity International University on Tuesday, SXU squares off with Judson University on Saturday. — Ken Karrson

Richards

On the edge...and right on target!

Straight talk from Bartosh in Sports Southwest

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards junior Antonio Mitchell tackles Batavia’s Anthony Scaccia during Saturday’s Class 6A championship contest in DeKalb.


4

Section 2 Thursday, December 5, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Basketball roundup

Trinity sports report

Trolls men drop three more

(Continued from page 2) drove and dished off to Markusic, who scored the game-winning basket with 19.3 seconds remaining.    The Lady Trojans missed a 3-point attempt on their ensuing possession and could not get off another shot before time expired.    Markusic scored 24 of her game-high 26 points in the second half. She also pulled down 16 rebounds. Mahmoud (13 points, 14 rebounds), Brooks (10 points, seven assists, five steals) and Shatat (six points) also positively impacted the Lady Spartans.    Oak Lawn opens up its South Suburban Conference schedule tonight with a crossover game against TF North at home. STAGG    The Lady Chargers split a pair of games at last week’s Hinsdale South Tip-Off Tournament, falling short of Hinsdale South (62-51) on Friday before defeating Plainfield South (43-32) on Saturday.    The Hinsdale game stayed close until the Lady Hornets stretched their lead out in the fourth quarter. Stagg never got any closer than seven points the rest of the way.    Both teams were solid in the opening period, which ended with Hinsdale in front by four, 17-13. Better dribble penetration and a combined 8-of-10 display at the foul line by Hannah Henderson and Alex Abed then enabled the Lady Chargers to climb within 27-24 at intermission.    Junior forward Mia DiGiacomo (team-high 14 points) had Stagg’s only field goal of the second quarter.    “Mia is playing well for us in the post, improving and gaining more confidence with each game,” Lady Chargers coach Bill Turner said.    Abed (12 points) made two 3point baskets for Stagg in the third frame, and Henderson (13 points) dropped in a bucket and a couple of free throws to keep the game close (43-37) entering the final period.    The Lady Chargers had some difficultly stopping one player, Hinsdale’s Gabrielle Rush (24 points), who knocked in six longdistance shots. The last of those opened the fourth quarter and put Stagg on its heels.    The Lady Chargers also lost the rebounding battle and were hurt several times on offensive putbacks by the Lady Hornets.    “We need to shore up our interior defense a little bit and limit teams to one shot,” Turner said. “On the offensive end, we have to improve our team free-throw shooting percentage and our perimeter shooting as well.”    Stagg shot just 4-of-20 from 3point territory.    “We are getting double-digit scoring from several players, and I thought we had a good effort and competed for 32 minutes against a very good team,” Turner said. “We are going to get to work and make a couple of adjustments when we get back to practice.” ***    In their final game of the tourney the Lady Chargers came away with a convincing win over the Plainfield South. Stagg limited the Lady Cougars to single-digit scoring in all four quarters.    “This was our best defensive effort of the season, and it was a total team effort,” Turner said. “All available players played in the contest and we led the game from beginning to end.”    After opening up an 11-9 firstquarter edge, the Lady Chargers extended it to 25-18 by halftime. Casey McMahon led Stagg’s offense with 13 points, but Abed added eight and six other Stagg players also reached the scoring column.    “We took care of business on the backboards against a taller team and were rewarded with secondchance points and 24 trips to the foul line,” Turner said. “I thought our defensive pressure caused a

Knights (Continued from page 2) multiple three-hour bus trips would create, the Knights didn’t enjoy the luxury of a spread-out schedule within the Brimfield Tournament, something every other participant had available to it. And that four-game cluster Christian experienced upon arriving may have contributed to its downfall against the host school.    According to Pittman, the Knights “played some nice ball early, but let it slip away.” After building an 11-7 lead, Christian watched it evaporate beneath a 16-2 Indians run that closed out the opening stanza in Saturday’s later encounter.    From there, the margin kept expanding. Brimfield drilled nine 3-pointers in the contest to spark its attack.    “I was disappointed with our effort,” Pittman said. “We knew

By Tim Cronin

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist’s Tehya Fortune throws a pass to Bri Rosa during last Monday’s Thanksgiving tournament game against South Shore. lot of problems for them, resulting in 30 turnovers.”    Stagg’s lead was extended to 3424 by the end of the third quarter and grew to as many as 16 points in the final period.    “Even though we did not shoot the ball real well again, defending and rebounding can carry you on those rough shooting nights,” said Turner, whose team weathered a 24 percent showing from the field. “Consistency in those [other two] areas will be the key to our success throughout the season, but especially in the next few games.”    Mother McAuley, Andrew,

Homewood-Flossmoor and Lincoln-Way East await the Lady Chargers (2-2) in upcoming tilts. MARIST    The Lady RedHawks started their Thanksgiving Classic on a bad note by dropping a 6861 decision to Rich Central last Tuesday.    Marist rebounded over the rest of the week, however, and won its final three games to capture the tournament title. The Lady RedHawks earned the crown with a 55-49 triumph over Crete-Monee on Friday. (Continued on page 6)

   The road to success is sometimes filled with potholes.    Trinity Christian College’s men’s basketball team has to hope they don’t get too deep, lest the wheels come off.    The Trolls dropped three straight games last week, losing a conference matchup with Roosevelt University before suffering back-to-back defeats against Indiana-East and Madonna University in the St. Xavier Thanksgiving Classic. The setbacks left Trinity with a five-game losing streak and eight losses in its last nine games entering this past Wednesday’s game at Viterbo.    The 78-65 loss to Roosevelt was the Trolls’ second in as many Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference outings this season, and was due to slow starts in each half. It took Trinity almost three minutes to score a field goal, and it was down by nine points quickly, en route to trailing by 13 at the break.    Aside from Jake Van Den Berg’s 3-pointer, there was another slump to start the second half, and the deficit was too much to make up against the Lakers. Van Den Berg’s 13 points led the Trolls, and while four players scored at least 10 points, the same was true for Roosevelt, which was paced by Kevin Priebe’s 23 and game-leading eight rebounds. The boards belonged to the Lakers by a 36-29 margin.    Friday’s 84-76 loss to IndianaEast was decided by a five-minute stretch in the second half, when the Red Wolves broke a 43-43 tie with a 10-2 run from which Trinity couldn’t recover. Indiana-East’s Tyler Fangman and Cody Banet scored 23 points each, negating the Trolls’ five double-figure men, of whom Jared Jones (18 points) led the way.    The difference came on the boards. Indiana-East pulled down 14 offensive rebounds while shooting 47 percent — and 62 percent in the second half, when Trinity shot 59 percent itself — and outrebounded Trinity 37-33 overall. Aside from Ezekiel Odonkor’s 14 rebounds, nobody on the Trolls had more than six.    Saturday brought an off-key performance in the form of an 8460 loss to Madonna. The 24-point defeat was similar to the others — Madonna shot better from the field (52-to-39 percent) and outrebounded Trinity 42-26.

   The Trolls fell down fast, as they trailed 24-6 and couldn’t recover despite 11 points each from Logan Vos, Odonkor and Jones. ***    • Record: 2-8 overall, 0-2 CCAC, 2-2 home, 0-3 away, 0-3 neutral. Leaders (through Nov. 29): Jared Jones 13.9 ppg., 25 assists; Ezekiel Odonkor 8.3 rpg., 9 blocks; Cody Rhorer 8 steals.    • Schedule: Saturday, at Trinity International University, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 14, at Indiana-Northwest, 3 p.m.; Dec. 17, at Cardinal Stritch University, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 19, vs. Judson, 3 p.m. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL    Roosevelt won the CCAC last season, and showed no sign of diminished quality when meeting Trinity last week.    The Lakers rolled over the Trolls, administering a 91-57 spanking. The loss was Trinity’s third straight, and it was a comprehensive one. Three more road games loom before the Trolls play at home again.    Trinity trailed 51-21 at intermission, closing the second-half gap from 47 points to the 34-point margin found at the finish by scoring against the Lakers’ second string. But the general theme of this season — and the previous one — continued.    The Trolls’ shooting percentage (34) was less than Roosevelt’s (48), and outside of a 46-43 rebounding advantage for the locals, the Lakers held the edge in every statistical category.    Caitlin Cody led Trinity with 20 points. She and Rebecca DeHaan (11 points) both pulled down 10 rebounds. ***    • Record: 2-8 overall, 0-2 CCAC, 1-3 home, 1-4 away, 0-1 neutral. Leaders: Allie Paluchniak 10.3 ppg., 23 assists, 14 steals; Caitlin Cody 7.1 rpg., 6 blocks; Rebecca DeHaan 14 steals; Brooke Bambrick 6 blocks.    • Schedule: Saturday, at Trinity International University, 5:30 p.m.; Dec. 14, at Goshen, noon CT; Dec. 17, at Cardinal Stritch University, 5:30 p.m.; Dec. 19, vs. Judson University, 1 p.m. VOLLEYBALL    The Trolls (37-7) were set for at least a three-day run at the NAIA Championship, in roundrobin play from this past Tuesday through today.    Trinity was slated to play Park University (Mo.) today at 1 p.m., following matches against defend-

ing national champion Concordia (Calif.) on Tuesday and Georgetown (Ky.) on Wednesday. The top two teams of that quartet move to single-elimination play beginning Friday.    The final match is Saturday at 7 p.m. ***    • Record: 37-7 overall entering NAIA Championship, 17-1 CCAC, 13-0 home, 9-1 away, 15-6 neutral. Leaders: Kaitlin Feddema 429 kills; Erynn Schuh 45 aces, 10.18 sets per game; Ellie Raebel 571 digs; Jessica Wiltjer 174 blocks.    • Schedule: NAIA Championship at Sioux City, Iowa: today, vs. Park (Mo.), 1 p.m.; FridaySaturday: TBA. WOMEN’S SOCCER    The second-seeded Trolls (15-32) began National Christian College Athletic Association Championship play against eighth-seeded Houghton (N.Y.), in Kissimmee, Fla., and continued this past Wednesday against Azusa Pacific (Calif.).    The survivor from that threeteam group was to join the winners of two other groups, plus the next-best squad from all three in the NCCAA semifinals on Friday. The championship match is Saturday.    Trinity advanced via a 2-0 victory over Judson, which was goalkeeper Becky Gold’s seventh shutout of the season. Abby McDonald (fifth goal) and Rachael Webb (team-high 17th) scored for the Trolls in the 20th and 81st minutes, respectively.    Gold made six saves, while Trinity put nine shots on goal against Judson keeper Sara Hoffman.    Houghton (13-3-1), a provisional NCAA Division III school, beat Mt. Vernon Nazarene 2-0 to also advance, while Azusa Pacific (12-2-1) won the Pacific West, an NCAA Division II league, but is too new to the league to advance to NCAA Tournament play. Thus, Azusa Pacific accepted an at-large bid after dropping a 2-0 decision to Point Loma in the NCCAA West final. ***    • Record: 15-3-2 overall, 9-1-1 CCAC, 9-2-1 home, 6-1-1 away, 0-0 neutral. Leaders: Rachael Webb 17 goals, 8 assists, 42 points; Becky Gold, 0.94 goalsagainst average, .845 save percentage (87 saves, 16 goals against, 6 shutouts).    • Schedule: NCCAA Championship at Kissimmee, Fla.: FridaySaturday: TBA.

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Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist’s Dajawe Black calls out a play while bringing the ball upcourt for the Lady RedHawks last Monday versus South Shore. they could hit 3s and we left way too many shooters open. If you give a good shooter time, he’s going to hit shots.    “I think conditioning was a factor [for us], but I didn’t like our mentality in this one. Our learning curve has to be steep if we want to be successful. We were never able to put a run on and erase that 16-point [deficit] we built for ourselves [in the first half].”    Washington (13 points), Parker (12), Wolterink (10) and Wright (eight) were the Knights’ ringleaders in their final tourney outing. Christian was back home this past Tuesday, when it hosted Evergreen Park.

Statistics Chgo. Christian Tremont

Washington 7, Wright 7, Spencer 6. Assists: Parker 5. Steals: Wright 5. Chgo. Christian Princeville

Chicago Christian Scoring: Washington 15, Parker 13, Wolterink 10, Wright 6, Boss 3, Leo 2, Spencer 2. Rebounds: Wright 10. Assists: Wright 5. Steals: Wright 5. Chgo. Christian 13 7 15 10 - 45 Midwest Central 13 9 7 6 - 35 Chicago Christian Scoring: Parker 14, Wolterink 11, Washington 8, Wright 8, Spencer 4. Rebounds: Washington 8, Wolterink 7. Assists: Parker 5. Steals: Wright 5, Parker 4. Chgo. Christian Brimfield

13 14 15 17 18 17

9 - 51 9 - 61

Chicago Christian Scoring: Wright 20, Winchester 9, Parker 6, Washington 6, Spencer 4, Wolterink 4, Leo 2. Rebounds:

12 10 17 12 - 51 10 6 11 9 - 36

13 8 10 18 - 49 23 14 12 23 - 72

Chicago Christian Scoring: Washington 13, Parker 12, Wolterink 10, Wright 8, Winchester 4, Spencer 2. Rebounds: Spencer 10, Wright 9. Assists: Wright 4. Steals: Wright 4.

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Chargers (Continued from page 1) Gardner, Goral, Sebastian Kolpak and Nick Sims still fall into the lesser-known category. Yet, like so many other athletes who’ve passed through Daniels’ programs over the years, they’re finding important niches to fill.    “Everybody sort of chipped in, and that’s the encouraging thing,” Daniels said. “You can’t [always] rely on one kid to pull you through.    “There are things we’ve got to get better at — we didn’t draw a charge all week, which is unheard of for our teams — but it’s nice when other guys do their part. That’s the biggest thing I liked. They got some confidence [from that].”    Against Nazareth, a 13-0 surge by the Chargers in the third quarter allowed them to break open a 29-28 game. Strus contributed four points to the cause, but just as important to the run were Sims’ 3-pointer, Goral’s bucket, and a steal and layup by Kolpak.    “A 13-0 run means you got stops,” Daniels said. “I thought our defense really stepped up. It could have gone either way [before that], but [Nazareth] tried to run with us and they took quick shots.”    And with White on the floor, Stagg’s lead was safe.    “Kevin White is like [former New York Yankees pitcher] Mariano Rivera — he’s a closer,” Daniels said. “It’s really hard to trap Kevin [and force mistakes] because he’s such a good ball handler and he knows his angles. He only had four turnovers, which is nothing considering that he handles the ball on every possession.”

Stagg 58 St. Laurence 40    The Vikings hung with the Chargers for most of the first half last Wednesday, but Stagg created a bit of breathing room for itself before intermission, which it entered with a 29-21 lead in tow.    Thanks to the Strus-White duo, things never got any better for St. Laurence, which was outscored by five points in each of the last two periods. Between them, the Chargers’ big guns accounted for 41 points, although Vikings coach Mark Sevedge noted that six of Strus’ 21 markers came on transition baskets.    “We’ve got nobody near his size, [so] I think the guys that guarded him did a pretty good job,” Sevedge said.    “I thought his kids played really hard,” Daniels said, referring to Sevedge’s athletes. “They were scrappy and they battled us early. Mark’s a good guy and he’s coaching them up.”    One thing definitely not working in St. Laurence’s favor was its long-distance shooting. While the Vikings were an acceptable 9-of-20 from inside the arc, their accuracy rate dipped below 25 percent outside it as they canned just 4-of-17 3-point attempts.    “You live and die by the 3 [sometimes],” Sevedge said. “Unfortunately, we died by it three times [during the tournament].”    Quentin Forberg paced St. Laurence with 17 points, Matt Gurgone had 10, and guard Tim Delaney provided the Vikings with five points, five rebounds and three assists. More impressive to Sevedge was the latter’s work on the defensive end throughout the tournament — Delaney got charges called against foes seven times in four games. ***

Thursday, December 5, 2013 Section 2    Prior to tangling with St. Laurence, the Chargers bagged wins over Lindblom and Willowbrook. In both cases, Stagg distanced itself after engaging in a tight opening period — Lindblom, in fact, scored eight of the first 10 points last Monday.    Strus was the Chargers’ main man in both contests, as he roasted the Eagles with 28 points and then poured in 30 versus the Warriors.    Meanwhile, neither of the Chargers’ opponents was able to settle into a prolonged offensive groove. Their willingness to keep launching perimeter shots actually played into Stagg’s hands.    “Every team we played wanted to shoot the 3-pointer,” Daniels said. “They kept firing it, and long shot [means] long rebound. We got it and we were off.    “We were doing a real good job of getting the ball in transition and we just sort of put on the jets in the second half [of each game].” Nazareth Academy 51 St. Laurence 37    Long-range inaccuracy was also the Vikings’ bane in their seasonopener, as a 6-of-29 display of 3point shooting undermined their bid to topple the Roadrunners last Monday. What was unusual about St. Laurence’s struggles was that, for the most part, they didn’t stem from a failure to properly execute.    “Twenty-five of those were outstanding looks — open shots we want our guys to take,” Sevedge said. “That was a game we could have had, but I think missing those open shots got inside our kids’ heads a little bit and kind of set the tone for the rest of the week. If we would have had more success there, I think things would have gone differently [from

Moraine athletics wrap Come-from-behind win highlights Cyclones’ week By Maura Vizza

team would possess a better record to date had it played with the same degree of intensity at other times. ***    Last weekend was a disappointment to Moraine, as it dropped two games at the Cincinnati State Tech and Community College Surge Classic Tournament.    The Cyclones squared off with the host school on Friday and were routed 106-44. Besides not coping well with the winners’ defensive pressure and giving their shooters too many open looks, Moraine was also hampered by the absence of Ward, one of its best players, because of an injury. According to Howard, that affected his other athletes psychologically.    Harris’ double-double of 13 points and 10 rebounds paced the Cyclones. Shannon contributed 12 points, five rebounds and three assists, and Ostruskevicius supplied 11 points and four boards.    The news wasn’t much better on Saturday, as Moraine fell to a 116-89 defeat against Malcolm X College. The Cyclones were within 28-21 in the first half before enduring a cold spell that couldn’t be completely overcome.

   Shannon (19 points), Harris (15 points, seven rebounds), Kaiser (14 points), Jason Allen (11 points), Juillerat (10 points, three assists) and John Curran (eight rebounds) all played well for Moraine in a losing cause, which pleased Howard. He also liked the fight the Cyclones demonstrated much of the way.    “Other teams [in the Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference] are 5-3 or 5-4, so we’re still in the mix,” Howard said. “All these games are preparing us for the conference [and] the scores are not indicative of who we are as a team.    “We have what it takes, [but] we need to rise to the occasion when we play better teams. Our Achilles heel is rebounding — we definitely need to work on that.    “[Our players are] discouraged, but I still believe in my guys. As long as we keep working hard, we still can be in it. When we play aggressive and don’t settle for jump shots and attack the rim, we’re a much better team.” WOMEN’S BASKETBALL    The Cyclones lost to the College of DuPage, 63-60, last Tuesday at home.

Devils early and trailed by 14 at intermission. Even though Hinsdale Central was limited to 17 points (Continued from page 1) after the break, Sandburg was from one large media outlet. When unable to make up much ground, the Meteors scored 23 second-pe- thanks to 29 percent shooting. riod points and assumed a 36-29    “I don’t know if it was [due halftime lead, they appeared in to] the big win from the night control of the proceedings. before, but it was the tale of two    But De La Salle got “Niko-ized” games,” Allen said. “I thought we in the third quarter. Niko Cahue got very rushed offensively and and Niko Kogionis both deposited their size hurt us. six points for the Eagles in that    “We didn’t do a good job of frame — Kogionis doing so on a matching up with them physically pair of 3-point buckets — and and we weren’t able to establish point guard Alec Martinez drilled an inside presence. They were able another trey. to keep us away from the rim    It all added up to a 22-10 scoring and forced us to shoot from the advantage for Sandburg, which perimeter.” then held on for a 66-60 triumph    The Devils’ superior size also that Allen jokingly called “the up- translated into a hefty 37-19 edge set of the century.” on the glass. Hinsdale included a    “I’m real happy to get the win dozen offensive rebounds among — it says a lot about the kids,” its total, which led to 21 points. he said. “We felt good about the    No Eagles player managed to game. reach double figures in scoring.    “Last year, we came out of the Pete Paxinos’ nine points topped gate and really struggled, so I’m Sandburg and Kogionis tallied glad to get that first one under our seven. belts. This was great for the kids’ 56 confidence because [the Meteors] Hinsdale South 40 were very talented, and I’m very Sandburg    It was more of the same on proud of them in that regard.”    Cahue and Kogionis finished Friday, at least offensively, as the with 27 and 14 points, respectively, Eagles once again struggled to get and the former also grabbed nine anything substantive going. Allen rebounds. Cahue notched one- cited the presence of 6-foot-9 Horthird of his points in the fourth nets sophomore Barrett Benson as quarter to keep De Salle at bay. a factor in his team’s lackluster    Allen, though, credited the third production. period as the most instrumental    “He kept us out of the lane,” one in terms of deciding the out- Allen said. “I wasn’t happy with come. our performance offensively be   “Twenty-two points, for us, is a cause everybody on our team was lot in one quarter,” he said. “We too perimeter-oriented.” got good shot opportunities and    Martinez and Kogionis both open 3s in transition.” had nine points to pace Sandburg,    Sandburg went 9-of-18 from which could not get closer than 3-point range and clicked on 59 eight in the fourth quarter. 61 percent of its shots overall. It also Sandburg 57 picked up 13 points at the char- Glenbard South    A new wrinkle in the Hinsdale ity stripe. Hinsdale Central 47 Central Tournament was its crossSandburg 37 promotion with an event hosted    The Eagles couldn’t carry their by Glenbard West. On Saturday, good fortune over into Tuesday, that pitted the Eagles against as they fell behind the host Red the Raiders in a game played at

Glenbard East.    And coming forward to headline for Sandburg was junior Joe Ruzevich, whose eight first-period points fueled a 20-6 getaway. Ruzevich ended the contest with a team-best 17 points, a performance that Cahue backed with 12 points of his own. Martinez added 10.    Glenbard South rallied in the second frame and reduced the margin to one, then inched in front by a point in the third quarter. But the foul line became the Eagles’ ally over the last eight minutes, as they went 9-of-13 from there to seal their victory deal.    “I was glad to see us come back and get a win after losing two in a row,” said Allen, whose club faces Lincoln-Way East in a SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue game on Friday.

   Moraine Valley College’s men have a fondness for coming from behind on the basketball court, and that strategy worked out well for the Cyclones last Tuesday.    A slow start and flat performance put Moraine in arrears of the College of DuPage at halftime, but the Cyclones rallied behind Kyle Ward and Johnte Shannon in the second half to bag a 78-66 win over the Chaparrals. Ward and Shannon combined for 26 points and were included among five double-digit scorers.    Also providing solid performances on Moraine’s behalf were Paulius Ostruskevicius (15 points, five rebounds), Cameron Juillerat (15 points, three assists), Stagg alumnus Brett Kaiser (12 points, 11 rebounds) and Des’nique Harris (eight points, nine rebounds), In addition to his team-high 16 points, Ward had five rebounds and three assists, while Shannon complemented his 10 markers with six steals, five rebounds and four assists.    First-year coach David Howard liked the energy he saw from the Cyclones over the final 20 minutes and asserted that the

Eagles

5

Photo by Jeff Vorva

St. Laurence’s Tim Delaney drives to the basket during last Wednesday’s matchup with Stagg at the John McBride Classic. a win-loss standpoint].”    Forberg, Gurgone and Mike Witkowski all netted eight points to lead the Vikings, who were guilty of only 10 turnovers. Sevedge also felt his guys were respectable on the defensive end, even though Nazareth was awarded 35 free throws, 19 more than St. Laurence.    “[The Warriors] were much bigger than us, but I thought we guarded well,” he said. “We’re real young — every game we started four juniors and a senior, and for a lot of [our kids], this was their first time on a varsity floor. At times we played like it, [but] I thought we played very well [here], especially defensively.”

the Vikings in their losing cause. Delaney pitched in with 12 points, four assists and three rebounds, while Forberg tossed in nine points. St. Laurence connected on 13-of-35 shots, but was just 2-of-16 from 3-point territory.    The Vikings also misfired 10 times in 33 chances at the line. St. Laurence 52 Willowbrook 44    A 10-2 getaway for the Vikings on Saturday gave them the boost they needed to defeat the Warriors and salvage some tournament success. Willowbrook did climb to within a deuce in the fourth quarter, but 11 free throws helped St. Laurence survive.    Gurgone hit five of those foul shots, part of a 28-point outburst for him. His production included a perfect 6-of-6 effort from behind the arc. Delaney added 13 points, and both players, plus Forberg, dished out three assists.    “I was kind of hoping we could get out of there with a 2-2 start [to the season],” Sevedge said. “We could have, but I’m really happy with how hard we played. As young as we are and with our [lack of] size, I’m a little nervous, but I thought we went after it and executed well.”    For the first time in four games, the Vikings demonstrated a good shooting eye as they drilled over 50 percent of their field-goal tries, which included a 7-of-14 display on 3s.

Lindblom 54 St. Laurence 49    The Vikings spotted the Eagles a first-period edge and spent the rest of last Tuesday in chase mode. They were as close as two points during the fourth stanza, and in the late going reduced a nine-point deficit to three behind a long ball from Forberg and Delaney’s threepoint play.    With 20 seconds left, St. Laurence fouled Lindblom’s poorest free-throw shooter and saw that strategy rewarded with two misses. However, the Vikings were unable to corral a rebound and the Eagles got two more chances at the stripe, which they converted to hold St. Laurence at bay.    “I felt this game was decided on the boards,” Sevedge said. “The timely rebounds they got really Statistics hurt us. As small as we are defensively, it’s going to be big for St. Laurence 12 9 8 11 - 40 us to play as well as we can on Stagg 12 17 13 16 - 58 the boards.”    Dan Curley’s 19 points topped St. Laurence Scoring: Forberg 17, Gur-

gone 10, Delaney 5, Dan Curley 4, Radford 4. Rebounds: Delaney 5. Assists: Delaney 3. Stagg Scoring: Strus 21, White 20, Gardner 8, Goral 8, Kolpak 1. Rebounds: Strus 8. Assists: White 4. Nazareth Acad. Stagg

12 11 10 18 - 51 8 19 24 15 - 66

Stagg Scoring: Strus 21, White 17, Gardner 10, Goral 9, Sims 5, Kolpak 4. Rebounds: Gardner 8, Goral 8, Strus 6. Assists: White 6. Willowbrook Stagg

11 9 18 12 - 50 12 27 23 10 - 72

Stagg Scoring: Strus 30, Goral 16, White 7, Gardner 6, Kolpak 6, Sims 6, Jordan 1. Rebounds: Strus 6. Assists: White 5. Nazareth Acad. St. Laurence

13 11 11 16 - 51 10 14 5 12 - 37

St. Laurence Scoring: Forberg 8, Gurgone 8, Witkowski 8, Kelly 4, Delaney 3, Cummings 2, Dan Curley 2, Radford 2. Rebounds: Gurgone 5. Assists: Delaney 4. Lindblom St. Laurence

16 10 12 16 - 54 13 12 7 17 - 49

St. Laurence Scoring: Dan Curley 19, Delaney 12, Forberg 9, Gurgone 6, Radford 4, Witkowski 1. Rebounds: Delaney 3. Assists: Delaney 4. Willowbrook St. Laurence

9 16 17 13

7 12 - 44 9 13 - 52

St. Laurence Scoring: Gurgone 28, Delaney 13, Dan Curley 3, Forberg 3, Witkowski 3, Kelly 2. Rebounds: Witkowski 5. Assists: Delaney 3, Forberg 3, Gurgone 3.

Statistics Sandburg De La Salle

13 16 22 15 - 66 13 23 10 14 - 60

Sandburg Scoring: Cahue 27, Kogionis 14, Paxinos 8, Straka 6, Martinez 4, Ruzevich 4, Manthey 3. Rebounds: Cahue 9. Assists: Martinez 6. Sandburg 9 7 8 13 - 37 Hinsdale Central 17 13 11 6 - 47 Sandburg Scoring: Paxinos 9, Kogionis 7, Cahue 6, Straka 6, T. Demogerontas 3, Manthey 3, Martinez 3. Rebounds: Straka 4. Sandburg Hinsdale South

7 9 11 13 - 40 14 11 14 17 - 56

Sandburg Scoring: Kogionis 9, Martinez 9, Manthey 6, Cahue 5, Piazza 5, Straka 3, Paxinos 2, Ruzevich 1. Sandburg Glenbard South

20 9 13 19 - 61 6 22 15 14 - 57

Sandburg Scoring: Ruzevich 17, Cahue 12, Martinez 10, Kogionis 6, Straka 6, Mansour 4, T. Demogerontas 3, Manthey 3.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Stagg’s Max Strus squares up to launch a 3-point shot last Wednesday versus St. Laurence. Strus tallied a game-high 21 points for the Chargers in their win.


6

Section 2 Thursday, December 5, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Community sports news Sarah Herold (Dennison University), Brooke Heimerl (Millikin University) and Karli McLaughlin (Quincy University).    Other spring-season athletes who selected their future schools were baseball players Ryan Donegan (Concordia University), Sean Leland (University of Louisville) and Bryan Pall (University of Michigan), and soccer players Emily Osoba (University of Illinois) and Samantha Messina (University of Illinois-Chicago).    Also declaring her college intentions was tennis player Molly Traverso, who will continue her education at John Carroll University in Ohio. Dave Sinclair

Sinclair honored as ‘Man of the Year’

   The Catholic Grade School Football Conference posthumously selected Dave Sinclair as its “Man of the Year” for 2013. The announcement was made at a grade-school all-star football game played at St. Rita on Nov. 23.    Sinclair, who succumbed to ALS in September, spent many years as a football coach at St. Patricia.

Mt. Assisi student-athletes named state scholars

   Six student-athletes from Mt. Assisi were recently feted for their academic accomplishments by getting named as Illinois State Scholars.    Included among the Screeching Eagles chosen for the honor were two local residents: Mary Kate Wetzel, of Palos Heights, and Jeslyn Vayalil, of Orland Park. Also recognized were Jacqueline Freeman, Patricia Peters, Rachel Sepulveda and Lauryn White.

Hickory Hills, Palos Hills baseball programs merge

Two more baseball camps announced

   Chicago Christian and Lewis University in Romeoville will both host six-week baseball camps during the winter.    Lewis’ camp will begin Jan. 11 and be directed by Flyers coach Tim McDonough, while the one at Chicago Christian starts Feb. 1 under the guidance of Knights coach and school athletic director Eric Brauer. Both are being held in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy and are open to players in grades 1-12.    Sessions will be offered in advanced hitting, pitching, catching, fielding and baserunning. Registration is now underway, and classes are limited to six players per coach. Previously, a similar camp was announced for Oak Lawn High School with a start date of Jan. 5.    For more information on any of three camps, visit www.USBaseballAcademy.com or call 1866-622-4487.

Midwest Elite looking for softball players

   Midwest Elite Diamond 19-andover women’s fast-pitch softball    After years of competing against club is looking for college-rostered each other as local rivals, Hickory players to compete in the sumHills Youth Baseball and the Palos mer of 2014. Hills Baseball Association have    The team will play in four local merged into one organization. tournaments — including nation   The new entity will be known als — and two round-robin events. as “Hills Baseball Softball Asso- All positions will be considered, ciation,” and provide baseball and but specific needs include pitcher, softball at all levels for children catcher and infield/slapper. No aged 4-16. HBSA, which will con- practices are required. duct play on fields in both com-    For more information, conmunities, will accept youngsters tact Bill Lammel at 289-3438 or from throughout the southwest ditrfp73@aol.com. suburbs for recreational participation, as well as for its part-time St. Al’s 8th-graders complete and full-time travel teams. impressive basketball run    Registration dates are Jan. 11    Two St. Alexander 8th-grade and Feb. 8 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. each girls’ basketball teams captured day. Both Saturday sessions will titles in the South Side Catholic be held at Conrady Junior High Tournament at Mother McAuley. School, Roberts Road and 97th Defeated in the championship conStreet in Hickory Hills. tests were squads representing    George Czarnik, of Hickory MHR and St. Barnabas. Hills, and Peter Donahue, of    The two St. Al’s teams are no Palos Hills, will serve as HBSA strangers to success, having claimed president and vice president, re32 championships of some sort over spectively. For more information a five-year span. Those feats include about the new organization or 11 regular-season crowns and 10 how to become involved with it, tournament titles in two different contact Czarnik at 599-6983. leagues, plus three tourney championships apiece at Mother McAuley Sandburg athletes and Incarnation. make college choices    The key has been a sense    Ten Sandburg athletes recently of selflessness — no head-andfinalized their college choices by shoulders-above-the-rest star has signing National Letters of In- emerged from St. Al’s ranks, as tent. different players have routinely    Four of them were softball play- stepped up to deliver a spark on ers. Lady Eagles making their either the offensive or defensive decisions official were Caroline end. That balance was created by Kuzel (St. Xavier University), a sense of camaraderie, which one

Basketball roundup (Continued from page 4)    Marist started its comeback with a hard-fought 67-63 win over Oak Park-River Forest. Daniela Boricich broke a 63-all tie with the Lady Huskies at the 34.2-second mark by hitting both ends of a 1-and-1, then Tehya Fortune cashed in on another pair of charity tosses with 16.5 seconds left to lock it up.    Fortune finished with a teamhigh 12 points, while Brooke Wyderski (12 rebounds), Madison Naujokas (11 points) and Skylar Patterson (11) also performed well for the Lady RedHawks.    In the championship matchup with the Lady Warriors, Wyderski’s double-double of 17 points and 10 rebounds led the way for Marist (4-1). Fortune added 11 points, while Patterson chipped in 10 points and six rebounds.    The Lady RedHawks were declared the tourney champion because of this head-to-head victory over Crete, which also went 3-1 last week. MOTHER MCAULEY    The Mighty Macs split a pair of games last week. Morgan Park doled out a 58-47 setback on Tuesday, but Mother McAuley rebounded with a 51-47 triumph over Maine West at the Hoffman Estates Tournament on Friday.    Elizabeth Nye was a dominant figure for the Macs (3-2) versus the Lady Mustangs as she tossed in 28 points. Raven Willis added six, Amy Balich had five points and seven rebounds, and Claire

Two St. Alexander’s 8th-grade girls’ basketball teams won recent tournament championships at Mother McAuley. of the girls stated this way: “We Bob Dytrych, Mike O’Leary, Bret went to the basketball evaluations Rosynek, Brian Reidy, Jim Ryan as relative strangers in 4th grade and Ed Touhy previously. and exited as best friends and a family as 8th-graders.” Palos Park to host    Comprising the St. Al’s rosters were Maddie Brennan, Ally Corcoran, Anna Djikas, Lauren Dytrych, Emma Fisher, Maddie Glennon, Emily Marx, Annie McKenna, Jesse McMahon, Abby Munro, Molly Murrihy, Molly O’Leary, Sam Reidy, Abby Rosynek, Jaime Ryan, Eileen Somers and Moira Touhy. St. Al’s coaches included Tom Murrhy and Mike Glennon this year, as well as Mike Ahern, Bridget Brennan,

winter basketball league

   Palos Park, in conjunction with the Palos Heights Recreation Department and Worth Park District, will host a winter basketball league for youngsters in grades 1-8 that will play games each Saturday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. beginning Jan. 18 and running through March 15.    Each child will have one practice and one game per week, with an emphasis being placed on skills de-

velopment. Separate leagues will be formed for boys and girls, and play will be conducted in a total of four different age groups.    For more information, call 6713760.

Submitted photos

hitting, pitching, catching, fielding and baserunning, but space is limited.    Registration is currently underway. For more information, visit www.USBaseballAcademy.com or call 1-866-622-4487.

Oak Lawn High School to host Openings for baseball camp in January    Oak Lawn High School will Diamond in the Rough host a six-week baseball camp, in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy, starting Jan. 5, 2014.    Former Spartans varsity coach Brian Clifton will direct the program, which has classes available for players in grades 1-12. Sessions will be offered in advanced

   Diamond in the Rough fast-pitch softball has player openings in its girls’ windmill pitching, beginner, intermediate and advanced levels.    For more information, call Bill Lammel at 289-3438 or email ditrfp73@aol.com.

Mueller totaled five points and six rebounds.    McAuley entered the game without Shea O’Malley (ankle), Lauren Carlson (back) and Molly O’Malley (illness). The Macs also lost guard Molly McGinty to an ankle injury midway through the first period.    Nye (18 points, eight assists), and Erin Drynan (17 points, 11 rebounds) were McAuley’s ringleaders against Maine West. SHEPARD    The Lady Astros were defeated twice last week at the Beecher Tournament, as they dropped verdicts to Peotone (50-31) and Tinley Park (45-41) on Monday and Tuesday, respectively.    Dae Jae Williams had 21 points and eight rebounds for Shepard (1-5) in the third-place contest versus the Lady Titans after scoring nine against the Lady Blue Devils. CHICAGO CHRISTIAN    The Lady Knights lost a pair of games at last week’s Lincoln-Way Central Tournament as they came up short against both LincolnWay West (55-35) and Plainfield North (67-56).    Anna Persenaire posted a double-double of 21 points and 11 rebounds for Chicago Christian (1-3) in the latter contest. Submitted photo SANDBURG Oak Lawn’s girls’ basketball team won four games and a tournament championship at Glenbard East last week, giving it a 5-0 start    The Lady Eagles gained a split to the 2013-14 season. at the Hinsdale South Tournament last week. Central on Saturday. points and 13 rebounds. was followed up by another, 46-24 seconds remaining lifted the Lady    Sandburg downed Plainfield    The Eagles entered the current versus Oak Forest on Friday. Mustangs to a thrilling 39-38 vicMT. ASSISI    Nicole Carli notched 11 points tory over Elmwood Park at the South 61-30 behind 17 points week with a 2-1 ledger. from Sam Youngwirth and 12 by    Host Riverside-Brookfield and Maggie Bennett added eight Immaculate Conception TournaQUEEN OF PEACE Erin Cronin. Youngwirth stood nosed out the Screeching Eagles for the Pride (0-4) against the ment on Friday.    Zoe Monks led Evergreen Park tall again on Saturday, but her 16 56-55 in Thanksgiving tourna-    Downers Grove South nipped Lady Mustangs. points weren’t enough to prevent ment play last Monday. Mary the Pride 39-38 last Tuesday in (4-4) with 17 points, while NiEVERGREEN PARK the Lady Eagles (3-1) from suffer- Kate Wetzel was Mt. Assisi’s top the Lyons Township Tournacole Larkin scored 10 and Nard ing a tough 58-55 loss to Hinsdale gun with a double-double of 25 ment. That Queen of Peace loss    Jonie Nard’s basket with 10 finished with eight.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Bulldogs (Continued from page 1)    The title was Richards’ first in the season-opening tournament since 2009.    “We’ll take the 4-0,” Chappetto said. “I think people were stunned to see we were 4-0 without Tears and Shannon. I kind of was, too.    “And it’s not like we won by last-second shots or any of the crazy stuff — we beat everyone pretty good. If everything remains normal, we’ll have depth at a lot of positions.”    Chappetto pegged Slaughter as the perfect example of a breakthrough player.    “He’d never been on any Richards team before,” Chappetto said of the 6-foot-6 senior guard. “He had some maturity issues [previously], but I’ve seen some [positive] changes. And his game has improved.”    Chappetto admitted the Bulldogs entered into their first contest “with a lot of question marks,” but District 218 sister school Shepard derived no real benefit from that uncertainty. Behind five 3s from Othman, Richards constructed a commanding 41-27 lead by halftime and was never seriously challenged over the final 16 minutes.    “That was one of those Richards starts when we’re good,” Chappetto said. “We play quick, get easy baskets and shoot the ball well.”    Jacob Littleton tried to keep the Astros in the hunt by tallying all but three of his squad’s 17 third-quarter points, but his outburst couldn’t make a dent in the differential. Meier and Othman combined for 41 points between them, and freshman Catledge flashed star potential by torching Shepard for nine points, eight rebounds, three steals and two assists in just 12 minutes of floor time.    “You always worry about freshmen, but he doesn’t have any ego,” Chappetto said of Catledge. “And he has the best hands of probably anybody I’ve ever coached. He gets everything that comes his way.”    According to Chappetto, having the Chicago State Universitybound Meier around is a big plus for everyone else on the Bulldogs’ roster.    “We had the best player in the tournament and he makes life easier for everybody,” Chappetto said. “It’s like having six guys out there. Obviously, we’re going to establish Meier in the post until [opponents] find somebody good enough to guard him, but when teams try to double- and tripleteam him, that opens things up for other people.”    Richards took 68 shots from the field and connected on 46 percent of them. The Bulldogs registered a 42 percent success rate from 3-point range and sank 10-of-14 free throws. By contrast, Shepard shot 40 percent from the floor and 47 percent at the line.    Also hampering the Astros were 18 turnovers — 10 of which resulted directly from Richards steals — and a 36-22 disadvantage on the glass.    “Richards has got a nice team — I was impressed,” Shepard coach Tony Chiuccariello said. “And we’re really inexperienced. Even some of the seniors we have didn’t play as juniors, so we’ve got a few growing pains to go through.”    Littleton’s 25 points on 8-of-16 shooting paced the Astros. Kyle Longfield added 10 points and was one of three Shepard players to collect four rebounds. Richards 58 Andrew 26    Chappetto thought there were moments against Shepard when his team experienced “a defensive lull that looked really troubling,” but there was nothing of the sort emanating from the Bulldogs’ side last Tuesday.    Not only did Richards hold the Thunderbolts to one first-half field goal, but it never loosened its suffocating grip. Andrew ended the game with only eight baskets in 49 tries, a performance that was low-lighted by an 0-of-15 exhibition from 3-point land. The T’bolts also missed half of their 20 charity tosses.    “I think our defense was really good and they shot poorly,” Chappetto said. “I think some of our efforts made them take bad shots.    “They played really fast the first night [against Chicago Perspectives Charter], and I think they thought they could do the same against us. We were challenging a lot of their shots at the end of the press.”    Andrew was facing an uphill climb of 18 points after 16 minutes, thanks both to Richards’ stern defense — the ’Dogs finished with 13 steals — and Meier’s 12-point eruption in the second period. The big senior ended the contest with a double-double of 21 points and 13 boards.    Othman and Alexander each chipped in 10 points, while Catledge had six points, nine rebounds and four steals. Richards went 19-of-42 from the field. Richards 67 Perspectives Charter 58    The Panthers used a shortened

lineup in last Wednesday’s game and, interestingly, that gave the Bulldogs some first-half problems. Othman (10 points) and Meier got the Bulldogs off and running in the opening quarter, but Perspectives Charter was within one at the break and two at halftime.    In the third period, however, Richards benefited from the stricter enforcement of handcheck and body-contact rules that are in place this season and took 13 free throws. A technical foul called on the Panthers’ coach also contributed to the Bulldogs’ charity-toss bounty, which paved the way for a 16-point uprising and 12-point lead after 24 minutes.    “The game lacked a lot of flow,” Chappetto said, “and maybe that helped us.”    Richards’ edge grew as big as 20 in the fourth quarter, but after Othman fouled out, Perspectives Charter was able to make some inroads. The Bulldogs were never in danger of relinquishing their lead, but they also weren’t able to emphatically slam the door on their foe.    Meier (20 points), Othman (16) and Catledge (12, including 9-of11 at the stripe) were Richards’ offensive stars, while Slaughter loomed large as a defensive presence. His work on the Panthers’ David Bryant was a key to the ’Dogs’ success — after scoring 12 first-quarter points, Bryant netted just two more baskets over the next two frames.    “A lot of different guys are stepping up,” Chappetto said. “We’re playing nine or 10 guys, and some of them are guys I thought would be cut.” Richards 59 Marist 40    Under a revamped tournament format that divided eight teams into two separate pools, the Bulldogs met up with the RedHawks to decide an overall champion. Like Richards, Marist had chalked up three consecutive victories to begin its 2013-14 campaign.    And 16 minutes into the title clash, the two teams were evenly matched. With Meier beset by foul trouble, the Bulldogs had a difficult time generating a great deal of offense, and their halftime lead stood at a meager two points (23-21).    But everything changed in the third quarter. With Meier back in action and supplying nine points, Richards embarked on a momentum-shifting 17-0 run that put it in full command.    “We really turned up the pressure and forced them to rush,” Chappetto said of the RedHawks, “and I think their inexperience showed a little bit there.”    Othman (19 points) and Meier (17) again led the way for the Bulldogs. Catledge scored eight points, two of which came on a thunderous dunk that followed a steal. Perspectives Charter 69 Shepard 43    Last Tuesday’s matchup against the Panthers presented Chiuccariello with a reunion of sorts — on the opposite sideline sat Javon Mamon and Mike Smith.    Mamon is a former HomewoodFlossmoor player whom Chiuccariello remembered from the Astros’ days in the now-defunct SICA East, and Mamon’s brother, Jesse, once played for Shepard. So, too, did Smith, who teamed with Michael Hall, Reggie George and Jon Cleveland to form one of the Astros’ best-ever contingents in the early 2000s.    Mamon and Smith put aside any personal fondness of Chiuccariello long enough to have Perspectives Charter dole out a defeat. The Panthers outscored Shepard in every quarter, starting with a 12-7 advantage in the opening period.    While Chiuccariello had no trouble crediting Perspectives Charter for all it did right, he also thought the Astros “could have done some things better out there.”    “We could have done a better job with our effort and execution,” Chiuccariello said. “I was disappointed with the team aspect — we didn’t do a very good job of moving the ball and we forced some things on an individual basis. That’s not what I consider to be Shepard basketball.    “We always talk about [the fact] there are things we can control, and this was the one game out of four I felt we didn’t play very well.”    Evidence of the Astros’ lack of sharing was found in their total of just eight assists. Longfield (13 points) and Littleton (12) both cracked the double-figure plateau in scoring, but Shepard shot only 30 percent from the floor while committing 23 turnovers and getting out-rebounded by a 3721 margin. Andrew 53 Shepard 48    The Astros and T’bolts went toe-to-toe for three periods and took a 40-all tie into the final frame last Wednesday, but Andrew inched in front near the end and handed Shepard a tough-to-swallow loss.    Littleton’s layup off a Zack Hexel assist had the Astros within a point with two minutes to go, but Shepard missed a 3-pointer on its next trip down the floor and then allowed the T’bolts to

Thursday, December 5, 2013 Section 2 rebound their own missed free throw. Andrew, which had netted a basket right before the charity toss, ran more seconds off the clock to put the Astros into a deeper — and ultimately inescapable — hole.    But while his club suffered a third straight setback, Chiuccariello saw a light in the apparent darkness.    “I thought it was the hardest and most together we’ve played so far,” he said. “When you do those things, you’re at least giving yourself a chance to win.”    For the first time in three games, Shepard played even with its foe on the glass and committed fewer turnovers. Littleton (16 points, five assists) and Longfield (12 points, six rebounds) once again gave the Astros’ attack much of its juice, but Shepard’s accuracy rate continued to languish near the 40 percent mark. Shepard 74 Southland Prep 41    Everything finally clicked for the Astros on Saturday, when they drubbed Southland Prep in a meeting of last-place pool finishers. A 22-11 edge in the first quarter got Shepard going, and it followed up with a 21-9 scoring advantage over the next eight minutes.    Littleton was four assists away from recording a triple-double, as he totaled 28 points, 10 rebounds and six assists. Longfield contributed 10 points and eight boards, Yakov Witherspoon delivered eight points and six rebounds, and Darren Cohen also tossed in eight points.    While Chiuccariello still wasn’t thrilled with his club’s lack of accuracy, having 66 shot attempts enabled the Astros to survive another round of rather heavy misfiring. Shepard benefited from a 44-29 differential on the glass — which included 15 offensive rebounds — 25 made free throws and 24 Southland Prep turnovers, which were seven more than the locals committed. The losing team shot only 26 percent from the floor.    “Southland Prep’s a little down, so it’s hard to gauge this game,” Chiuccariello said. “But for the second game in a row, we played as a team. That’s where we have to get with this group — being [consistently] unselfish.” Marist 62 Little Village 35    The 20 turnovers and 18 percent shooting that undermined the RedHawks in their Friday loss to Richards ran counter to everything else they accomplished in the District 218 Tournament before that.    Its lopsided season-opening conquest of Little Village was a better example of what Marist can do when its execution is up to snuff. The RedHawks jumped out to an 11-point lead in the first quarter and kept on extending that margin over the remaining 24 minutes.    With Jeremiah Ferguson (17 points, eight rebounds, two assists), Bradley Hill (16 points, two assists, two steals) and Kevin Lerma (13 points, two steals) showing the way, Marist sank 57 percent of its two-point shots. Complementing that display was a defense that caused 20 Little Village turnovers.    “I thought our efficiency on both sides of the ball was very good, and winning just becomes a product of that,” RedHawks coach Gene Nolan said.    The rapid getaway for Marist was somewhat unexpected, seeing as how 10 seniors graduated from the program last spring, including career scoring leader LJ McIntosh and No. 1 assist man Lexus Williams. With Ryan Tucker and Nic Weishar not yet available following a prolonged football season, Ken Rivard was the lone RedHawks player with any degree of past varsity experience.    “It’s different,” Nolan said of his team’s situation. “All of the faces are new, but it’s something exciting. We’re kind of learning about ourselves, [but] some unknowns became knowns, or at least we got a better sense of what we have.    “For a team with as little experience as us, the game minutes are what we’re lacking. However they set it up, we’ve always enjoyed going to [the District 218 event], but getting a guaranteed fourth game was big for us.” Marist 67 Southland Prep 42    Although the RedHawks chalked up another convincing win last Tuesday, that didn’t begin happening until the second quarter. The first period was spent engaging Southland Prep in a heated battle.    Nolan wasn’t completely taken aback by Marist’s slow start.    “Everybody’s always up to play Game 1, no matter who it is,” he said. “The real test is in Game 2, when the excitement has worn off. That’s always a challenge.    “We want to make sure we always approach things the way we need to and find a way to play well for four quarters, not just the middle two.”    Doing well in the second and third periods was enough to boost the RedHawks on this particular occasion, however. An 8-0 run

triggered by contributions from Ferguson, Lerma and Kyle Reynolds, plus a couple of Southland turnovers gave Marist a doubledigit edge during the earlier of those stanzas.    The RedHawks outscored Southland 20-9 over that eightminute stretch to assume a 3419 halftime lead and then posted a 19-12 advantage in the third frame to basically seal the deal. Lerma finished with 21 points, six rebounds and three steals to pace Marist, while Reynolds (11 points), Ferguson (10 points, five rebounds) and freshman Romello Burrell (seven points, six rebounds) all offered able support behind him.    Three other players had six points for the RedHawks, who shot 59 percent from inside the arc and collected 36 rebounds.    “We were able to play everybody in the first two games, which really helped [their development],” Nolan said.    Notable in this game was Marist’s lack of reliance on the 3-ball. Normally a major component in the RedHawks’ attack, the long shots taken here numbered just six.    “One of the things for us is having an accurate perception of reality,” Nolan said. “We can’t ask every kid to be great at everything. We want to accentuate our strengths and stay away from our weaknesses.” Marist 97 Eisenhower 93    Even when pitted against the shot-happy Cardinals last Wednesday, the RedHawks didn’t suddenly start launching bombs. Marist, in fact, reduced its total of 3-point tries to two.    Nevertheless, the RedHawks had enough potency to withstand a typical Eisenhower barrage and emerge with a third consecutive victory in Blue Island. The Cards did briefly grab a fourth-quarter lead, but that 79-78 edge soon turned into a 92-85 advantage for Marist.    Nolan, though, didn’t grow too comfortable.    “When you play a team like Eisenhower, no lead is safe and no deficit is insurmountable,” he said.    Sure enough, the Cardinals came roaring back and drew within 93-90 with 45 seconds left. Eisenhower’s best shooter then missed an open 3 and Brian Barry’s two free throws created a five-point margin, but Marist

Crusaders (Continued from page 2) we’ve got to do all the little things to make sure we compete,” Harrigan said. “Guys need to come off the bench and be confident.    “Teams will make sure Ray and Quinn don’t hurt them too badly, but if [Rubio and Niego] know they’re being keyed on, they’ll be sure to get other guys involved.” Brother Rice 58 Rich Central 38    That was the scenario against the Olympians last Saturday.    While Niego (12 points) and Rubio (11 points, six rebounds, four assists, three steals) did their part to aid the Rice cause, so, too, did several others. A total of nine Crusaders reached the scoring column, and football players Dan Scanlon and Luke Mueller also gathered in 14 rebounds between them.    “They’ve both stepped up and given us some toughness,” Harrigan said of the latter pair.    With Scanlon and Mueller leading the charge, Rice held a decisive 32-16 edge on the boards. The Crusaders also shone on defense, as evidenced by Rich Central’s 31 percent shooting and 15 turnovers. Riverside-Brookfield 69 Brother Rice 66    The host Bulldogs trailed the Crusaders by 10 points at one

required another pair of charity tosses from Lerma to survive after the Cardinals drilled one more long-range bucket.    There were still 5.6 seconds left after Lerma buried his second foul shot, but with no timeouts remaining, Eisenhower was in a dire predicament.    “We told our players, ‘Let them fly the ball up the floor because they can’t stop the clock,’” Nolan said. “They couldn’t win unless we fouled them on a [made] 3-point shot, so we just had to make sure we didn’t.    “To win a game like this was a real character test for our team, and our kids responded very well.”    Five players tallied in double figures for the RedHawks, a group led by Lerma, who deposited 28 points on Marist’s behalf. Chamar Hawkins had 15, Ferguson and Burrell 12 apiece, and Hill 11. Six players grabbed at least four rebounds.    The RedHawks shot 61 percent in the game. ***    Hill’s 12 points represented Marist’s high-water mark against Richards, as the Bulldogs’ pressure defense continually frustrated the RedHawks.    “Their pressure on our guards really sped us up and we were not able to get into an offensive rhythm,” Nolan said. “All of their kids stepped up and played well. A sign of a really good team is when it finds [different] ways to win.”

Statistics Shepard Richards

14 13 17 11 - 55 21 20 19 23 - 83

Shepard Scoring: Littleton 25, Longfield 10, Cohen 9, Lawson 5, Heidinger 3, Witherspoon 2, Hexel 1. Rebounds: Heidinger 4, Hexel 4, Longfield 4. Richards Scoring: Meier 21, T. Othman 20, Catledge 9, Alexander 8, Cottrell 6, Slaughter 6, Jones 4, Hussein 3, Anagnostopolous 2, Burton 2, O. Othman 2. Rebounds: Catledge 8, Meier 6. Assists: Alexander 5, T. Othman 5. Steals: Alexander 3, Catledge 3. Andrew Richards

3 6 7 10 - 26 11 16 15 16 - 58

Richards Scoring: Meier 21, Alexander 10, T. Othman 10, Catledge 6, Anagnostopolous 2, Cottrell 2, Hussein 2, O. Othman 2, Spencer 2, Jones 1. Rebounds: Meier 13, Catledge 9. Assists: T. Othman

juncture of last Friday’s matchup, but R-B bounced back from a meager eight-point third period to score 26 fourth-quarter points and ease its way past Rice.    The Bulldogs prospered behind 60 percent marksmanship and a measurable differential at the free-throw line. There, R-B sank two more tosses than the Crusaders attempted (25-23).    Once again Rubio and Niego were something of a two-man gang for Rice, as they combined for 43 points. Rubio augmented his offense with eight rebounds and three assists.    “I was kicking myself for small things I could have done differently,” Harrigan said. “I want our default mind-set to be one of aggressiveness.” OPRF 68 Brother Rice 48    The tale of the tape last Monday was the Crusaders’ disastrous opening stanza. Rice never fully recovered from a two-point output that shoved it into a double-digit hole.    The Huskies outshot the Crusaders 62 percent to 44 overall and by 14 percent (43-29) from behind the arc. Niego had 21 points for Rice and Rubio added 15, but no other Crusader generated more than five.    Harrigan understands that some Rice fans might not be as satisfied with the team’s fourgame split as he was, but that’s OK with him.

You’ll ask him about the side dish.

7

3. Steals: Catledge 4. Persp. Charter Richards

16 18 6 18 - 58 17 19 16 15 - 67

Richards Scoring: Meier 20, T. Othman 16, Catledge 12, Anagnostopolous 9, Cottrell 4, Slaughter 4, Jones 2. Marist Richards

11 10 4 15 - 40 15 8 21 15 - 59

Marist Scoring: Hill 12, Hawkins 7, Reynolds 7, Ferguson 6, Turner 5, Burrell 3. Rebounds: Hawkins 6. Assists: Ferguson 5. Richards Scoring: T. Othman 19, Meier 17, Catledge 8, Hussein 7, Cottrell 5, Anagnostopolous 3. Persp. Charter Shepard

12 18 18 21 - 69 7 11 11 14 - 43

Shepard Scoring: Longfield 13, Littleton 12, Cohen 7, Ogungbemi 6, Hexel 2, Lawson 2, Witherspoon 1. Rebounds: Cohen 5. Andrew Shepard

15 9 16 13 - 53 11 13 16 8 - 48

Shepard Scoring: Littleton 16, Longfield 12, Cohen 9, Ogungbemi 5, Witherspoon 4, Gorski 2. Rebounds: Longfield 6. Assists: Littleton 5. Southland Prep Shepard

11 9 5 16 - 41 22 21 16 15 - 74

Shepard scoring: Littleton 28, Longfield 10, Cohen 8, Witherspoon 8, Hexel 6, Vitello 5, Ogungbemi 3, Gorski 2, Lawson 2, Smith 2. Rebounds: Littleton 10, Longfield 8, Witherspoon 6. Assists: Littleton 6. Little Village Marist

6 12 9 8 - 35 17 16 18 11 - 62

Marist Scoring: Ferguson 17, Hill 16, Lerma 13, Hawkins 5, Burrell 4, Rivard 4, Turner 2, Barry 1. Rebounds: Ferguson 8, Hawkins 8. Assists: Ferguson 2, Hill 2. Steals: Hill, Lerma. Southland Prep Marist

10 9 12 11 - 42 14 20 19 14 - 67

Marist Scoring: Lerma 21, Reynolds 11, Ferguson 10, Burrell 7, Hill 6, Rivard 6, Turner 6. Rebounds: Burrell 6, Lerma 6, Rivard 6, Ferguson 5. Assists: Hawkins 3, Turner 3. Steals: Lerma 3. Marist Eisenhower

23 32 15 27 - 97 23 18 24 28 - 93

Marist Scoring: Lerma 28, Hawkins 15, Burrell 12, Ferguson 12, Hill 11, Reynolds 9, Barry 8, Rivard 2. Rebounds: Ferguson 6. Assists: Ferguson 5.

   “There’s definitely an expectation,” Harrigan said. “That’s one of the things Coach Richardson established, and that’s good.”    The Crusaders begin Chicago Catholic League play on Friday versus longtime nemesis Mt. Carmel.

Statistics Brother Rice OP-RF

2 15 16 15 - 48 14 19 15 20 - 68

Brother Rice Scoring: Niego 21, Rubio 15, Collins 5, Finn 4, Baldali 3. Rebounds: Mueller 5. Assists: Finn 3. Brother Rice Kenwood Acad.

7 10 23 25 - 65 11 11 12 24 - 58

Brother Rice Scoring: Niego 27, Rubio 27, Baldali 4, Mueller 4, Conlisk 3. Rebounds: Collins 5, Niego 5, Rubio 5. Assists: Conlisk 1, Niego 1, Rubio 1. Brother Rice R-B

12 19 15 20 - 66 13 22 8 26 - 69

Brother Rice Scoring: Rubio 24, Niego 19, Finn 9, Gallagher 7, Mueller 5, Scanlon 2. Rebounds: Rubio 8, Mueller 7. Assists: Rubio 3. Rich Central Brother Rice

8 8 8 14 - 38 17 15 11 15 - 58

Brother Rice Scoring: Niego 12, Rubio 11, Finn 8, Scanlon 8, Collins 5, Finn 4, Gallagher 4, Perez 4, Baldali 2. Rebounds: Mueller 8, Rubio 6, Scanlon 6. Assists: Perez 4, Rubio 4. Steals: Rubio 3.

But you won’t ask him about the side effects.

We ask questions everywhere we go, yet at the doctor’s office, we clam up. Ask questions. For a list of 10 everyone should know, go to AHRQ.gov.

Questions are the answer.


8

Section 2 Thursday, December 5, 2013

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For Sale

For Notice Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.JACK HOWE JR. A/K/A JACK O. HOWE JR., AMERIPRISE BANK, FSB, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ORLAN-BROOK CONDOMINIUM OWNER’S ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 21026 15500 ORLAN BROOK DRIVE #221 ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 24, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 8, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15500 ORLAN BROOK DRIVE #221, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-302-018-1389, Property Index No. 27-14-302-018-1441. The real estate is improved with a four unit condominium building with individual garages. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to le number PA1127530. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1127530 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 21026 TJSC#: 33-21382 I573947

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.ANTHONY M. JARZEMBOWSKI A/K/A TONY JARZEMBOWSKI, KARI M. HETT, DEER CHASE ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, BMO HARRIS BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, JILL GALVIN, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 043160 17231 BROWNING DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 26, 2013, Auction.com, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on January 8, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, 350 West Mart Center Drive (in the Auction.com room), CHICAGO, IL, 60654, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17231 BROWNING DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-29422-002, Property Index No. (27-29-401-004/012, 27-29-403-001, 27-29-011 Underlying). The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-12-34828. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-34828 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 043160 TJSC#: 33-22037 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I571735

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, I N C . � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � NANCY LIZOTTE, BANK OF AMERICA, NA S/B/M TO LASALLE BANK NA, HICKORY OAKS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION UNIT 1, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF CHARLENE M LIZOTTE, IF ANY, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, WILLIAM BUTCHER, SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF CHARLENE M. LIZOTTE, D E C E A S E D � D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 07869 9430 GREENBRIAR DRIVE UNIT 1F Hickory Hills, IL 6 0 4 5 7 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 4, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 7, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 9430 GREENBRIAR DRIVE UNIT 1F, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-303-109-1006. The real estate is improved with a three story multi unit condominium. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1302676. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1302676 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 13 CH 07869 TJSC#: 33-23524 I573216

For Sale For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR IN I N T E R E S T � TO WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � NANCY L. BLARY; ORLAND GOLF VIEW C O N D O M I N I U M � ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON R E C O R D � CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 12 CH 6672 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on September 20, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, January 10, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 27-14-412-013-1047. Commonly known as 15704 FOXBEND COURT UNIT 2N, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1200445. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I574956

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N , � P l a i n t i f f � V . � WILLIAM M. THOMAS; ANGELA L. THOMAS A/K/A ANGIE L. THOMAS; WEBSTER BANK, N.A.; PALISADES COLLECTION, LLC; CITY OF C H I C A G O , � AN ILLINOIS MUNICIPAL CORPORATION; MONTEREY FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., ASSIGNEE OF ARONSON FURNITURE COMPANY, D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 42024 Property Address: 6843 WEST EDGEWOOD RD. PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 11-056227 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 8, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on January 6, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 6843 West Edgewood Road, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Permanent Index No.: 24-31-110-008-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 308,991.77. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I569650

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � MOHAMMED H. SHOUBAKI D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 027002 15410 YORKSHIRE LANE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 1, 2013, Auction.com, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on January 8, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, 350 West Mart Center Drive (in the Auction.com room), CHICAGO, IL, 60654, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15410 YORKSHIRE LANE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-15-208-011. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-19875. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-19875 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 027002 TJSC#: 33-22296 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I571988

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP P l a i n t i f f , � v . � MILAN POPOVIC, DOBRILA POPOVIC, HSBC NEVADA, NA FKA HOUSEHOLD BANK, CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) N.A., LAS FUENTES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA) N.A. D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 17280 9086 W. DEL PRADO DRIVE UNIT 2E PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 20, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on December 17, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 9086 W. DEL PRADO DRIVE UNIT 2E, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10-209-013-1090. The real estate is improved with a multi unit condominium building; two car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1102466. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1102466 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 11 CH 17280 TJSC#: 33-24925 I573503

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION MIDFIRST BANK, P l a i n t i f f � V . � RUTA HARDIN A/K/A RUTA KHAN; NOORUN KHAN; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S , � D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 3582 Property Address: 23 COUR MADELEINE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 11-049689 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 19, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on January 3, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 23 Cour Madeleine, Palos Hills, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � Permanent Index No.: 23-23-101-018 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 216,835.68. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I570790

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CALIBER HOME LOANS, INC. Plaintiff, -v.MUHAMMAD A. JAVAID, MOQUDDAS C. JAVAID, A.S.A. CONSTRUCTION INC., VILLAGE OF ORLAND PARK, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A. Defendants 13 CH 007981 14721 S. 88TH AVENUE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 3, 2013, Auction.com, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on January 8, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, 350 West Mart Center Drive (in the Auction.com room), CHICAGO, IL, 60654, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 14721 S. 88TH AVENUE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-10-409-029. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-13-06971. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-06971 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 007981 TJSC#: 33-22606 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I571719

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION ONEWEST BANK, FSB Plaintiff, -v.JEFFREY S. HANSEN A/K/A JEFF HANSEN, DONNA J. HANSEN, ROBERT DUFFER, CELESTE ZYWICIEL, SUNSET RIDGE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC. A/K/A ORLAND GOLF VIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION CALENDAR #58: JUDGE SIMKO Defendants 12 CH 044071 15713 S. SUNSET RIDGE COURT UNIT #1N ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on July 30, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on December 19, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15713 S. SUNSET RIDGE COURT UNIT #1N, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-401-021-1039. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-12-34028. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-34028 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 044071 TJSC#: 33-25168 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I574265

This newspaper strives to monitor the classified ads it prints. However, when an ad is submitted from outside this area, it is often impossible for us to check its credibility. Therefore, we suggest caution when answering ads with offers that seem too good to be true. For more information regarding financing, business opportunities and/or work-at-home opportunities in this newspaper, we urge our readers to contact the Better Business Bureau, 330 N. Wabash Ave. #2006, Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 832-0500.

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For Notice Sale For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO MID AMERICA BANK, FSB Plaintiff, -v.GEORGE DODAS, THEODORE DODAS, ORLAND VIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF ARGIRIOS DODAS, IF ANY, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION S/B/M TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, WILLIAM BUTCHER, SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF ARGIRIOS DODAS, DECEASED Defendants 12 CH 45135 15801 SOUTH 76TH AVENUE UNIT 2B ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 24, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 8, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 15801 SOUTH 76TH AVENUE UNIT 2B, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-13-402-025-1005, Property Index No. 27-13-402-025-1017. The real estate is improved with a 6 unit condominium with a two car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to le number PA1224748. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1224748 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 45135 TJSC#: 33-21311 I573779

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.ELIZABETH M. MILLER A/K/A ELIZABETH M. HEPHURN, STEPHEN P. MILLER, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 31243 12023 SOUTH 70TH COURT Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 6, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on December 12, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12023 SOUTH 70TH COURT, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-30-112-003-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $304,010.13. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, or a unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). In accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(h-1) and (h-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the property, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subsections (g)(1) and (g)(4) of section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Anthony Porto, FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC, 1807 W. DIEHL ROAD, SUITE 333, NAPERVILLE, IL 60563, (866) 402-8661 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com.. Please refer to file number F11050137. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. DIEHL ROAD, SUITE 333 NAPERVILLE, IL 60563 (866) 402-8661 E-Mail: foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com Attorney File No. F11050137 Attorney ARDC No. 3126232 Attorney Code. 26122 Case Number: 11 CH 31243 TJSC#: 33-24705 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I572947

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO MID AMERICA BANK, FSB P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ROMUALDA ROKITTA A/K/A ROMUALDA UZKURIENE, WOODS EDGE II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 13 CH 11004 9174 SOUTH RD APT F PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 1, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 8, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9174 SOUTH RD APT F, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-22-200-045-1024. The real estate is improved with a six unit condominium with a one car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1305752. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1305752 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 13 CH 11004 TJSC#: 33-21873 I573949

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � DAINIUS KOPUSTAS, VIRGINIA KOPUSTIENE D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 12401 9424 S. 83rd Ave. Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 2, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 3, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9424 S. 83rd Ave., Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-411-013-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $283,392.17. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 12401 TJSC#: 33-22617 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I567985

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � RAFAL ROGOWSKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF RAFAL ROGOWSKI, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS A N D � NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 10 CH 30584 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on November 6, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, January 10, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-01-317-006-0000 Commonly known as 9406 SOUTH 76TH AVENUE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a occupied single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1017255. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I574920

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, O N � BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE HOME E Q U I T Y � ASSET TRUST 2002-2, HOME EQUITY P A S S - T H R O U G H � CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-2 Plaintiff, v s . � BRIAN W. SMITH, MARY T. SMITH, UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S . � D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 3017 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on September 27, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, January 7, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-26-305-008-0000. Commonly known as 12416 South Iroquois Road, Palos Park, IL 60464. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. David C. Kluever at Plaintiff's Attorney, Kluever & Platt, L.L.C., 65 East Wacker Place, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 236-0077. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I574852

Publisher’s Notice    All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.    This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1 (800) 927-9275.

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10

Section 2 Thursday, December 5, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

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Out & About

7

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Videoview

Broaden Your Horizons This week ‘Joan Walsh Anglund’ Christmas luncheon     The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, will host a Joan Walsh Anglund-style Christmas Luncheon on Tuesday, Dec. 10, from noon to 2:30 p.m.     Each December, The Center celebrates an artist whose Christmas artwork they love. This year they are sharing their love and enjoyment of beloved folk artist Joan Walsh Anglund. Do you remember those tiny books, in the 1960s and ’70s, of wisdom and drawings of wide-eyed children? Accompanied by photos of her artwork and stories of her life, Lois Lauer will lead the celebration of the life and work of Joan Walsh Anglund and also include some favorite Christmas carols and readings from her books. With the help of Center art teacher April Schabes, the event will end with some Joan Walsh Anglundinspired Christmas crafts.     The luncheon costs $17 per person, and requires reservations. Call The Center at 361-3650.

The Bridge Teen Center upcoming events

Ashton.     • Aaron Williams and Wooden Paddle — 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Dec. 7, listen to live music from Aaron Williams and get free pizza from Wooden Paddle Pizza. This event is exclusively for students in 9th12th grade and is free with a student membership application or $5 with a school ID. For more information call 532-0500 or visit thebridgeteencenter.org.     • Christmas Cookies — 4 to 5:30 p.m. Dec. 10, decorate or bake a tray of Christmas cookies.     • Help, I’m Lost! — 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Dec. 11, learn all about driving permits with activities to get ready for the road.     • Recording and Mixing — 4:30 to 6 p.m. Dec. 11, a new multimedia studio that allows students to record and create demos of their very own music. Learn how the equipment and software is used before reserving your own studio time.     • Cross Stitch Frame — 5 to 6 p.m. Dec. 12, pick a word that inspires you and cross stitch it onto a screen inside a picture frame.     • Dream Drop Distance — 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Dec. 13, live music from Dream Drop Distance and free food from Famous Dave’s. This free event is for teens in 7th through 12th grade. For more information, call 532-0500 or visit thebridgeteencenter.org.

held on Thursday evening, Dec. 5, at 5:30 p.m. and Saturday morning, Dec. 7, at 8 a.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     The labyrinth, a new large circular stone path for spiritual meditation is located at the north end of The Center parking lot. In addition to the group walks focused on peace and fellowship, the labyrinth is available for individual walks at any time during the month.     There is no cost to those wishing to walk the labyrinth and no reservations are necessary. The walks will take place rain or shine. For information, call Pastor Chris Hopkins at 361-3650.

Dickens’ Christmas dinner     Reservations are currently being taken for a Dickens Christmas Dinner to be held at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, on Sunday, Dec. 8, beginning at 5:15 p.m.     The evening features a reading of Charles Dickens’ “Christmas Carol” and a roast goose, turkey, and plum pudding dinner, reminiscent of the Bob Cratchit family’s dinner in Dickens’ story.

    • Holiday Tunes with Ashleigh Ashton — 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.     The Bob Cratchit Dinner Dec. 6, The Bridge Teen Cencosts $32 and requires reservater, 15555 S. 71st Court, Orland tions. For reservations and more Labyrinth Park, will serve hot chocolate and information, call The Center at live holiday music from Ashleigh     Group labyrinth walks will be 361-3650.

Liz Smith by Liz Smith

Vince Gilligan to direct ‘Breaking Bad’ spinoff     “I NEVER drink ... wine.”     That, of course, is Bela Lugosi’s famous line from the original “Dracula.” The count’s polite refusal of normal libation has been repeated down the ages by others who’ve played the role, but Bela still stands alone in his delivery and menace.     Speaking of vampires. Like zombies, they are undead, in myth and in movies and TV. This is the one genre that can’t suffer a stake through the heart. (Or shot in the head - that’s how you kill a zombie.)     Now we learn that acclaimed director Guillermo del Toro will present 13 episodes of a new vampire saga on FX, based on “The Strain” a trilogy of books del Toro co-authored. Apparently, the first season will tell how a “vampire virus” was conceived. The second - if there is one - will presumably show us how the vamps are being fought.     Hey, AMC’s “The Walking Dead” continues to be a smash hit. So maybe FX will strike an artery with this one.     ARE YOU suffering from the end of the “Breaking Bad” fever? Well, in case you can’t keep up with what goes down in TV and cable these days, let me pass on that “BB” creator Vince Gilligan has signed on for an eight-figure deal with Sony, which produced his “BB” drama on AMC.     As you probably know, creator Vince has a deal for a spinoff titled “Better Call Saul,” in which his “BB” stars     Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul (now ready for sainthood) will play cameo roles. And Vince swears he will also direct the “Saul” followup himself and stick around for a year at least.     Meantime, actress Anna Gunn, who played the betrayed or treacherous - depending on your point of view - wife, Skyler, in “Breaking Bad” has her own fish to fry. She will play a detective, the lead character, in a Fox series “Gracepoint.” (This will be an American version of the BBC drama “Broadchurch.”)     We will then see if all the crazy fans of “Breaking Bad” can stop

attacking and wanting to kill her, so much so that she wrote a defense of herself as an actress in The New York Times op-ed page. Now maybe they will worship her as a real-life detective; one of the good guys!     ONE OF my favorite people is the actress Elizabeth Berkley. She survived being abandoned by everybody connected with the (now) classic “Showgirls” and went out on her own to face the music. It was more of a dirge of bad reviews and lousy box office. Of course, since then, the movie has made a fortune on video and DVD. Elizabeth, who had come to fame on the teenthemed “Saved by the Bell,” held her head high. Honestly, I never thought she was bad in “Showgirls.” Everybody in the film was directed to project to the balcony - in China! Berkley did as her director asked. Too young to argue.     Elizabeth went on to some impressive stage, TV and screen work. She never appeared bitter. She just moved on, as they sing in “Chicago.”     Recently, she’s been seen on “Dancing with the Stars” looking like a million bucks. Now the mom of a one-year-old, Elizabeth says she’s in better shape, and feels far sexier than her old “Showgirls” days. She credits the endless training with her “DWTS” partner Val Chmerkovskiy.     She also tells In Touch magazine that despite her “Showgirls” role as an alluring dancer, she wasn’t that confident about herself. (Actually, to see the film now, she looks terrific but real, a body many women could identify with.)     I interviewed Elizabeth a number of times over the years and always came away with a little high. She’s very positive and forward thinking. And she’s mad for animals! I’m glad the “Stars” are dancing with her!     IT’S SUCH a fast-moving, fastfood world. More than ever! And it caused me to ponder the good old days of the automat. Some of you must remember? They were pretty big. Manhattan had quite a few Horn and Hardart automats scattered all over town. They served simple but tasty little meals. You could see the food through windows. Put in some

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coins or a bill and out it popped. Quite inexpensive, and the many automats were often hangouts for those who were in-between jobs, or actors (who are always in-between jobs.)     The old-fashioned automats were eventually killed off by faster fast-food emporiums. I believe the last one in Manhattan closed in the early ‘90s. It might have been the one just a couple of blocks from my apartment, on the corner of Third Ave and 42nd. There’s a Gap store there now.     I say bring back the automat. Make it faster, gussy it up, but keep the essentials.     And don’t say it can’t be done. Back in the mid-’60s, when skirts rose and heels fell, fashion experts predicted high heels would never return. Ha!     The ‘70s wave of nostalgia for the ‘40s and ‘50s brought back the platform shoe. Within a couple of years, women were again sauntering on high, slender stilettos. If you can bring back crushed toes and backs thrown out of alignment, you can bring back mac and cheese pushed through a little glass window.     I AM usually loathe to print blind items. For one thing, Michael Musto does it so much better! But I can’t resist.     What early-morning news show might be teetering on the edge of a tremendously entertaining scandal?     It does not involve anybody being fired, promoted, using drugs, drinking, or using slur words.     However S-E-X is playing a big factor! Rumors are all over the Internet, naming names. I can’t go down that road. (Ah, to be young and have made your name in the reckless age of cybergossip!)     If it’s true and it breaks open, media rivals and columnists will be clutching their heads in glee. The participants will not be so joyful.     (E-mail Liz Smith at MES3838@aol.com.)

by Jay Bobbin     STARTING THIS WEEK: “THE WOLVERINE’’: Thanks in no small part to the input of director James Mangold (“Walk the Line’’), Hugh Jackman gives his “X-Men’’ character another reboot in this wellstaged adventure. An appeal from an old friend (Hal Yamanouchi) to protect his daughter (Tao Okamato) sets Wolverine on a mission in contemporary Japan, where he faces not only other enemies — including one atop a bullet train in a fabulous action sequence — but also the one within himself. And, as always whenever Jackman tackles this role, special kudos to his physical trainer. DVD extras: “making-of’’ documentary. *** (PG-13 and unrated versions: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray)     “THE SMURFS 2’’: There’s trouble when Smurfette — whose voice is supplied again by music superstar Katy Perry — is kidnapped and taken to Paris by the ever-sinister Gargamel (Hank Azaria) in this sequel that combines animation and live action, as did the first film. Neil Patrick Harris and Jayma Mays (“Glee’’) also reprise their parts from the initial round, but the little blue Smurfs expectedly get plenty of screen time as they mount a rescue mission. The film is dedicated to the late Jonathan Winters, heard again as Papa Smurf. Alan Cumming, George Lopez, Christina Ricci and J.B. Smoove also supply voices. DVD extras: two “making-of’’ documentaries; deleted scenes. *** (PG: AS) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)   “THE M O RTA L INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES’’: It might seem like “Twilight’’ time again, but this familiar-feeling adventure is adapted from a separate set of best-selling books (by Cassandra Clare). Lily Collins (“Mirror Mirror’’) plays the young heroine, whose mother’s (Lena Headey)

disappearance clues her into her heritage; she’s a descendant of demon slayers, and she uncovers a world beneath New York that puts her to the test of living up to her ancestors’ skills. Co-stars include Jamie Campbell Bower, Jonathan Rhys Meyers (“Dracula’’), CCH Pounder and Jared Harris (“Mad Men’’). DVD extras: two “makingof’’ documentaries; deleted scenes; music video. *** (PG-13: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “MARY HARTMAN, MARY HARTMAN: THE COMPLETE SERIES’’: Veteran producer Norman Lear (“All in the Family’’) generated a cult classic — and also gave syndicated television another benchmark — with this satirical soap opera, casting Louise Lasser as the title housewife who faces crises both large (waxy buildup) and small (serial murders) in the fictional Ohio town of Fernwood. Martin Mull, Mary Kay Place and Dabney Coleman were among the co-stars whose fame was boosted by the show. Greg Mullavey, Dody Goodman and Debralee Scott also appear. *** (Not rated: AS, V)     “THE SIMPSONS: THE SIXTEENTH SEASON’’: By now, you know whether you’re “in’’ or “out’’ when it comes to Springfield’s most famous family, the stars of television’s longestrunning scripted series ... with no end in immediate sight. If you’re “in,’’ you know what to do regarding this round of the animated Fox sitcom, detailing the further misadventures of Homer, Bart and company. Among the guest voices here are Amy Poehler, Ray Romano, Stephen Hawking, James Caan, Liam Neeson and Jason Bateman. DVD extras: audio commentary by cast and crew; deleted scenes; sketch galleries; bonus episode; “Easter eggs.’’ *** (Not rated: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray)     “GOOD OL’ FREDA’’: Even those who think they know the

Beatles’ history thoroughly should enjoy this portrait of Freda Kelly, who was the Fab Four’s secretary and confidante, witnessing their ups and downs from a perspective that only a true insider could have. The fellow Liverpudlian shares her observations of the wild ride John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr took on the roller coaster of fame during the 1960s. DVD extras: deleted and extended scenes; AXS TV documentary. *** (PG: AS, P) (Also on On Demand)     COMING SOON: “ADORE’’ (Dec. 10): The long friendship of two women (Naomi Watts, Robin Wright) is threatened when each falls for the other’s son. (R: AS, P)     “BATTLE OF THE YEAR’’ (Dec. 10): Dance teams from around the world compete for an international trophy. Josh Holloway (“Lost’’) stars. (PG13: AS, P)     “DESPICABLE ME 2’’ (Dec. 10): Now domesticated, the formerly evil Gru (voice of Steve Carell) is enlisted to join the Anti-Villain League in the animated sequel. (PG: AS)     “FAST & FURIOUS 6’’ (Dec. 10): Vin Diesel, Paul Walker and others return as the original crew sets out to stop a team of more sinister drivers. (PG-13 and unrated versions: AS, P, V)     “ELYSIUM’’ (Dec. 17): In a grim world of the future, the elite live aboard a luxurious space station hovering over a depleted Earth. Matt Damon and Jodie Foster star. (R: AS, P, GV)     “THE LONE RANGER’’ (Dec. 17): As the masked hero, John Reid (Armie Hammer) gets assistance from the loyal Tonto (Johnny Depp) in trying to right wrongs in the Old West. (PG-13: AS, V)     FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast by Jeraldine Saunders     ARIES (March 21-April 19): A lot of smoke doesn’t necessarily mean there’s a fire. During the week ahead, you might be forced to deal with emotional issues and might not be able to act on passing enthusiasms.     TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s admirable to be organized and strive for security. With enough hard work and by applying yourself you’ll receive recognition and easier times in the week ahead.     GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The only people you need in your life are those who need you in theirs. Following your heart and fancies wherever they lead may prove disappointing this week.     CANCER (June 21-July 22): Maintain an angelic viewpoint and fly high above petty whims in the week ahead. Don’t lose altitude by discussing your intentions prematurely or before all the data is in.     LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Put business above pleasure in the week ahead. If you focus on making ambitions a reality you can go far. If you’re overly sensitive to slights you might overreact and lose traction.     VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): If you’re soft as a marshmallow you won’t be hurt by the hardest things. In the upcoming week, a partner may vie for your attention and be slightly unpredictable or exasperating.     LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Know your part by heart. This isn’t a good week to try out new

lines with a romantic partner or coworker, since a misunderstanding could cause a permanent break. Let matters rest.     SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The worst people may provide you experience but the best ones will give you memories. Make it a habit to give the better people in your life higher priority as the week unfolds.     SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Walk away from the drama. In the week ahead, surround yourself with those who want you for more than your money. One financial problem will be solved.     CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Even setbacks can offer another piece of the puzzle. In the week ahead, it might be in your best interest to not get what you want, since something better may come along.     AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Impulsive actions can upset your love life or financial

situations. The first half of the week is a poor time to fix problems that crop up, as tinkering could make things worse.     PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t let anyone dull your sparkle in the week ahead. You might not always get your way by using your charm but don’t let that make you feel you must head for the doghouse.

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2x4


12 Section 2

Thursday, December 5, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Wolfgang Puck’s Holiday Kitchen by Wolfgang Puck

Bake a batch of holiday cupcakes

Fotolia.com

Melt semisweet chocolate to frost these festive treats. frosted the cupcakes, decorating them is easy. Top each with a fresh berry, if you like. Or go wild with your favorite little candies, from traditional rainbow sprinkles to jelly beans or gumdrops to crushed pieces of red-and-white-striped holiday candy canes.     So, what are you waiting for? Make your inner child happy and bake a batch soon! HOLIDAY BUTTERMILK CUPCAKES Makes 20 12 ounces unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 vanilla bean 1-3/4 cups granulated sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 4 large cage-free eggs 1 pound cake flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup buttermilk Semisweet Chocolate Frosting (recipe follows) Whole fresh organic raspberries or blackberries, unwrapped holiday candies, or other decorations (optional)     Set a rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.     Put the butter in the mixing bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or in a large mixing bowl. Using the stand mixer at medium speed, or a hand-held electric mixer at medium speed, beat the butter until it looks light, pale yellow, and fluffy, about 1 minute.     With a small, sharp knife, carefully split the vanilla bean lengthwise. With the knife tip, scrape the seeds from each half and put the seeds in the bowl with the butter. Add the sugar and beat at high speed until the mixture looks very light and fluffy, about

6 minutes, stopping as needed to scrape down the bowl with a rubber spatula.     Add the vanilla extract and break in 2 of the eggs. Beat until thoroughly blended, and then scrape down the bowl. Beat in the remaining eggs and scrape down again.     Over a separate bowl, use a flour sifter or fine-meshed wire sieve to sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. In three batches each, alternate beating in the dry ingredients and the buttermilk until combined, stopping as necessary to scrape down the bowl.     Line 20 cupcake cups with paper or foil cupcake liners. Spoon in the batter, filling them about three-fourths full.     Bake in the preheated oven for 12 minutes, then rotate the pan and continue baking until the cupcakes look golden brown in the center and darker brown around the edges, 3 to 5 minutes longer.     Remove the pan from the oven and leave on a wire rack to cool to room temperature. Remove the cupcakes from the pan and spread them with the frosting. Decorate each cupcake, if you like, with a berry or candy. Store in an airtight container at room temperature until serving. SEMISWEET CHOCOLATE FROSTING Makes about 4 cups 12 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate chips 12 ounces unsalted butter, at room temperature 2 cups confectioner’s sugar     Bring 1 to 2 inches water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Reduce the heat to maintain a simmer. Put the chocolate in a heatproof bowl large enough to sit on top of the rim of the pan without its bottom touching the water. Stir the chocolate over the simmering water until melted. Remove from the heat and leave at room temperature until completely cool but still soft and creamy.     Put the butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, or in a mixing bowl using a hand-held electric mixer, and beat at medium speed until smooth and fluffy, about 3 minutes, stopping as necessary to scrape down the bowl with a rubber spatula. Use the spatula to scrape the melted chocolate into the butter mixture. Beat until smooth, about 1 minute longer. Use immediately to frost the cupcakes.

Variety

by Brian Steinberg Food Network: Brand tie-ins that sizzle but don’t burn     Imagine being able to pay for the privilege of having Sandra Lee or “Barefoot Contessa� Ina Garten use a specific kind of butter, sugar or spice in one of the recipes they prepare on TV’s Food Network.     For years, that sort of thing had only been a pipe dream of various marketing executives. The people behind Food Network have kept the outlet’s how-to programming — the backbone of its daytime schedule — free from shout-outs to various comestibles made by Pillsbury, Kraft or McCormick.     “We always had a policy of not doing that and the reason was that we really wanted to build a brand based upon authority and trust,� says Karen Grinthal, senior VP of ad sales for Food Network and its sibling, Cooking Channel. “We couldn’t risk losing that neutral status, which is what would have happened if we had appeared to endorse any brand within the content.�     Twenty years in, however, Food Network has tweaked its advertising recipe.     While the outlet continues to run a platoon of how-to programs such as “Ten Dollar Dinners� or “Cooking for Real,� it has broadened its palate. As Food Network’s programming menu has expanded, so too have opportunities to let advertisers weave themselves into the content mix. Placements can take the form of product appearances in the shows themselves, or in the ad breaks, where Food Network talent might show up in special vignettes hawking the wares.     Grinthal recalls a 2006 effort that matched Guy Fieri, at the time fresh from winning “The

Serve up this easy Asian appetizer     More and more, the world of dining is going global. In my own flagship restaurant, Spago, for example, you’ll find dishes inspired by the kitchens of France, Italy, Japan, China, India, America and my own native Austria, among other places.     So why, I sometimes wonder, do home cooks so often stick to one cuisine when they entertain? They’ll offer their guests an Italian-themed menu, or they’ll cook up some all-American favorites, or they’ll announce they’re “doing Chinese� for a particular evening.     That approach surprises me, for two main reasons. First, offering a variety of cuisines can delight your guests, a phenomenon I see every day in my restaurants, as people not only get excited by the range of options available but also often turn a meal into an edible world tour. Second, a global approach also expands your options as a cook, giving you even more opportunities to be creative when composing a meal.     Such flexibility comes into play even more as you start planning parties for the quickly approaching holiday season, especially casual gatherings featuring hors-d’oeuvres or buffet-style food. Sure, it helps to fall back on some old standbys - the cheese platter with artisanal breads and crackers, the crudites platter with assorted dips, the deviled eggs, the cocktail meatballs kept warm in a chafing dish or slow cooker.     But why not add a few original twists from around the world? They don’t have to be difficult. You could have some preassembled pizzas ready to pop onto a hot pizza stone in the oven, which bake up in a matter of minutes and can be cut into small, easy-topass-around slices or squares. Or maybe serve some simple Chinese dumplings — pot stickers made from wonton wrappers filled with seasoned minced pork or chicken, or steamed shrimp in rice-noodle wrappers — served with a dip of soy sauce, rice vinegar, and ginger.     One my favorite offerings at such parties, though, is satay, the slender skewers of marinated meat, poultry, or seafood popular in Southeast Asia. They’re very easy to assemble on bamboo or wooden skewers, cook quickly, and are great fun for guests to eat. If you have an electric countertop

Next Food Network Star,â€? with As Food Network grew bigger, TGI Friday’s. As Fieri hosted “we got much more involved in “Ultimate Recipe Showdown,â€? the deals,â€? Grinthal says, though recipes from the program would all the hosts are represented show up in promotional cards at independently by agents. the chain’s outlets. TGIF ended up     In the meantime, sponsors striking a separate endorsement are cropping up in all sorts of deal with the celebrity chef, spaces. John Lee, executive chef of Outback Steakhouse, served as Grinthal recalls.     Today, Food Network often a judge on an Australian-themed serves as a broker (the better to episode of “Chopped,â€? while help avoid marketing relationships FedEx was able to demonstrate such as a controversial one Paula how it helped print and deliver Deen struck with Novo Nordisk, posters quickly on “Restaurant: a medication for diabetes that Impossible.â€? raised questions about the fatty, creamy ingredients she used on her shows).     And there are times when the cabler uses its clout to nix Landscape Architects & Contractors endorsement opportunities for its personalities if the deals happen to clash with the network’s agenda. But more often than not, the association with the Food Network is money for chefs.     Consider the case, of Alex Guarnaschelli, who came to be known as a regular judge on “Chopped.â€? Guarnaschelli was enlisted last year to share recipes inspired by sponsor Fisher Nuts during ad breaks on both Food Network and Cooking Channel.     Parent company Scripps Networks Interactive helped put together a separate one-year deal • Snow & Ice Removal • Custom Hardscapes between the celebrity chef and John B. Sanfilippo and Son, the • Property Master Planning/ Phasing company that owns Fisher Nuts. • Ponds & Water Features

grill or griddle, you could even put it somewhere safe and secure on the buffet table and let guests cook their own or pick them up freshly cooked, since the skewers need less than a minute per side.     The recipe I share here for beef satay with a Szechuan-inspired dipping sauce is incredibly simple, yet delivers big flavor. You can use it with pork, lamb, chicken, or turkey, too, and multiply or divide the quantities to suit the size of your party. I hope it will help you expand your horizons and go global during this holiday season. BEEF SATAY WITH SPICY SZECHUAN SAUCE Makes 24 skewers MEAT: 3/4 pound New York strip steak or fillet MARINADE: 1/2 cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon honey 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric SPICY SZECHUAN SAUCE: 6 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 garlic cloves, blanched for 30 seconds in boiling water, drained, chilled in ice water, and minced 1 organic green onion, finely chopped 1/4 cup bottled hoisin sauce 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes     Put 2 dozen bamboo or wooden skewers in a shallow baking dish wide enough to hold them flat. Add cold water to cover, put the dish in the refrigerator, and chill

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for 1 hour.     Cut the steak into 24 long equal strips, each weighing about 1/2 ounce. Drain the skewers and wipe the baking dish dry. Pass each skewer back and forth through a strip of steak all along its length. Arrange the skewers on a platter or baking pan. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until needed.     About half an hour before serving time, prepare the marinade: In a small bowl, stir together the soy sauce, honey, pepper flakes, cumin and turmeric. Remove the skewers from the refrigerator, uncover them, and pour the marinade over the meat, turning the skewers to coat the meat evenly. Leave at room temperature to marinate for about 15 minutes.     Meanwhile, preheat an indoor countertop electric grill, a stovetop grill pan, or the broiler.     While the grill or broiler is heating, prepare the sauce: In a small skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter over medium heat. Add the garlic and green onion and saute, stirring frequently, until soft, about 2 minutes. Pour in the hoisin sauce and the soy sauce, add the pepper flakes and cook 1 to 2 minutes longer. Strain into a clean pan and whisk in the remaining butter. Cover and keep warm.     Just before serving, arrange the skewers on the grill or under the broiler. Cook until medium rare, 30 to 40 seconds per side.     Pour the sauce into a small bowl and set in the center of a large serving platter. Arrange the skewers around the bowl and serve immediately.

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    Every grown-up seems to become a child again as the holidays approach. We’re humming carols. We’re wearing festive outfits. We’re all wondering, at least secretly, what presents we might receive — while hurriedly finishing up the shopping for the ones we’re going to give. And, usually not so secretly, we’re dreaming about all the delicious, sweet holiday treats we’re going to eat.     Some of those treats we might actually bake ourselves, too. I know so many people right now who seem up to their elbows in sugar and flour, nuts and dried fruits and chocolates. They’re pulling all their baking sheets and pans from the cupboards. They’re trying to figure out how they’re going to wrap everything, and to whom they’re going to give it all.     So let me offer one little suggestion that might ease your mind about that last-minute holiday baking: Keep it simple. Bake a batch of holiday cupcakes!     Unlike fruitcakes, on which public opinion will be forever divided, cupcakes are universally loved. Who doesn’t want to receive their own individual cake, one they don’t have to share, one they can eat in a single sitting? It’s like every child’s dessert fantasy come true. No wonder so many cupcake shops have popped up in recent years.     But you don’t have to go shopping and pay high prices to enjoy great cupcakes. They’re so easy to make at home. Whether you have a stand mixer, or just a big bowl and a hand-held electric mixer, you can put together the batter in a matter of minutes. Pretty paper or foil cupcake liners (you can even find them decorated in holiday colors and patterns) eliminate the need to grease the pan — and they make unmolding and serving simple, and cleanup a cinch.     You’ll find my recipe for buttermilk cupcakes easy. The acidity of the buttermilk gives them a pleasant tang, while also helping to keep them extra tender. (You could also substitute sour cream, for an even tangier taste, or canned coconut milk for its unique character.) A whole vanilla bean (you’ll find jars of them in the spices section of your supermarket), its tiny seeds and pulp scraped out and included in the batter, adds remarkable flavor. And I can’t say enough about how easy, and luscious, the chocolate frosting recipe is from Spago’s executive pastry chef Sherry Yard.     Once you’ve baked, cooled, and

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72nd Year, No. 49 3 Sections Thursday, December 5, 2013.

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