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The Voice of Palos - Orland Since 1941

Your Independent Community Newspaper Named best small weekly in Illinois — five times

THE 72nd Year, No. 32

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

3 Sections

Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities.

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Thursday, August 8, 2013

Orland’s got talent to replace O’Halloran Mayor has six names, expects more by Tim Hadac staff Reporter     Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin said Monday that he expects to recommend a successor soon to replace former Trustee Brad O’Halloran, who resigned under pressure late last week.     While neither McLaughlin nor the village trustees — or anyone else in the room — uttered O’Halloran’s name during the meeting, the mayor spoke briefly with reporters after the Village Board adjourned to executive session.     The law calls for the mayor to name a successor within 60 days, but McLaughlin expects to take action well before that, he said.     “I’m not really setting up any kind of a formal system because we have a kind of — I don’t know if this is the proper term to use — ‘farm system’ in terms of so many volunteers and people who have served on our different advi-

Photo by Tim Hadac

Mayor Dan McLaughlin speaks with reporters moments after the Village Board voted to adjourn to executive session, as he discussed how O’Halloran’s seat will be filled within the next 60 days. sory boards and commissions for years, as well as people who are involved in the community,” the

mayor said. “So we know a lot of the interested parties out there, and I’m hearing from people who are showing an interest.”     McLaughlin added that he has heard from or of “five or six” interested applicants and anticipates more.     “I’ll call in people who are the strongest candidates, talk to them and make sure, you know, that their heart is in the right place, they know what they’re getting into—and then I’ll make a recommendation to the board.”     The Village Board must vote to confirm the mayor’s appointment.     O’Halloran resigned from the Village Board “with great regret” last Thursday after nearly 20 years of service. He reportedly had repaid $22,000 to Orland Park after it was disclosed that he had received village pay while serving on Metra’s board, a violation of state law.     The same day, O’Halloran

resigned as Metra board chairman, after a fiery several weeks of public conflict over his role in the board-approved $700,000plus severance package granted to Alex Clifford, the departing chief executive officer of the railway agency.     O’Halloran won re-election to the Village Board last April, but his successor will not automatically serve the entire four-year term, the mayor added. That person will serve until the spring of 2015, when voters will choose a candidate to fill out the final two years of O’Halloran’s term.     O’Halloran did not return phone calls seeking comment about his resignations.     O’Halloran’s replacement will be the second change on the Village Board since 2011, when Carole Ruzich was elected to take over the seat of Bernie Murphy, who retired after serving since 1985. It will be just the second change since 2003.

Photo by Tim Hadac

An empty nameplate is the only visible sign of former Trustee Brad O’Halloran, who resigned last week after some 20 years on the Village Board.     Seated just feet from the former trustee’s empty chair, McLaughlin said he respected O’Halloran’s decision to depart suddenly, and said it “was the right thing.”

    “Right now, I want to put it beyond us, and let’s get going,” he concluded. “It was kind of a distraction for three or four weeks, and now I’m anxious to move on.”

Lift 76th Ave. blockade? ‘Be patient’ by Tim Hadac staff reporter

Photo by Jeff Vorva

August brings Taste of Orland     Mike Gagner, 5, of Orland Park, enjoys some of the messy food — and tattoo art — that was available at Taste of Orland Park.     Despite a wet Friday, thousands enjoyed themselves in much better weather Saturday and Sunday. Aside from the food, there was plenty of entertainment and activities available.     For more photos, see Page 4.

    Don’t look for an early re-opening of the half-mile stretch of 76th Avenue under reconstruction in Palos Heights.     Some in the community have complained about what appears to be the slow or even stalled reconstruction of the road between 127th and 131st streets.     The project, which began on April 23, has shut down the shortcut between Oak Hills Country Club village and downtown Palos Heights.     What has had some scratching their heads is how the project has appeared so close to completion, yet nothing has changed — including road construction signs announcing a Nov. 1 completion date.     Alderman Dolores Kramarski (3rd Ward), who chairs the City Council’s Roads and Construction Committee, told the City Council Tuesday that the lull in work is due to Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) “restrictions and scheduling” relating to landscaping. IDOT does not allow landscaping to be installed until sometime between Sept. 1-15, (See 76th Ave., Page 3)

Photo by Tim Hadac

The barricaded four-block stretch of 76th Avenue, between 127th and 131st streets, may look inviting to some motorists eager to start using it again, but remains stuck in neutral for the moment.

Fanfare at City Hall conveys prize winnings by Tim Hadac staff reporter     It’s not every day that a cougar sits outside Palos Heights City Hall, and no one calls police or animal control officers.     The 1969 Mercury Cougar convertible drew nothing but smiles and longing gazes Tuesday as it rested in the parking lot. It was brought there for a photo opp with about a dozen Palos Heights Classic Car Event Committee members and winners of the event’s Classic Car Raffle.     The car was won by William Clark, of Orland Park, at the July 18 drawing, but he opted instead for a $10,000 cash prize. In the seven years that classic cars have been offered as raffle prizes at the event, only twice have the winners chosen money over machine, committee members said.     Consequently, aldermen voted unanimously Tuesday evening to authorize the city to sell the Cougar, which when it debuted in 1967 was named Motor Trend magazine’s Car of the Year and was a successful rival to the iconic Ford Mustang.     While the city owns the sleek auto, no tax dollars were used to purchase it from Midwest Car Exchange of Alsip, explained Classic Car Event Co-Chair John Hanley, of Palos Heights. The city used funds raised and provided by the committee.     With several bills still coming

in, a final tally from the July 18 fundraiser is not yet available. However, the event did bring in more than $30,000 in raffle ticket sales and $14,000 plus in sponsorship revenue, according to Committee Co-chair Bob Starzyk of Palos Heights.     He did not disclose the asking price for the vintage vehicle, but said that serious prospective buyers interested in purchasing the Cougar may contact him at 3344848. “It is not cheap,” Starzyk cautioned. “This is not a surplus vehicle. This is not a cheap vehicle. It was bought for the raffle.”     Collectors often covet the 1969 Cougar because it was the first year convertibles were available on the model and because production was limited to only 5,796 cars.     The Classic Car Event is an annual celebration of automobiles made mostly from the 1930s through 1960s. It is held along Harlem Avenue (from 122nd to 125th streets) in July, attracting thousands of auto enthusiasts from Palos Heights and surrounding areas.     Revenue generated by the Classic Car Event over the past decade has enabled the city’s volunteer Beautification Committee to lead the way for such community improvements as the Adopt-A-Pot initiative, assistance to the Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens, support for the local farmers market, landscap-

Photo by Tim Hadac

Palos Heights Classic Car Raffle winners are all smiles on Tuesday evening outside City Hall. Posing with ceremonial checks reflecting their winnings are (from left) Plainfield residents Dave and Sue Mondo, William Clark of Orland Park, and Penny Ochoa of Palos Heights. Providing a backdrop are Classic Car Event Committee members, as well as a 1969 Mercury Cougar convertible, which was won by Clark—who chose a $10,000 cash prize instead. ing of the berms behind Harlem Avenue businesses, the Sept. 11 memorial near City Hall, and more, Hanley said.     Also on Tuesday, in a unanimous

roll-call vote, aldermen approved a motion by Alderman Robert Basso to enable city employees to remove 14 sculptures from the grounds of the home of Dr. Joseph Shana-

han, of Burr Ridge. The donated pieces of art will be transported to Palos Heights for placement by the city as part of the work of the newly formed city public

arts commission.     Basso expressed his gratitude. “This is quite an acquisition, quite a donation, quite an honor, to have those pieces,” he said.




The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013

For the Public Safety

Beware of new phone scams targeting the area From Palos Park Police Commissioner Dan Polk     An automatic system tells the call recipient that their ATM or debit card has been “deactivated” and asks them to push the number 1 to verify their information. The call then asks the individual to enter their card number and PIN.     Your bank already has your information and account numbers, and will not collect this type of information via an automated phone system contact. This type of activity is called a “phishing” scam, and if the recipient responds with account information, the scammers will access the account and take money.     If there is any doubt about the source of a call, hang up and call the bank directly. Anyone who has given out account information over the phone should call their bank immediately!     Two other phone scams are also occurring: Seniors are contacted by phone and by an un-

known offender who states the resident had won $2.5 million and a Mercedes Benz. The caller then asked the senior citizen to purchase a Green Dot Money Card and to load $499 on it, and then mail it to an address in Florida.     The second one involves a phone call in which the caller asked for the person’s Medicare Identification Number (SSN) for the new “Health Care program.”     Palos Park Police reminds everyone to remember:     • If it sounds to good to be true, it likely is.     • Never give your bank account number, social security number or credit card numbers to people you don’t know.     • When pressured to purchase something immediately, say no.     • Never pay for a prize, when there are taxes or processing fees to pay, it is likely a scam.     • Scammers are clever, and will often change their stories, so be on the lookout.

Your Public Servant

Palos Twp. assessment appeal period underway From Robert E. Maloney Palos Township Assessor     We wish to inform the residents of Palos Township that the time period to file a property assessment appeal application is now to Aug. 30.     Palos Township is located at 10802 S Roberts Road, Palos Hills. We are open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information, call 598-4418.     Appeal applications must be

received by the Cook County Board of Review no later than Sept. 3. Therefore, Palos Township will assist residents with applications until Friday, Aug. 30, allowing the last day, Tuesday, Sept. 3, for delivery.     Please note: Property tax increases are directly related to the amount of money local taxing bodies request for spending. Therefore, even in a declining market, tax bills will not go down unless taxing bodies reduce spending.

In Other Words

Political bullying cheats us out of a democracy by Donald Kaul     If our government were a card game, the American people would surely have realized by now that they’re playing with a marked deck. The Republicans are cheating.     In the 2012 elections, Democratic candidates for House seats collectively won about five percent more votes than their Republican opponents did overall. Yet the Republicans hung onto their control over the House of Representatives. They now outnumber Democrats in that chamber, 234 to 200.     How could that be?     Well, we’re not a pure democracy, and we were never meant to be. The Founders, in their wisdom, gave us a representative democracy, in which geographic areas, as well as people, have a voice in government.     But this is ridiculous.     Republican state legislatures, mainly in the former Confederate and western states, have gerrymandered their congressional districts to make it virtually impossible for Democrats to achieve House representation commensurate with their support.     You would think that would be enough for them, right? Wrong.     House Speaker John Boehner has said that he won’t let the immigration reform bill come to the floor for consideration unless it has the support of a majority of the Republican caucus.     That means just 118 members (read tea partiers) wield a virtual veto over anything President Barack Obama, the Senate, or simply the majority of House members want to do.     That’s not representative democracy, that’s political bullying.     All of which would be bad enough if the Republicans actually wanted to do something. But they don’t, unless you count cutting taxes until the government dies of starvation. Hard as it is to believe, the true believers in the Republican Party, the Paul Ryans and Rand Pauls of the world, believe that we’d all be better off if we stopped relying on government for things — those frills like health care, public schools, and safe food — and threw ourselves on the tender mercies of multi-national corporations that, as we know, care deeply about our well-being.     Obama gave a rip-roaring speech at Knox College the other day in which he listed his legislative priorities for the coming three years. He wants to build

prosperity by expanding the middle class through education, re-training, and job creation. He would undertake a public works program to repair our broken infrastructure. He would fund research and development programs to keep us competitive in the world.     He would, in short, do the common-sense things that every Democratic president of the past 80 years has promised to do.     The Republicans treated the proposals with absolute derision. He would do none of those things, they said. They wouldn’t let him.     Instead, they threatened to shut down the government if Obama went ahead with his health care plan. In addition, they drafted legislation to cut the Environmental Protection Agency by 34 percent, kill greenhouse gas regulations, reduce financing for the Fish and Wildlife Service by 27 percent, and halve the Endowment for the Humanities budget.     Other proposed Republican bills would eliminate the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and cut education grants to poor students by 16 percent.     GOP lawmakers are saving their biggest guns, however, for their continued assault on the Affordable Care Act — which seems to be working despite Republican claims that it isn’t.     Republican leaders have sent out a letter announcing their intention to block raising the debt ceiling on September 30 if so much as one penny is spent on implementing Obama’s landmark health care law. When asked whether he’s worried about how this do-nothing stance could hurt his party, Boehner declared that Congress “ought to be judged on how many laws we repeal.”     Let’s review: Republican leaders refuse to acknowledge or do anything to deal with climate change and are dead set against expanding health care coverage for the uninsured and under-insured, improving the regulation of financial institutions, supporting research, expanding public works, and respecting our public cultural institutions.     Their vision of the nation looks like a gated community in a rich area of Florida, surrounded by slums.     And the rest of us? We’re in those slums. OtherWords columnist Donald Kaul lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan. OtherWords.org.

Readers Write Coyotes killing pets in Palos Park Dear Editor:     My neighborhood has a terrible coyote problem, and I think that other neighborhoods in Palos Park do too.     The construction along Southwest Highway has exacerbated the problem. Some coyotes have probably had their dens disturbed and are roaming around.     A couple of days ago, my neighbors across the street lost their cat to a coyote, and a few weeks ago, two of my neighbors lost their dogs. Both of the men who lost their dogs were in the yard close to their dogs when the coyotes attacked.     Coyotes seem to have no fear of humans. One coyote jumped the fence around the backyard, grabbed the dog in front of the owner, and jumped back over the fence with the dog in its jaws. The other man said that he was standing in his front yard just a few feet from his dog when a coyote suddenly appeared, took his dog, and ran off into the woods with it.     I spoke to a woman on the Palos Park Police Department, and she had some suggestions. First, residents should make a police report if they lose a cat or a dog to coyotes. If everyone did that, then the village would have an idea of the severity of the problem and exactly where the attacks are happening.     Also, when walking a dog, people should carry a flashlight and a noise maker.

    Finally, coyote urine can be used to mark off your property to help keep out coyotes. Capital Pet on 175th and Cicero in Country Club Hills sells coyote urine, but they’re currently sold out. They expect more to come in in a week or two. It’s $22.99 for 16 ounces, so it’s not cheap. Unfortunately, it has a bad smell and doesn’t last forever, but it is a humane way to help keep coyotes away. Also, residents should never feed coyotes.     Please pass along the warning about coyotes killing pets in Palos Park. Noelle Connor Palos Park

Thank you for summer reading support Dear Editor:     The Youth Services Department would like to thank everyone involved for another successful year of summer reading at the Palos Heights Public Library! Our theme this summer was “Have Books, Will Travel,” and hundreds of local children and teens did just that, coming to the library each week to take part in our reading program and events. During June and July, we registered a total of 704 participants (553 kids and 151 teens) who read a total of 215,552 minutes.     Thank you to the many local businesses that generously supported this summer’s program. Donated prizes from the following businesses helped

motivate kids and teens to keep reading: Applebee’s, Aurelio’s Pizza, Breadsmith, Brookfield Zoo, Champps Americana Restaurant, DuPage Children’s Museum, Haunted Trails Family Amusement Center, Hollywood Park, Jewel Osco, Joon Lee Tae Kwon Do, Jullianni’s, Krazy Nails, McDonalds, Nick’s BBQ, Natalie Light/Noah’s Ark, Oak Forest Bowl, Orland Bowl, Pop’s Italian Beef, Pretty Nails, Raging Waves Water Park, Running for Kicks, Shedd Aquarium, Standard Bank and Trust, Target, Tastee Freez, Walgreens, Wendy’s, and the Windy City Thunderbolts. We sincerely appreciate your generosity and support of literacy in our community.     Thank you to our teen volunteers for sharing their time and talents with us this summer. Twenty-three teens volunteered for more than 150 hours during June and July. We couldn’t provide such a wide variety of activities without their help.     Lastly, thank you to all of the parents who brought their children to the library this summer to take part in our program. We hope that you will continue to take advantage of what the library can offer for your family all year long! Debbie Larsen Head of Youth Services Palos Heights Public Library

Dear Editor:     I have spoken to former

On today’s card: National security needs vs. public’s right to know     News is swirling these days around a complex mix of national security issues, leaks of classified information, and First Amendment protections for a free press amid the new world of digital journalism. Let’s use some terminology from a heavyweight boxing bout to track this “match” pitting the needs of national security against the public’s “right to know:”     Round One: Score it for the Obama administration, which came out of the corner fighting against leaks early in the first term — by this year, bringing more prosecutions under the Espionage Act than ever before. Just that fact alone alarms those who see whistleblowers and an independent press as the ultimate watchdog on government actions, particularly those done in secret.     Round Two: Government takes this one, on a mixed card. Just as a shield law longsought by many journalists to protect the reporter-source relationship was nearing a final vote in the U.S. Senate in 2009, a haymaker gets thrown: Wikileaks released hundreds of thousands of memos and battlefield briefs to the public. Officials cried “treason,” while others saw it as a plus for public knowledge — but down goes the proposed “Free Flow of Information Act.”     Round Three: In Spring 2010, U.S. Army Pvt. Bradley Manning is arrested on charges of giving more than 700,000 State Department cables, ter-

rorism detainee assessments, combat logs and videos to WikiLeaks — the largest such leak in U.S. history. Manning will go to trial in three years later, facing more than 130 charges ranging from theft to “aiding the enemy,” which could mean life in prison. Government round, clearly.     Round Four: In May 2013, The Associated Press threw some serious punches when it’s revealed that the Justice Department secretly obtained months of AP phone records for as many as 20 reporters and at multiple AP offices while investigating leaks. AP chief Gary Pruitt called the seizures “unconstitutional” and said already some sources are backing away from his reporters. DOJ takes it on the chin.     Later “rounds” are harder to score.     Round Five: The bout is fully joined in late May and into June with a series of major disclosures by former low-level NSA analyst Edward Snowden of a massive National Security Agency program that provides access to the “metadata” of millions on American phone calls and e-mail — but, the government said, not to the content of the calls or messages. Snowden begins a global trek to avoid U.S. authorities, eventually leading to Moscow.     Round Six: In punches to the journalistic gut, it’s revealed that as part of an investigation of a 2009 leak, a search warrant request named Fox News’s James Rosen as “an aider and abettor and/or co-conspirator” for receiving

Letters Policy The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your address and telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. Mail or bring Readers Write letters to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463, or e-mail us at theregional@comcast.net

A summit worth the price to see

Inside the First Amendment

by Gene Policinski

Ceasefire executive director Tio Hartiman and suggested that his September gang summit in Chicago should schedule as speakers Sen. Mark Kirk, who called for the wholesale arrest, conviction and incarceration of 18,000 Gangster Disciples and me.     Kirk wants to lock up the intended audience, and I want to legalize drugs to strip them of their ability to earn money in the drug business. It would be worth the price of admission to see the audience reaction. James T. Gierach Palos Park

the information. A quick series of jabs by free press advocates and media officials lead White House officials to back-pedal. President Obama declares first that he supports the First Amendment, and later decries any attempt to “criminalize” news reporting. Obama also announces White House support for a revived federal shield law, despite its opposition to the near-identical 2009 proposal.     Round Seven: Jabs and roundhouse swings at the government over the AP records seizure and the Rosen affair produce an invitation in midJune from Attorney General Eric Holder to major news outlets to discuss long-standing rules within the Justice Department governing attempts to get journalists’ files or other records. The meeting is offthe-record, so some journalists will not attend. Still, updated guidelines revising Watergateera rules are set out in early July, offering more protection to news media.     Round Eight: One for the government. On July 19, the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that New York Times reporter James Risen must give take the stand at the trial of a former CIA agent being prosecuted for leaking of state secrets. The court said “there is no first amendment testimonial privilege, absolute or qualified, that protects a reporter from being compelled to testify … in criminal proceedings.”     Round Nine: As July ends, (Continued on page 3)

THE

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This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and however it may be threatened.


The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013



Former judge active in DAR named to Heights library board by Tim Hadac staff reporter     On a unanimous voice vote, aldermen on Tuesday approved Mayor Robert Straz’s appointment of Susan Snow to the Palos Heights Public Library Board of Trustees.     She replaces Steve “Bud” Stefan, who “resigned for other commitments,” the mayor said.     The move was the mayor’s fourth library board appointment in recent weeks. On July 2, the council unanimously approved his appointment of Rose Zubik, John Weglarz and Pat Hunt to replace Frank Petrosino, Julie Lawler and Lois Stanciak.     Snow, a retired judge known for her work to make Cook County Circuit Courts more responsive to the needs of families — especially those in crisis — was not

there to hear her appointment approved. Reached by phone later that evening, she said she was pleased by the news and honored to join the board.     In 2000 she retired after serving on the bench for nearly 20 years. She remains active with the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, a group that strives to improve the lives of children and families through resolution of family conflicts.     She also is a leading local and state official with the Daughters of the American Revolution and worked with Straz and other officials last year to commemorate the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution and educate the community about its relevance and importance in the present day.     Snow and her husband, Bill Erickson, have been residents of the

area for a number of years.     A grandmother of five — two of whom live nearby and visit the library with her — she is an artist and quilter who has donated her oil paintings and quilts to raise funds for charitable causes.     She praised the public library and everyone associated with it, especially the “knowledgeable, kind and generous” staff. As “an educator from way back” (she taught Russian and English at Rich East High School), she said is “passionate about education and knowledge.”     “A library is a precious place, a sanctuary, a quiet place where knowledge is primary,” Snow said. “It is a little more still, a little more studious. It belongs to the community and is a place where we proudly gather knowledge and information and say ‘This is who we are.’”

Property tax appeal seminar offered for Palos Twp. taxpayers     Cook County Board of Review Commissioner Dan Patlak will hold a property tax appeal seminar that will be offered to Palos Township taxpayers seeking to appeal their 2013 property tax assessments.     The seminar will be held Monday, Aug. 19, at 6:30 p.m., at the Kaptur Administrative Center, 8999 W. 123rd St. in Palos Park.     The seminar is co-sponsored by Palos Park Mayor John Mahoney, Palos Township Assessor Robert E. Maloney, and Township Supervisor Colleen GrantSchumann. The hour long session will educate taxpayers on how to file a successful tax appeal in a time when the economy is put-

ting added pressures to home and business owners.     The seminar includes a presentation by Commissioner Dan Patlak explaining how property taxes are calculated and the appeal procedure of the Board of Review. Before the end of the evening, taxpayers will have an opportunity to work with staff from the Board of Review to address their specific questions and concerns.     This event is free to the public and there is no fee to appeal at the Board of Review. Taxpayers are asked to bring a copy of their most recent tax bill.     Appeal forms also may be picked up at the Board of Review located at 118 N. Clark St., Room 601 in Chicago or at the Bridgeview

Satellite Office located at 10200 S. 76th Ave, Room 237. A limited number of appeal forms may be available at the Palos Township Assessor’s Office.     Contact Outreach Director Daniela Hernandez at (312) 603-7356 with any questions.     The Cook County Board of Review is a quasi-judicial agency responsible for adjudicating assessment appeals for all property in Cook County. Commissioner Dan Patlak represents the 1st District of the Board of Review, which encompasses 90 percent of suburban Cook County and the 19th and 41st Wards of Chicago.     Taxpayers may also file an appeal online by visiting the website, cookcountyboardofreview.com.

Circus coming to Palos Hills By Jeff Vorva Reporter editor

    Heck, there will even be a pygmy hippopotamus scheduled to make an appearance.     There will be clowns.     The Carson and Barnes Circus     There will be high-flying tra- will attempt to offer all sorts of peze artists. fun activities for members of the     There will be elephants and family when it rolls into Palos camels. Hills Aug. 19 and 20.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Fifteen-month-old Gunnar VanCleave of Seneca gets up close with Cubs outfielder David DeJesus last Thursday at Advocate Children’s Hospital in Oak Lawn.

Cubs’ DeJesus cheers patients at Christ by Jeff Vorva Reporter Editor     Cubs outfielder David DeJesus slammed into a wall to try to make a catch in New York in June and his body paid the price as he suffered a sprained shoulder and missed 33 games and returned in late July.     So when he stopped by the Advocate Christ Medical Center and the Children’s Hospital in Oak Lawn last Thursday, he knew of what some of the patients were going through.     “I just kept the faith,” he said in a room featuring several young patients. “I know that I can rely on my trainers and rely on the guys who have knowledge to help me get better. Time will heal all wounds and everyone here has their own struggles going on. But you have to believe that there is healing in the world and everything will be OK if you keep that positive mentality.’’     On a lighter note, he encouraged long-suffering Cubs fans to keep the faith as well. The Cubs have gone more than 100 years without a World Series title and since Theo Epstein took over as the Cubs president, the team has been subpar in 2012 and 2013 and gutted in order to rebuild with young players.     “It’s going to happen sooner than later,” DeJesus said. “I think Theo and the new management team are on the right program.

    But it will offer some painful and somber reflection as well.     The Circus, which will take place on Sunny Creek Drive and Photos by Jeff Vorva South Roberts Road, will feature shows each night designed for the David DeJesus shakes hands with Hickory Hills’ Mike Henderson state of Illinois victims and surwhile his parents Janet and Jeffrey, look on. vivors and their families of violence, rape, missing loved ones They are building from within the the hospital said in a news release. or murder. minor leagues. A lot of young guys “It’s great to have the kids in    A candlelight vigil will be held are coming up together. When teracting with these professional at 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 19. they come into the major leagues athletes and seeing the smiles on     The shows will feature songs they will have that camaraderie. their faces.” from Jacque Hollander, herself Sprinkle in a couple of guys who     That included Hickory Hills’ a victim of sexual assault. The are veterans to keep them right Mike Henderson, who was able to ensuing legal action brought by and I think it’s going to happen meet DeJesus hours before having Hollander against her alleged rapsooner than later.” surgery performed. ist — soul singer James Brown     Having a major league ballplay-     He admitted to DeJesus he was — helped change the law for er show up changes the climate more of a Sox fan than a Cubs victims to allow them unlimited of the day at the hospital. fan but still looked thrilled to be time to bring a civil charge against     “[It] really brightens the day able to spend a few minutes with their attackers, according to her of our pediatric patients,” Dr. a professional athlete. LinkedIn account. George Harris, a pediatrician at     After visiting with some of the     Hollander will auction off her younger patients, DeJesus made own designed t-shirts and proa trip to the adult surgical heart ceeds will benefit the Illinois Coaliunit to pay a surprise visit to dietion Against Sexual Assault. One hard Cubs fan Carmen Murphy of the songs she wrote, “I am of Addison. the Circus” was dedicated to the     The two talked baseball for Carson and Barnes Circus, and 16awhile and Murphy said “I year-old trapeze artist Franchesca saw your father play with the Cavallini sang lead vocals on its Cubs.” recording.     DeJesus had to politely tell     “Sexual assault, domestic vioMurphy that former Cub Ivan lence, kidnapping and murder DeJesus was not his father [has] now reached an epidemic and people tell him that all the level and we here at Carson and time. Barnes Circus want to be [a part]     “I’m just a kid from Jersey,” of shedding light on this matter,” he said. “I’m not related to Ivan circus officials wrote in a news although my dad did know him release. in college.”     Tickets at the gate are $16     DeJesus asked Murphy what he for adults and $10 for chilthought of the Cubs and Murphy dren. For more information said “They are going in the right Photos by Jeff Vorva and to purchase advance tickdirection.” ets visit www.bigtopshow.com. Jennifer Murphy, David DeJesus, Carmen Murphy and Alexa Murphy     In the future, Cubs players pose Thursday at Christ Hospital. Carmen Murphy of Addison is a will be visiting another Advocate die-hard Cubs fan who underwent heart surgery and was surprised hospital later in the month in pleted soon, “further down, by the IDOT’s website lists the project’s by DeJesus’s visit. Park Ridge. creek; and then when they get the price tag at $880,000. Kramarski green light for the landscaping, said that the state is picking up (Continued from page 1) once that’s completed, they can 70 percent of the tab, with the put the final (layer of pavement) city covering the rest. when temperatures typically cool down,” she added.     She predicted that the entire down and make it more likely that     Kramarski credited assistance project will be completed signifigrass and other plants successfully from the Southwest Conference of cantly in advance of Nov. 1 and take root, Kramarski said Mayors in helping the city secure advised local motorists and resi    “A little bit of curb work” re- state funds for the road improve- dents of Ishnala and Palos Pines mains to be done, and installation ment — which includes new storm to “be patient and you will be of roadside guardrails will be com- sewers and drainage structures. well rewarded.”

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First Amendment (Continued from page 2) there is a series of developments that is tough to score. Manning is convicted July 30 of violating the Espionage Act, and could be sentenced to as long as 36 years in prison. But he’s acquitted on the charge of aiding the enemy. Still, a flurry of news reports raised the idea that the conviction — combined with continuing zealous efforts elsewhere by the Department of Justice — will “chill” whistleblowers and scare them away from talking with journalists.     Round Ten: In the U.S. House, the NSA data surveillance program survived a surprisingly tight vote, 217-205,

on July 24, At the same time, more documents and allegations surface from Snowden, supporting the claim that even low-level NSA analysts can gain access to the content — not just data surrounding — individual phone conversations and e-mails.     And the bell will ring soon for even more action: Manning’s sentencing. More threatened disclosures by Snowden of secret programs. Congressional debate over the new shield law. And a larger, longer debate over national safety vs. individual freedom and privacy.     The fight analogy has its limits, but clearly we’re only in the early rounds of balancing legitimate national security concerns against over-classification and with the need of the public

for accurate information on what its government is doing.     First Amendment concerns include not only threats to a free press’ ability to report the news, but also to the potential for a narrowly drawn shield law which may exclude newmedia users like bloggers, or which provides for a kind of “licensing” of journalists as a special legal class that later could be withdrawn.     Even with all that’s come to light, we’re just getting though the early sparring in this ongoing Constitutional rumble. Gene Policinski is chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute and senior vice president of its First Amendment Center. Email him at gpolicinski@ newseum.org.

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The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013

Plenty to see, do and eat at Taste of Orland

Photos by Jeff Vorva

The Blissful Banana booth was decorated for the three-day Taste of Orland Park.

Members of the Orland Park Doonaree Pipe Band belt out a tune to entertain the crowd near the main stage of the Taste of Orland Park.

The crowd builds during Sunday afternoon’s Taste of Orland Park — the final day of the three-day festival.

The rock group The City performs a Bon Jovi song during the Orland Performer Michael Horn is the first act in the Orland Park’s Got Talent Park’s Got Talent contest. Lead singer is Michael Reda. contest at the Taste of Orland Park.

Orland Park’s Jim DiBiase’s 1967 Dodge Dart GT at the Taste of Orland Park Car Show had a humanizing quality to the look of its engine.

Orland Park’s Taylor Connolly, 3, checks out the classic cars as her own car is being pushed by her grandfather, Francis Valencia, of Blue Island.

Orland Park’s Mike Kehoe shakes hands with competitors after finding out he won the Taste of Orland Park Orland’s Got Talent contest at the fest. Cora Georgiou and Joe Pajkos took second and Leah Vithoulkas was third.

Orland pool earns 3rd five stars     The Orland Park Centennial Park Aquatic Center earned five star awards for all three of its risk management audits for the 2013 season.     The Starfish Aquatics Institute (SAI) awarded the village’s water park a third five star award following an unannounced risk management audit on July 31.     The Starfish Aquatics Institute is one of the largest lifeguard, swim instructor and pool operator certifying agencies in the United States. The institute’s certification program provides pool, water park and restricted waterfront lifeguards skills exceeding nationally recognized standards. Using a combined curriculum of emergency skills, lifeguards are trained to protect life or prevent further Submitted photo injury until emergency medical personnel arrive.     Swimming facilities are tested on a surprise basis with the audi    Val Artis, a teen volunteer enrolled in summer activities at the Bridge Teen Center in Orland Park (left), tor anonymously observing from drank tea and ate scones with Smith Crossing resident Madeleine Anderson, and Valerie Capriglione, outside of the facility. While the another teen enrolled with the Bridge Teen Center. guards supervise the pool from     The teens were among 10 girls from the center who recently spent an afternoon at Smith Crossing, their chairs, the auditor evaluates a continuing care retirement community, at 10501 Emilie Lane in Orland Park, visiting with 10 or so and grades the guards’ perforresidents. The teens and older adults donned red and purple hats for the occasion. mances.     To learn about volunteer opportunities at Smith Crossing, contact Shelly Genis at 326-2600.     “The village’s aquatic center

Tea at Smith Crossing

has been very busy with the hot weather,” said Mayor Dan McLaughlin. “And, we are very proud of the pool staff for their hard work and for earning five star awards for all three safety audits this season.”     Once the hidden audit is completed, the auditor then selects guards, team leaders and squad leaders to respond to mock emergency scenarios.     “These kids are the best of the best,” said Trustee Pat Gira, chair of the village’s Recreation and Parks Committee. “They’ve had a pretty busy summer and keeping an eye on things at the pool is not an easy task. We are very proud of the entire staff at the village’s aquatic center.”     “Very few aquatic facilities qualify to receive this honor,” said Leslie Donavan, President of SAI. “It represents a tremendous commitment to safety and training, and exceptional performance by the lifeguard staff on duty at the time.”     “We are very proud to have the village of Orland Park as a member of the SAI family and that they have chosen to train

their staff using our programs,” said Donavan. “We also commend them for participating in the StarReview Audit Program and believe our focus on professionalism and accountability gives our providers the opportunity to lead the industry in effective and safe programming,” she said.     The village of Orland Park’s Centennial Park Aquatic Center is at 15600 West Ave., and is open daily from noon to 8 p.m. More information about the center is available by calling 349-4FUN or the village’s Recreation Department at 403-PARK.

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The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013



Accused DUI mom in crash had three kids in car: police     Orland Park police arrested Jennifer L. Albright, 29, of Orland Park, and charged her with driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol, possession of cannabis, three counts of endangering the life of a child, driving while license suspended, operation of an uninsured motor vehicle with bodily harm, failure to wear a seat belt and failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident, police said. Albright was arrested at 3:16 p.m. July 11 following a single-car rollover accident near 135th Street and Medina Drive. Her children, a girl and a boy, ages 2 and 3, and a 1-year-old baby, were examined at Christ Advocate Hospital in Oak Lawn and suffered no injuries, according to the police report. Albright was taken into custody after being treated for injuries to her arms and head, police said. At the accident scene, Albright slipped away to a nearby home and asked the homeowner if she could use the bathroom, police said. She then allegedly flushed an unknown quantity of cannabis down the toilet, discarded papers in the kitchen trash bin and returned to the crash site. Albright was held overnight for a bond hearing at the 5th Municipal District Cook County Courthouse in Bridgeview. Her first court date was Aug. 7 in Bridgeview, police said.

ORLAND PARK POLICE     In other Orland Park police news, Jennifer L. Mozwecz, 30, of Orland Park, was arrested at 9:46 p.m. July 26 and charged with DUI after she was stopped in the 9200 block of Cliffside Lane, police said. Mozwecz’s vehicle swerved as she drove south on La Grange Road near 151st Street, prompting several motorists to call and report a reckless driver, police said. She was also reportedly charged with improper lane usage. Mozwecz has a court date of Sept. 16 in Bridgeview.     David J. Klimek, 23, of Orland Park, was cited with unlawful possession and use of fireworks at 1:41 a.m. July 25, police said. Klimek told police he was lighting the fireworks off in front of his home in the 15500 block of Peachtree Drive because it was his birthday, according to the police report. He has a hearing date of Aug. 13 at the Civic Center in Orland Park.     Maisoon Yasser Makhlouf, 42, of Orland Park, was arrested at 11:08 p.m. July 26 and charged with driving while license suspended and driving without headlights when required after she was stopped near 151st Street and La Grange Road, police said. Makhlouf has

a court date of Aug. 26 in Bridgeview.     Chong S. Kim, 47, of Orland Park, was arrested at 8:23 p.m. July 17 and charged with driving while license suspended and driving with only one red taillight, police said. After stopping Kim in the 14600 block of La Grange Road, police learned his license had been suspended for approximately six months, according to the police report. Kim has a court date of Aug. 15 in Bridgeview.     Christina M. Villarreal, 25, of Orland Park, was arrested at 9:04 a.m. July 17 and charged with driving while license suspended and driving with obstructed (tinted) front side windows after she was stopped in the 15600 block of 94th Avenue, police said. The tint on Villarreal’s front driver’s-side window was 16 percent, police said. She has an Aug. 15 court date in Bridgeview.     Keesha L. Pinnock, 36, of Orland Park, was arrested at 11:22 a.m. July 26 after she turned herself in at the police station, 15100 Ravinia Ave. on an outstanding warrant on a charge of failure to appear in court on a charge of DUI, police said. The warrant was issued two weeks ago, according to the police report. Pinnock has a court date of Sept. 3 in Bridgeview.

Vandalism hits post office     Two mercury vapor lights were smashed above the back entrance of the Palos Park Post Office, 12100 S. 80th Ave. According to an employee who reported the crime on July 22, the vandalism occurred sometime between 5:15 p.m. July 19 and 1:15 p.m. July 20. Officers investigating noticed that a lock on a ComEd meter box was also broken and lying on the ground.     A gas generator was reported stolen from the exterior of a medical office in the 8100 block of West 119th Street, Palos Park police said. A 56-year-old employee reporting the crime on July 23 told police she could not recall the last time she had seen the generator, valued at $12,500.     Thieves stole as much as $1,000 worth of copper wire from the cell phone tower at 12150 S. Wolf Road. A 45-year-old Verizon Wireless tech-

PALOS PARK POLICE nician who reported the crime on July 22 told police he believes the theft may have occurred as many as several months ago, based upon the condition of cut wires that remained. There was no sign of forced entry, police said. The technician said the thieves may have gained access via a keypad entry system.     A 45-year-old Chicago woman was arrested on a warrant by Cook County Sheriff’s Police on a charge of domestic battery. Candie Taylor was apprehended after police learned of the warrant while questioning her in the Shell gas station parking lot at 12301 S. 80th Ave. at 9:17 p.m. July 25, police said. Unable to post the required 10 percent of her $5,000 bond, Taylor was taken into custody by Cook

County Sheriff’s Police three hours later and transported to the county lockup in Maywood, according to the police report.     Maria Kelly, 37, of Orland Park, was cited with driving without a license or proof of insurance, as well as driving a vehicle with a suspended registration. Police on routine patrol ran a license plate check on her vehicle near 119th and Southwest Highway at 7:45 p.m. July 26, according to the police report. The car was impounded, and Kelly is due in court in Bridgeview on Sept. 11.     Police cited Nusrean Haddad, 21, of Orland Park, with driving a vehicle with a suspended registration after they stopped her near 131st and La Grange Road at about 2:30 p.m. July 23. She is scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview on Sept. 11.

Teen charged with burglary     Palos Heights police arrested Henry Van Witzenburg, 17, of Palos Heights on charges of burglary and armed violence after he allegedly entered a garage in the 400 block of Shadow Creek at about 6:20 a.m. Monday. He was spotted allegedly rummaging through unlocked vehicles parked inside, police said. The victim, alerted by a motion detector alarm, said he confronted the intruder, who then allegedly brandished a knife and fled, according to the police report. He was spotted by police nearby and arrested. Bond was set at $75,000, with a court date to be determined, according to the police report.     In other Palos Heights police news, Samantha O’Connor, 26, of Worth, was charged with drug paraphernalia possession. Pulled over by police near 120th and Ridgeland at about 11 p.m. Monday for not wearing a seat belt, O’Connor reportedly gave police consent to search her vehicle, police said. Police found two smoking pipes under a passenger seat, and O’Connor admitted they were hers, according to the police report. She is scheduled to appear in court on

PALOS HEIGHTS POLICE Sept. 5.     Palos Heights resident Pamela Smith, 53, was charged with retail theft after she allegedly removed a bottle of vodka from a store on the 12800 block of South Harlem at 2:50 p.m. July 23. Bond was set at $1,500, and she is scheduled to appear in court on Aug. 20.     Amanda Cutro, 18, of Palos Hills, was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. Police stopped her vehicle at 11900 S. Harlem at 2:08 a.m. Tuesday for not having a working light above the rear license plate, police said. Police detected an odor of burnt cannabis and found a smoking pipe when they searched the vehicle. Cutro is scheduled to appear in court on Aug. 20.     Police arrested Orland Park resident Cassidy Daniel, 18, on a charge of drug possession paraphernalia. Pulled over by police near 123rd and Harlem at 12:30 a.m. July 29 for speeding, Daniel was found with a smoking pipe with burnt cannabis residue inside, according

to the police report. Bond was set at $120, and she is due in court on Sept. 5.     Aaron Crawford, 45, of South Holland, was charged with driving under the influence (DUI). Police stopped him at 3:26 a.m. Sunday at 6400 W. 127th St. for improper lane usage, police said. Police said he was transporting alcohol illegally. He was also cited with no proof of insurance. Bond was set at $1,000, and Crawford is set to appear in court on Sept. 5.     Police arrested Mary Byrne, 22, of Palos Heights, on a DUI charge. Pulled over for speeding at 2:44 a.m. July 24 near 132nd and Harlem, Byrne also was cited with driving without a valid license. She failed a sobriety test and was taken into custody, according to the police report. Bond was set at $3,000, and Byrne is due in court on Sept. 13.     Two air conditioning units were stolen from the rear of an office complex in the 6400 block of West College Drive. The person reporting the crime told police that the theft occurred overnight between July 29 and 30.

Park police offer Yellow Dot packet that can save lives     Palos Park residents may obtain a Yellow Dot packet at the Police Department, 8999 W. 123rd St.     Emergency responders are trained to look for a Yellow Dot on the left rear window of the vehicle when approaching an accident.     This indicates that there is a packet in the glove compartment containing important medical documentation. Medical personnel can make the best decision regarding emergency treatment when they know the crash victim(s) may have health issues, a heart condition, or medical allergies. Certain medications could react adversely with drugs normally given in the emergency room. This can make the difference between life and death for the patient.     Police Commissioner Dan Polk, MD, said: “This innovative program alerts first responders to a vehicle crash about the driver and passengers’ medical information, including any medications the injured person(s) may be taking. This information can be critical to a severely injured crash victim during the first golden hour of emergency treatment that determines whether a crash victim will

survive or not.”     Each kit contains a bright yellow decal for the car window, and a bright yellow plastic pocket to hold photos and medical information. Keep your pocket in the glove compartment for easy access during emergencies. Place the decal on the outside of the left rear (driver’s

side) window of the vehicle. Put the yellow plastic pocket with your medical information inside your glove compartment.     “Be safe! Have a Yellow Dot Pocket for every family member. In the event of an accident this information could be life saving,” Polk said.

Palos Park offers online virtual neighborhood watch     The Palos Park Police Department is forming a virtual neighborhood watch program partnership with the online neighborhood social network Nextdoor.com.     A connected community is a safer community, Police Commissioner Dan Polk said.     In an effort to help facilitate a virtual neighborhood watch program in Palos Park, the Police Department has partnered with Nextdoor (nextdoor.com), the private social network for neighborhoods.     It provides a secure network for neighbors to collaborate with each other. Residents in Palos Park

can register as their own private Nextdoor neighborhood website, accessible only to residents of that neighborhood.     “All safe neighborhoods have one thing in common, they communicate with each other, and we just want to be a part of that,” Commissioner Dan Polk said.     To join Nextdoor, visit the website to join your existing neighborhood website. Palos Park residents can log on to their computers to access the Nextdoor website, or download the Nextdoor iPhone App and connection to their neighbors is at their fingertips.

Submitted photo

Palos firefighters win Cure Challenge     Members of the Palos Fire Protection District won first place overall in the Fire Up a Cure Challenge on July 27.     Fire Up a Cure is a fundraiser hosted at St. Xavier University to raise awareness of and money to treat pediatric cancer. Shown are the Palos firefighters, 6-year-old Gavin Clarke, who is their honorary coach, and the first place trophy. The firefighters are Tom O’Connor (from left), Kevyn Holdefer, Jim Hackett, Paul Snyder, Aaron Rutter and Brian Vlcek.     This was the second annual Fire Up a Cure. Palos Fire Protection District won first place last year, as well.

Orland offers citizens’ police academy     The Orland Park Police Department will again hold its Citizens’ Police Academy, offering an inside perspective into law enforcement in the village of Orland Park.     The academy will be held on nine consecutive Tuesday evenings, from 7 to 9 p.m., Sept. 3 through Oct. 29. The class is limited in size and is open to adults age 18 and older. A criminal history review will be conducted on registrants prior to acceptance into the academy.     “This is a great way to learn about all that the Orland Park Police Department does within the community,” said Mayor Dan McLaughlin. “Adults who have an

interest in law enforcement or those who simply want to know more about the department are invited to register.”     “The Citizens’ Police Academy is a nice opportunity to see firsthand the many functions of the Orland Park Police Department,” said Trustee Carole Griffin Ruzich, chair of the village’s Public Safety Committee.     “We’re very excited to again offer the academy,” said Police Chief Tim McCarthy. “This is a great overview of the department with weekly focuses on our different divisions,” the chief added.     The 2013 academy curriculum includes the functions of the

department’s Patrol and Investigations Divisions. Participants will meet officers serving in the Traffic Unit, DARE Program and schools. The department’s K-9 unit will conduct a demonstration and students may participate in mock traffic stops along with other simulations.     There is no charge to participate and completed registration forms must be submitted to the department. Registration forms may be downloaded from the village’s website at orland-park. il.us.     For more information, contact Officer Chuck Barth at 3644736.

Lake Katherine obtains grant for 12 outdoor recycling bins     Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens will be getting even more cleaner and greener after receiving a 2013 Dr. Pepper Snapple Group/Keep America Beautiful Park recycling bin grant.     In total, 35 grants were awarded to local and state governments in 22 states. Lake Katherine received 12 outdoor recycling bins that will be placed near the parking lot and buildings, and around the lake and trails.     Lake Katherine Operations Manager, Gareth Blakesley said: “We are happy to finally be able to provide the public the opportunity to recycle responsibly when they visit Lake Katherine.” The core of Lake Katherine’s mission is to promote environmental sustainability, so the addition of recycling bins is an important step for the organization. Blakesley adds, “It’s been a long time coming.”     In an effort to help local, regional and state parks create convenient recycling opportunities for visitors, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group committed to a one-year collaboration with Keep America Beautiful to fund the placement of these recycling bins at parks throughout the country, ranging from small neighborhood parks to regional parks in natural settings.     “We are pleased to be working with Keep America Beautiful to develop meaningful solutions that support public space recycling,”

said Tim Gratto, vice president of sustainability for Dr. Pepper Snapple Group. “The grant program makes recycling easier and more accessible for consumers in their favorite parks and public spaces while also aiding efforts to reduce litter.”     Lake Katherine Nature Center

& Botanic Gardens is located at 7402 W. Lake Katherine Drive in Palos Heights. Lake Katherine is owned and supported by the city of Palos Heights and managed by Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) charitable organization.

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The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013

School Notes Comedy at Trinity theatre pare children for kindergarten.     Trinity Christian College’s Alumni Theatre will perform “More Fun than Bowling” by Steven Dietz at 7:30 p.m., Thursday through Saturday, Aug. 22-24, in the Marg Kallemeyn Theatre, Trinity Christian College, 6601 W. College Drive in Palos Heights.     Tickets are $8 for students and seniors; $12 for general admission and can be purchased online: at trinityalumnitheater2013.event brite.com.     Director and Trinity alumnus Jake Szafranski describes the play, which is set in a Midwestern town bowling alley, as a “slightly absurd laugh-out-loud comedy.” The story follows Jake Tomlinson as he relives moments of his life with his two dead wives, Lois and Loretta, both of whom died in freak bowling accidents.     The expected run time is about two hours and 15 minutes, and will include a 15-minute intermission.

Children’s Farm preschool signup     A few fall openings remain for young children who love animals and nature at the Farm and Nature Discovery Preschool at Children’s Farm, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.     The preschool is a lively handson opportunity for children, ages 3-5, to become creative learners through experiences with the natural world of the woods, fields, farm, and animals that lie directly outside their classroom door.     The program includes creekwalks, hayrides, hikes in the woods, animal care, pony rides, and nature-themed crafts, plus a basic academic curriculum to pre-

    The preschool is in the Anderson Activity Center, in separate classrooms for three year old children and for four to five year old children. Both morning and afternoon sessions are offered, either two or three days per week.     Parents interested in more information may contact preschool director Kristin Hale at 361-8933 or visit thecenterpalos.org.

Worth Twp. Pixie School program expanded     Worth Township plans to expand its Pixie School program beginning with the fall 2013 session on Sept. 3 to five days a week.     Children age 4 and 5 will attend on Monday, Wednesday and Friday between 9 and 11:30 a.m. Children age 3 will attend during the same hours on Tuesday and Thursday. Enrollment is open to children who reside within Worth Township. Children outside the Township boundaries may enroll at a slightly higher cost. In addition, the fee can be paid in full or divided into two payments.     Parents and children are encouraged to visit the Township during the Youth Commission’s ‘Open House’ on Thursday, Aug. 29 between 10 a.m. and noon. Meet the staff and familiarize yourself with our program. Pixie School not only encourages young children to make new friends, but teaches them skills that will be helpful in kindergarten.     Children who participate in Pixie School must be toilet trained before the start of classes. For more information, visit the township website at worthtownship. com and click on Youth Commission, or call 371-2900, Ext. 45.

Student News

Submitted photo and text

Cooking Camp at SW Suburban Montessori     This summer’s Cooking Camp at Southwest Suburban Montessori School in Palos Park transported its young chefs on a culinary tour.     Not only did the children explore a variety of ethnic dishes, they also learned about the various cultures and customs of each country along the way. Menu items included: meatballs, pasta and tiramisu from Italy; Japanese fare of Asian noodles, chicken fried rice and dessert sushi; tortilla soup, chicken tacos, and sugar cookie fruit tacos from Mexico; and southern comfort recipes of mac and cheese and banana pudding.     Chopping, slicing, grinding, measuring and mixing was fun, but the young chefs agreed that lunching on their creations was the best treat of all. Who knows, maybe the makings for the next Iron Chef are in our midst.     Ken Katayma, of Palos Heights, slices peppers (photos clockwise from top left).     Aaron Aldrich, of Palos Heights, cuts green onions. Francesca Snyder, of Palos Heights, pours ingredients. Caroline Kasper, of Orland Park, enjoys her lunch.

Moraine Valley names spring dean’s list     Moraine Valley Community College has named the local students who made the Dean’s List for the spring 2013 semester. They are as follows:

nomou, Reem M. Elayyan, Eyad M. Elmosa, Madiha Fatima, Scott Finlay and Patrick R. Finucane;     Also Joseph S. Gawlak, Nickolas C. Georgiou, Brittany Golab, Agata Golas, Daniel Gruszka, EmOrland Park ily A. Gut, Justyna E. Jachymiak,     Rima Al-Natour, Hia Alazzam, Takhreed M. Jamal, Karolina Manal Alharsha, Amal J. Ali, Jaros, Bart Kaluza, Kellianne H. Sumera Ali, Tamara A. Alkurdi, Kim, Stephanie H. Kim, StephaKatherine M. Angelakos, Allison nie Kincaid, Luke C. Kingsbury, D. Araujo, Rudina N. Atieh, Bar- Gemma A. Koszulinski, Victoria C. bara L. Bensema, Anne Berkery, Kozlowski, Youna Lee, Ashley E. Phillip A. Bianco, Timothy M. Lewis, Kelley A. Leyden, Joseph Biangmano, Karolina M. Bobak, M. Liskiewicz, Joseph C. Maes, Andrew M. Brittain, Sherri L. Christopher Marciniak, Alyssa M. Cannonito, Alex Cole, Joanna L. Martinez, Christopher K. Massura, Curtis, Xerxes Allyn C. Cuyos, Lisa Masterson, Lauren B. Maton, Karley N. Daudell, Issa Dawud, Mark A. McCague, Don McKendry, Paul W. Debski, Karrie Dineen, Gabriel Miller, Eloy Molina, Ashley Michael S. Durling, Demitra Eko- N. Morris, Maribel A. Musa, Rudy

J. Negrete, Jeffrey N. Nonog, Mary K. Noone, Lauren Olson, Jennifer K. Pajak, Daniel A. Pasqua, Jeffery N. Perino and Helen Picman;     Also Sarah Rochacz, Miranda T. Rodriguez, Venezia M. Rodriguez, Juan A. Rosado, Donald R. Rueckheim, Dina Salem, Paige K. Sallas, Meda Serenaite, Rouzan Shaqoura, Cathy Simmons, Jonathan R. Spear, Joy K. Starek, Nathaniel E. Stozek, Jacob R. Sulski, Megan M. Swiderski, Paul Szymanski, Mark Teplitz, Alison M. Thoma, Scott Thomas, Maria J. Villafana, Roxanne C. Villagrana, Anne M. Walsh, Courtney Wessman, David Wichmann, Allison R. Wolfer, Clarissa J. Wysocki, Olfat Zaghloul, Yusef M. Zayyad, Fred Zegar and Janusz Zieba.

Palos Heights     Eric W. Anderson, Christine M. Bentivenga, Cortney Busen, Jacqueline A. Coleman, Emily M. Duran, Ian T. Fagan, Michelle S. Howe, Matthew F. Ladewig, Shea V. Mills, Patrick J. Neylon, David M. Pusateri, Alexander D. Roth, Edward M. Shaw, William J. Shaw, Christi L. Spayth, Katerina N. Szot, Bradley J. Thomas, Anthony Thompson, Katlin B. Tietz and Carolyn R. Toomey. Palos Park     Brandon W. Ardisson, Matthew A. Beechler, Amber A. Bey, Karissa L. Burnson, Olivia M. Cribbin, Julia A. Guerrero, Andrew Meek, Stephen J. Neven, Joshua Rupp and Rosemary A. Sullivan.

Submitted photo

Orland history, staged at Park school     Students presented the history of Orland Park to staff and parents at Park School with research and a presentation of the early days of Orland Park through songs, last month.     Students performed “The Farm Animals Song” to describe farming days, “The Choo Choo Train” and “Lots of Big Trains” for the industrial age and “Riding Around on Golf Balls” that represented Orland as the “Golf Capital of the World.”     Students also created various mediums of artwork that were exhibited for families and staff to enjoy.

    Benedictine University in Lisle has named the local students named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2013 semester.     The Dean’s List recognizes full-time students who achieve a 3.5 grade point average or above. They are:     Jon J. Altman, Giana Dyan Canfield, Claire Irene Kositzky, Deborah A. Sackett, Eman Faith Sahloul, Amira Saleh, Noora H. Shubbak and Ryan James Simmons, all of Orland Park;     Christina Marie Bigoness, Renee Michelle Habbal, Arifa Mohammad Ibrahim and Ameera Nahhas, all of Palos Heights;     Iman Habes Abdallah and Tara Bodinet, both of Palos Park. ***     The following local students received degrees during the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s spring commencement ceremonies, May 17-19.     Christy Leigh Stamos, of Palos Heights, B.S., Environmental Studies, Geography, and Alexandra Nicole Walters, of Palos Park, B.A., Zoology. ***     Erin Cassidy, of Palos Park, graduated from Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, with a Juris Doctor degree in Law at the conclusion of the spring 2013 semester. ***     The following local students recently graduated from Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, Ind.     Sydnie Corso, daughter of Sandy and James Corso, of Palos Park, graduated with a BS in nursing.     Erin Durkin, daughter of Mary and Bryan Durkin, of Orland Park, BA in English literature.     Heidi Ryan, daughter of Elvira and Michael Ryan, of Palos Park,

BA in history.

***     The following local students graduated from Dominican University in River Forest in spring 2013.     Jessica Parran, of Orland Park, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and dietetics. Parran attended Sandburg High School.     Andrew Kurber, of Orland Park, earned a bachelor’s in mathematics. Kurber attended LincolnWay East High School. ***     In recognition of outstanding academic achievement, Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, released the college’s Dean’s List for Spring 2013. Trinity students must be enrolled full time and earn a minimum 3.5 grade point average.     Local students on the dean’s list are Mark Davis, Mary Houlihan, Molly Johnson, Sara Leth, Christian Perry, Stasia Rafa, Shea Schaaf, Anthony Stasi, Jessica Timmermans and Kelsey VanDyken, all of Palos Heights.     Shane Olson and Patrick Page, both of Palos Park. ***     The following local students graduated from Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights, in spring.     Paola Barajas, Stephen Friel, Daniel Hopkins, Sara Leth, Cynthia Muhammad and Stasia Rafa, all of Palos Heights.     Shane Olson, of Palos Park.     The following local residents are part of the University of Dayton’s most selective incoming class in school history.     William Brennan, of Palos Heights, Conor Doyle, of Orland Park, Margaret Hurley, of Palos Heights, Nicholas Strolia, of Orland Park and Timothy Barry, of Palos Heights.


The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013

Community Notes



Recreation Roundup

Bike hike in Palos Park

Heights Woman’s Club blood drive

Ballroom dance

    Grab your bike, family, and friends for a leisurely 3-mile ride on dedicated paths on Saturday, Aug. 24.     This bike hike will begin at 9 a.m. at the Palos Park Metra Station.     At most, the ride should take about 40 minutes. When you return to the Metra Station, a grilled lunch with refreshments will be provided. Representatives will be available to discuss the new Cal-Sag Trail. This event will end at noon.     Register at the Palos Park Recreation Department, 8901 W. 123rd St. Fee is $5 per person or $12.50 for three or more household members. (671-3760)

    The Palos Heights Woman’s Club will hold their annual blood drive on Thursday, Aug. 15, from 3 to 7:30 p.m., at the Palos Heights Recreation Center, 6601 W. 127th St.     They decided to do a summer drive instead of in February, because there is such a great need at this time of year.     All donors will be treated to a pulled pork sandwich and receive a $7 Oberweis gift card.     To schedule an appointment, call Courtney at Heartland Blood Centers at 342-9722 or Nancy Clark-Jurek at 769-5724, chairman of the event.     Walk-ins are welcome.

    The Orland Park Recreation Department has added additional ballroom dance classes with classes offered Aug. 9 through Sept. 13.     Ballroom I and Ballroom II classes taught by Instructor Tony Ziegler focus on learning dance steps, proper position and floor etiquette for a variety of dances. Both levels of classes will be held on Friday evenings at the Franklin Loebe Dance Studio located at 14650 S. Ravinia Ave.     Level 1 will meet from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. and Level II from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. Fees per person are $25 for residents and $38 nonresidents. (403-7525)

Cook-off contestants sought for Autumn in the Park by Tim Hadac     Palos Park officials are putting out the call for cooks to participate in two competitions that will be a part of the Autumn in the Park Festival next month.     “These cook-offs are a lot of fun and typically attract a nice mix of people — experienced cooks, first timers and everyone in between,” said LeeAnn Fisk, director of recreation for the village. “We invite everyone to join us.”     Both events are set for Saturday, Sept. 21, at the Palos Park Village Green, 8901 W. 123rd St.     The first is a “people’s choice” chili cook-off set for the morning. Entry fee is $10, and cooks need to bring enough ingredients to

produce at least two gallons of chili for a public tasting that will begin at about 1:15 p.m.     The second is a barbecue rib cooking contest that starts in the morning and culminates in a public tasting at 5:15 p.m. Entry fee is $75, and each cook will be provided with 10 slabs of baby back ribs.     Additionally, judges are needed for the chili cook off and are encouraged to call 671-3760 for more information.     In both competitions, cooks also need to bring their own cookware, portable stove, tables, chairs, a canopy and related items. Full details on both contests, as well as the expanded two-day festival itself, can be found at palospark. org or by calling 671-3700.

Submitted photo

Raffle winner Carol Sequin and Palos Heights Farmers Market manager Anne Girzadas are shown at the canning demonstration held Wednesday last week at WellBeingMD Center for Life in Palos Heights, where Dr. John Principe’s next Roadmap to Wellness series will soon start. Details in Health Beat on Page 9.

Heights Garden Club at Farmers Market SEPTEMBER 20-21

Library story hour for children returns at 10 a.m.

Submitted text

    The Palos Heights Garden Club, which meets monthly at Lake Katherine and sponsors/maintains gardens at Lake Katherine, looks forward to being at the Farmers Market on Wednesday, Aug. 14. The garden club earlier this year helped Lake Katherine embark on its 10-year master plan by developing a new Butterfly Garden based on more than six butterfly-attracting native plant species. We will be highlighting to Market visitors how the garden club “promotes gardening through sharing knowledge,” member’s talents and resources, while developing community pride, environmental concern, and a sense of friendship and fulfillment.” We will be offering visitors an opportunity to join the garden Road, during August and Sep- to benefit Ride 2 Recovery, club at the Farmers Market. Bring your own tember. McCord is asking the making a difference in the     Join the Palos Heights Public Library at 10 a.m. for another fun-filled story hour. Come and hear bag to aid McCord community to bring their own lives of wounded warriors, us- fun stories, sing songs, and do a craft. Other library staff will be on-hand to inform patrons about     Whole Foods’ One Dime at a shopping bags and to choose to ing cycling to rehabilitate and upcoming library events, and register new patrons for cards. Time program provides an incen- donate to McCord. empower combat veterans, will     Congratulations to Carol Sequin, winner of the Ball home-canning kit and cookbook raffle held at tive to their customers to elimi-     Classes at Whole Foods with be held this Sunday, Aug. 11, the July 31 canning demonstration: Pickles held at the office of Dr. John Principe. The next canning nate single-use plastic bags. McCord instructors will include from noon to 5 p.m., at Harald demonstration will be held Wednesday, Aug. 28, at 7 p.m., and will feature tomato and salsa canning.     At the register, customers who Beth Leahy’s Wine, Cheese, and Viking Lodge, 6730 W. 175th St., There will be a sign up sheet at the City Tent, or call Dina at 448-9450. While there, pick up free bring their own bags have the Painting class for adults on Aug. Tinley Park. products from the Ball Company, including packets of instant pectin and kosher dill pickle mix. option to receive a 10-cent per 1. On Saturday, Aug. 17 there     The $20 entry fee includes     While at the City Tent, be sure to pick up the latest recipe from Dr. John Principe MD of Wellbag refund as cash back off their will be demonstrations of other a Pop’s Beef buffet and raffle beingMD Center for Life. Previous week’s recipes will also be available. Make sure to have your receipt or they can choose to do- McCord class offerings from 11 prizes, including an LED HDTV Frequent Shopper Card endorsed, and pick up a beautiful photo note card. Proceeds of the note card nate it to that month’s selected a.m. to 2 p.m. and a Kindle Fire HD. sales benefits the market.     The Palos Heights Farmers Market is at 12217 S. Harlem Ave. every charity organization.     DJ will play classics and Wednesday through Oct. 9, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. More information can be found at palosheights.org     Whole Foods has chosen Mcdusties from the 50s and ’60s. join us on Facebook, or call 361-1800. Oldies dance Cord Gallery & Cultural Center for wounded veterans     Call 310-1634 for details. to be featured at their Orland     Hosted by Brian Smith, local Park store, 15260 S. La Grange     An Oldies but Goldies dance rider and former Army officer.

Benefits & Fundraisers

Orland Fall rec. guide arrives

Library Notes Travel trivia night for prizes     The Palos Park Public Library presents Travel Trivia Night on Tuesday, Aug. 13, at 7 p.m.     Teams of two to three people will compete to earn the most points in a travel related trivia game. Prizes will be awarded. The winners of the summer reading program will also be announced.     Call the library to register at 448-1530 or visit the website at palosparklibrary.org.     The library is at 12330 Forest Glen Blvd.

Book & Film

discuss “City of Scoundrels” by Gary Krist available for pick up at the library. Bring your lunch; refreshments and dessert is provided.     • Learn about the numerous degree and certificate programs offered at Career Paths and Coffee with Moraine Valley Community College on Monday, Aug 12, at 6:30 p.m.     • Learn how living a healthy lifestyle can change everything at “Slow the Aging Process” with Tony Lewis, owner of Body Image, and Dr. Soltes on Tuesday, Aug. 13, at 7 p.m.     • Get one small treasured item evaluated at Antique Roadshow with Rex Newell — limited to the first 40 Palos Heights Public Library cardholders — on Thursday, Aug. 15, at 7 p.m. Additional space is available for those who want to come and enjoy the show.     • Learn how to explore and experience the Internet safely at Welcome to the Internet — Let Me Show You Around on Monday, Aug. 19, at 6:30 p.m.     Program registration is always appreciated. Register online at palosheightslibrary.org, by phone at 448-1473, or in person. All programs are free and open to the public.

    The Book & Film Series returns to the Palos Park Public Library on Wednesday, Aug. 14, at 2 p.m., with the film “Silver Linings Playbook,” based on the book by Matthew Quick.     Bradley Cooper stars with Academy Award-winning Jennifer Lawrence and a star studded cast as a man who moves back home to get his life back together and discovers life is more than a playbook. Runtime 122 minutes.     This program is free and open to the public. All who attend will be entered in a raffle to win a free copy of the book. Heights library     The library is at 12330 Foryouth programs est Glen Blvd. Call the library to register at 448-1530. (palos     The Palos Heights Public Liparklibrary.org) brary offers the following upcoming programs for children and teens. Heights library     • Stories at the Palos Pool upcoming programs — Take a break from swimming     The following events will take this Friday, Aug. 9, at 2 p.m. and place at the Palos Heights Public listen to watermelon stories by Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. the concession area of the Palos     • Needle Club — Bring your Pool. projects and enjoy the company of     • Teen Gaming — Unwind this others while working on Tuesday, Friday, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. with Aug. 13, from 10 a.m. to noon. Wii or X-Box games in the Young New members always welcome. Adult area. This program is for     • Thursdays at the Movies on teens in grades 6 and up. Aug. 8 will show the film “Anna     • Tween Book Discussion — Karenina.” There will be three Kids in grades 3-5 will discuss showings: 10 a.m. (with subtitles), “Cheesie Mack Is Not a Genius 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. or Anything” by Steve Cotler on     • Lunch Bunch Book Discus- Tuesday, Aug. 13, at 7 p.m. Parents sion — Join the Lunch Bunch are welcome too. Books are availon Monday, Aug. 12, at noon to able at the Youth Services Desk.

    • Stories at the Farmers Market — Hear stories and make a simple craft at the Palos Heights Farmers Market on Wednesday, Aug. 14, at 10 a.m.     • Teen Book Discussion — Teens in grades 6 and up will discuss “Between Shades of Gray” by Ruta Sepetys on Wednesday, Aug. 14, at 7 p.m. Parents are welcome too. Books are available at the Youth Services Desk.     All programs are free and open to everyone at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. For more information or to register for a program, visit palosheightslibrary.org, call 448-1473, or stop by the Youth Services desk.

Senior Notes Ice cream social for seniors     Palos Township Health Service will hold an ice cream social for seniors on Wednesday, Aug. 21, from noon to 2 p.m.     This event is sponsored by Elder Life Professionals for both residents and nonresidents of Palos Township.     It will be held at Palos Township, 10802 S. Roberts Road in Palos Hills. Call the Health Service at 598-2441 to reserve your spot.

    The Orland Park Recreation Department’s fall program guide is due to arrive at homes this week inside another local newspaper.     The village’s fall offerings are currently online at orland-park. il.us/files/Rec/2013FallBrochure/ index.html.     The guide includes upcoming events and programs for adults and seniors, athletics, cultural arts, dance, early childhood and the great outdoors. It also includes gymnastics, health and fitness, parties, Smart Living, special events, Special Recreation, programs at the village’s Sportsplex, theater and youth and teens.     Among the village’s special events are Maggie Speaks performing at Centennial Park West on Sept. 1; the Open Lands Golf Outing on Sept. 17; the Great Pumpkin Party on Oct. 5; the 35th annual Orland Open Spelling Bee on Oct. 20 and Orland Park’s annual Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 28. The annual holiday festival with Mayor McLaughlin’s tree lighting will be held Dec. 1.     New this year is the Polar Express, held on Dec. 7. Registered participants are invited to a holiday themed train ride departing from the 143rd Street train station.     Village resident registration begins Aug. 14, with nonresidents being able to register beginning Aug. 21. Registration will be available on the village’s website, at Recreation Administration, 14600 S. Ravinia Ave. and at the village’s Sportsplex, 11351 W. 159th St. For more information, call the village’s Recreation Department at 403-PARK.

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The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle

THE

REGIONAL Archives

Barriers 2

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1. Almost out of 6. Attire for Dracula 10. Brother of Little Joe on '60s TV 14. Spanish tourist center 15. Soon, in verse 16. "Ulysses," for one 17. U.S. money market 19. Anniversary, e.g. 20. Tough to trick 21. Stick of gum, informally 22. Sweater type 24. Heroic deed 25. Holm of "Still Breathing" 26. Preacher's admonition 29. Strongly opposed 30. Publicist's assignment 31. "Warmer" or "colder" 32. "You gotta be kidding!" 36. 45 or 78 37. Cagney's TV partner 38. Hatchery sound 39. __-eyed 40. Discordant deity 41. Converted split, e.g. 42. "Ivanhoe" author 44. Trample underfoot 45. Branch out 48. Ill-mannered sort 49. "Can't resist!" 50. Lover's __ 51. __ up (make sense) 54. Huff and puff 55. Engineer or conductor 58. __ Reader (eclectic magazine)

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1. Things on books 2. Place to do laps 3. See 20-Across 4. Feeling rotten 5. Just emerging 6. Shift-6 7. One more time 8. "The Gold-Bug" writer 9. Plea 10. Crop-dusting plane 11. Iridescent gems 12. Occupy, as a table 13. Noisy public fight

50 Years Ago This Week 8/4/2013

American Profile Hometown Content

59. Like dishwater 60. Oddball 61. Compote fruit 62. Nordic runners 63. Well-known

From Aug. 8, 1963

18. "Take __!" 23. Supermodel Carol 24. Indecisive sort 25. Road construction markers 26. Pete Rose's longtime team 27. Devil's doings 28. Cuban currency 29. OK to do 31. Literary Bret 33. Disorderly stack 34. Pianist Peter 35. All-comers tournament 37. Aerobics attire 41. Brief visit along the way 43. Stimpy or Sylvester 44. Take to the sky

45. Make confetti of 46. Quartz variety 47. Karan of fashion 48. Partners of whistles 50. Stripper St. Cyr 51. Comic Sandler 52. Fake out at the rink 53. Scott in a noted court case 56. Cousin of a puffin 57. In the style of

    Shoppers jam Heights for Sidewalk Sale: The Palos Heights police did an excellent job of directing traffic and helping children cross busy Harlem Avenue.

(Answers on page 10)

2 1 4 5 3 6 4 5 7 1 8 5 9

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Sudoku The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9. (Answers on page 10)

© 2009 Hometown Content

Discarding one’s treasures (From Aug. 8, 1985)     How would you cope if you were suddenly faced with the necessity of moving from your present home to a small apartment?     Avis Carlson, who writes a column for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, is faced with this prospect. This lady, who is past 80, is moving from the 10-room house where she has lived for more than 25 years into a two-bedroom apartment.     She will no longer be responsible for the care of her yard, the carrying out of her garbage, the shoveling of her snow, nor the sweeping of her walks.     But how will she compress the contents of 10 large rooms into five small ones?     Like most of us, Mrs. Carlson has been a collector and a hoarder. She has collected books and numerous memorabilia. She has saved “perfectly good” but outmoded clothing, hoping they would eventually come back in style, as they often do.

ens, blankets and quilts. Some of those quilts are heirlooms and she prizes them highly.     How will she ever squeeze all of her dishes and table linens into that tiny dinette, or all her pots, pans, and kitchen equipment into   (1914 that miniature kitchen?     She can’t possibly take her 1995) grand piano nor her several bookcases to the new apartment. What     She has been the recipient of will become of them? many gifts, some of which she     She will have to find room for didn’t even need, but one doesn’t her desk and typewriter, perhaps throw away the gift that some in the extra bedroom. They are kind friend or relative has given essential to her work. one.     All those lawn tools, the mower,     She has saved drawers full of hoses, clippers, et al, as well as clippings and reference material the snow shovels and the garden that might be of use to her in tools will no longer be needed. writing her columns. They will have to go.     Mrs. Carlson has traveled     But Avis Carlson, or any older widely, and there are all those person who moves into smaller mementos collected from places quarters, will not discard the acfar and near. cumulations of a lifetime without     With five bedrooms and three many a wrench and many a sigh. baths, she has accumulated a Discarding one’s treasures isn’t goodly supply of towels, bed lin- easy.

Virginia  Richards

    Once we were here during December and the temperature dropped to 38 below one night. Yet, we changed a flat tire in 25 below weather one morning in Palos.     Another time we spent Christmas here at our cabin in 20-25 degree weather when it was 10 below in Chicago that same day.     You can get used to any kind of by Carl Richards weather if you have to. We spent our (1906-1988) growing up days in the city of St. Louis when the summers are long and hot. As we mentioned in an (From Aug. 7, 1980) for heavy winter weather. When earlier column, we had 31 straight     If you wish to make friends and snow approaches, they don’t have days of over 100 degrees. keep them up here in the north- to round up snow plows and hire     When a friend in Palos asked woods of Wisconsin, don’t ever ask, Mayor Byrne’s boys to run them. how we stood the hot summers “How do you stand the winter Or, as it was in 1967 when Chicago in St. Louis, we replied, “We were weather?” had to borrow snow plows from born into the heat there and we     You’ll get an answer something Wisconsin. never knew there was any differlike this: “It is not as bad as you     It gets cold and stays cold up ent kind.” sometimes have in the Chicago here and there are no in-between     These Scandinavians up here area.” And, he might be right. warm periods such as are common were born into the cold and they     For one thing, they are equipped in Palos and Chicago. seem to love it.

From Aug. 9, 1973

40 Years Ago This Week     Letting the good times roll: On the sidewalks of the shopping center and in the city park, residents found low-priced bargains and lots of old-fashioned fun at the city’s annual sidewalk sale and summer festival.     Top, these smiling kids were pleased as punch with the appearance of Smokey the Bear and his firefighting friends, the Dalmatians. The distinguished guests, along with jolly old Santa Claus himself, visited the city courtesy of the Palos Heights Volunteer Firemen’s association.     Above, Susie Klein and Nanette Caravette (throwing the balls) are intent on winning a prize — some pretty little goldfish. We don’t know if they won, but chances are lots of household in Palos Heights now have new additions to their pet families. [Today, Nanette owns a highly regarded Palos Heights based pet-sitting service. Satisfied clients include the Regional’s Pick of the Litter veterinarian Dr. John Fleming and Regional News editor Jack Murray].

Paragraphs From This Old Stump

From Aug. 7, 2003

10 Years Ago This Week     A family outing brought Jason Gutknecht, 15, of Orland Park (left), to Lake Sedgwick in Centennial Park on Saturday morning, along with Tim Ebert, and Carrie Gutknecht. They came prepared for high water by wearing waterproof waders. Recent rains, including cloudbursts on July 27, have flooded some streets and basements in Orland Park, and other communities in the area, raising the water level in some lakes and ponds.


The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013



Healthy Answers for Life by Carolyn Johnson

Debunking supplement myths and bad science Dear Carolyn:     I had heard on the radio something about how fish oil increases the risk of prostate cancer. I’ve taken fish oil for a long time for heart health and arthritis, but I don’t want to do anything that’s hurting me. Have you heard about this study? What do you think? Thanks, Doug Dear Doug:     Thanks for writing. First, let me say that news sites and the mainstream media love to jump on anything that say that supplements are harmful, no matter how flawed a study may be.     Please do not be afraid to take your fish oil supplements. There are countless research studies on the many, many benefits of fish oil, so to take the word of one (flawed) study which I’ll go into more detail about below, and to discontinue using omega 3s would do yourself a large disservice.     The study in question, which has been bandied about news sites, has been largely discredited. The headlines urging people to stop taking their omega 3s are as a result in a 0.2 percent difference in blood levels of omega 3s, which is to say that the people in the study who developed prostate cancer had 0.2 percent higher levels of omega 3s compared with those who didn’t — a negligible amount.

    Also, the study was not about supplements, and nowhere in the study did the researchers measure the amount of fish oil or fatty fish consumed. Interestingly, there has been research which has found that prostate cancer can change fatty acid metabolism in the body, so the slightly higher levels may be due to that.     There were also many other factors which were not publicized, including the fact that in the prostate cancer group, 53 percent were smokers, 30 percent had a family history of prostate cancer, and 80 percent were overweight or obese.     With this study, along with everything else, it’s all about context. The evidence of the huge body of research on fish oil and omega 3 supplements is overwhelmingly positive, so to listen to one negative study while ignoring the countless positive ones would be crazy.     A number of years ago something similar happened with vitamin E, where taking vitamin E was supposedly going to kill you according to the news sources. People stopped taking the vitamin in droves, especially seniors, who would benefit the most from supplementation. Vitamin E had been proven to help with cardiovascular health, longevity, cancer prevention, and more, but again,

Back to School Bonanza     Pass Health Foods will offer a Back to School Bonanza with samples and tastings of delicious foods for healthy lunches and snacks this Saturday, Aug. 10, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.     There will be raffles, giveaways, healthy recipes, and lots to taste and try, most of which people only heard one negative study, and in their fear didn’t want anything to do with vitamin E, which was certainly not a good thing. The news likes to be sensational, and rarely will you hear positive things unfortunately.     Finally, one example I’d mention is the Inuit population of Canada, who have much higher blood levels of omega 3s and consume much more fish oil compared to the rest of the Canadian population. That group also has significantly lower levels of prostate cancer than the Canadian average. Fish oil has so many benefits to cardiovascular health, joint health, brain function, and more. I hope reading this has allayed your fears and is a voice of reason to balance out the anti-supplement media.    To submit a question to be an-

are suitable for children with food allergies or Celiac. Also, the first 10 people to come at the start of the Bonanza will receive a free canvas grocery bag.     Pass Health Foods is at 7228 W. College Drive, Palos Heights. (448-9114) swered in a future column send an email to healthyanswersforlife@ gmail.com or mail to Healthy Answers for Life c/o Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive, Palos Heights, IL 60463.    Carolyn Johnson is one of the knowledgeable associates at Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive. Feel free to stop by the store for more information or advice. passhealthfoods.com.    This column makes no claims to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure diseases with any advice or products. Any health related information in this article is for educational purposes only. The ultimate responsibility for your choices and their effect on your health are yours and before applying any therapy or use of herbs, supplements, etc., you should consult your health care provider.

Pick of the Litter By John R. Fleming, DVM Dear Dr. Fleming:     My home is in the Southwest Suburbs and I graduated vet school in 2010.     I practice in Wisconsin right now and my mother sent me your article from last week’s Regional about the “whiner.”     Thank you for writing that article, I am learning to deal with this part of practice (something else they never taught us in school). I work my butt off, I owe $175,000 in student loans, I am grateful to have a full-time job and I was raised to treat people kindly and fairly.     Thanks again, it is good to know I am not alone. M. Dear M:     Yep Dear Readers:     About every five years I write an article about dogs biting veterinary clinic personnel. A couple of things prompted me to delay an article on heartworm disease in cats and do this one instead.     My good friend and vet school classmate, Dr. (Col.) Cornwell and his wife were in town last week from Florida for the national AVMA meeting. Scotty and Susan really liked Chicago and we were fortunate that they could spend a couple of days with us here in Palos and a couple days in Fish Creek, Wis.     During one of our walks to the marina, Scotty told me the story about a new young female veterinarian back home who was examining a Rottweiler for a yearly exam. The dog was up on the exam table (face height when standing) and she was “loving-up on the dog,” as he put it. The dog was kissing her face back. She was doing nothing painful to the dog when suddenly, without warning, he bit her in the face and the staff picked up part of her face off the exam room floor. Horrible, but true.     Here’s another vet clinic story. Back in 2012 a young vet technician in Miami had her arm mauled by a dog. Unfortunately the mauling eventually led to amputation of her arm. Or this one, some years ago a vet in Maryland died from an infected dog bite wound. Or

Submitted photo

Meet Lisa’s 160 pound Disco having his teeth checked. In every examination of a pet there comes a brief wrinkle in time when an understanding is established as to who is in charge and who is not. this one, a young female vet was working with me one morning in another clinic when I heard her cry out from her exam room. A German Shepherd has just severely bit and traumatized her left breast.     One of my staff used to work at a very large clinic (perhaps 100 employees) in the Chicago area. She tells me that when she worked there they sustained about three bad bites to their employees weekly. This is totally ridiculous, unfair to unseasoned employees and shows a poor bite management/prevention program. Or, and this would be worse, perhaps they are more concerned about offending someone and losing money instead of using a simple muzzle.     No amount of money is worth someone getting bit. Just yesterday in the clinic I had about three or four dogs try to nail me, and toward the end of the day I walked into the lab and said, “Damn, must be a full moon, had a few biters today.”     Dr. T. responded, “I know, they’re all out today. What’s up?”     For those of you who don’t know my background, let me tell you why we sustain very few bites in our clinic. When I graduated vet school I went into the military

to pay back student support. I worked with the meanest dogs you can imagine and it was standard operating procedure, well before my time on base, that the dogs were muzzled prior to entering the base vet clinic. I liked that a lot!     After the military, my first civilian boss, here in Palos Heights, told his vets that if we felt we needed to muzzle a dog and the owners refused, we could feel free, even at the cost of losing a client, to show them the door they just came in through. I liked that too.     Also, Harold taught me how to make the best homemade muzzle in the world, which I have since taught to many young vets and technicians. In vet school, no one seemed to care if the students got bit. Even today we have the occasional client who laughs when their dog bites, or nearly bites, us.     After working for Harold, I did housecalls for a number of years and found myself in home situations with a mean dog and no trained help. I was also in the employ of many breeders who appreciated the housecall service. For years I treated a lot of Rottweilers, Danes, St. Bernards, German shepherds and Akitas.

The Danes and German shepherds were my favorites, but the only dog that sent me to the hospital was a Dane.     When I came off the road and started to accumulate a staff, I quickly learned how naive young vets and techs are. We all love dogs, but every one of them, under the right and unpredictable situation, can nail you.     I feel like I was well trained, both in the military and by my first boss. Fortunately we have very few bites in our clinic. Our clients are wonderful in caring for our safety. I am crazy about protecting my young employees’ hands and faces, and, as an extra bonus, our workers’ comp insurance is low. Repeated animal bites in the veterinary staff are the number one way to see your workers’ comp insurance skyrocket. As I said, at our clinic, we are blessed by the most congenial and pleasant clients that ever entered an animal clinic. We actually don’t muzzle many dogs in our daily routine but when we feel the need for one rarely does anyone object. In fact, it’s often the owner that gives us the heads-up and suggests a little gentle restraint for Killer. Did I mention that we love our clients? When was the last time we had to show someone the door? Years ago.     The vast majority of you reading this will never see the inside of our clinic, but please let me give you some advice. When you go to your vet, if he or she suggests a muzzle, regardless of how meekly, jump at the suggestion and say, “Sure Doc, your hands and your staff are important!” I guarantee you the level of service you receive that day will be superior. Also, never laugh when your pet tries to bite a staff member. If you do, nothing may be said, but you are on the poop list. If you really want to impress your vet and her staff, bring your own muzzle.

Submitted photo, sponsored by Joy’s Best Friends, Ltd. Best Bites

Dog of The Week     This is Shasta. She is a one year old Tri-Colored Beagle. Shasta is a rambunctious and curious little puppy who loves her life and everything that comes with it. She enjoys playing with her best friend, a black and white tabby cat, Gracie, and her toy seal, cleverly named Lucille. Shasta likes being read to by our daughters and they lovingly consider her their sister. Shasta lives with the Banicki family in Alsip.     Shasta is the 2nd Dog of the Week in August. She qualifies to be in our “Dog of the Month” Contest. The Dog with the most Votes WINS $100 Best Bites Gift Certificate. Voting begins Sept. 1st IN-STORE ONLY. Receive 1 (one) Vote for every item purchased thru Sept. 25th. Ask us how your dog can be a winner!    Best Bites is located at 13034 S. LaGrange Road in Palos Park. 708-448-1515. Visit us online at www.joysbestfriends.com. Follow US on Facebook.com/JoysBestFriendsBestBites.

Tendon injury? Midwest Orthopaedic Consultants offers a new minimally invasive treatment option     Isabel M. Rojas, D.P.M. of Midwest Orthopaedic Consultants in Orland Park and Oak Lawn, offers a new advanced treatment that quickly and safely removes the source of tendon pain.     Based on technology developed in collaboration with the Mayo Clinic, TENEX Health TX™ is a minimally invasive treatment option for tendon and soft tissue injuries, such as Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles Tendonitis. Other treatment options may be Tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow, and jumper’s knee.     “I am extremely pleased with the results I am seeing in my patients who have been treated with TENEX Health TX,” says Dr. Rojas. “They have reported experiencing a nearly painless treatment, a quick recovery and pain relief.”     TENEX Health TX is performed using a local anesthetic to numb the area — patients are awake and alert the entire time. During the treatment, sophisticated ultrasound imaging is used to identify the location of the damaged soft tissue. Once located, a small MicroTip is inserted into the damaged tendon. The instrument delivers ultrasonic energy specifically designed to cut, break down, and remove damaged tissue safely and quickly, without disturbing the surrounding healthy tendon tissue.     “Before tendon-related injuries were a common problem that did not have a good solution,” says Dr. Rojas. “By using the TENEX Health TX System, I am able to intervene earlier in my patients’ care, change the nature of the disease, and get them back to their daily activities quickly.”

    Currently, over 10 million people in the United States suffer from severe pain due to damaged tendon tissue, which limits their range of motion and keeps them from living an active life. Common treatment options such as rest, pain medication, cortisone injections, or physical therapy address the pain but not the damaged soft tissue, the source of tendon pain. An open surgical procedure removes the damaged tissue but carries the risk of invasive procedures, including damage to the surrounding healthy tissue and a lengthy recovery time with restricted activity.     Unlike conventional treatment methods, TENEX Health TX replicates the goal of an open surgical procedure by removing the damaged tissue, but in a minimally invasive manner. The procedure usually takes 20 minutes or less, requires only a small adhesive bandage to close the micro-incision, and offers quick recovery time for patients, usually within 6 weeks or less.     “I am excited about being able to provide the most technologically advanced treatment option for tendon injuries here in Orland Park and Oak Lawn, that truly benefits my patients,” says Dr. Rojas. It is profoundly rewarding to see them really enjoying their lives — without pain. TENEX Health TX has made a world of difference for my patients.”     To learn more about the use of TENEX Health TX in procedures medically known as Percutaneous Tenotomy and Percutaneous Fasciotomy, contact Midwest Orthopaedic Consultants at 226-3300, or visit orthoexperts.com. — Midwest Orthopaedic Consultants

    If people let government decide what foods they eat and what medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny. — Thomas Jefferson.

Health Beat RoadMap to Wellness at WellBeingMD

WellBeingMD. Food tastings are served during each week’s class. RoadMap classes are covered by     Learn about Dr. John Principe’s most insurance plans. Topics are WellBeingMD’s RoadMap to Well- as follows: ness course at one of two upcom-         Week 1: Aug. 24 — Practicing ing free info sessions. Wellness: Creating Your Wellness     They will be offered Saturday, Wheel. Aug. 10, at 10 a.m., and Wednes-     Week 2: Sept. 7 — Stress Reducday, Aug. 14, at 7 p.m., at WellBe- tion: Exploring The Mind Body ingMD Center for Life, 11950 S. Connection. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights.     Week 3: Sept. 14 — Physical     To make your reservation for Activity: Staying Fit for Life. one of the above informative Week 4: Sept. 21 — Fooducation: sessions, call 448-9450 or email Energizing with Healthy CarboRSVP@WellBeingMD.com hydrates.     The next six-week RoadMap     Week 5: Sept. 28 — Fooducato Wellness classes will be held tion: Rebuilding and Refueling on Saturdays, Aug. 24 through with Healthy Fats and ProOct. 5, from 10 a.m. to noon at teins.

    Week 6: Oct. 5 — Fooducation: Putting It All Together; Virtual Supermarket Shopping/Dining Out.

value, and the ratios as well as glucose values. Do not eat or drink after midnight the night before the test. A fee of $35 is charged for residents, $45 for nonresidents. Cholesterol screenings, Palos Twp.     The Hemoglobin A1C test can be performed for diabetics     The Palos Township Health which reflects the average blood Service will hold cholesterol sugar levels over the previous screenings on Monday, Aug. 26, three months. No fasting is refrom 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. quired for this test. The fee is     A total cholesterol screening is $10 for residents, $15 for non$10 for residents, $15 for non- residents. residents. This test tells only the     All fees are cash only. Call the total cholesterol value. Fasting Health Service at 598-2441 to is preferred. schedule an appointment. All     The Cholestech test tells the screenings are done at Palos total value, the high density, Township, 10802 S. Roberts the low density, the triglyceride Road in Palos Hills.

Give the gift of life to children around the world. ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Memorial and Honor P.O. Box 1000 Dept. 174 Memphis, TN 38148-0174 800-276-8340 www.stjude.org/tribute


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The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013

Death Notices Diane L. Courtright

    Diane L. Courtright, née Farrell, 61, of Palos Park, died Aug. 1 at home. Visitation was held at Schmaedeke Funeral Home in Worth on Aug. 4. A funeral Mass was offered at Our Lady of the Woods Catholic Church in Orland Park on Aug. 5. Interment was at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Worth.     Mrs. Courtright is survived by her husband, Ken; her sons, Kenneth, William and Michael; her daughters, Tina Kelly and Mary

Martin; her brothers, John and Daniel Farrell; and nine grandchildren.     Mrs. Courtright was born in Evergreen Park. She was an office administrator.

    Mr. Hreben is survived by his mother, Joyce Grochowski; his sisters, Kerri Carlson and Kristi McLaren.     Mr. Hreben was born in Oak Lawn. He worked in the construction industry. Keith L. Hreben     Memorials to Palos Community     Keith L. Hreben, 44, of Palos Hospital Hospice, 15295 E. 127th Heights, died July 31 at Palos St., Lemont, IL 60439. Community Hospital in Palos Heights. A funeral service was Jeanette M. Meyer held at the Lutheran Church     Jeanette M. “Jean” Meyer, of the Good Shepherd in Palos née Bulthuis, 91, formerly of Heights. Interment was private. Palos Heights, died July 31 at

Harbor Hospice in Muskegon, Mich. Visitation was held at Colonial Chapel Funeral Home in Orland Park on Aug. 2. A funeral service was held at the funeral home on Aug. 2. Interment was at Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery.     Mrs. Meyer is survived by her sons, Thomas, Stephen, Jack and Michael; her daughter, Diane Exoo; and 16 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.     Mrs. Meyer as born in Chicago. She was a homemaker.

Simple Gifts Worth Twp. school supplies drive for needy

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Folliard - Jachim     Madeline M. Folliard and Lance Cpl. Kyle M. Jachim, USMC, were wed on July 14.     Madeline is the daughter of Jack and Darlene Folliard, of Palos Heights.     Kyle is the son of Jane Jachim-Campbell, and the late Rich Jachim and the late Jerry Campbell, of Evergreen Park.     Maddy is a graduate of Mother McAuley High School. She attended Columbia College in Chicago as a dance major.     Kyle graduated from St. Rita High School and recently graduated from flight school as a flight crew chief on helicopters for the Marine Corps.     A destination wedding was held in Calumet Park, LaJolla, Calif. The couple exchanged vows, which they had written themselves, under a white rose-covered arch. Calumet Park overlooks the ocean and provided a perfect backdrop for the ‘sand’ unity ceremony. The bride carried a bouquet of white roses wrapped with her great grandmother’s initial “M” handkerchief, dating back to the 1950s. The groom wore his Marine dress uniform.     A reception was given at the Azul Steakhouse in LaJolla. Azul provides a dining courtyard under the open sky. The couple had both their brothers and several close friends as bridal attendants. About 35 family and friends from the Chicago area attended the wedding and five days of wedding festivities.     The couple currently reside in Oceanside, Calif. Kyle is stationed at Camp Pendleton and Maddy is a dance instructor for Dance to Evolve and Carlsbad Dance Center.

    Worth Township’s Apple Tree Program is collecting donations of school supplies for township families experiencing financial difficulties.     The greatest need for children is the beginning of each school year. Apple Tree is made possible by donations of local residents, businesses, church groups, schools and civic groups. The Youth Commission accepts school supplies and monetary donations all year.     Visit the Worth Township website at worthtownship.com to find a list of the various supplies needed.     Donations can be dropped off at the township offices, at 11601 S.

Pulaski Road in Alsip. (371-2900, Ext. 45)

selves and to instill respect for the court. (403-4001)

Clothing drive for young defendants

Children’s Farm rummage sale donations

    Orland Township Youth and Family Services will hold a “Dress for Success” clothing drive on Saturday, Aug. 10, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the dropoff site at Orland Township, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave.     The agency is joining forces with retired Cook County Circuit Court Judge Donna Cooper and the Dress for Success program, collecting gently-used dress clothing such as dress shirts, ties, polos, khaki pants and jackets for young men who are attending court in an effort to develop healthy self-esteem regarding the way they will begin to see them-

    The Children’s Farm will begin accepting donations Monday for its annual rummage sale, to be held on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 30 and 31, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.     The farm’s large indoor horseback-riding arena will be filled with a huge assortment of housewares, hardware, sporting goods, kid’s toys, craft items, clothes, books, audio and video equipment and furniture.     Donations should be brought directly to the farm. Because of

House of Worship Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church

ing worship, 8:30 and 11 a.m. Wee Church throughout worship for children 2 and 3 years of age     This Sunday regular service in the Sonrise Room. Children’s times — 8:30 a.m. contemporary Worship Time dismissed during service and 11 a.m. traditional worship service for pre-K through service. Nursery care for new- 5th grade children in Primary born through 24 months 8:15 Hall. a.m. through 12:15 p.m. every     The church’s Tent Service and Sunday. Children’s Ministry dur- Block Party will be held Sunday,

Aug. 18 at 11 a.m. There will be no 8:30 a.m. service that day.     Chicken, grilled hot dogs and brats, lemonade and ice water will be provided. Families with last names beginning with A - H, bring an appetizer, J - P, bring a salad and Q - Z — bring dessert.     The church is at 12312 S. 88th Ave. (448-5220)

Benefit planned for the family Dan Wilmot left behind at 46 A benefit for the family of Dan Wilmot will be held Saturday, Aug. 17, from 3 to 8 p.m., at 115 Bourbon Street, 3359 W. 115th St. in Merrionette Park.     Cost is $30 entrance fee 12 years and older, must be 21 to receive alcohol bracelet.     The Wilmot family, Dan, Chris, Jake and Jenna were like many other families on the Southside of Chicago.     All this changed on Sept. 20, 2012, when Dan returned from work at Meade Electric to have dinner with his family. It would be the last dinner the family would enjoy together. Dan, who was 46

years old, suffered a fatal heart attack that evening.     A veteran, Dan Wilmot served in the 480th Tactical Fighter Squadron rising to the rank of sergeant and was stationed at Spangdahlem Air Force Base in Germany. He was a loyal member of I.B.E.W., Local 9; a member of the St. Christina Holy Name Society. Dan graduated from St. Christina grammar school and Marist High School.     He loved golfing, darts, playing guitar, softball, bags, and fishing — whether fly fishing or just tossing a line in the local bass pond. He loved being with his family

and friends and is remembered for his friendly disposition and welcoming smile.     But Dan’s greatest love was his family, Chris, Jake and Jenna. They made their home in Garden Homes, in unincorporated Worth Township.     Family and friends of Dan Wilmot have planned a benefit for Chris, Jake and Jenna to assist with their devastating loss and overwhelming expenses. They invite you to donate a silent auction item, merchandise, basket or monetary donation.     An account has been established at Archer Bank. Any gifts

state recycling laws, the farm cannot accept old TVs. Call for pickup of large items.     All proceeds will benefit The Center. For more information, visit thecenterpalos.org or call 361-3650

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© 2009 Hometown Content

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A benefit for the family of Dan Wilmot is planned for next Saturday, Aug. 17, at 115 Bourbon Street. can be dropped off directly to Archer Bank, 3435 W. 111th St, Chicago IL — Anna Lobas (773) 640-5901.     For any monetary dona-

tion, make any checks payable to: Benefit for the Family of Dan Wilmot. Visit the website, loveyoumorebenefit.com for more information.

Billy Graham’s “My Answer”     Q: Does God ever tell us to do something, or to believe something, that contradicts the Bible? A friend of mine says the Bible is out of date and we need to let the Spirit guide us in new directions, but I’m not so sure about that. — S.Y.     A: You’re right to be skeptical of your friend’s views — because God never tells us to do anything that He has clearly forbidden in His Word, the Bible. God does not change, and neither does His Word.     After all, one reason God has given us His Word is so we can know what is true and right — and also what isn’t true and right. If it was wrong to murder or steal

or commit adultery when God gave the Ten Commandments to His people over 3,000 years ago — then it’s still wrong. If it was wrong to reject Christ and nail Him to a cross 2,000 years ago — then it’s still wrong. As the Psalmist wrote, “The law of the Lord is perfect.... The statutes of the Lord are trustworthy” (Psalm 19:7).     Pray for your friend, that he will realize the moral and spiritual dangers he faces by rejecting God’s Word and giving in to the world’s relativism. Perhaps he’s struggling with a particular sin in his life, and is seeking to excuse it by claiming God doesn’t care. Or he may be anxious to win the

approval of others and not appear “narrow-minded.”     Whatever his reason, ask God to help you be a witness for Christ to your friend — not condemning him, but being an example to him of Christ’s love and truth. The Bible says, “Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone” (Colossians 4:6).    (Send your queries to “My Answer,” c/o Billy Graham, Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, 1 Billy Graham Parkway, Charlotte, N.C., 28201; call 1-(877) 2-GRAHAM, or visit the Web site for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association: www.billygraham.org.)

History of the World by Mark Andrews     Aug. 8: ON THIS DATE in 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte set sail for St. Helena to spend the rest of his life in exile. In 1974, President Nixon announced he would resign the next day at noon after new revelations in the Watergate scandal erased any chance he had of avoiding impeachment.

It was the only known case of a meteor entering the Earth’s atmosphere and leaving it again. In 1988, President Reagan signed a measure providing $20,000 payments each to Japanese-Americans who had been interned during World War II.

    Aug. 11: ON THIS DATE in 1909, the SOS distress signal was     Aug. 9: ON THIS DATE in first used by an American ship, 1854, Henry David Thoreau the Arapahoe, off Cape Hatteras, published “Walden.” In 1969, N.C. In 1934, the first federal actress Sharon Tate and four prisoners arrived at the island other people were found slain in prison Alcatraz in San Francisco Tate’s Los Angeles home. Cult Bay. leader Charles Manson and a group of his disciples were con-     Aug. 12: ON THIS DATE in victed of the crimes. 1953, the Soviet Union conducted secret tests of its first hydrogen     Aug. 10: ON THIS DATE bomb. In 1981, IBM introduced in 1966, a meteor was seen in its first personal computer and daylight from Utah to Canada. PC-DOS version 1.0.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

    Aug. 13: ON THIS DATE in 1521, after a three-month siege, the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlán fell to Spanish conquistadors, marking the end of one empire and the rise of another. In 1624, French King Louis XIII named Cardinal Richelieu his first minister.     Aug. 14: ON THIS DATE in 1900, international forces, including U.S. Marines, entered Beijing to put down the Boxer Rebellion, which was aimed at purging China of foreigners. In 1935, the Social Security Act became law, creating unemployment insurance and pension plans for the elderly.    (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarq mail.com.)

23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39.

Cover your head when it rains Line your bird cage Make a fireman’s hat Shade the sun from your eyes Mulch for your garden To pottie train house pets Wrap fish and other goop in it Wrapping for freezing meal Use to pack with when moving Roll into fireplace logs Blanket for bench sleeping Roll up to make telescope Recycle for cash Clean car windows Make spit balls Temporary curtains for your home Put on floor when painting Use for wrapping gifts Emergency toilet paper Use as insulation Use letters for writing ransom notes Rustling sound effect for home movies Start a fire with it Make into house slippers Roll up to make a megaphone Stand on pile to appear tall Make a collage Use as a temporary cast Use as shoehorn Make a fan Empty vacuum cleaner on it Fix hole in shoe Keep flowers fresh until you get a vase Put on floor when you shell pecans Spank your dog Make confetti Scoop up dead bugs Fingerpaint on it Stuff in wet boots to help them dry

40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77.

Insulate water pipes in winter Swat flies Use rolled up to beat rug To line the trash can Make a kite Paper your friend’s yard Feed a goat Use as funnel for filling gas tank Make patterns for sewing A must for silly-putty users Keep kitchen clean when transferring potted plants Use for ironing ties Make printer’s hat Stuff in shirt to make muscles Clean your feet on Absorb things you spill Make paper dolls To hide in at dinner table For table cloth at annual picnic A source for rubber bands Collect as a hobby Make yourself look important by carrying it Use as door-stop Disposable plate when eating watermelon Use in magic tricks Tearing strips for birthday party streamers Save the seat next to you Make a Christmas wreath Take out frustration by tearing and throwing To collect hair when cutting Blot your lipstick Pack the ice cream freezer Test out your new paperweight Practice stapling Make people think you’re not at home Stuff pillows Use under car when you have oil leak Backing for wax transfers

78. 79. 80. 81. 82.

Make a dummy for Halloween Mask your car for painting Use as a coaster for cold drinks Use as a dart board Practice for big-league basketball 83. Fold up a page and make your wallet look impressive 84. Make your hat fit better 85. A wrapper for used chewing gum 86. Collect the yellow from the sun 87. Good for breaking windows, screen doors, etc. 88. Exercise your grip 89. Teach dog to fetch 90. Backing for magic marker art projects 91. Sit on it at raining football games 92. A place mat for office coffee pot 93. Use as dust pan 94. Give subscription as a gift 95. Temporary replacement for broken window 96. Filler for Santa Claus belly 97. Paper stencils 98. Use as worm food 99. Read it: national and local news, sports, editorials, human interest, television listings, wedding announcements, births, deaths, are all available in the newspaper. 100. Advertise in it: new cars, grand openings, fashions, furniture, food, toys — you name it. If you want to sell something, the newspaper can help. Newspapers have been and continue to be the number one advertising medium in the United States. For more info on advertising contact us.

6 3 8 2 4 1 7 5 9


The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013

11

Photos by Tim Hadac

Firehouse Subs donates for fire safety trailer     Orland Fire Protection District officials accepted a $20,000 check last Friday at the Firehouse Subs restaurant, 159th Street and La Grange Road.     The funds will help the district pay for a new $78,000 public safety trailer used to educate school children and others about fire safety, as well as how to understand and respond to weather-related dangers.     Unlike the trailer that the OFPD has used for the past two decades, the new unit will be heated, accessible to people with disabilities, and used year round.     Officials hope to take delivery of the new trailer later this month and showcase it at the district’s open

house on Oct. 5. They anticipate using the trailer to help provide safety education to 5,000 or more people a year, up from the 3,000 or so currently served.     Hoisting the ceremonial check were Orland Fire Chief Ken Brucki, Firehouse Subs owners Christine and William Vanderbilt, and OFPD Battalion Chief Daniel Smith (left photo).     In his remarks to the several dozen people in attendance, Brucki credited Smith for his effectiveness in applying for the funds, which came from the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation (right photo). Since 2005 the foundation has donated more than $6.8 million to public safety agencies in 38 states and Puerto Rico, including more than $78,700 in Illinois.

Can you benefit from municipal bonds?     Over the past couple of years, the economic picture has brightened for many cities and states — but some of them are still facing potential financial problems. As a citizen, you may well have concerns about these issues. And as an investor, these financial woes may affect your thinking about one particular type of investment vehicle: municipal bonds.     Specifically, given the difficulties faced by a few municipalities, should you consider adding “munis” to your to the fixed-income portion of your portfolio?     It is true that municipal defaults, though still rare, rose in 2012. But we haven’t experienced any sharp increases in defaults in 2013. Overall, default rates for municipal bonds are low — much lower than for corporate bonds of comparable quality, according to Moody’s Investor Services.     Of course, there are no guarantees, but if you stick with “investment-grade” municipal bonds — those that receive the highest grades from independent rating agencies — you can reduce the chances of being victimized by a default. And municipal bonds offer these benefits:     • Tax advantages — Municipal bond interest payments are free from federal taxes, and possibly state and local taxes, too. (However, some munis are subject to the alternative minimum tax, as well as state and local taxes.) This tax treatment means you would

Jim Van Howe

have to earn a much higher yield on other types of bonds to match the “taxable equivalent yield” of municipal bonds.     • Civic benefits — By adding quality municipal bonds to your portfolio, you can help support worthwhile projects in your community, such as construction of schools and hospitals.     • Steady income — Barring a default, you will receive a regular, predictable income stream for as long as you own your municipal bonds. However, if you currently own many long-term munis, you may want to consider reducing your overall position. Eventually, rising interest rates will push down bond prices, and long-term bonds carry added risk because their prices will decline more as interest rates rise. Work with your financial advisor to determine the most appropriate approach for your situation.     • Diversification — Municipal bonds can help you diversify the fixed-income portion of your portfolio if it’s heavily weighted toward corporate bonds. And you

can even diversify your municipal bond holdings by building a “ladder” consisting of munis of varying maturities. Once you’ve built such a ladder, you can gain benefits in all interest-rate environments — when rates are low, you’ll still have your longer-term bonds working for you (longer-term bonds generally pay higher rates than shorter-term ones), and when interest rates rise, you can reinvest the proceeds of your shorter-term bonds at the higher rates.     Consult with your financial advisor to determine if municipal bonds can be an appropriate addition to your portfolio, as investing in bonds involves risks, including credit risk and market risk.     Bond investments are also subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease, and the investor can lose principal value if the investment is sold prior to maturity.     Investors should evaluate whe­ ther a bond ladder and the securities held within it are consistent with their investment objectives, risk tolerance and financial circumstances. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones Investments, in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Vaccinations, physicals help prepare children, parents for the school year by Jennifer O’Boyle physician assistant Palos Medical Group     Going back to school is an important time of the year. Kids need to get used to waking up early, and getting on schedules again. Parents need to get used to waking their kids up early and helping out with homework.     It is also time to make sure school and sport physicals are done and vaccinations are up to date. Take the time to do this sooner than later.     Parents should always keep a copy of their child’s physical form so the immunization record is available. And they shouldn’t be afraid to ask any questions about their child’s physical, mental or social well-being at the visit. All of these are important aspects of the child’s health and wellness, and a physical exam is a great opportunity to take care of any concerns. Vaccinations and physicals     During these appointments is a good time to make sure your child is up to date on immunizations. The requirements have changed and vary between schools, and it’s important to know what your child needs. There is nothing worse than finding out at the last minute your child is missing something. It’s just an unnecessary stress for everyone!     For most schools in our area, physical exams are required upon entering kindergarten, sixth grade and high school. The freshman exam also covers any high school sports your child plays within this year (This doesn’t count club sports). Kindergartners will receive their last set of childhood

booster vaccines at this visit. Sixth graders will receive their Tdap booster. High school students will receive their Tdap booster if they need it and possibly a Menactra vaccine, which prevents against bacterial meningitis.     Also, vaccination records will be reviewed at these visits and children will be caught up on any other vaccines they may have missed. Other optional vaccines that could be given include Hepatitis A and Gardasil.     One important change is the Tdap vaccine, or what people are referring to as the whooping cough shot. Up until a few years ago, kids entering high school would get their Td booster, or tetanus shot. This vaccine did not have the pertussis component like their childhood vaccination. Then there were numerous outbreaks of pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, found on some college campuses across the country. Whooping cough is essentially a bacterial infection that causes a fairly prolonged cough. Signs and symptoms vary between children and adults. For most people it is treated with antibiotics but it can last for 6 to 12 weeks. Insurance     We always recommend checking with your insurance company to see if you are covered for immunizations given at a physician’s office. Many of our patients have good insurance but need to get their shots at their local township. This is important to know before coming to the visit so you do not get billed for a service your insurance will not cover. Well being     During the physical exam, it’s a

good time for parents and children to address any concerns they have. These issues may not have to do with their physical health.     Kids today have a lot more to deal with on a daily basis — social media, peer pressure, bullying. It is important to let your child know they can talk to both you and your health care provider about these issues.     Don’t be surprised if your doctor or physician assistant asks you to leave the room so he or she can have a more open discussion with the child. It allows patients to speak more freely without their parents in the room. This is the best and most effective way to get kids to answer our questions concerning a day in the life of an adolescent or teenager.     During my 16 years in practice, I have learned this can be a valuable tool in helping the patient feel more comfortable in opening up about important topics, ultimately building a provider-patient relationship based on trust. Building a solid relationship allows the child to come to us when they need to, without feeling worried or self- conscious. I pride myself on the fact that I have taken care of patients since they were young.I know all about their lives, and they come to me for their health and wellness, and with any other issues they need taken care of.     Jennifer’s office is in the Palos Primary Care Center South, 15300 West Ave., Suite 223, Orland Park. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact Palos Medical Group at 460-5100 or visit Palos CommunityHospital.org/PMG.

Chamber Corner Multi-chamber networking event     The deadline is Tuesday, Aug. 13 to pre-register and pay for the upcoming members-only multichamber networking luncheon.     Registrants must be a member of the Mokena, New Lenox or Orland Park Area Chambers of Commerce to participate.     The multi-chamber networking

luncheon will be held on Tuesday, Aug. 20, with check-in at 11:30 a.m., at Jenny’s Steakhouse, 191 South, 10160 191st St. in Mokena.     The fee is $15 and registration will be limited on a first-come, firstserved basis to one representative per company and nine representatives per industry. No walk-in attendees will be accepted.     Participating chamber members

will be given two minutes to give their sales speech and there will be four rounds of structured roundtable networking. Participants are reminded to bring business cards and brush up on their 30-word sales pitch.     Members of the Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce may register by calling 349-2972, or emailing bonnie@orlandpark chamber.org.

Job Search Bonefish Grill, Orland, hiring

100 local residents upon opening.     Applications to join the fresh fish experts will be accepted for     Bonefish Grill plans to open various positions including anat 15537 S. La Grange Road in gler (server), host, bartender and Orland Park on Monday, Sept. kitchen staff, and will be available 16. online or in-person at the new     The restaurant will have hired location. Interviews will be con-

ducted with qualified candidates that apply online.     Applications are being accepted now through the opening on Sept. 16.     To apply, visit bloominbrands careers.com/Bonefish and complete the online application.

Caroline’s Fashion Chat by Caroline Foreman

Festival Fashion takes over the Lollapalooza scene     Lollapalooza exploded in Chicago for another year last weekend.     City dwellers, out-of-towners and suburbanites alike all burst onto the scene to celebrate their passion for an eclectically curated lineup of musicians and the pure excitement of a scene composed of festive and joyous gatherers.     Upon making a visual realization of the scene, it is difficult not to associate the festival with that notorious 1969 Summer of Love at Woodstock. Although the majority of festival goers were not even a whisper of tangible existent, these attendees clearly channel Woodstock as a source of their wardrobe inspiration.     Without addressing the use of psychedelic substances, Woodstock was the epitome of freedom, expression and joy. Footage of the now legendary performances reveals the audience to be a colorful and flowing mob of effervescent youths bonded together by the thoroughly candid and human pleasure of music and life. Their garb inevitably reflected this hippie-licious state through the use of bohemian style clothing, floral prints, fringe details, feathers, floppy hats, tie-dye, flowing fabrics, poly-cultural influences and whimsical styling.     Lollapalooza conjures these very impulses from festival-goers. What is now termed, “festival fashion” dominates all in attendance. An easy-going approach takes over the outfits through the use of maxi skirts, cut-off denim shorts, slouchy tank tops, cutesy, often fringy bracelets, boots of every height and style and chunky sandals on the girls.     Makeup is either purely natural or fun and bold, hair is tousled and wavy, often with the addition of a wrap or scarf head band. Longstrapped shoulder bags made of leather or woven fabrics carry necessities like the cell phones unheard of at the festival of ’69.     Guys of Lollapalooza tend to don patterned button ups, printed tanks, quirky graphic tees, straw fedoras and porkpie hats, shorts of

Photo: Rockinstyle.blogspot.com

Woodstock brought out the most expressive and fun fashion choices from its attendees. any color, skinny jeans, and sunglasses of colored plastic.     The approach is refreshingly light-hearted and carefree. However, the unfortunate effect of this dominating fashion style on the scene is the consequential faux pas. Admittedly, here my claws shall come out. Many attendees treat “festival fashion” as a dress code,

forcing them to abide by what they consider the established rules. They wear something that is exceedingly unflattering, like cut-offs with far too much cut off or fringed bras more like a Tarzanian Band-Aid. Head wraps, clearly a fresh purchase from Forever 21, are carefully (Continued on page 12)

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12

The Regional News Thursday, August 8, 2013

their cheeks and outer eyes.     I have come to diagnose Lollapalooza as the summertime Halloween. I shall explain further. Halloween has become a night, or party season really, for which people are nationally obligated to wear whatever they want. They by Caroline wear the most daring, often crude Foreman and raunchy “outfit� for the celebrations. Lollapalooza has become (Continued from page 11) a strikingly similar “anything goes� type situation. placed around the crown of a per-     The charm of “festival fashfect and neatly straightened head ion� comes with the genuinely of longish hair. The boldest of the personal expressions of clothing. poseurs wears bright face paint on The intensely personal experience

Caroline’s Fashion Chat

of the music being performed coincided with the intensely personal approach to dressing for the one-ofa-lifetime event. The individuality portrayed through the ensembles is bold and interesting, but nonetheless, real. Lollapalooza was also full of eager attendees with honest expressions of fashion to enhance their concert experiences.     Perhaps the most significant aspect to note is the continuation of the homage to vintage fashion inspiration and a historic desire to express oneself while experiencing the timeless enjoyment of music for the masses.

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor

outhwest

sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, August 8, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

Community sports news Evergreen 13 All-Stars win state tournament

    The 13-year-old all-star baseball team representing the Evergreen Park Athletic Association recently captured a state championship in Woodstock and then advanced to a regional tournament in Kalamazoo, Mich., where it placed fourth.     Comprising Evergreen’s roster were Matt Fitzpatrick, Connor Cahill, Kevin Healy, Matt Kairis, Josh Nash, Jack Altman, Danny Reynolds, Ben Watkins, Sean Quinn, Sean Coyle and Ryan Demer.

Hickory Hills Patriots take third in Pony National regionals

    After posting a glittering 19-1 regular-season record, the Hickory Hills 16-U Patriots continued their strong play by advancing all the way to the Pony National North Regional.     The Patriots wound up third. Winning the championship and moving on to the Zone portion

of the 2013 Pony World Series was the Steger Cyclones.     Featured on the Patriots’ roster were Tom Semanic, Matt Gonsowski, Travis Cooley, Victor Pennacchio, Dennis Egan, Tristan Egan, Tim Gambill, Fernando Perez, Christian Delgado, James Raya, Uriel Gonzalez, Kyle Marrotta, Sean Marrotta, Paul Byrdak and Rich Kaszuk. Joe Marrotta was the team manager, while Rich Kaszuk Sr. and Ryan Conrad were his coaches.

Mt. Assisi announces dates for fall sports tryouts

    Mt. Assisi Academy will begin tryouts for its fall sports teams on Wednesday, Aug. 14.     Cross country coach Bill Rolette will lead his tryout from noon-1:30 p.m. on that day, while golfers will meet with coach Ken Malnar from 12:30-2:30 p.m. The two men will be entering their 14th and 10th years at the school, respectively.     Doug Stangeland, who coached the Screeching Eagles tennis team to a Girls Catholic Athletic As-

sociation divisional championship last season, will hold his tryout from noon-2 p.m., while volleyball coach Karen Van Assen will conduct two tryout sessions. The first, for freshman players, will go from noon-2:30 p.m., while the second one will run from 3-6 p.m. and be for JV and varsity athletes.

Fisk to appear at CSC golf outing

    Hall of Fame catcher Carlton Fisk will be the special guest at the 22nd annual Cancer Support Center golf outing on Friday, Sept. 13, at Flossmoor Country Club, 1441 Western Ave., in Flossmoor.     Fisk will compete against golfers on the club’s par-3 seventh hole. Registration for the event begins at 11 a.m., with a shotgun start to follow at noon. Lunch and dinner are included in the $325 cost.     The CSC provides programs at no charge for anyone affected by cancer in more than 70 Chicagoland south-side communities. For more Submitted photo information, call 798-9171 or visit www.cancersupportcenter.org. Evergreen Park Athletic Association’s 13-year-old all-star baseball team won a state title in its age division.

Are you ready to pick some football?     With the high school football season approaching, we looked around the office and noticed that youngsters Ken Karrson, Jeff Vorva and Anthony Nasella have more than 75 years worth of sportswriting experience between them.     So we figured that with all of that knowledge, we would pick the outcomes of high school and local college football games start-

ing with the Aug. 29 edition of the Sports Southwest section.     But you can try to get in on the fun as well. For the nine weeks of the high school football season, we invite one reader per week to try to out-pick the so-called experts.     The first nine people to respond via e-mail at sports@regional publishing.com will have the opportunity to take on our guys.

Put “Football Picks” in the subject line and give us your name, hometown, phone number, a little personal background (What you do for a living. Did you play football? Do you just love the sport?, etc.) and a spiffy jpeg photo of yourself.     There are no prizes except for bragging rights, which are priceless.

After so much nasty, here’s some nice Bartosh     OK, it’s time for something completely different.     Regular readers — and doggone it, I know you’re out there even if you prefer to remain anonymous — usually expect this column space to be filled with the latest tales of athletic-world misbehavior. Goodness knows there’s a lot of it, which gives my computer keyboard precious little time to cool down.     And admit it — most of you like reading about the missteps, in part because they’re not yours but also because it brings the high-dollar people down a few pegs, at least in our minds. They still have far more money than the majority of us would see even if we lived a dozen lifetimes, but it’s comforting to know they’re as character-flawed as the rest of the American populace.     Of course, well-heeled individuals tend not to see themselves in any sort of unflattering light. Wealthy people, regardless of how they acquired their money, think those hefty finances automatically give them class.     What the dollars really do is enable them to easily afford a bevy of sycophants, who’ll say or do anything to make the cash crowd feel extra important. That’s done in the hope there is a scintilla of truth in the concept of trickle-down economics.     But I don’t want to start another journey through the trashing side of town. Instead, as a change of literary pace, I want to relate a couple of stories that legitimately show sports people in a favorable light.     Actually, they did the heavy lifting themselves by simply refusing to act like prima donnas. In an age when self-importance might be at an all-time high among public figures, these guys instead made some perfect strangers feel important.     The first of those men was Portland Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard. Initially praising the NBA Rookie of the Year for a thoughtful action was SB Nation writer Seth Rosenthal, and I quickly jumped aboard the Lillard bandwagon when I read about what he did for a teenaged fan.     Apparently, Lillard was spotted in a mall by said fan, who asked if he could take a picture with the player. Lillard responded that it wasn’t the best time

and that he preferred to finish shopping, but added that he was agreeable to doing it later.     The fan, Siros Ardestani, then did what most people in his position — children and adults — would not have: He simply moved on. Even though Ardestani didn’t know if Lillard was merely giving him a blow-off, there was no hissy fit thrown or cursing of the sought-out celeb, a response that is all too common among snubbed fans.     And perhaps that’s part of the reason Lillard was unable to forget the incident. He tweeted about it and expressed his regret, going so far as to say, “I feel bad now.”     Mind you, he works in a profession where regret usually stems solely from an athlete’s inability to squeeze an extra million dollars or so from team coffers.     Ardestani saw the tweet and responded to Lillard, saying everything was fine and he understood how difficult it was for someone in the public eye to make time for every person who might want a moment with him. Lillard then told Ardestani where to meet up with him, and the two got together for a photo that quickly spread across various Internet sites.     What struck me first and foremost about this entire episode was the civility shown on both sides. Ardestani had more reason to be cordial, seeing as how he was seeking something, but still his attitude was commendable.     Lillard, on the other hand, could have easily played the I’m-a-star-and-you’re-not card and become just another object of nationwide criticism, like so many of his ball-bouncing peers. But he told Ardestani he’s a man of his word, and then he went ahead and proved it.     As years go by and Lillard becomes even more of a household name within basketball circles, it’ll be increasingly difficult for him to maintain that sort of normal-guy persona because he’ll be getting pulled in so many different directions. But even if he eventually succumbs to that, Lillard can take pride in knowing at least on one occasion, he was an athlete worth getting to know. ***     NHL player Antoine Roussel also earned some good-guy

Submitted photo

The Hickory Hills 16-U Patriots took third place in the Pony National North Regional.

Inaugural WeishFest slated for Sept. 1 points for his willingness to interact with fans.     The Dallas Stars forward didn’t have the same one-onone opportunity as Lillard to do right, but Roussel has reached out by trying to arrange for his fans to exchange, without additional cost to them, the No. 60 jerseys they purchased this past season for the No. 21 he intends to wear in the 2013-14 campaign.     The change was brought about by Stars management’s desire to see Dallas players in lower numbers as the organization prepares to unveil newly designed uniforms next season. As another writer pointed out, I guess those front-office types have never heard of Wayne Gretzky (No. 99) and Mario Lemieux (No. 66).     Be that as it may, Roussel — who chose his new number because it’s the date of his birth — felt bad that people who may have spent a fair amount of money on his No. 60 jersey are now in possession of something that will soon have no connection to anyone on the roster.     As he told Internet writer Sean Leahy, he saw a couple people last year who had purchased No. 60 and told them at that time that he was going to keep the number. Although Roussel is only following a team edict by making the jersey switch, he said he still “kind of felt bad for [the owners of No. 60] because they trusted me, and I felt like I let them down. I felt like it’s fair to do that.”     “That” refers to Roussel’s setting up of the free jersey exchange through the Stars offices. More specifics weren’t revealed since training camp doesn’t begin until September, but Roussel insisted he’s serious about seeing the process through to a satisfying conclusion.     “It’s an investment for some people,” he said. “With the economy these days, I don’t want to put those people in a bad spot. I felt that was a good thing to do.”     Actually, it’s a pretty great thing to do, regardless of the economic climate. Here’s hoping Roussel, like Lillard, is indeed a man of his word and, if so, has a season for the ages next winter.     Gee, I almost forgot what it was like to feel good about something in sports.

Event honors former Brother Rice student-athlete     The inaugural WeishFest will be presented on Sunday, Sept. 1, at Standard Bank Stadium in Crestwood.     The event, which will feature three musical acts, will donate 100 percent of its proceeds to the Andrew Weishar Foundation. The foundation is named after the former Brother Rice student-athlete who died of cancer at the age of 21 in October of last year.     General admission to WeishFest is $20 in advance, $25 at the gate. VIP access is available for $50 and $60, respectively, and includes unlimited food, soft drinks and beer, plus exclusive VIP seating and parking. Tickets are available by phone (489-2255), at the Standard Bank box office or on its online site.     Weishar, whose youngest brother, Nic, is a returning two-time all-area football player at Marist, was born on Oct. 26, 1990. He was an honors student and three-sport athlete at Rice before attending Illinois Wesleyan University. At age 19, however, Andrew Weishar was forced to leave college after he was diagnosed with colorectal cancer.     Intense rounds of chemotherapy and radiation followed, then Weishar was brought to the Mayo Clinic for extensive surgery designed to save his life. One year after the surgery was performed, though, the cancer reappeared and, after a two-year fight with the disease, he passed away in the early hours of Oct. 12, 2012.     Following is a written reflection of Weishar’s other brother, Dan, about his older sibling: “[Andrew was] a loving grandson, nephew and cousin, a student of outstanding achievement, an athlete of countless accolades and a leader amongst his peers. He was a devout Catholic, a friend to everyone who crossed his path and the one that forever changed the lives of so many, a role model, an inspiration and, most of all, a hero to us all.     “His entire life reflected the amazing smile, laugh and love in which we all remember him. Considered to be the ‘nicest kid I have ever known’ by those privileged to meet him, Andrew invoked goodness in everyone around him his entire life. His faith was instilled in him at an early age as a student at St. Damian Grammar School. These years not only molded his faith, but also his character, academic superiority, competitiveness, leadership and drive to be great.

    “And great he was. He went on to Brother Rice High School, where his legacy was further defined. In a community of thousands, Andrew shined as a student, an athlete and, most importantly, as one who perfectly portrayed what it means to ‘act manfully in Christ Jesus.’ Known for his amazing work ethic, unmatchable drive and unstoppable determination, Andrew very humbly made his mark on the South Side of Chicago.     “[After] graduating from Brother Rice, Andrew chose to further his academics and football career at Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington. Within eight short months, Andrew’s values, kindness and character became known around not just the football team, but the entire campus.     “Andrew’s story, however, is not defined by the date of his birth or by the date he passed. Rather, his story is stamped by his actions in between those times and his legacy that continues to thrive. There are no words that can do justice to the impact that Andrew Weishar has had on the lives of thousands.     “Upon hearing the news of diagnosis, and despite its life-changing and deadly reputation, Andrew welcomed the challenge as if it were just another opponent to defeat. Never complaining and always reassuring others of his refusal to give up — ‘I am not done fighting,’ he said so inspiringly in response to the hospital’s offer of hospice care.     “As more bad news rolled in, Andrew’s optimism grew exponentially. Throughout his battle,

he was the one lifting spirits, bringing positive thoughts and enforcing determination. Even amid his pain, he remained the beacon of hope and inspiration, and he did this all with a smile on his face.     “Andrew’s time with us could not be a better blueprint of how to live. More than anything else, [he was] showing us how to live a life of faith, courage and strength, and how to live a life knowing that every day is a gift.     “Andrew’s story was shared from community to community, state to state, and even across the globe. His inspiration was felt by thousands as he fought for his life and taught life lessons greater than any amount of education can provide. Andrew exemplified what it means to live an optimistic life, with constant resilience and a positive attitude. He reminded us to never take for granted each of the blessings we have in our lives.     “We hope that Andrew’s example will forever thrive in the hearts of all who heard his story, and it is our plan to never let these lessons, his name or his legacy wither away with time. Even despite his situation, Andrew asked very little of his family and friends. However, the one request he asked of our family was to ‘pay forward’ the kindness, generosity and compassion that was shown to him and the entire Weishar Family.     “We hope that The Andrew Weishar Foundation fulfills his one wish and becomes a mechanism for doing just that: paying forward the incredible generosity in every way possible.”

Submitted photo

Andrew Weishar (No. 55) will be remembered at the inaugural ‘WeishFest,’ a fundraising event scheduled for Sept. 1 at Standard Bank Stadium. Proceeds will benefit The Andrew Weishar Foundation.


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Section 2 Thursday, August 8, 2013

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF GSAMP 2002-HE2, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-HE2 P l a i n t i f f , � v . � VICTOR F. ESPINOSA, PILARITA G. ESPINOSA D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 17747 8530 WEST BROADMOOR Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 11, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 16, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8530 WEST BROADMOOR, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-115-024-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family r e s i d e n c e . � The judgment amount was $245,118.54. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 6 0 5 / 1 8 . 5 ( g - 1 ) . � IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: RANDALL S. MILLER & ASSOCIATES, 120 N. LASALLE STREET, SUITE 1140, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 239-3432. Please refer to file number 11IL02167-1. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I550040

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FIRST MIDWEST BANK, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO PALOS BANK & TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, -v.RONALD KOERBER, SHARON KOERBER, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA LIEN CLAIMANT PURSUANT TO LIENS RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. 0926526120 AND 0926526121, THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, LIEN CLAIMANT PURSUANT TO LIEN RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. 1020926017, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 35200 61 CARRIAGE TRAIL Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 3, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on September 5, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 61 CARRIAGE TRAIL, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 2325-110-018-0000. The real estate is improved with a two story residence. The judgment amount was $255,989.82. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Kimberly A. Padjen, GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC, 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410, CHICAGO, IL 60604, (312) 332-6194. Please refer to file number 44495. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410 CHICAGO, IL 60604 (312) 332-6194 Attorney File No. 44495 Attorney Code. 90334 Case Number: 11 CH 35200 TJSC#: 33-14844 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I546542

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION GUIDANCE RESIDENTIAL, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � MOHAMMAD M. MOSA, LINDA MOSA, 2004-0000384, LLC, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 043183 8746 S. 81ST AVENUE HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 18, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 22, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8746 S. 81ST AVENUE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-205-029. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-34967. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-34967 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 043183 TJSC#: 33-16049 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I550131

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Marquette Bank, P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � B & F Properties Incorporated, William C. Barnes, Non-Record Claimants and Unknown Owners, D e f e n d a n t s . � 13 CH 4212; Sheriff's No. 130641-001F. Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on September 18, 2013, at 1 P.M. in Room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 W. Washington St., Chicago, IL, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment:PIN: 23-10-400-013-0000.Address: 9169 Windsor Drive, Palos Hills, IL 60465.Improvements: Single family house.Sale shall be under the following terms: Not less than 10% of successful and highest bid to be paid at the time of sale and the balance to be paid in full within 24 hours after the sale, all paid to the Sheriff of Cook County by cashier's check or certified funds.Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special assessments, and any prior first mortgages. Premises will NOT be open for inspection. For information: Paul Doucette; Kelly, Olson, Michod, DeHaan & Richter, LLC, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 333 W. Wacker Dr., Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606, Tel. No. (312) 236-6700.This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.I551642

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ROBERT MURRAY, LAURA MURRAY, VILLAGE OF PALOS PARK, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., LEWIS UNIVERSITY, CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) N.A., NCO PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT ASSIGNEE OF CHASE Defendants 12 CH 09384 8301 W 118TH ST Palos Park, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 5, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 22, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8301 W 118TH ST, Palos Park, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-23-407-003-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $346,799.93. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: POTESTIVO & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 223 WEST JACKSON BLVD, STE 610, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 263-0003. Please refer to file number C12-66200. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. POTESTIVO & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 223 WEST JACKSON BLVD, STE 610 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 263-0003 Attorney File No. C12-66200 Attorney Code. Case Number: 12 CH 09384 TJSC#: 33-16304 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that p u r p o s e . � I550610

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For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH MORTGAGE TRUST 2006-1, P l a i n t i f f � V . � MARCIN POPEK; HIDDEN VALLEY CONDOMINIUM MASTER ASSOCIATION; HIDDEN VALLEY CONDOMINIUMS, UNIT THREE, ASSOCIATION A/K/A HIDDEN VALLEY 3 CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS ASSIGNEE OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION, AS RECEIVER FOR WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK S/I/I TO LONG BEACH MORTGAGE COMPANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S , � D e f e n d a n t s � 09 CH 28722 Property Address: 10965 SOUTH 84TH AVENUE UNIT 1A PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M � Fisher and Shapiro file # 09-018397 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 25, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on August 28, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 10965 South 84th Avenue, Unit 1A, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-14-400-089-1001 and 2 3 - 1 4 - 4 0 0 - 0 8 9 - 1 0 2 3 � The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $202,664.91. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I545913

For Sale Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � ONEWEST BANK, FSB P l a i n t i f f , � v . � SIGITA SAVILOVA, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 39941 8949 SOUTH MAPLE LANE HICKORY HILLS, IL 6 0 4 5 7 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 7, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on September 10, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8949 SOUTH MAPLE LANE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-03-210-009-0000. The real estate is improved with a one story single family home with a one car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1221593. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1221593 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 39941 TJSC#: 33-14005 I547605

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � STANISLAW S. CHRUPCZAK, ELZIBETA T. CHRUPZAK, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR LEHMAN BROTHERS BANK, FSB D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 28517 8314 W 91ST ST Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on September 16, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8314 W 91ST ST, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-202-012-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $388,896.27. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: POTESTIVO & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 223 WEST JACKSON BLVD, STE 610, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 263-0003. Please refer to file number C12-66226. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. POTESTIVO & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 223 WEST JACKSON BLVD, STE 610 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 263-0003 Attorney File No. C12-66226 Attorney Code. Case Number: 12 CH 28517 TJSC#: 33-15180 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that p u r p o s e . � I548248

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RUN 8 8 13 For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR BNC MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-2 Plaintiff, -v.MILES M. DORE A/K/A MILES DORE, LINAE DORE A/K/A LINAE M. DORE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Defendants 13 CH 003657 9612 S. 78TH COURT HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 3, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on September 11, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9612 S. 78TH COURT, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-12-100-066, Property Index No. 23-12-100-067. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-13-02914. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-02914 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 003657 TJSC#: 33-14206 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I547723

Salefor Rent VacationFor Notice Home This newspaper strives to monitor the classified ads it prints. However, when an ad is submitted from outside this area, it is often impossible for us to check its credibility. Therefore, we suggest caution when answering ads with offers that seem too good to be true.

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“10 in the Park” NEW as of 7/7/11 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION ARCHER BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH ALLEGIANCE COMMUNITY BANK P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ROBERT PALICHLEB, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS THE ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF JANUSZ PALICHLEB, DECEASED, ANDRZEJ PALICHLEB, ANNA PALICHLEB, STANISLAW PALICHLEB, UNKNOWN HEIRS OR LEGATEES, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 01695 8449 S. 85TH CT. Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 28, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on September 16, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8449 S. 85TH CT., Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 18-35-305-009-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $210,276.93. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: MARTIN & KARCAZES, LTD., 161 North Clark Street - Suite 550, CHICAGO, IL 60601, (312) 332-4550. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. MARTIN & KARCAZES, LTD. 161 North Clark Street Suite 550 CHICAGO, IL 60601 (312) 332-4550 Attorney Code. 80461 Case Number: 13 CH 01695 TJSC#: 33-13241 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that p u r p o s e . � I548247

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The Regional News - The Reporter

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Thursday, August 8, 2013 Section 2

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Tips for making home improvements safer    Homeowners are increasingly hands-on when it comes to improving their homes. While it was once commonplace to call a contractor to do household repairs and renovations, nowadays more and more homeowners act as their own handyman.    Though often more affordable and rewarding, it is also more risky for homeowners to tackle projects themselves. Accidents are more likely to occur when a weekend warrior rather than a trained professional does the work. To help do-it-yourselfers work safely, Woodcraft offers the following tips. Be prepared    Even the most seasoned DIYers get hurt from time to time, but being prepared for an unexpected accident is the key to avoiding a tragedy.    “A fully-stocked first aid kit is a must for every homeowner and DIYer,” says home expert Danny Lipford who is host of the nationally-syndicated TV show, Today’s Homeowner, and radio show, Homefront.    “Always have it handy wherever you’re working. You’ll be surprised at how often you’ll need it. Plus, periodically check the kit and restock those items that are getting low.”    It is also important to have a charged, portable or cellular phone within arm’s reach at all times. While it’s best to work with a partner, that’s not always possible. Earlier this year, a Connecticut man’s arm got stuck while he was mending a boiler. Trapped for two days, he eventually cut off his arm to save himself. Access to a phone might have saved his arm. Select user-friendly products    Inexperienced amateurs often struggle because they choose the wrong tools or risk injury by using unfamiliar tools.    “The right tools make a job so much easier,” Lipford adds. “Plus, they’re safer to use because if you’re using a tool not intended for the task, you increase your risk of injury. If you don’t own the tool, consider renting it, particularly if it’s relatively expensive and you plan to use it infrequently.”    Choose easy-to-use products

User-friendly tools, such as the Kreg Deck Jig System, make home improvement projects safer and easier. that promote safety, such as the Youngstown Glove Company’s Anti Vibration Glove. The glove dampens shock and vibration, making it ideal for use with medium-to-large motorized tools, including chainsaws, weed eaters, edge trimmers, and more. With a unique wrist wrap designed to provide support and relieve arm tension, the glove ensures that homeowners won’t weaken during a project. What’s more, the extensive nonslip reinforcement on palm, fingers and thumb provides added grip to reduce the risk of injury, and the terry cloth thumb for wiping sweat and debris keeps workers focused.    The Kreg Deck Jig System offers an easy, safe way to create a beautiful, functional deck surface free of exposed fasteners and painful splinters. The jig’s easy grip handle provides a secure hold and total control over every joint as the jig creates an incredibly strong wood-to-wood bond using precisely placed self-tapping screws. Three separate drill guides enable the deck builder to work like a pro to install deck boards, even in the

hardest-to-reach areas. Finish without a mishap    Many home improvement accidents occur when it appears a project is completed.    As homeowners confidently step back and admire their handiwork or resolve to clean up later, the risk of an accident increases. To be safe, step carefully and immediately put your work area in order, making sure tools are turned off.    For extra protection, use a SafeStart Systems SafetyGate(TM) Professional. It employs patented sensor technology that recognizes when tools are accidentally left on. An illuminated yellow LED light indicates when items are on but not in use, and a protective “gate” stops the flow of electricity, keeping tools from restarting while homeowners are away or otherwise occupied. Compatible with electric tools and home appliances, the SafetyGate is ideal for parents with young children.    For more information about Woodcraft, contact the store nearest you, visit www.woodcraft.com or call (800) 535-4482.

Small projects add up to big appeal    In this economy, homeowners are watching every penny. Just because money is tight doesn’t mean every renovation plan has to be cast aside. Smaller projects can revitalize a room without a big investment.    Homeowners who don’t have much to spend still don’t want to compromise quality with smaller improvements. Therefore, they’re often thinking of big appeal, albeit on a smaller scale.    To get started, homeowners should look at the rooms they use the most and begin there. What’s the point of starting in a guest room or renovating the basement if it’s rarely used? Put available funds to work on the rooms that get seen.    For example, the kitchen is a popular room in many homes. If budget doesn’t allow for a rehaul of appliances or cabinetry, think about less expensive ways to modify the space. A new faucet can give the room a different look, as can replacing cabinet hardware and hinges. Revitalize the appearance of the room with new

flooring, such as laminate that mimics the look of stone, wood or other natural surfaces. Change the accessories in a china hutch or hang some different artwork for an instant change.    Bathroom makeovers are often high on the list of improvements. But many improvements can be budget-busters. Think about improvements that change what is disliked. Maybe outdated wallpaper can be removed and replaced with paint. Clean up the grout around a bathtub by redoing to freshen the room. Go with a new color scheme achieved by replacing the old linens, bath mat and shower curtain.    Living room re-dos can be achieved with some accessory changes and perhaps a new piece of furniture. Change a glass coffee table for an earthy leather ottoman that can also store toys or throw pillows. A simple swap of window treatments can dramatically change the look of the room. If seating has seen better days -- but a new set is not an option -form-fitted slipcovers are a quick,

and generally low-cost, fix.    Kids’ rooms often can be improved with some much-needed storage space. Clear up clutter from the floor by installing a closet organizing system, which can hang clothes within reach for children. Older children may appreciate a room that reflects their maturity. Now is the time to change princess prints for bolder graphics or dump trucks for sophistication. All it often takes is a little paint and some new bed linens to achieve the look.    For a dramatic change in a home with hardwood floors being hidden by carpeting, take the weekend to pull up the carpeting and reveal the floors beneath. A little sanding and resealing is often all it takes to bring out the beauty of the wood. And that will instantly provide value while increasing aesthetic appeal.    Another simple and very inexpensive way to renovate a home is to reduce. By removing clutter and items that are simply collecting dust, homeowners can breathe new life into spaces. Rearranging furniture is also another option.

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For Notice Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NA AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-PR2 TRUST Plaintiff, -v.JESSE RACHEL CRANE, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MARTIN E. CRANE, EAGLE RIDGE II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, WILLIAM P. BUTCHER, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE Defendants 12 CH 004735 17828 BERNARD DRIVE UNIT #3A ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 10, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on September 12, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17828 BERNARD DRIVE UNIT #3A, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-32-101-007-1063. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-11-07900. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-07900 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 004735 TJSC#: 33-14475 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I548098

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CASTLE PEAK 2012-1 LOAN TRUST; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � GLEE T. HIBBELER; D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 19238 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on May 28, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 29, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 12819 South Shoshone Road, Palos Heights, IL 60463. P.I.N. 23-36-210-004-0000. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, PO Box 165028, Columbus, Ohio 43216-5028. (614) 220-5611. 1 2 0 0 4 1 2 8 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I549709

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PROSPECT FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � JOHN STYRCZULA, BERNICE STYRCZULA, A N G E L I N A � STYRCZULA, DISCOVER BANK, DISCOVER F I N A N C I A L � SERVICES, INC. UNKNOWN OWNERS AND N O N - R E C O R D � CLAIMANTS Defendants, 12 CH 30005 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on June 3, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, September 6, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 9437 S. 83rd Ct., Hickory Hills, IL 6 0 4 5 7 . � P.I.N. 23-02-411-006-0000. The mortgaged real estate is a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: Bidders must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Brandon R. Freud at Plaintiff's Attorney, Ruff, Weidenaar & Reidy, LTD., 222 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 263-3890. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I551043

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST C O M P A N Y � NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS GRANTOR TRUSTEE OF THE PROTIUM MASTER GRANTOR TRUST; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � PALOS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, N/K/A FIRST MIDWEST BANK AN ILLINOIS BANKING C O R P O R A T I O N � OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AS T R U S T E E � UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF A TRUST A G R E E M E N T � DATED THE 24TH OF MAY, 2003 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 1-5725; CHRISTINE A. RAFA; STANLEY E. RAFA, JR.; CAPITAL ONE BANK BY VIRTUE OF A JUDGMENT RECORDED AS D O C # 0 9 0 8 9 2 6 0 6 5 � D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 10797 6129 West 128th Street, Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on June 5, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, September 6, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 24-32-110-002. Commonly known as: 6129 West 128th Street, Palos Heights, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. This information is considered reliable but is not warranted. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. This sale is subject to unpaid real estate taxes, assessments, covenants, conditions, easements and restrictions of record. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. This pleading is a communication for the purpose of collecting the mortgage debt, under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. If you fail to dispute, in writing, the validity of this debt within thirty days, it will be assumed to be valid. Finally, any information you provide will be used for the purpose of collection. Upon payment, of each portion of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Receipt of Sale. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the mortgaged real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection, except by the arrangement and agreement of the current owner or o c c u p a n t . � For information: JAROS, TITTLE & O'TOOLE, LIMITED, Plaintiff's Attorney, 20 North Clark Street, Suite 510, Chicago, Illinois 60602, (312) 750-1000. Phone calls will be taken only between the hours of 9:00 thru 11:00 A.M. When calling, please refer to file number 11-35785. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I551009

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST AGREEMENT FOR THE S T R U C T U R E D � ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE P A S S � THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-8 P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � KATARZYNA SZATKOWSKA; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., D/B/A AMERICA'S SERVICING COMPANY; M O R T G A G E � ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S � D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 3511 PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on April 26, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-23-101-116-1048. Commonly known as 11114 South 84th Avenue, Unit 3B, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo, Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F12010307 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I549684

Publisher’s Notice    All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age Publisher’s Notice of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant     All Real Estate advertising inwomen this newsand people paper is subjectsecuring to the Faircustody Housingof Act children under 18.to advertise “any which makes it illegal preference, limitation or discrimination.”    This newspaper will not knowFamilial status includes children under ingly anywith advertising the age accept of 18 living parents or for legal real estate which women is in violation custodians, pregnant and people of the law. Our of readers are herby securing custody children under 18. that will all dwellings ad-ac informed   This newspaper not knowingly vertised in this for newspaper are cept any advertising real estate which onofanthe equal opportunity isavailable in violation law. Our readers are basis.informed To complain discriminaherby that allofdwellings advertionin call HUD toll-free 1 (800)on tised this newspaper areat available 669-9777. The toll-free an equal opportunity basis.telephone To complain of discrimination HUD toll-free at 1 number for thecall hearing impaired (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone is 1 (800) 927-9275. number for the hearing impaired is 1 (800) 927-9275.

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Miguel Villicana; Martha Gonzalez; BMO Harris Bank, National Association f/k/a Harris, National Association; Cambridge in the Hills Condominium Association Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 22788 Sheriff's # 130456 F11020190 CHOH Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on September 10, 2013, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 8100 West 87th Street Unit 1A, Hickory Hills, Illinois 60457 P.I.N: 18-35-407-091-1001 Improvements: This property consists of a Residential Condominium Unit. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of a condominium unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments as required by 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1) Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I547484

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4

Section 2 Thursday, August 8, 2013

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The Regional News - The Reporter

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HEALTH ARE YOU A 45-79 YEAR OLD WOMAN WHO DEVELOPED DIABETES WHILE ON LIPITOR? If you used Lipitor between December 1996 and the Present and were diagnosed wih diabetes while taking Lipitor, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H. Johnson Law toll-free 1-800-535-5727

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Wanted to Buy Kaneta Johnson-Sanni looking for missing spouse; notice to Dauri Sanni aka Tony. Last known ad- Older Chevy Astro van in readress: 102nd and Ridgeland Ave., sonably good running condition. Apt. 208, Chicago Ridge. Must have 2 rear doors (not 3). Call Tim or Pat B. Call (727) 557-7767 at (708) 448-4000

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Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

7

The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast by Jeraldine Saunders

Mark Wahlberg and Denzel Washington play undercover agents in Baltasar Kormakur’s “Two Guns.”

    ARIES (March 21-April 19): gotta have friends. In the week Dec. 21): Creative ideas ache Stick your toe in and test the to come, your circle of friends, to be expressed in the week to waters first. A temporary lack of your clubs or other groups might come. Your imaginative ideas can funds may keep you from satisfy- take up more of your time than blossom into reality — but first ing all your desires in the begin- usual. You know how to edge your you must acquire necessary tools ning of the week. You will achieve way to the top by being especially and experience. You might find a masterful mentor. a happy medium near the middle friendly. of the week.     VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):     CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.     TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Be proud and persevere. Your fi19): Those who are detail-oriLove is the only four-letter word nancial predicament will appear ented might take center stage in you manage to utter. During the much rosier by the middle of the the week ahead. Offer a pat on the upcoming week, your kindness week. Spending habits may be back to those who demonstrate and sensitivity toward others reexamined; a special someone selflessness and be generous with are demonstrated with an air will be happy to give you the your own time and talent. Set a of refinement and delicacy that benefit of the doubt. good example. everyone admires.     LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):     GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Time for the tried and true. In     AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. Gentle and fun-loving Venus is in the week ahead, you may be 18): Be well equipped to offer your sign for a few more days. adept at finding coupons to cut a quip. Your social circle could You might find that expressing costs and finding other ways to expand during the week ahead, your love of the most beautiful get the best value. You might be so stock up on some small talk things and perhaps investing in most at home with old friends and keep a few jokes on hand to Universal Pictures them might be the safest route who stick by you through thick entertain an audience. The love pursuit of a drug lord in director as the week unfolds. and thin. boat might sail.     CANCER (June 21-July 22):     SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. Reveal some initiative behind the 21): The power of love out-     PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): scenes. Your outlook might im- shines the love of power. In the A kiss is just a kiss. You might prove greatly when Venus enters week to come, you might find feel like you are floating on cloud your sign midweek and offers you that romantic outings are just as nine in the week to come if you more opportunities for happy thrilling and satisfying as making meet up with a hot new romantic is counting on the chemistry social interactions. Expect more headway in the boardroom. Give prospect. Remember to keep in of Wahlberg and Washington romance. it your all. touch with old friends as well to carry this barely-above-action     LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You     SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22- as new ones. fare. To an extent, he gets what he wants. Despite the incredibly silly outset the two characters start with, they’re eventually too likable not to carry a certain weight. Neither is actually stretching much here: Wahlberg a straight-arrow tough guy with an axe to grind, Washington a cool cat, but always dangerous and leaving you guessing a bit. As I said, not a stretch, but when Thursday, August 8th........................................DJ Dunn 5 pm working with a Blake Masters Friday, August 9th.........................................Hello Nuvo 8 pm screenplay based off a graphic novel (no, Hollywood hasn’t ravSaturday, August 10th.......................................Hat Guys 7pm aged them all yet) it’s likely Karmakur thought that was enough Sunday, August 11th..........................................Infinity 7 pm for success. It isn’t exactly. “Two Guns” has its moments of clever banter from its stars, no doubt, and it does indeed have a whole lot of bullets flying, but not much in the way of originality past the 45-minute mark. I like a good caper/action. I Like Denzel Washington. I like Mark Wahlberg. And I like exactly where this film was released in the summer also-rans. The studio was right: “Two Guns” has the firepower, but still never has the range to hit a sure shot.

Two Guns: not a sure shot by Jase Howell     You have to wonder about a movie starring Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg being released in the August slums of summertime. Both actors are draws alone, but together they should be pretty much guaranteed success in a studio action flick. So why such a late invite to the summertime festivities? Yes, the answer is pretty much as simple as it appears in the film “Two Guns” in which they star. The conclusion is that this movie was probably not deemed a sure shot by the powers that be. Was this good reasoning? In this case, perhaps it may have been.     For the most part you’ve seen the buddy-action film and everything in it done better in the filmscape before, but that is not to say the film doesn’t have a couple of pseudo-original rifts here. First to the plot, which finds Mark “Stig” Stigman (Wahlberg) and Robert “Bobby” Trench (Washington) attempting to rip off a diner. No, they are not two bit thieves, and this is supposedly not an average diner. The diner is supposedly a hold for notorious kingpin Papi Greco (Edward James Olmos)

and is supposed to be holding three million in cash, although the amount we find is actually ten times that. We also find out Stig and Bobby are not who they seem as this caper unfolds. Stig is a D.E.A. agent, while Bobby is an undercover Naval Intelligence Officer. The trick for a good portion of this film is that the two do not know each other’s identities. Yes, I said there were a few differences — the big one was just used up plot-wise.     It isn’t before long the two genius crime-fighters figure out the vast amounts of money, each other’s identities, and how many people have laid claim to this cash. Luckily for Wahlberg and Washington, the film equips them with a whole lot of bullets. The likes of Naval officers on the take in James Marsden and Will Patton appear, as well as a cast of other characters, but that’s par for the course in this kind of affair. Far more intriguing is Stig’s ex-partner/stripper played by Paula Patton, because … well, she is Paula Patton playing a stripper.     But let’s be honest: director Baltashur Karmakur, who previously worked with Wahlberg on the forgettable “Contraband,”

St. Gerald’s Carnival August 8-11 2013 ~ Southwest Hwy. & Central

BEER GARDEN EVENING ENTERTAINMENT

Videoview by Jay Bobbin     (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)     STARTING THIS WEEK: “OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN”: America’s most famous residence has had a rough year on the screen, thanks to “White House Down” and this preceding thriller, which has the same theme of enemies invading the presidential home. Directed by Antoine Fuqua, this version stars Gerard Butler as a disgraced ex-bodyguard who comes to the chief executive’s (Aaron Eckhart) aid again when terrorists strike. The strong cast also includes Morgan Freeman, Melissa Leo, Angela Bassett, Dylan McDermott, Robert Forster, Radha Mitchell (“Red Widow”) and Ashley Judd. DVD extras: eight “making-of” documentaries; deleted scenes. *** (R: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “THE COMPANY YOU KEEP”: Robert Redford remains every bit a movie star, as he demonstrates in this melodrama that

he also directed. He plays a former radical who’s now a lawyer in Albany, N.Y., but he’s forced back on the run by the arrest of a former colleague and the curiosity of a young reporter (Shia LaBeouf). The very impressive cast also includes three other Oscar winners besides Redford — Julie Christie, Susan Sarandon and Chris Cooper — plus Nick Nolte, Stanley Tucci, Richard Jenkins, Terrence Howard, Anna Kendrick and Sam Elliott. DVD extras: two “making-of” documentaries; red-carpet and press conference footage. *** (R: AS, P) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “THE BIG WEDDING”: The movie itself may not be Oscarworthy, but there are Academy Award winners to spare in this would-be comedy that’s sort of a thematic spin on “The Birdcage.” Robin Williams starred in that film, and he also turns up in this ultimately too-frantic tale of a divorced couple (Robert De Niro, Diane Keaton) pretending still to be married for the sake of their soon-to-wed adopted son (Ben Barnes). Susan Sarandon is another Oscar owner in the cast; Katherine Heigl, Amanda Seyfried and Christine Ebersole

appear as well. DVD extra: “making-of” documentary. ** (R: AS, N, P) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “GIRLS: THE COMPLETE (Continued on page 6)

For more information call 708-422-0234

7-11-13

HOMESTAND CONTINUES TONIGHT! Thursday, August 8th at 7:05pm vs the Frontier Greys $1.25 domestic draft beers and $2.25 domestic bottles.

Friday, August 9th at 7:05pm PET NIGHT! All pets are welcome. Pets can walk the bases with their owner following the game.

6-GAME HOMESTAND STARTS ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 13th! Come early on Sundays for pre-game autographs, stay later to play catch in the outfield!

2013

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6 Section 2

Thursday, August 8, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Broaden Your Horizons This week

Submitted photo

All about the sweet corn in Mendota    Tons of free, hot buttered, delicious Del Monte Sweet Corn will be the highlight of the annual Sweet Corn Festival held in Mendota today through Sunday.    The Mendota Area Chamber of Commerce, sponsors of the event, is preparing for the huge undertaking of hosting 55,000 visitors, who consume nearly 50 tons of sweet corn during Festival weekend.    Fresh Del Monte sweet corn will be served free to the public on Sunday, at about 2 p.m., following the Grand Parade, at the intersection of Illinois Avenue and Jefferson Street in downtown Mendota.    Mendota’s well-know food festival features a host of vendors. For details, visit the website at sweetcornfestival.com.

Videoview (Continued from page 5) SECOND SEASON”: Still a polarizing show for many viewers, the HBO comedy that’s the brainchild of star and frequent writer and director Lena Dunham sends its heroines down a variety of paths for its sophomore round. Hannah (Dunham) is trying to move on in her personal life while still being pulled by her romantic past, making her miss the presence of her bestie Marnie (Allison Williams) that much more. Zosia Mamet and Jemima Kirke also continue prominently in the cast. DVD extras: “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by cast and crew; “Guys on Girls” featurette; episode table read. *** (Not rated: AS, N, P) (Also on Blu-ray)     “EMPEROR”: Tommy Lee Jones’ performance as Gen. Douglas MacArthur — complete with

Top Pop Singles     1. Blurred Lines, Robin Thicke, featuring T.I. + Pharrell, Colossal Tunes Music     2. We Can’t Stop, Miley Cyrus, Hollywood Records     3. Radioactive, Imagine Dragons, Kid Ina Korner/Interscope     4. Get Lucky, Daft Punk, featuring Pharrell Williams, Columbia     5. Treasure, Bruno Mars, Atlantic     6. Can’t Hold Us, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, featuring Ray Dalton, Macklemore     7. Cruise, Florida Georgia Line, featuring Nelly, Republic Nashville     8. Holy Grail, Jay-Z, featuring Justin Timberlake, Roc Nation / Universal     9. Cups (Pitch Perfect’s When I’m Gone), Anna Kendrick, UMe     10. Mirrors, Justin Timberlake, RCA Records

pipe and sunglasses — is this drama’s true spark, but much of the focus is on one of the military legend’s aides, a general (Matthew Fox, “Lost”) tasked with deciding whether Japan’s Emperor Hirohito (Takataro Kataoka) should be tried and executed for war crimes. A resurfaced relationship from the past makes the mission more difficult. DVD extras: “making-of” documentary; audio commentary by director Peter Webber and producer Yoko Narahashi; deleted scenes; photo galleries. *** (PG-13: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “SOUTHLAND: THE COMPLETE FIFTH AND FINAL SEASON”: Rescued by TNT after NBC canceled it, the smartly written and acted Los Angelesset police drama reached its conclusive end earlier this year. A gang war and a bank robber with a give-to-the-poor mindset are among the challenges faced by the officers and detectives played by Ben McKenzie, Regina King and Michael Cudlitz, among others. DVD extras: “making-of”

Top Country Albums     1. Here’s to the Good Times, Florida Georgia Line, Republic Nashville     2. Based on a True Story..., Blake Shelton, Warner Bros.     3. True Believers, Darius Rucker, 10 SPOT     4. Hunter Hayes, Hunter Hayes, Atlantic     5. Red, Taylor Swift, Big Machine Records     6. Golden, Lady Antebellum, Capitol Nashville     7. Pioneer, The Band Perry, Republic Nashville     8. Night Train, Jason Aldean, Broken Bow     9. NOW That’s What I Call Country Volume 6: 18 Chart Topping Hits, Various Artists, UMe     10. Life on a Rock, Kenny Chesney,Blue Chair Records, LLC / Columbia Nashville

documentary; deleted scenes. *** (Not rated: AS, P, V)     COMING SOON: “AMOUR” (Aug. 20): The internationally acclaimed, Oscar-winning drama stars veteran talents Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva as an aging couple challenged by health concerns. (PG13: AS, P)     “SCARY MOVIE 5” (Aug. 20): Familiar faces including Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan and Heather Locklear populate the latest installment of the horror-spoof series. (PG-13: AS, N, P, V)     “THE GREAT GATSBY” (Aug. 27): Leonardo DiCaprio plays the wealthy recluse trying to recapture a lost love in director Baz Luhrmann’s take on the F. Scott Fitzgerald story. (PG-13: AS, P, V)     “PAIN & GAIN” (Aug. 27): Several bodybuilders hatch an extortion scheme in director Michael Bay’s fact-inspired tale. Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Anthony Mackie star. (R: AS, N, P, GV) FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

Top DVD Rentals     1. Oz the Great and Powerful, Walt Disney Pictures, PG     2. G.I. Joe: Retaliation, Paramount Pictures, PG-13     3. Identity Thief, Universal Pictures, R     4. A Good Day to Die Hard, 20th Century Fox, R     5. Warm Bodies, Summit Entertainment, PG-13     6. 42, Warner Bros., PG-13     7. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters, Paramount Pictures, R     8. Jack the Giant Slayer, Warner Bros., PG-13     9. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone, Warner Bros., PG-13     10. 21 and Over, Relativity Media Distribution Group, R

p.m. on Sundays. to 5:30 p.m. each day. The Rev.     Isle a la Cache Museum is lo- Chris Hopkins will lead the all cated at 501 E. 135th St. (Romeo day workshop on Saturday and a Celebrated Clarinet Road), ½-mile east of Route 53 group walk and instruction at 2 Choir free concert in Romeoville. p.m. on Sunday. However, guests     The Celebrated Clarinet Choir     For information, call the mu- are invited to walk at any time.     There is no cost to those wishing will perform classical and pop seum at (815) 886-1467. to walk the labyrinth individually tunes, such as: “On A Hymnor as part of the group walk on The Bridge Teen Center song of Philip Bliss” by Holsinger, The “Overture to the Barber of     The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 Sunday. The Saturday workshop, Seville” by Rossini, “Puttin’ On S. 71st Court in Orland will host which includes lunch, costs $40 the Ritz” by Berlin, “Georgia on Friday Night Live 7:30-10:30 p.m. and requires registration. My Mind” and of course “The Aug. 9, with music from Shine     Construction is also underway at The Center for a permanent Clarinet Polka.” Bright Baby, plus samples from     The free performance is Wednes- Meijer. This free event is for teens labyrinth to be dedicated on Sept. 22. For information, call Hopkins day, Aug. 14, from 7 to 7:45 p.m., in 7th through 12th grade. at 361-3650. If it looks like rain, at Zion Lutheran Church, 17100     Saturday Night will be held call to be sure the labyrinth is S. 69th Ave. in Tinley Park. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Aug. 10, with     This 19-piece ensemble is com- music from The Sounds We Hear set up. prised of high school students who plus Cheesecake Factory samples. Palos Village have been rehearsing this sum- This event is exclusively for stumer. Lynn Hojnacki leads this dents in 10th-12th grade and is Players auditions event to showcase the clarinet. free with a student membership     The Palos Village Players will application or $5 with a school hold auditions for their musical, Living history ID. (532-0500) “Once Upon a Mattress,” an adat Isle a la Cache aptation of the fairytale “The Princess and the Pea.”     The Isle a la Cache Brigade     The auditions will be held from will bring insight into what life 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. was like in the Illinois TerriCenter Cinema 18, and from 7 to 9:30 p.m. on tory during the mid-18th century     “2001: A Space Odyssey” will Monday and Tuesday, Aug. 19 during a living history demonbe shown on Friday, Aug. 16, at and 20, at All Saints Lutheran stration this Sunday, Aug. 11, 6 p.m., as part of the monthly Church, 13350 S. La Grange Road from noon to 3 p.m., at Isle a Center Cinema series at The Cen- in Orland Park. la Cache Museum in Romeoville. ter, 12700 Southwest Highway,     Park in the rear lot and enter The event is free of charge and Palos Park. at the southwest back door. No open to all ages.     Stanley Kubrick produced this appointments are necessary. The     The Isle a la Cache Brigade is a intriguing Sci-Fi 1968 movie audition will consist of cold readvolunteer group that shares skills which is one of the Sight and ing from the script. Auditionees used in the 18th-century fur trade. Sound “10 best-ever” films. should also bring something to The Brigade consists of re-enac    A discussion follows the movie. sing that will showcase their votors who represent voyageurs, Free popcorn is served. No fee cal range. courier du bois, French women, is charged but registration is     Dance auditions will be handled Metis and Native Americans, necessary. Call The Center at the same way. potters, musket shooters, cooks, 361-3650.     Performance dates will be Nov. seamstresses or craftsmen sharing 9-16. The play will be staged at their talents. Labyrinth at The Center the Palos Park Recreation Cen    Demonstrations will be ongoing from noon to 3 p.m., so the     The outdoor labyrinth will be ter, 8901 W. 123rd St. in Palos public can arrive at anytime to available for walking on Satur- Park. observe the demonstrations and day and Sunday, Aug. 17 and 18, talk with the Brigade about life at The Center, 12700 Southwest in the wilderness. Highway, Palos Park. Also, a spe    The program is offered inside cial day-long labyrinth celebrathe accessible building or outdoors tion workshop will be held on (weather permitting). Outdoor Saturday, Aug. 17, from 9 a.m. programs will be held on unpaved to 3:30 p.m. areas with uneven ground.     Weather permitting, the laby    While at Isle a la Cache, visit rinth, a large circular path for the museum devoted to the fur- spiritual meditation, will be set trade era, open from noon to 4 up near the chapel from 9 a.m.

Upcoming

Broaden Your Horizons in Out & About TiCkeTs $1600 Adults $1000 kids

a u g u Stth

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Save $2.00 per ticket... purchase tickets in advance online at carsonbarnescircus.com. Purchase tickets from Palos Resource & Rec. Dept. and sAVe $4.00!

4:30 & 7:30 eaCh day

in PaLoS hiLLS ~ Sunny Creek drive. at South roberts rd.

is proud to present

SurvivorS under the StarS SponSored by paloS HillS reSource & rec. dept. An All StAr Show SpecificAlly deSigned for the StAte of illinoiS victimS And public, feAturing performerS from All over the world! Carson & Barnes Circus is proud to bring back to the state of Illinois nationally known song writer and producer Jacque Hollander. In 1988 Hollander became a victim of sexual assault and proceeded to change the law for all sexual assault victims in the state of Illinois with HB 1462 (the equitable estoppel bill). As a tribute to the sexual assault victims in Illinois, Hollander has agreed to design her own T-shirts and will auction them off with the proceeds benefitting ICASA. Hollander has been on tour with the Carson & Barnes Circus for the last year and has written and produced the song “I am the Circus”, a magical song that represents the strength, the love, compassion and hope that is the circus. Franchesca Cavallini, our 16 year old trapeze artist, sang lead vocal on the song with nationally acclaimed musicians and was produced by Hollander.

Oak Lawn Park District Women’s Indoor Basketball League — Ages 18 and Up —

Games played on Sundays at the Community Pavilion

$575 per team due at time of registration.

9401 S. Oak Park Ave. October 6th - December 15th 6pm-10pm

Registration deadline: September 22, 2013

Candle light Vigil at the aug. 19th 7:30 Show!

Contact: 708-857-2420 www.olparks.com

3x5

100 North 16th Street Springfield, IL 62703 (217)753-4117

this show is to honor all survivors & their families who have experienced violence, rape, missing loved ones or murder.

1,700 Candles will be distributed and lit simultaneously at 7:30 pm.


20130808 regional news