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The Voice of Palos - Orland Since 1941

Your Independent Community Newspaper Named best small weekly in Illinois — five times

THE 72nd Year, No. 17

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

2 Sections

Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities.

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Thursday, April 25, 2013

Palos Place seeks national brand tenants by Jeff Vorva staff reporter

    Palos Place, which will replace the old Ben Franklin building in the 12200 block of Harlem Avenue, just needs a few signatures of Palos Heights officials before it will begin getting down to serious business.     Once the I’s are dotted and the T’s are crossed — likely before the May 7 City Council meeting — Brigid Capital LLC owner Michael Coogan is ready to move forward with the target completion date of June 2014 for the facility, which will replace the old Ben Franklin building.     The proposed three-story building will feature retail on the first floor, office space on the second floor and apartments on the third.     Coogan has a wish list of national clients he wants to bring in, including the Corner Bakery Café and Jamba Juice store.     “Our aspirations are that there are some tenants we would love to attract — the Corner Bakery Café being one of them,” he said. “However, we don’t know if they

will be attracted to us. They might be. Maybe a Jamba Juice. Perhaps a State Farm Insurance. Perhaps a children’s boutique and a nice family homestyle restaurant. Those are the aspirations and we’ll look to attract those kinds of tenants.     “National tenants will help strengthen the local community and we’re looking to bring in some national tenants.”     The Corner Bakery Café has nearly 150 restaurants across 15 states, including 33 in Illinois, 38 in California and 31 in Texas. Corner Bakery has locations in Orland Park and Oak Lawn.     It specializes in “fresh innovative food” and “remarkable sandwiches” according to the Corner Bakery website. It serves breakfast food, salad, soups and chili, signature sandwiches, Panini’s, bakery sweets and other items.     Jamba Juice is an international business that specializes in smoothie-type drinks. It has a location in the Orland Square Mall.     “We are at the finish line and we need meet with our tenants,” Coogan said. “We want to go out

and attract those tenants that I have been talking about. We need to talk with the bankers and talk with the construction people and continue to move forward.”     He said there is no set date for demolition of the Ben Franklin building.     The final approval for the zoning reclassifications for the Ben Franklin property as well as property located at 12312 S. 72nd Court to make room for 94 parking spots was done at the April 16 meeting.     Unlike some major redevelopment project proposals in recent years, this project went smoothly with little controversy. Council members and members of the public were worried about the lack of parking in the area, but for the most part, people seem excited about the new venture.     In March, when Coogan made presentations to the council and committees, some observers eyed this as a move that would change the look of the Harlem Avenue area.     Don Larson, a former member (See Palos Place, Page 4)

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Palos Place officials are reaching out to national businesses, such as the Corner Bakery Café to fill its retail section. Above is a photo of the Corner Bakery Café in Orland Park.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Palos Park Finance Director Barb Maziarek gives the council a presentation on the fiscal year 2014 budget Monday night.

Palos Park adopts $8.04 mil. budget by Jeff Vorva staff reporter

one what they want. So I want to compliment Barb and her staff on keeping this budget flat from     The Palos Park Village Council last year.” unanimously voted to adopt the     “I don’t envy you who have to village’s fiscal year 2014 budget of tell the directors ‘no’,” Commis$8.04 — a 0.38 percent increase sioner G. Darryl Reed told Pavlaover the previous budget. tos and Maziarek. “You can only     The five-member council voted give them this much and they on it Monday night after Finance want more.” Director Barb Maziarek’s presen-     Most of the money involves the tation earlier in the meeting. general fund, which will have $4.4     The budget anticipates $4.32 million in revenues and $4.3 milmillion in general fund rev- lion in expenses, giving the village enue. a surplus of more than $76,000.     Much of the later stages of     “That’s our largest and most the budget process were without important fund and I am happy the direction of a finance com- to say there is a surplus,” Mazimissioner after Kent Oliven left arek said. and there was a three-month gap     Most of the revenues are coming before James Pavlatos was ap- from $3.2 million of anticipated pointed in March. taxes, including $1.26 million from     Pavlatos said he was impressed property taxes. with the village being able to     Total general fund expenditures keep the budget on par with are $4.25 million. last year.     A surplus of $76,447 is antici    “Everybody has a wish list and pated in the general fund. they bring the wish list to us,”     Expenses of $1.9 million are Pavlatos said. “The staff did an earmarked for the Police Departoutstanding job whittling the wish list down. We can’t give every(See Palos Park, Page 4)

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Undaunted run for Boston     Athletes get rolling at the start of Monday’s solidarity run in Palos Heights in a memorial tribute to raise funds for victims of the Boston Marathon terror bombings.     First Midwest Half Marathon organizers seek more volunteers than ever to add eyes and ears to the big run scheduled here May 5. Story and more scenes from Monday’s tribute run on Page 3.

Stagg and Sandburg both react to keep students safe from harm by Jeff Vorva staff reporter     Security officials at Stagg and Sandburg high schools were busy last Friday because of two incidents.     On Friday afternoon, Stagg went into a lockdown after the Bank of America at 10208 S. Roberts Road in Palos Hills was robbed. The lockdown lasted approximately two hours.     Shortly after that lockdown was lifted, Sandburg went into protective mode when a replica hand grenade was found on one of the buses at 3:05 p.m.     Orland Park police said that Sandburg was not on a lockdown, but only students who

had parents waiting for them in the school’s parking lot were able to leave.     A student had found what was believed to be a grenade on the floor of a school bus at dismissal, police said. The student immediately gave the grenade to the bus driver who then evacuated the school bus and notified Sandburg staff who then called 911.     “All of the buses were immediately evacuated and the Orland Park police responded and cordoned off the area where the buses were located on the west parking lot of the school,” Cmdr. John Keating said. “Investigators located the grenade on the school bus and, after

consultation with the Cook County Sheriff’s Police Bomb Squad, it was determined to be a replica grenade that was considered inert. Investigators took possession of the replica grenade and the investigation continues.”     The other buses were searched, however no other suspicious items were found and students were able to reboard the buses at 4 p.m. — one hour later than their usual time, Cmdr. Keating added.     There were reports that someone phoned in a bomb threat but Keating quashed those rumors, saying there were not verbal Photo By Jeff Vorva or written threats toward the Buses line up at Sandburg High School Monday morning. Last Friday afternoon, a replica hand grenade school. was found on a bus at dismissal and students evacuated the buses at the Orland Park school.




The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013

View from Trinity by Dr. Steven Timmermans

Planning to succeed     Were you able to stop in at Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens’ open house on April 16?     I stopped by and was excited to better understand Lake Katherine’s desired future. Their master site plan provides glimpses of the future, whether it’s the Festival Grounds or the Woodland Adventure area for children.     Planning is always essential, whether for organizations, schools and colleges, or cities. Sometimes plans are modest; other times, grand. But all planning seeks to understand future needs and opportunities by carefully studying the present realities and predicted trends. One saying often mentioned is if you fail to plan, you plan to fail.     So, Lake Katherine is making some exciting plans, anticipating an even more central life in the role of our community. The festival tent will provide superb opportunities for private and public events. And the other enhancements will draw individuals and families in even greater numbers.     Palos Heights, too, is succeeding in planning, and thus, planning to succeed. Last week, the City Council approved the development plan for the Palos Place project to replace the vacant Ben Franklin property. It’s an exciting new concept to have retail and residential combined right on Harlem, and we know this effort took much planning. In fact, in a very real sense, the plan can be traced back to the Comprehensive Plan developed by a consultant and approved by the City back in 2008. While the Comprehensive Plan is vision not to be fully realized for years, last week’s action is a very important and strategic step.     Trinity also is engaged in such planning. Some years ago, we abandoned the more typical master plan since once things are drawn, expectations become encased in concrete. As a college looks to the future, there’s more variability, and so we switched and began using a Conceptual Framework. Rather than drawing future buildings on a campus map, our Conceptual Framework provides guiding principles to use, should

a new building (or road, or sidewalk, etc.) become necessary.     For example, the east side of our campus is primarily a wetland area. Therefore, the guiding principle is to maintain that area and not seek to tame it with fill, sod, and flowers. Rather, it’s a natural area where Navajo creek snakes its way downstream. So our work there relates to bank stabilization and trying to weed out invasive plants, not building and paving.     Then on the west side of the College, the campus meets Cheyenne drive and a host of residences. In order to complement this terrain on the west side, we, too, have neatly trimmed grass and plantings as specified in our Conceptual Framework. Of course, the Conceptual Framework has other guiding principles as well (e.g., computing should be ubiquitous throughout campus; the northern academic hub of campus “sits” next to the southern residential hub of campus). But the lesson in all of this is that we all need to plan for the future, and to do so responsibly requires much thought, analysis, and forecasting.     One of the joys of community planning is the act of gathering around a table and sharing dreams of where we would like to be, and to do this across generations. During the past year, several Trinity business students had the remarkable opportunity to come alongside the critical planning efforts of Lake Katherine as a team project that was part of their organizational consulting coursework. Building from a formal class setting, it was wonderful experience for them to grapple with the complexities of shared community life viewed from within a business development setting. A joy for all to behold!     So, hats off to those who plan. While the process can often invite dissenting opinions, the outcomes are worth the price. Congratulations Lake Katherine and Palos Heights! Steve Timmermans, Ph.D., is president of Trinity Christian College.

In Other Words

Addiction Empire Maintaining steady access to natural resources is goal of global control by William A. Collins Bribe and gun And dagger lurk, For us to make Our empire work.     Ruling the world, as our government does, is tricky. Uncle Sam can never relax. The moment resisters in some subservient country, like Pakistan, sense weakness, they test him. He can’t afford to be seen as soft and he’s got to keep his eye on previously uncontested lands, like Mali.     Maintaining steady access to a bounty of natural resources is the major goal of this global control. The world is using them up at a heady clip. America dares not fall short of controlling its lion’s share, especially with China’s growing appetite for iron ore, oil, and other commodities.     Happily, we have a helpful tool for getting what we want: conquest. Not necessarily through pitched battle or incessant bombing — though those remain important techniques to trot out from time to time.     Thanks to WikiLeaks, we have a pretty good grip on how these operations work today. Our Special Forces have a manual that explains it. Recommended tactics focus on paramilitaries, surveillance, censorship, press control, limiting unions, limiting political parties, warrantless searches, arbitrary detention, employing terrorists, false charges of terrorism, false flag operations, and propaganda.     In other words, all the usual stuff of empire. Our embassies, consulates, military liaisons, and army bases have been teaching these tactics for decades. They’re further supported by the State

Department-financed National Endowment for Democracy and International Republican Institute. Having been deemed to actually constitute foreign agents, these groups have recently been expelled from Russia, Egypt, and a few other countries.     Normally all these imperial activities go unremarked in the U.S. media. In part, that’s because there’s nothing new regarding the scale of our empire. The Obama administration may have sharply cut troop levels in Iraq and Afghanistan, but it has also vastly expanded America’s reliance on drone warfare and the scale of U.S. military operations in Africa.     Plainly, there are other large world players in the empire game. Russia may be a hegemonic has-been, but it still possesses a slew of nukes. In response, we’ve got a massive wall ofanti-missile bases around that country — to which Moscow loudly objects. Likewise the Pentagon is surrounding China with bases to menace it militarily in case it gets too economically powerful.     So that’s how the American empire goes in the 21st century. It’s an addiction. Uncle Sam is trying to control every country, propping up his dictator friends and subverting his antagonists, whether autocrats or democrats.     And as our leaders cut Social Security and Medicare to pay the outlandish tab for ruling the world, they have to justify it by claiming that this blessed nation is somehow in mortal danger. OtherWords columnist William A. Collins is a former state representative and a former mayor of Norwalk, Connecticut. OtherWords.org

Readers Write Reasons to love living in Palos Park Dear Editor:     Ten reasons why I love to live in Palos Park:     1.) Trees     2.) Beautiful     3.) Awesome Community Events     4.) Un-Crowded     5.) Horses, Eagles and More     6.) Great Walking/Running Streets     7.) The Arts     8.) Plush Horse     9.) Bordered by Forest Preserves     10.) Everyone Knows Each Other

    Palos Park is a one-of-akind tiny town surrounded by hundreds of acres of forest preserves, lakes and paths.     Its rolling hills, large lots and horse friendly zoning makes for an un-crowded country feeling. From nesting eagles, sharing the road with a horse and rider to passing a herd of grazing sheep by the Children’s Farm, this is all 30 minutes from the third biggest city in the United States.     It’s cultural rich with the Arts — from events sponsored by Palos Fine Arts, its own cultural center, The McCord House, a Theatre troupe aptly name The Palos Village Play-

ers to poetry readings and art retreats at The Center. Its historic homes and buildings including the iconic Plush Horse, winding roads and trees make a morning walk or run a site seeing adventure.     And best of all because of its size, a real sense of community. You’re friendly with the post master, a shopping trip takes longer because you run into three people you know and Palos Park’s annual festivals and events, including a parade that looks and feels like something out of a movie complete with Fire Engines, Marching Bands and a Beauty Queen, make you feel like

Inside the First Amendment

No flowers for gay wedding     Imagine Robert Ingersoll’s hurt and humiliation last month when his local florist refused to do the flower arrangements for his wedding to Curt Freed, his partner of nine years.     As longtime customers of Arlene’s Flowers and Gifts in Richland, Washington, Ingersoll and Freed had mistakenly assumed that shop owner Barronelle Stutzman would be happy to provide the service.     But also imagine the pain Stutzman felt at having to turn down a friend and neighbor. Here’s how she described the awkward scene to KEPR-TV:     “I grabbed his hand and said ‘I am sorry.’ I can’t do your wedding because of my relationship with Jesus Christ.’ We hugged each other and he left, and I assumed it was the end of the story.”     As it turns out, the story was only just beginning.     On April 9th, the state’s attorney general filed a consumer protection lawsuit against the florist and the ACLU, representing the gay couple, is now asking for Stutzman to apologize and agree to serve gay weddings in the future.     This painful dispute confronts the courts — and all of us — with a cruel choice between two compelling values central to the American commitment to liberty:     The right of citizens to be free from discrimination in places of public accommodation is pitted against the right of religious business owners to follow their conscience in matters of faith.     Unfortunately, this is not an isolated incident. A small, but

growing number of conflicts have already broken out in other states where bakers and photographers have balked at providing services to same-sex weddings.     Stutzman argues that she is not discriminating against gay people. She points out that she has hired openly gay people and has many gay customers. In an interview with the Seattle Times, her lawyer framed Stutzman’s views this way:     “This is about gay marriage, it’s not about a person being gay. She has a conscientious objection to homosexual marriage, not homosexuality. It violates her conscience.”     But gay couples seeking wedding services see this argument as a distinction without a difference. When they enter a business that serves the public, they expect to be treated like every other couple — particularly in states like Washington where gay marriage is now legal.     Although it upsets some gay rights advocates whenever they hear it, the First Amendment requires us to protect liberty of conscience as far as possible. That’s why, for example, many people on all sides support “conscience clauses” for houses of worship and religiously affiliated organizations in states that recognize gay marriage.     Catholic charities, to cite a controversial example, should be not forced to provide adoption services to same-sex couples in violation of Catholic teaching, as long as those couples have ready access to other providers.     But any business serving the public is obligated not to

discriminate against customers on the basis of sexual orientation. And no matter how gay-friendly Stutzman claims to be, refusing to treat Ingersoll and Freed like other couples is treating them like second-class citizens because they are gay.     If business owners were exempted from non-discrimination laws on religious grounds, where would the line be drawn? What about religious objections to inter-racial marriage — commonplace at one time and still held by some? If Stutzman wins her case, why can’t another religious florist refuse to serve a mixed race couple?     I strongly support finding ways to protect religious claims of conscience whenever possible. But when it comes to places of public accommodation, our commitment to non-discrimination should trump religious claims for exemption from civil rights laws.     Ingersoll and Freed, of course, can find another florist. But they shouldn’t have to suffer the humiliation of asking florists, bakers, photographers, or other providers if they’re willing to provide services for gay weddings.     Business owners have a right to their religious convictions. But when they open their doors to the public, they have a civic and legal responsibility to uphold the civil rights of every customer. Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Education Project at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. Web: firstamendmentcenter.org. Email: chaynes@freedomforum.org.

you’ve jumped into a Norman Rockwell painting. Julea Joseph Palos Park

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This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and however it may be threatened.


The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013



Running for Boston from Running for Kicks     More than 200 runners took part in a solidarity run late Monday afternoon in Palos Heights. The 4-mile run started outside the Running For Kicks store and raised at least $2,000 to go to The Boston Fund for victims of the Boston Marathon bombing.     Diab will sell shirts for $20 starting Friday at his Running For Kicks store at 7158 W. 127th St. All of the money will go to the Boston Fund as well.     Monday’s turnout surprised

Diab as he was expecting 100 or so runners. But he said the running community is tight knit and many athletes were affected by the Boston Marathon incident.     Some in Monday’s run ran in the Boston Marathon last week and heard the blasts.     Palos Heights will also host the First Midwest half marathon on May 5. It will be the sixth running of the event and Diab is a co-founder of that race. He is hoping 2,000 runners will enter.

More than 200 runners pose for a photo before taking off for a solidarity run in Palos Heights on Monday.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

A sign in front of Running For Kicks remembering the Boston Marathon attack is displayed in front of an adidas ad featuring Lukas Verzbicas, a Sandburg graduate who was one of the top high school Running for Kicks owner Mel Diab rallies the runners before the start David Maugher, of Lansing, aka “Frogger,” crossed the finish line at runners in state history. of the solidarity run. the Boston Marathon, 52 minutes before a bomb exploded.

After Boston, half marathon seeks more volunteers by Jeff Vorva staff reporter     In the wake of the bombing deaths and injuries at the finish line at the Boston Marathon on April 15, local officials are on alert about the May 5 First Midwest Half Marathon in Palos Heights.     Palos Heights Alderman Jeff Prestinario (1st Ward) helped bring the event to town and it’s been around for five years.     The planning for the sixth running of the race seemed to be going smoothly, but the Boston events have Prestinario seeking out extra volunteers at the last minute. Photo by Jeff Vorva     “I want to put a plea out to First Midwest Half Marathon director Jeff Prestinario is seeking the residents of the city of Palos more volunteers in the wake of the terror bombings at the Boston Heights and surrounding suburbs Marathon. that we would like more volun-

Reporter’s Notebook by Jeff Vorva

teers,” he said. “We would like as many volunteers as possible. We want as many eyes out on the course to be watching everything as much as possible.”     Volunteers, who would likely be more in charge of marshaling the course rather than performing security duties, will be treated to a dinner at Moraine Valley Church Wednesday. Volunteers will receive a T-shirt. They will arrive at 6 a.m. and work approximately four hours.     Prestinario said volunteers should sign up by calling the Palos Heights Recreation Department at 361-1807. They are also needed to stuff goody bags Wednesday evening at Moraine Valley Church.     Since the Boston incident, Prestinario has been setting the wheels in motion to make the

Palos Heights event safe.     “I was on the phone and emailing the police just to put plans into place to heighten procedures and policies for the event,” Prestinario said. “We are doing what we can and we will meet with the police department. The proper procedures are in place. People need to be alert on the day of the event.”     Prestinario added that acts of terrorism should not be tolerated.     “It angers me,” Prestinario said. “Being involved in something like this — it just upsets me. To see this happen is just … you know … I’m sure a lot of people feel the same way. But it’s out there. It’s reality. Whether we like it or not, it’s a part of our lives now and we have to be involved in it and stand up to it. Our forefathers

T-shirts aid Boston bombers’ victims     Spero Speropoulos, of Palos Hills, wore a big Uncle Sam-like hat.     “I’m here because this is a wonderful sport and there was a terrible tragedy and we don’t want the enemy to win,” he said.     Fredric Nielsen, of Orland Park, and Richard Brija, of Lemont, brought large American flags to wave during the run. Brija is a Marine veteran whose flag flew over Afghanistan in 2011.     “I carried this on my last 50K race in Fort Worth Texas,” he said.

“So I brought it for this event. This is for Boston.”     One guy who showed up a few minutes before the run who was given the hero treatment from the other runners was David Mauger, of Lansing, whom everyone knew as “Frogger.” He crossed the finish line at Boston and 52 minutes later the first bomb went off, he said.     “I‘m sort of in recovery mode after running the marathon but I’m here to run easy and just be a part of all of this,” he said. “I didn’t expect this many people.

    Mel Diab wants to sell you a shirt.     That’s not new. The owner of Running For Kicks in Palos Heights has been selling shirts, shoes, socks, and other accessories to runners for years.     What’s new is that he has ordered a whole bunch of gold One Fund: Boston 2013 T-shirts and he is charging $20 for them. He said all the money will go to the Boston Fund to help victims of the bombings at the Boston Marathon April 15.     Starting Friday, they will be available at his store, at 7158 W. 127th St. He had a shipment of 100 earlier this week but they were gobbled up quickly before the start of Monday’s solidarity run that he helped host.     “People came in and bought the shirts up and some people didn’t even buy shirts but left donations of dropping two bucks, five bucks — a couple of people left $100 checks, which was beautiful,” Diab said. “We’ll sell as many as we can and help as many people as we can. There are people rehabbing after their injuries. We’ll cut the check and there are no strings attached. They can use it for whatever they need to use it for.”     Monday’s run brought out 200 runners even though it was put together in less than a week. The close-knit running community came to the aid of the Boston victims. Photo by Jeff Vorva     There were some characters in Mel Diab shows off the shirt he is offering for $20 in which all the the run. money goes to the Boston Fund.

I expected a good turnout but Park’s Ninety7Fifty on the Park this is really phenomenal. This luxury apartments will be able is a lot.” to move in on Friday.

Number of the Week

Quote of the week

    2 — Noteworthy area happenings on Friday. At 11 a.m., Palos Park officials will participate in a groundbreaking ceremony for its recreational park at 12220 S. WillCook Road. With less fanfare, the first group of tenants at Orland

    “What are we doing to the commuter lot? Paving it in gold?” — Palos Park Commissioner Dan Polk after examining a $35,000 expenditure on the village’s budget for the lot’s maintenance and supplies.

fought for our freedom. We need to step up and make this raise a statement here in Palos Heights. It’s something we need to do.     “The mayor of Boston said next year’s Boston Marathon will come back bigger, better and stronger,” Prestinario added. “Us as a community — that’s a statement we need to make. We need to make a statement about terrorism with our race here in Palos Heights.”     n Palos Park police remind area residents about street closures during the half marathon. Route 83 will be closed to traffic in Palos Park from 6 a.m. top approximately 11 a.m. Police Commissioner Dan Polk encouraged residents to use 111th Street, 123rd Street, 131st Street, Harlem Avenue or Ridgeland Avenue as alternate routes.

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The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Mid-April downpour floods low spots     A week ago, there was plenty of rain to cause flooding throughout the Chicago as some areas reached as much as 7 inches, causing some suburbs to be declared disaster areas.     The Palos-Orland area got socked to the point where a handful of roads were closed, several in Orland Park, causing traffic woes in some pockets of the area last Thursday morning, but it could have been a lot worse.

    Some roadways, including the Southwest Highway area at the Palos Heights and Orland Park borders, were still closed last Friday morning. At left, cars drive southbound on a wet Southwest Highway heading into Orland Park Thursday morning.     At right, water builds up in front of the Palos Park Kaptur Center last Thursday morning, giving it a sort of Lake Kaptur effect.

Drop off Rx drugs to police this Sat.     The villages of Orland Park and Palos Park are participating with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to support the National Prescription Take-Back Initiative this Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.     Orland Park’s participation in the national observance is in addition to its recently announced collection at the police station, Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.     This Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., area residents may bring

Palos Place (Continued from page 1) of the city’s economic development committee, told the City Council in March that approving Palos Place would make the downtown area “vibrant.�     “It’s a start,� he said. “It’s something this town needs desperately. This could be the first one of many. Other developers could see how well we worked with him and how we cooperated with him and how successful this project is. This could be day 1 of a long-term revitalization.     “The city has skin in the game. This is the first developer will-

Palos Park (Continued from page 1) ment, including $1.1 million in salary expenses.     “Salaries and benefits are the largest expense for the village, followed by insurance,� Maziarek said. “There are a lot of things we need for day-to-day operations but they are minor compared to salaries, insurance, health insurance and pension costs.�     n Mayor John Mahoney named the village’s ad hoc Fence Committee to discuss and possibly change policy regarding the village’s codes on front-yard fences.     Julie Kay will chair the committee; Jack Martin will be the vice chairman.     Kay is a veteran of the village’s plan commission and Martin has

no-longer-needed prescription drugs to the Orland Park police station, 15100 S. Ravinia Ave. and to the entrance of Smith Crossing at 10500 Orland Parkway. The confidential and anonymous service is free of charge, but cannot accept glass containers, aerosol canisters, intravenous solutions or syringes.     In Palos Park, drop off your expired or unused prescription drugs between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. to the Police Department, at 8999 W. 123rd St. ing to come into the city and put his money down and start in this downtown area, where the buildings are tight and side-by-side. Every issue that came up, he wanted to make residents happy. It’s a very unusual situation for a real estate developer.�     Parking for future projects will have to be addressed.     “We have an emphasis of redeveloping older sections of the downtown area and parking is going to be a problem — it always has been,� Mayor Bob Straz said in March. “There are some successful suburban areas such as La Grange who face the same situation. We as a city will have to come up with a master plan for parking.� experience on the zoning board of appeals.     Others on the seven-member panel are Ronette Leal McCarthy, Vanetta Wiegman, Vicky Blount, Jennifer Gallagher and Reta Wegele.     Reed encouraged the public to attend the open meetings but the date for the first meeting hasn’t been determined.     The council also reappointed Loretta Gaidas, Charles Wells and Steven Desmond to the Recreation Advisory Commission.     n The village will enter in intergovernmental agreement with the city of Palos Heights regarding use of the Heights’ swimming pool facilities.     Palos Park residents will be able to purchase a season family pass for $205 by May 31 and $235 after June 1. Palos Park seniors will pay $65 by May 31 and $90 after June 1.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Having fun at the library     With the rain and flooding last Thursday, patronage at the Palos Heights Public Library was scant in the afternoon. But 11-monthold Lydia Carlson, of Crestwood, was found in the children’s area looking for a book to play with.

Submitted Photo

Animal shelter thanks volunteers The Animal Welfare League, 10305 Southwest Highway in Chicago Ridge, held its annual Volunteer Appreciation dinner April 18 at Nickobee’s, 10555 Southwest Highway in Worth. More than 50 volunteers attended the event and were honored for their services with a family-style dinner and thanks from League executive director Linda Estrada. For more information on volunteering call the League at 636-8586 or visit the shelter, or obtain our volunteer application at www.animalwelfareleague.com/programs/volunteers.asp.Must be at least 16 years old to volunteer.

Retire Smart by Jill Schlesinger

    Americans love getting a tax refund. The IRS says 80 percent of taxpayers received an average refund of over $2,700 last year. What’s not to like about found money? But a refund is really just the return of a year-long, interestfree loan that you extended to your spendthrift Uncle Sam. This year, make sure that you keep that money and put it to work. Before you plunk down big bucks on a flatscreen TV or take that big vacation, consider the following investment opportunities:     1. Replenish emergency reserves. Before retirement, you should always keep 6-12 months of living expenses in a safe place, like checking, savings or money market accounts. If you are already retired, it’s advisable to double that amount. For one reason or another, you may have dipped into your emergency reserve funds over the course of the year. Uncle Sam’s refund check can help replenish those accounts. With interest rates still at rockbottom levels, explore CDs and I-bonds to boost the income on your emergency reserves. Check out www.depositaccounts.com for help.     2. Pay down credit card, auto and maybe mortgage debt. Your refund is an excellent way to put a dent in your outstanding debts. The bonus is that when you pay down debt, you are essentially earning a guaranteed return that is likely MUCH higher than any investment available. For those who are riskaverse, consider paying down your mortgage. Even though your rate may be low, it’s probably higher than whatever you are earning on your cash equivalents.     3. Retirement contributions. If you are still working and have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, like a 401(k), a 403(b) or a 457 plan, increase your contribution amount for 2013. Because you have that 2012 refund in the bank, you can afford to absorb the extra money coming out of your paycheck. The 2013 pre-tax contribution limit for employer plans has increased to $17,500, and the limit for over-50 catch-up contributions is $5,500.     You can also use that extra money to get a jump on funding an IRA or a Roth IRA for tax year 2013 right now. The maximum you can contribute to all of your traditional and Roth IRAs is the smaller of: $5,500 ($6,500 if you’re age 50 or older), or your taxable compensation for the year.     Note: Even if you have an employer-sponsored plan, you may also qualify for the full annual IRA

deduction. Check the IRS website for details.     4. Invest in a non-retirement account. If you have maxed out your retirement accounts and still have extra money, consider opening a non-retirement investment account with a no-load mutual fund company like Vanguard, T. Rowe Price or Fidelity, or go to a discount brokerage firm like Charles Schwab or TD Ameritrade. Don’t be tempted to purchase actively managed mutual funds: According to research, over the 23 years ending in 2009, actively managed funds trailed their benchmarks by an average of one percentage point

a year. Another report from S&P found that most actively managed funds waged a losing battle over the five years through Dec. 31, 2010.     5. Fund 529 plans. Is someone in your family struggling to save for college? It’s not surprising since the cost of college tuition has spiked 300 percent since 1990. If you are interested in giving the gift of education, then consider funding a Section 529 college savings plan. The money you deposit in a 529 plan grows tax-free, and withdrawals that are used to pay for qualified college expenses sidestep taxes, too. You can invest up to $14,000 in 2013

without incurring a federal gift tax. There are some states that offer state tax benefits as well, so be sure to research the options at www.savingforcollege.com.     Of course, if your financial house is in order, it really is OK to blow the refund and have some fun, too!    (Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Editor-at-Large for www. CBSMoneyWatch.com. She covers the economy, markets, investing or anything else with a dollar sign on her podcast and blog, Jill on Money, as well as on television and radio. She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@jillonmoney. com.)

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The Regional News

Vehicle rim caps stolen     Palos Heights police received two recent complaints of stolen center caps from the rims of vehicles. Caps were stolen either April 10 and April 11 from a parked vehicle in the driveway in the 12200 block of South 68th Court. The second theft came either April 11 or April 12 in a driveway in the 6400 block of 124th Street.     In other Palos Heights police news, a resident reported the theft of a GPS unit either April 13 or April 14 from a parked vehicle in the 6200 block of Carol Lane.     Police took a report of a ve-

PALOS HEIGHTS POLICE hicle window being damaged April 14 by an unknown object at a sports facility in the 12200 block of Ridgeland Ave.     A resident told police that her purse and its contents were stolen either April 12 or April 13 at a nursing home in the 11800 block of South Southwest Highway.     Clayton B. Hanes, 26, of Oak Lawn, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence (DUI) after his car was pulled over at 12:23 a.m. April 12 in the 12100

ORLAND PARK POLICE charged with felony retail theft and possession of cannabis, police said. According to the police report, officers arrived to find Harr struggling with loss prevention agents on the ground outside of a store in the Orland Square shopping center. He had allegedly stuffed PlayStation video game controllers inside his jacket, hat and pants and left the store without paying the $320 retail cost. Officers also found four white pills and less than 2 grams of cannabis in his jacket pocket, police said. Harr was held overnight for a bond hearing the next morning at the George N. Leighton Criminal Courts building in Chicago.     Marie E. Dorans, 48, of Orland Park, was arrested at 8:34 p.m. March 23 and charged with driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol after she was stopped in the 8800 block of 143rd Street for driving 67 mph in a 40 mph zone, police said.

She was also reportedly charged with speeding and failure to yield to police. She had a court date of April 12 in Bridgeview.     Grace E. Pitel, 19, of Orland Park, was cited with retail theft at 12:10 p.m. March 27 after she allegedly hid a cheetah-print jacket in a purse she carried and left a store in the Orland Square shopping center without paying, police said. Pitel has a hearing date of May 14 at the Civic Center in Orland Park.     Ricarda Garcia, 29, of Orland Park, was arrested and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license at 4:29 p.m. March 24 after a crash in the 9200 block of 159th Street, police said. Garcia has a court date of April 22 in Bridgeview.     Patrick S. Steagerman, 46, of Orland Park, was arrested on an active warrant on a charge of DUI at 7:51 p.m. March 27 at his residence in the 14200 block of Terry Drive, police said. Steagerman was held overnight for a bond hearing the next morning in Bridgeview.

Ridge stab victim reportedly turned tables on attacker by Laura Bollin     A 22-year-old Chicago man has been charged with attempted first degree murder in the alleged stabbing attack against a homeowner in the 6600 block of Ridge Drive.     Carlos M. Luna was arrested at 10 p.m. April 20 after being released from Advocate Christ Medical Center, where he sought treatment for a stab wound to the chest inflicted by the man he is accused of trying to kill, according to Chicago Ridge police.     Luna reportedly waiting for

the 29-year-old victim to return home at 2:20 a.m. April 18, and ambushed him as the man walked up his driveway, police said. Luna reportedly stabbed the man several times including once in the neck, and sliced the man’s hand. Police believe the altercation may have stemmed from a relationship, and that an acquaintance of the victim asked Luna to stab the man.     The victim was treated at the scene and released, police said. He did, however, apparently manage to inflict some damage on his attacker. The man at



block of Harlem Avenue. He has a May 17 court date scheduled in Bridgeview.     Ian D. Duckworth, 32, of Oak Lawn, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence after his car was pulled over at 3:24 a.m. April 14 in the 4800 block of West 109th Street. He has a May 17 court date scheduled.     Gregory A. Kozacek, 28, of Frankfort, was arrested and charged with DUI after his car was pulled over at 3 a.m. Sunday in the 13000 block of South Harlem Avenue. He has a June 3 court date scheduled.

Pair charged with selling pot to undercover buyer     Matthew H. O’Boyle, 19, of Homer Glen, and Leah C. Wright, 17, of Palos Hills, were both arrested at 5 p.m. March 20 and charged with felony possession of cannabis with intent to deliver, police said. O’Boyle and Wright were arrested after they allegedly sold 4 ounces of marijuana to an undercover police source for $900 in the parking lot of the Orland Square shopping center, police said. Police recovered more than 5.5 ounces of pot from the pair and their vehicle, and two glass pipes and 24 empty plastic bags police said. Wright was also charged with possession of a controlled substance after police found four Aderall capsules wrapped up in tissue paper and hidden in her bra, according to the police report. The two were held to await a bond hearing at the 5th Municipal District Cook County Courthouse in Bridgeview on March 21.     In other Orland Park news, Luke S. Harr, 24, of Orland Park, was arrested at 8:02 p.m. March 23 and

Thursday, April 25, 2013

one point during the struggle took the knife from Liuna and stabbed him in the chest, puncturing one of Luna’s lungs and causing it to collapse, police said. Luna fled the scene in a white van driven by an unidentified person who dropped him off at Advocate Christ, where he is being treated for his injuries. He will appear in bond court when he is released from the hospital, police said.     Police reportedly tracked the van to the 5700 block of Kostner Avenue in Chicago and found a bloody knife inside.

Photo courtesy Orland Fire Protection District

No one was injured during a two-vehicle fire Sunday on Wolf Road in Orland Park. Police blocked southbound traffic onto Wolf from 159th Street.

Fiery crash clogs Wolf Rd. by Jeff Vorva staff reporter

be closed in that area for approximately an hour.     An off-duty Berwyn Fire Depart    Two vehicles caught fire after ment officer reported the crash a crash at about 3:15 p.m. Sun- by radio to the Orland Dispatch day afternoon just south of 159th Center, according to a fire district Street on Wolf Road in Orland spokesperson. Park, but there were no injuries,     An engine arrived in the 16000 according to the Orland Fire Pro- block of Wolf and reported two vetection District. hicles in a rear-end type crash that     The crash caused Wolf Road to were both on fire. Firefighters had

checked and reported all victims had been able to get out on their own before extinguishing both fires.     Fire officials said that gasoline leak by the front vehicle, a pickup truck, caused the fire to spread. The pickup was completely burned, while the car suffered damage in the engine compartment because of the fire and heavy front end damage because of the accident.

Palos alderman suggests city form outreach group for addicted teens by Kelly White Correspondent     After several apparent drug overdoses believed to be related to heroin use, some Palos Hills city officials are voicing their concerns about an increase in the teen’s abuse of the opiate.     Heroin has become increasingly popular among high school students and has taken on the reputation as a “party drug,” according to Palos Hills police. The drug’s versatility — it is so pure these days it can be snorted or smoked, rather than injected, to achieve the desired high — has contributed to teen’s use of it.     “These teens need someone they can turn to for guidance or counseling without going to the police,” Palos Hills Alderman Joe Marrotta (4th Ward) said at the Cituy Council’s meeting April 11. “Because of bad decisions, their lives ended before they even fully began.”     Marrotta has attended three wakes the past year for persons younger than 21 who have overdosed on heroin, he said.

He suggested Palos Hills create a volunteer committee that would work as a support group for teens struggling with or trying to overcome drug addiction. Teens might be more willing to trust and turn to an adult that has previously coached them in Little League or tutored them in school, rather than a total stranger, he added.     “These teens need somewhere to turn where they know they aren’t going to get in trouble and they will be able to talk to someone who will be willing to listen and to help them overcome their addiction,” Marrotta said. “We need to help them help themselves.”     Alderman Ricky Moore (4th Ward) said school guidance counselors and members of the City Council cannot be in denial of the harsh drugs floating around suburban high schools.     “I can’t sit back and know that this is taking place and do absolutely nothing about it,” Moore said.     Heroin’s rise in popularity among southwest suburban highs school students has been the subject of numerous news

stories within the past year and a half. Consolidated High School District 230, which oversees Stagg High School in Palos Hills and Sandburg High School in Orland Park, have communicated with parents about heroin usage among students. State Rep. Kelly Burke (D-35, Evergreen Park) is working with area high school officials on how to best address the problem, and Marrotta is hoping everyone can work together. He strongly believes education alone is not enough, he said.     “We need to be able to talk to these teens and provide a form of counseling with volunteers who are willing to do so.”     Marrottasaid drug rehabilitation outreach programs often have a waiting period, and that a community group could be available for guidance and consultation without having to wait for an appointment to speak to someone or to a group.     “Sometimes there is an urgency to need to talk to someone immediately, and when that option isn’t available, people don’t know where to turn,” he said.

Ridge man’s political connections aided Worth Twp. Board revolution by Laura Bollin

Mahoney said. “We had a board that was focused on the taxpayers. Now I feel like the new board will be focused and indebted to the people that got them elected. The taxpayers were overwhelmed with negative campaigning, and it led people to believe we were doing a bad job, which couldn’t be further from the truth.”     Mahoney, of Oak Lawn, was asked by Worth Township Democratic Committeeman John O’Sullivan to run on the opposing Worth Community First Ticket, he said; however, turned him down. O’Sullivan attempted to remove Toscas and incumbent Trustee Jack Lind from the ballot by filing an objection that claimed the two men’s respective position as village trustees in Crestwood and Chicago Ridge constituted a conflict of interest. An electoral board consisting of Murphy, Ma-

Party’s campaign.     “I got a lot of support from     A slate composed of political state representatives,” Moody upstarts earlier this month won said. “These are the same people seven of eight seats on the Worth that I hope will help us garner Township Board, and the sole canmore grants for our township. didate remaining member of the They appreciate the fact that I ousted political party claims the have been very active in all sorts group was elected with help from of campaigns- mayoral elections, the Illinois Democratic Party. state senate, gubernatorial cam    Worth Township Trustee Mike paigns. Anything that needed to Mahoney finished second among be done in a campaign, I was willfour candidates running for trusting to do. I have donated money ee, and was the only member of and volunteered at fundraisers. the Worth Unity party to be electI’ve done door to door campaigned. The victory, given the losses by ing.” seven of his party mates including     According to the Illinois State incumbent Township Supervisor Board of Elections website, The Jack Murphy and incumbent AsFriends of Edward Moody Comsessor John Toscas, was “bittermittee received $8,000 in campaign sweet,” Mahoney said. contributions, including $1,000     “You can’t compete against a from the Supporters of Jack B. slate of candidates backed by lifeFranks and $1,000 from Friends long politicians with war chests of David Gonzalez, the mayor of exceeding over $1 million apiece,” Chicago Heights. Trustee candidate Eamon McMahon received more than $4,700 in campaign contributions through the Friends of Eamon McMahon Committee, including $1,000 from the Chicago Regional Council of Carpenters Political Action Committee.     Moody said his party wants to keep their campaign promises, including term limits and bringing in new programs.     “We want to bring a whole new energy to the township office,” Moody said. “We want to try and secure more funds from the state of Illinois to improve services for our seniors and our kids. You have to view yourself as competing against other township governments. If you put some energy in and get to work, you can have better results.”     Hughes, who beat Murphy, was excited about the victory. Submitted Photo     “Were we expecting to win seven of eight seats?” Hughes said. “I don’t know what we were expecting. Nobody had run against these     U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski (D-3, Western Springs) and other House Democrats have unveiled the guys in so long. We knocked on a lot “Make It In America” comprehensive jobs plan aimed at revitalizing the country’s manufacturing of doors. The people we did talk to, sector Lipinski, who’s been part of the Make It In America campaign the last two Congresses, was we know our message was received, recognized for his Customs Training Enhancement Act and American Manufacturing Competitiveness and we were very optimistic. Act, two key pieces of legislation that promote job creation in our communities by reinvigorating the     “The voters were looking for a manufacturing sector. change, and they bought into the     Lipinski in March introduced the Customs Training Enhancement Act, which he believes will help things we were talking about. We level the playing field for American manufacturers by cracking down on foreign companies that un- want to have a more transparent dercut the competition by evading customs duties through illegal trading. The congressman will also government, and we want residents reintroduce his bipartisan American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act. to know exactly where the money

Make it here, Dems say

honey and township Clerk Roger Benson denied the objection.     “I turned it down because I came into this with Jack Murphy, and that’s not the kind of person I am,” Mahoney said of running on O’Sullivan’s ticket, which was headed by eventual supervisor race-winner Kevin Hughes. “I’m very loyal. We all live in this community. I would never want to turn my back on somebody I have worked with all these years.”     Worth Township United Party highway commissioner candidate Edward Moody of Chicago Ridge said the party received campaign contributions from state representatives he has helped in the past including Barbara Flynn Curry (D-25), Jack Franks (D-63) and Lou Lang (D-16). Moody did not know all of the people who contributed to the Community First

they pay in taxes goes.”     Hughes said his party received contributions from Democratic Party leaders.     “There were definitely some contributions made on behalf of Ed Moody,” Hughes said. “Ed in the past has worked very, very hard for a lot of different elections. People made some minor contributions, and sometimes, it gets to add up. I know everyone is trying to tie in this [Illinois House Speaker and Illinois Democratic Party Chairman Michael Madigan] but I have never met him or any of his staff, and none of them have ever given us a campaign contribution.”     Moody said the Community First Party wants to bring reforms to the township.     “If they say we’re politicians, we’re part of an evil cabal — bottom line, look at what we’re proposing,” Moody said. “We’re proposing

reforms, a lot of them, and the last time I checked, that’s good government.”     Hughes defeated Murphy 11,300 votes (52 percent) to 10,253 votes (48 percent) for supervisor, while Community First clerk candidate Katie Elwood received 12,237 votes (58 percent) to Roger Benson’s 9,042 votes (42 percent). Benson was appointed clerk last year to replace the late Bud Gavin.     Community First Party assessor candidate John Dietrick topped the incumbent Toscas 10,913 votes (51 percent) to 10,326 votes (49 percent), while Moody defeated incumbent Highway Commissioner Steve Loulousis of Oak Lawn, 11,736 votes (55 percent) to 9,531 votes (45 percent).     Trustee seats went to Community First Party members Theresa Roche, Patrick Hanlon and Richard Lewandowski.

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The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Surprise scholarship makes Sandburg senior smile     Sandburg senior Pat McMahon’s reaction when he found out he won a $20,000 scholarship Wednesday last week was of happiness and disbelief.     The cross-country and track star was one of 20 athletes from around the country to win an athletic scholarship from Foot Locker and the only one from Illinois. According to Foot Locker officials, 25,915 athletes applied. The winners were picked for athletic and academic accomplishments plus were judged on an essay that they wrote.

    McMahon, who has had cystic fibrosis since he was two, will continue his athletic career at Notre Dame. He and his second-period Spanish class were summoned to the school’s Little Theater under the guise of listening to a seminar on applying for scholarships.     Soon after, a Foot Locker rep appeared on stage to say a person in the room was going to receive a scholarship. When he started reading McMahon’s bio, the Orland Park senior smiled and buried his face in his hand. Afterward, his cheeks were hurting from smiling so much, he said.

School Notes Speech and theater scholarships: Palos Village Players     The Palos Village Players invites area high school students who have an interest in speech or theater to apply for a scholarship to the summer camp of their choice.     Students in High School District 230, at Shepard or Chicago Christian high schools in Palos Heights may apply. In the past, the most popular camps have been Northwestern, Illinois State and Bradley. All of those who receive a scholarship are then invited to the players meeting in the fall to present a sample of their work.     Applications for the scholarships are available in the speech and drama departments of the above mentioned schools. Interested students can also contact PVP scholarship chairman Joyce Eddy to receive one. Call 4489235, or email jedagreen@att.net. Applications must be received by the weekend of May 2.

Mother McAuley summer camps     Mother McAuley High School offers summer camps.     Grammar school and current McAuley students have a wide range of camps to choose from, including 13 sport camps, two music camps, an art camp and the Theatre Kids Kamp.     McAuley summer camps offer athletes, artists, actresses and musicians from kindergarten through high school age the opportunity to develop skills by learning from and interacting with staff.     Athletic camps are taught by McAuley coaches.     The music camps, Guitar and

Fiddle, are taught by Orchestra Director Hannah Lawson.     Kathy Gordon Davis will head the two-week Art Camp, while Kids Kamp, a three-week camp with over a 25 year history, will be run by 99th Street Theatre Company Director Patricia Haynes. A staff of theatre, dance and music professionals will work with the students throughout the weeks.     Sports camps reflect the interscholastic sports that McAuley offers its students during the year: basketball, bowling, dance, diving, golf, lacrosse, running, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, volleyball, and water polo. All fine arts camps, which consist of guitar, fiddle, art, and the theatre Kids Kamp, are open to both girls and boys. For detailed camp descriptions, dates, times and appropriate age groups, visit mothermcauley.org and look for the Summer Camp Information link.

Heights will benefit from St. Alexander Day today, Thursday, until 10 p.m., at Oberwies Dairy, 13030 S. La Grange Road in Palos Park.     The first St. Alexander Day at Oberwies held back in February was so successful and raised over $500 that a second date was added.     Shop with a coupon that is available on the school’s website as well as at the store on the day of the event and mention St. Alexander School. All proceeds will benefit the school programs.     This evening, from 6 to 9 p.m., see the ice-cream scooping skills of St. Alexander teachers and Principal Cathy Biel as they serve up scoops of Oberweis ice cream cones and sundaes. (448-0408; stalexanderschool. com)

Children’s Farm summer preschool

    Summer preschool begins Monday, June 3 at the Children’s Farm, 12700 Southwest Highway     Mount Assisi Academy com- in Palos Park. munity blood drive will be held     The two-week program is ofTuesday, April 30, from 7 a.m. fered on Monday, Wednesday, and to 2 p.m., in Heartland’s mobile Friday, or on Tuesday and Thurscoach in the parking lot of Mount day, from 9 a.m. to noon. Assisi Academy, 13860 Main St.     The Farm and Nature Discovery in Lemont. preschool is a lively hands-on op    Donors age 16 must have a portunity for children, ages 3-5, signed permission slip. Eat a who love animals and nature, to healthy meal and drink plenty become creative learners through of water prior to donating. Photo experiences with the natural ID required. (1-800-7TO-GIVE) world of the woods, fields, farm,     To schedule an appointment, and animals just outside their call (630) 257-7844. classroom door.     The adventure-packed program includes hayrides, hikes in the St. Alexander woods, animal care, pony rides Day at Oberweis and outdoor crafts.     St. Alexander School in Palos     Parents interested in more

Blood drive at Mount Assisi

information, may contact pre- through service and action in the school director Kristin Hale at community. The event is free and 361-8933. open to the public. Refreshments will be served.     For more information on the Volunteer fair

event, contact McGuire at 9745770 or mcguirem72@moraine valley.edu. More information is also available at actoutnow.org/ actout2013/.

at Moraine Valley

    Want to get more involved in the community?     Learn about the world of volunteerism and service at ACT OUT 2013, a mostly student-run service-learning/volunteer fair at Moraine Valley Community College on Tuesday, April 30, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Wednesday, May 1, from 1 to 3 p.m. Events will take place both days in the campus Library, 9000 W. College Parkway in Palos Hills.     Students from assistant professor Mike McGuire’s Composition II classes will exhibit their experiences working with local service and not-for-profit organizations such as the Greater Chicago Food Depository, Habitat for Humanity, Little Red Schoolhouse Nature Center, Music for Lombak, Share Your Soles, Together We Cope and Park Lawn.     Three speakers will discuss their organizations, opportunities for service, civic engagement, and the power of collaboration. Jodie Lieffring, regional volunteer coordinator from The American Red Cross of Greater Chicago will talk on April 30, from 9:30 to 10 a.m., Tamarra Coleman-Hill, assistant professor of Communications, will speak on April 30, from 11 to 11:30 a.m. and Claudia Ayala, from the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization, will give her talk on May 1, from 1 to 1:30 p.m.     Community members are encouraged to check out the fair, see what students have been up to and learn about how to get involved

Student News     Melissa Budz, of Orland Park, was named to the Dean’s List for the Fall 2012 semester at Dominican University.     Budz is a graduate of Providence Catholic High School. To qualify for the prestigious Dean’s List, students must achieve a semester grade point average of 3.8 (on a 4.0 scale), based on a full-time enrollment of 12 credit hours. ***     Dominican University named two local students to its Honors List for the Fall 2012 semester. To qualify for the prestigious Honors List, students must achieve a semester grade point average of 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale), based on a full-time enrollment of 12 credit hours.     They are Kyle Belluomini, of

Palos Park, a graduate of Stagg High School, and Kathryn Budz, of Orland Park, a graduate of Providence Catholic High School. ***     The following students from Orland Park made the third quarter honor roll at Marian Catholic High School: Claire Bessette ’13, Gregory Biggio ’15, Andrew Durbin ’16, Elizabeth Johnson ’16, Bridget Regan ’14 and James Spain ’13. ***     Adeline Larsen, of Palos Heights, a 5th-grader at Southwest Chicago School, won 2nd place in the junior division of Worth Township’s 36th Annual Lenon Wisdom Memorial Spelling Bee held on April 12.

the doctor will hear you now

Submitted photo

Palos West gets dirt on Earth Day     Students at Palos West marked Earth Day on Monday by working outside to clean and spruce up their school.     Spreading mulch, weeding, and picking up trash are all part of beautification efforts for the school grounds. All grade levels take time out of their day to pitch in, while teacher Jack Hrymak’s fifth grade class spearheads the project each year.

want better health care? start asking more questions. to your doctor. to your pharmacist. to your nurse. what are the test results? what about side effects? don’t fully understand your prescriptions? don’t leave confused. because the most important question is the one you should have asked. go to www.ahrq.gov/questionsaretheanswer or call 1-800-931-AHRQ (2477) for the 10 questions every patient should ask. questions are the answer.


The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013



Community Notes Palos Park Rid Litter Day optional to receive breakfast and La Grange Road.     Palos Park’s annual villagewide Rid Litter Day will take place this Saturday, April 27.     Volunteers will meet at 9 a.m. in front of the Village Recreation Center, at which time gloves and bags will be distributed.     It is estimated that more than two tons of garbage has been collected over the past 11 Rid Litter Days in Palos Park.

Earth Day celebration at Lake Katherine     Bring the whole family to celebrate Earth Day at Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens this Saturday, April 27, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.     This free event will include hayrides, children’s crafts, green exhibits, food, and a petting zoo by The Children’s Farm. Tree planting and dog agility demonstrations will take place, and the University of Illinois Extension Master Gardeners will give away a free shrub to each attendee.     A native plant sale will be held during the event to support Lake Katherine Nature Center. Native wildflowers and grasses will be sold for $3 per plug.     For more information, call 3611873 or visit lakekatherine.org. Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens is at 7402 W. Lake Katherine Drive in Palos Heights.

Global Youth Service Day

a T-shirt. Students must provide their own transportation and community service hours will be given. To register visit gysdchicago.com or call the Bridge Teen Center at 532-0500.

Southwest Symphony season finalé     The Southwest Symphony Orchestra with the Evergreen Park High School choir and the Leyden High School a cappella and varsity choirs will perform the choruses from three Verdi operas, including the famous “Triumphal March from Aida.”     Festivities begin at 4 p.m. this Sunday, April 28, at Trinity Christian College, 6601 W. College Drive, Palos Heights.     Another highlight features violinist and high school sophomore Patrick Bieszke, of Orland Park, winner of the 2013 SSO Youth Concerto Competition, playing Lalo’s Symphonie espagnole.     The program also includes Brahms’ Symphonie No. 2.     Tickets, from $5 to $25, seniors pay $15, can be purchased at the door or in advance by calling 802-0686 or online at southwest symphony.com.     Children 12 and under are free. Instrumentalists wishing to audition for the Symphony should call the number above.

Orland Park spring cleanup

    The village of Orland Park     Make a difference in the com- annual spring cleanup campaign munity by joining the Bridge Teen in cooperation with Waste ManCenter in Orland Park for a com- agement of the South Suburbs, munitywide service project day will be held today, Friday and called Global Youth Service Day Saturday. this Saturday, April 27, from 9     Dumpsters will be placed at the a.m. to noon. Public Works Facility, 15655 S.     A $6 GYSD registration fee is Ravinia Ave., one block west of

    Residents may dispose of normal household garbage between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. On Saturday, residents may access the dumpsters between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. All disposed materials must be placed inside of the dumpster and not along side the dumpster.     Household hazardous materials and construction debris are prohibited. These items include but are not limited to medical waste, paints and stains, fertilizers, pesticides, automotive parts, cleaners, pool chemicals, fluorescent tube bulbs, propane tanks, yard waste and electronics. (403-6350)

Palos Park Arbor Day program     Palos Park, Garden Guild 1 and Tree Body will celebrate their 20th annual Arbor Day celebration on Sunday, April 28, at 1 p.m., at the Kaptur Center, 8999 W. 123rd St.     The program honors the story of Johnny Appleseed and how he transformed the American frontier. Winning posters will be awarded and free seedlings will be given to participants.     All families are invited to attend this celebration, which acknowledges the importance of protecting and preserving the environment.

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Barn to be Wild     A live webcast of The Children’s Farm pig pen will feature The Center Pathway to Sobriety director Michael Wiggins and his wife Judy living with the pigs for 27 hours on May 11 and 12, as part of the fifth annual Barn to Be Wild fundraiser for The Center.     Five years ago Development Director Mark Walker coined the name and came up with the plan for the first Barn to Be Wild, which has evolved into a weekend party with the pigs and the participation of nearly 50 “pen pals,” who are each helping to raise funds for the event.     Supporters can sponsor the Wiggins and the efforts of their pen pals by making hourly pledges or sending donations to The Center. The entire event can be viewed on the live webcam, at btbw.org, or which can be accessed through The Center’s website, thecenterpalos.org, from 1 p.m. Saturday, May 11, to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 12.     Visitors are welcome at the farm, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, on May 11 and 12, as they are every Saturday and Sunday, from 1 to 4 p.m.     Call The Center at 361-3650 or visit thecenterpalos.org for information and to donate online.

Orland Days parade entries invited     Looking for some good PR for your business or community group?     Participate in the annual OrDahlia Club land Days Parade on Sunday, June 2. Theme this year is “Year of tuber, plant sale the Cheerleaders.” Entry forms are available at the Orland     The Southtown Dahlia Club’s Park Lions Club website, orland annual dahlia tuber and plant sale parklionsclub.com. will take place this Sunday, from 1 to 4 p.m., at the Crestwood Civic Center, 14025 S. Kostner Ave. in Crestwood.     A wide assortment of plants will be available in flats, hanging basket, potted arrangements, individual plants and tubers. Included will be show-quality dahlia and Rhonda Lee. Professional tubers, rooted dahlia cuttings, photographer Rick Sanchez will vegetables and herbs, annuals, take photos on the fire truck. Do- perennials, 50/50 cash drawing, nate a bag of non-perishable food garden gift raffle, crafts and garitems for the Orland Township den ornamentation. (Southtown food pantry and your guest gets DahliaClub.com) in free. Tickets can be purchased online at orlandfire.org or at the Civil War Roundtable door on May 2.     The South Suburban Civil War Roundtable will meet toTreasure Chest day, Thursday, at 7 p.m., at Ed Hawaiian luau

Benefits & Fundraisers Crisis Center golf marathon

christopherb@crisisctr.org or 4297255.Orland Fire Dist.

    The Crisis Center for South Suburbia will host its ninth annual Longest Day of Golf Marathon on Thursday, May 2, at Silver Lake Country Club.     This event challenges golfers to play 54 holes of golf in one day. Avid golfers are invited to participate and secure pledges and donations.     Up to 36 players will drive, hack, slice and putt their way through 54 holes of golf to raise funds for programs offered by the Crisis Center to victims of domestic violence.     Each participant golfs for free, and has a goal to secure sponsors. A goal of at least $1,000 in sponsorships is set for each golfer. Sponsorships come from family, friends, co-workers and employers, which often have matching gift programs.     More information about the event and how golfers can get involved is available on the Crisis Center’s website at crisisctr.org, or by contacting Chris Beele at

Foundation gala     The Orland Fire Protection District Foundation is preparing its fundraiser to be held on Thursday, May 2, at 94 West restaurant in Orland Park.     This year’s event will support Kids Fire and Life Safety Camp, the Community CARE and the Residential Knox Box programs.     Residents and businesses who wish to sponsor prizes may call 288-1643.     Donations, such as gift certificates, themed baskets, sports memorabilia, toys, golf packages, jewelry or event tickets, will be used for raffles to raise more funds during the event, and can be donated and dropped off in care of the Orland Fire Foundation at Fire Station No. 1, the OFPD Headquarters at 9790 W. 151st St.     Tickets for the event are $50 each. Each ticket includes drinks from 6 to 8:30 p.m., appetizers, and entertainment by Jimmy “O”

Submitted photo

Shop, wine and snack for Crisis Center at Lake Katherine     The Crisis Center for South Suburbia auxiliary plans a special fundraising event to benefit the Crisis Center on Saturday, May 18, from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Lake Katherine Nature Preserve, 7402 Lake Katherine Drive in Palos Heights.     The event will feature a plant sale, tea and cookie sampling, wine and snacks (after noon), raffle, live music, and shopping with a variety of specialty vendors.     The entry fee of $5 per person includes a free beverage and one raffle ticket. Additional raffle tickets will be available for purchase at $2 each or three tickets for $5. There is no charge to attend the plant sale only.     Guests can shop for specialty items from a variety of vendors.     Here, Auxiliary members Marie Kaminski (from left), Irene Riggio and Michelle Paluch make plans for the upcoming event.     All proceeds will benefit the Crisis Center’s emergency shelter for female victims of domestic violence and their children. All services provided by the Crisis Center are free of charge to victims.     To learn more about the event, visit the Crisis Center’s website at crisisctr.org/events/ccss-auxiliary.

    The Pediatric Oncology Treasure Chest Foundation (POTCF) of Orland Park will hold its annual Treasuring Our Kids Hawaiian Luau Fundraiser on Saturday, April 27, from 6 to 10 p.m., at Chicago Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th St. in Oak Forest.     The Hawaiian Luau will feature silent and live auctions for many prizes, including a framed photo of the Chicago Blackhawks locker room signed by the entire team along with a custom jersey autographed by team captain Jonathan Toews. The gala will offer attendees a chance to showcase their dancing skills, mingle with guests and enjoy an open bar and delicious food in a funfilled setting.     The fundraiser will help the foundation obtain the funding to aid children battling cancer throughout Chicagoland and across the nation.     The Treasure Chest Foundation is asking individuals and businesses to donate an auction or raffle prize for the upcoming Fundraiser. To arrange for a pickup, call 687TOYS (8697) or drop off your donation at the foundation’s new warehouse, at 15430 70th Court in Orland Park.     Tickets to the luau fundraiser are $35 (adults) and $15 (kids under 12) and include auctions beginning at 6 p.m., followed by a buffet dinner at 7 p.m. and a festive night of music and dancing. Call 687-TOYS (8697) or visit treasurechest.org.

Club Activities and Joe’s Pizza, 17332 S. Oak formation, call Dave Sanders Park Ave. or Lois Lauer at The Center     Don White, of Hickory Hills, at 361-3650. will present “Lincoln and the Gettysburg Address.” If coming for Palos Newcomers Club dinner, arrive by 6 p.m.     The Palos Newcomers Club will meet Thursday, April 25, at the Toastmasters Club Midlothian Country Club, 5000     The Center Toastmasters Club W. 147th St. will meet on Wednesdays, May 1     Cocktails start at 11 a.m.; and 15, at 7 p.m., at 12700 South- lunch served at noon. After a west Highway, Palos Park. short business meeting, members     Toastmasters International is and guests will be entertained by an organization for people inter- Terry Lynch, giving a historical ested in improving and practic- presentation about Ben Franking their public speaking skills. lin. Call Mickey at 448-0309 for Members take turns leading the reservations. meetings and giving speeches,     One need not be a newcomer to gaining confidence from the en- join the club. For info, call Terry couragement of each other. at 448-6598. Some of the clubs ac    The Center Toastmasters tivities include monthly meetings meet on the first and third at restaurants or country clubs, Wednesdays of every month. a book club, a bridge group, a New members and guests are canasta group and a needlepoint always welcome. For more in- group.

Library Notes Magical garden creature

and up can play the library’s Wii in the Young Adult area every     Children ages 5 and up are Friday, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. invited to the Palos Park Public Games are provided. No regisLibrary this Saturday, April 27, at tration necessary. 1 p.m., to create a fairy, gnome, or     All programs are free and open elf and decorate a special house for the magical garden creature.     The library is at 12330 Forest Glen Blvd. in Palos Park. Call the library at 448-1530 to register.

Heights library youth programs     • Tween Time — Kids in grades 4 and 5 can come to the Palos Heights Public Library to Build-a-Bot on Thursday, April 25, at 7 p.m.     • YA for Adults Book Discussion — For adults who like to read teen fiction. Come to the library on Monday, April 29 at 7 p.m., to talk about the book Butter by Erin Jade Lange. Copies of the book are available at the youth Services desk.     • Tween Book Discussion — Grades 3-5 can come to the library on Tuesday, April 30 at 7 p.m., to talk about the book “Love That Dog” by Sharon Creech. Bring mom or dad or a friend. Copies of the book are available at the Youth Services desk.     • Teen Gaming — Grades 6

to everyone at the library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. in Palos Heights. For more information or to register, visit palosheightslibrary.org, call 448-1473, or stop by the Youth Services desk.

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The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle

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1. Muffin choice 5. Casts off 10. "Pygmalion" dramatist 14. Theater section 15. Secret languages 16. Fish story 17. NYSE counterpart 18. Peter of synonyms 19. Steam up 20. Fans of politico Gary? 22. Youngest 500homer man, familiarly 23. Be an omen of 24. __-eyed (close to tears) 25. Theater guide 28. Unchecked 32. Goes after 34. Imitation 35. Stick up 38. "__ we forget ..." 39. Air freshener targets 41. Drone's home 42. Fireplace remnant 43. Cookie since 1912 44. Visibly upset 46. Robert Blake series 49. Upturned, as a crate 50. Jell-O formers 52. Social misfit 54. Shirt brand 55. Wrestling champ? 61. A whole lot 62. Really go for 63. "This can't be!" 64. Within: Prefix 65. Cubist Fernand 66. Vaudeville's Seven Little __ 67. Espied 68. Op-ed piece

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    A bit of “Paris in the Spring” will be brought to Palos Park when the Village Courtyard, 123rd Street at 81st Avenue, celebrates a week-long Festival of France starting April 20.     The Courtyard patio, known for its historic Palos oak, will be gaily bedecked with outdoor tables, flower cart, kiosks and other Parisian touches. Parisian fashions and gourmet foods or some of the items newly imported to the Courtyard shops. The Deacon’s Bench restaurant will offer a French menu for luncheon during the week.

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21. Tribal history 24. Upper limit, informally 25. Pac-12 team 26. The Beatles' "__ Leaving Home" 27. Marilyn Monroe working at a beanery? 29. Under way 30. Scratch up 31. Face, slangily 33. Needing liniment 36. Microwave or Dutch 37. Make concessions 40. NYPD fig. 41. "Don't touch!" 43. Surgery spots, for short 45. Circle dance

1. Dull as dishwater 2. Actress Downey 3. Golden __ (senior) 4. Second in preference 5. New England catch 6. Depression-era president 7. Slight lead 8. Salt lick visitor 9. Fliers from De Gaulle, once 10. Muscle problem 11. Salon workers' walkout? 12. Mete out 13. Like a neglected lawn (Answers on page 12)

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47. Builds a new room, say 48. Singer Bocelli 50. Tiny arachnids 51. Makeup of a layer with a "hole" 53. Abrasive stuff 55. Fit as a fiddle 56. Pindaric works 57. Snorers saw them 58. God with a hammer 59. "Watermark" New Ager 60. Optimistic

From April 18, 1963

Sudoku The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order.

From April 25, 1963

50 Years Ago This Week     First place in the science fair held last Friday at St. Michael School was awarded to James Jakich, Edward Hunssinger, Rory Mozden and Thomas Jackson for their demonstration of “The Aton in Peace and War.”

Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9. (Answers on page 12)

© 2009 Hometown Content

    One of the biggest things separating the strong players from the weak players is the willingness to battle over pots without a hand. While many players will take a flop and then fold when they miss, strong players have some tricks up their sleeves to stay in the hand and turn a miss into a profit. Today, I’m going to teach you how to float.     A float is a call on the flop with the intention of bluffing later. When choosing whether to float, I look for a few important things:     1) Is my opponent disinterested in the pot or weak?     2) Does my flop call look strong?     3) Are there lots of good turn cards for me? Are there few bad turn cards?     Here’s an example:     The table is nine-handed. Blinds are 50-100. Second position raises to 200, and I call in the next

Poker

History of the World

by Ben Wilinofsky

by Mark Andrews

position with Ah 4h. The small blind calls as well.     The flop comes 10c 6s 3h. The small blind checks, and the initial raiser bets 300 into a pot of 700.     Is my opponent disinterested in the pot or weak? He bet less than half the pot at a table with deep stacks. He doesn’t seem interested in playing a big pot. Also, early in tournaments, players often play very straightforward and give up on pots because pots are small compared with stacks.     Does my flop call look strong? Because of the preflop positions, I would often call preflop with J-J or even Q-Q. This flop is very dry — a term for a flop that helps few drawing hands — so if I have a strong hand, such as an overpair, a set or top pair, I don’t have to raise to keep from being outdrawn. And most players wouldn’t expect me to call the flop without a hand when there

is another player left to act.     Are there lots of good, and few bad, turn cards for me? I expect the raiser to keep betting on pocket jacks, queens, kings and aces. I probably have to fold on a jack, queen or king on the turn but can keep calling on an ace. On most other cards, I expect him to give up. Even if he doesn’t, I’ll turn a flush draw or an openended straight draw 26.5 percent of the time.     The small blind folds. The turn card is the 10d. My opponent checks. I bet 750. This bet is consistent with any hand that includes a 10, and unless my opponent expects me to call the flop without holding a pair, he would think it impossible for me to be bluffing on the turn.     My opponent calls. I expect him to have a two-pair hand, hoping that I’m betting a weaker two-pair so that I don’t get outdrawn on the river.

    The river is the Kd. He checks. I bet 2,100. He folds. My final bet represented three 10s or a strong two pair (with an overpair like J-J or Q-Q). My line was consistent and strong at every point, and my opponent had little reason to believe I was bluffing this river.     By extrapolating from a small piece of information (the size of my opponent’s flop bet) and being willing to apply pressure in an unexpected spot, I was able to pick up almost 18 big blinds. That may seem insignificant relative to stack size, but winning chips in a spot where most people would never bluff can help quietly build a stack, even when you can’t make a hand.    (Ben Wilinofsky is a Canadian poker player with more than $3 million in online tournament winnings and more than $1 million in live winnings. He won the 2011 European Poker Tour championship in Berlin.)

    April 23: ON THIS DATE in 1635, the first public school in the United States, Boston Latin School, was founded in Boston. In 1985, the Coca-Cola Co. announced it was changing the secret flavor formula for Coke. Intensely negative public reaction later prompted the company to resume selling the original version as Coca-Cola Classic, while New Coke remained on the market for several years.     April 24: ON THIS DATE in 1898, Spain declared war on the United States after rejecting America’s ultimatum to withdraw from Cuba. In 1980, the United States launched an abortive attempt to free American hostages in Iran, a mission in which eight U.S. service members died.     April 25: ON THIS DATE in 1859, ground was broken for construction of the Suez Canal. In 1945, during World War II, U.S. and Soviet forces linked up on the Elbe River.

    April 26: ON THIS DATE in 1607, an expedition of colonists went ashore in Virginia to establish the first permanent English settlement in the Western Hemisphere. In 1986, the world’s worst nuclear accident occurred at the Chernobyl power plant in the Ukraine, killing 31 people and spewing radiation that sickened thousands.     April 27: ON THIS DATE in 1861, West Virginia seceded from Virginia to become a Union state after Virginia had seceded from United States. In 1937, the nation’s first Social Security checks were distributed.     April 28: ON THIS DATE in 1789, a mutiny occurred on the H.M.S. Bounty as the crew of the British ship set the captain and a few loyal officers adrift in a small boat. In 1914, Willis H. Carrier patented the air conditioner.    (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@ embarqmail.com.)

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What is the biggest obstacle when training for a marathon or halfmarathon? (Asked at the solidarity run Julia Reich, Flossmoor Lori Pegues, Tinley Park Fredric Nielsen, Orland Park Spero Speropoulos, Palos Hills Joe Werner, Tinley Park, Monday outside Running for     “Miles. Days and miles. Short     “Getting to that point [race day]     “Patience. You want all that     “The 6 inches between my ears.     “The things you can’t control Kicks in Palos Heights). runs and longs runs and fitting it without getting injured. There are training compiled in one week but As Yogi Berra said about base- such as injuries and weather. In all in amongst living life.”

so many things you have to overcome to get to that point. And a lot of it is mental, too.”

you have to let it unfold before you. You have to listen to your body and enjoy the journey.’’

ball ‘90 percent of this is half mental.’ ”

18 weeks of blood, sweat and tears but things you can control are not obstacles. It’s the things that have no rhyme or reason that’s tough.”


The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013



Healthy Answers for Life by Carolyn Johnson

Antibiotics and probiotics Know the good and the bad Dear Carolyn:     I’ve gone through several courses of antibiotics over the winter. I’ve heard things about probiotics being a good thing to take after antibiotics, but I don’t know much about them and which to choose. I was hoping you would have some advice or information. Thanks, Michelle Dear Michelle:     Antibiotic medications were a wonderful discovery, and have saved countless lives over the years. There is a downside to antibiotics, however — they kill bacteria indiscriminately.     That on the whole doesn’t sound like too bad of a thing, but the fact is, we have trillions of microorganisms is our body, the majority of which are “good” bacteria which are necessary for proper bodily functions. In truth, antibiotic side effects as a whole can be traced to a deficiency of beneficial bacteria in the digestive tract. Antibiotics disrupt the body’s natural balance, which can set a person up for a host of other problems, including an increased susceptibility to yeast and other infections.     The word probiotic literally means, “for life”, and supplementing with good bacteria definitely is something everyone would benefit from, especially persons who have taken antibiotics in the past. Probiotics, or “good bacteria”, help with digestion, the immune system, and a host of other functions in the body.     Probiotics are best known for helping to promote good digestion with less bloating and gassiness, though they also prevent constipation and help to increase nutrient absorption. Regarding the immune system, there has been impressive research with probiotics that found that people who consumed good bacteria regularly

were significantly less likely to experience colds and respiratory infections.     Probiotics are also beneficial to pregnant women and their unborn children. There has been research which has linked prenatal consumption of probiotics with a reduced occurrence of eczema in children. For women prone to yeast infections, supplementing with probiotics, specifically a high dose of acidophilus, can help to treat and prevent vaginal yeast infections from developing.     Probiotics are not only helpful after taking a course of antibiotics, they can also work to combat antibiotic side effects when taken along with a prescription of antibiotics. One study found that people who took probiotics with their antibiotics were 42 percent less likely to develop diarrhea than those who took a placebo. When taking probiotics along with antibiotics however, it’s important to wait a few hours in between doses — if you take antibiotics and probiotics at the same time, the antibiotics will kill the good bacteria you’re supplementing with.     There are two main types of probiotics available, room temperature stable or refrigerated varieties. Generally, refrigerated varieties are more potent, though there are a number of room temperature stable products that have good potencies. Types of probiotics that don’t have to be refrigerated are often more convenient, since it can sometimes be difficult to remember to take them if they’re hidden away in the fridge.     When buying probiotics, it’s a good rule of thumb to look for varieties which list the actual amount of microorganisms it contains in billions rather than just saying it has 500mg of this or that. For a room temperature

variety, I very much recommend Jarrow’s JarrowDophilus, which has 5 billion organisms per capsule; they’re also enteric coated, which means the capsules have a protective coating to ensure the good bacteria aren’t killed by stomach acids. For a refrigerated probiotic, the brands Floragen and Flora have some wonderful, high quality products.     Finally, when taking probiotics, be sure to read the directions. Different capsules are formulated differently, some are meant to be taken with foods and others are made to be taken on an empty stomach. If you don’t follow the specific products instructions it’s likely you won’t be absorbing the maximum amount.     Good luck! I am a firm believer in probiotics and have had great results with them. If you have any other questions, stop by Pass Health Foods and we’d love to help you further.    To submit a question to be answered in a future column send an email to healthyanswersforlife@ gmail.com or mail to Healthy Answers for Life c/o Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive, Palos Heights, IL 60463.    Carolyn Johnson is one of the knowledgeable associates at Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive. Feel free to stop by the store for more information or advice. passhealthfoods.com.    This column makes no claims to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure diseases with any advice or products. Any health related information in this article is for educational purposes only. The ultimate responsibility for your choices and their effect on your health are yours and before applying any therapy or use of herbs, supplements, etc., you should consult your health care provider.

Health Beat Vision expo

at 2 p.m.     Attendance is free. Reservations     OASIS for the Visually Impaired are not required for workshop parwill sponsor its annual Vision ticipation. (oasisvision.org) Dynamics Resource & Products Expo this Friday, from 9 a.m. to Smith CCRCs 3 p.m., at Orland Park Christian support groups Reformed Church, 7500 W. Sycafor caregiver families more Drive.     The Expo will provide an op-     Residents who have family portunity for those who are vi- members or friends living with sually impaired, and their fami- Alzheimer’s disease or dementia lies, to sample a wide variety of are invited to join others who specialized products designed to have the same concerns at free help with work, school and daily meetings either May 2 at Smith living. All are invited to attend Crossing in Orland Park or May two informative workshops at the 7 at Smith Village in Beverly. Expo: The Guide Dog Lifestyle will     At 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May be held at 10:30 a.m., and and 2, Smith Crossing’s social service a macular degeneration update director and resident services di-

rector will facilitate a Q&A session at 10501 Emilie Lane in Orland Park (enter at 104th Avenue and 183rd Street). To reserve a place, call 326-2300.     At 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 7, at 2320 W. 113th Place in Chicago, Smith Village’s memory support coordinator Diane Morgan will start the meeting with a short film, “Bathing Without a Battle.” The film covers person-centered techniques, such as using no-rinse soap or a bed bath to help dementia sufferers enjoy bathing. To reserve a seat, please call (773) 474-7300.     Before ending, light refreshments will be served at the hourlong gatherings.

Submitted photo

Help Astros strike out ALS     The softball teams from Shepard and Evergreen Park high schools will collaborate in a fundraiser to support research of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease, on Wednesday, May 1, at 4:30 p.m., at Shepard.     Admission to the game will be $4. The Astros and Mustangs are hoping to pack the place, so any assistance with spreading the word is greatly appreciated.     The mother of a Shepard softball player currently battles ALS. Susan Curley-Michalik, an Evergreen Park native who attended Mother McAuley High School, was diagnosed with the disease two years ago.     ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord, according to the ALS Association.     In recent weeks, the teams have been raising money. All proceeds will go directly to the family to help pay for medical care.     To place an ad in the program, contact Kelsey Clifford at 371-1111, Ext. 3269.     To make a gift donation, contact Kate Richardson at 923-1753.     Monetary donations may be sent to: The Susan Michalik Strike Out ALS Fund at United Trust Bank, 12330 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463.

Submitted photo, sponsored by Joy’s Best Friends, Ltd. Best Bites

Dog of The Week     Hi, Katie here! Time is running out… Have you entered your Dog in our Dog of the Month Contest for May?    The 5 Dogs of the Week will qualify for the Contest and the one with the most votes will win a $100 Best Bites Gift Certificate!    Voting will be accepted June 1st thru June 25th IN-STORE ONLY. Limit 1 vote per item purchased. Visit our Store for more details or follow us on www.facebook.com/joysbestfriendsbestbites. Do you want your Dog to win?    Best Bites is located at 13034 S. LaGrange Road in Palos Park. 708-448-1515. Visit us online at www.joysbestfriends.com.

Pick of the Litter By Dr. John R. Fleming, DVM Dear Dr. Fleming:     My best friend just happens to be my dog. Now that he is getting older would you recommend I bring him in to my vet more than once yearly? I live in Chicago and my vet has been recommending twice yearly exams for some time now. Do you really think that is necessary? Clark, Chicago Dear Clark:     Good for your vet. If your pet is as precious to you as you say, it’s a good idea to have him looked over by a vet twice yearly. I check my dog daily. Do you want to know why most vets don’t recommend twice yearly exams on old pets? Because we are scientists, we are not good at “selling” good service; we are afraid of confrontation; we are afraid that if we offer something that costs the client a buck or two that we will be perceived at “pushing” services to enhance their bottom line. I feel their pain. And the bottom line thing? That’s a joke.     Let me give you two examples from our clinic last week why more frequent checkups might be in order. A couple of weeks ago Jim brought his older golden retriever in for his yearly exam. In the right eye I could see what I thought was a malignant melanoma that was at least a centimeter in diameter. The thing has obviously been there for awhile. Too bad we didn’t see it earlier when it was smaller. Perhaps the eye could have been saved, perhaps it’s already spread. Jim never even noticed it. He’s an electrician. He would see problems in my house that go right over my head.     Two days ago Jack and his wife came in for a yearly exam. They have an 8-year old lab who they treat like a child and who is a joy to work with. During the exam I asked if Fred was drinking normally and Cathy said that perhaps he was drinking “a little more” than normal. We also noticed that his weight was down a little. We do most of our Lyme/heartworm tests here in the clinic but if we send them to our outside lab for a pittance they will run not only the Lyme/heartworm test but will add on a nice metabolic panel. I recommended that we do this for Fred and that we also run a urinalysis here in the clinic. We ran the urinalysis after they left and found that Fred’s specific gravity was low at 1.012 and that the urine sediment was overwhelmed with rod-shaped bacteria (probably E. Coli) and my suspicion is the Fred may have chronic pyelonephritis (infection/inflam-

Submitted photo

Meet Keith Fox, Musak’s National Technician of the Year. Keith is one of those pet owners that every veterinarian would go out of their way to help with his pet’s medical problems.

heartworm test, a complete urinalysis, a thyroid function test, a fecal exam, a full metabolic/ chemistry panel, a complete blood count, ear cleaning, nail trim, six months’ worth of IverhartR heartworm preventative and a written report and recommendations. You can review this at our website (PrairieStateVet.com) and click on Health Exam Plus. Go to your own veterinarian’s website and look at their program. Almost all clinics offer one. It’s a good thing for your pet. Better yet, do it twice a year.     For pets less than 7 years of age, we send out a regular 29 cent postcard reminder, but for every pet 8 years and older, we go through the extra expense of mailing out a three- or four-page letter describing our HEP. Do a lot of people give their pet such a good exam? No. But those that do are our best clients.     Is it a pain to get four pages of lab data back and have to sit down and write an explanation to the owner of every abnormal parameter found in the tests? Yes, it takes a lot of the doctor’s time, usually after hours and after a long day, to write up the reports to send to the owners. It is a pain in the butt to explain why an SGPT could be elevated or why an alk-phos is four times normal or why the urine sediment could have become full of calcium oxalate crystals and what that means for the pet’s future. On most HEP’s we find something that needs to be addressed, some minor, some serious.     If you are really interested in monitoring your older pet with the help of a veterinarian, take a look at our Clipper Plan. This is a plan we took from a California veterinary hospital that is offered as a so-called “In-Clinic HMO”.

mation of the kidneys). He had no obvious external signs other than a little increase in his water intake and some weight loss. It wasn’t rocket science to get us on to a path that could save the dog’s life.     So, do we have a policy here at PSVC of recommending twice yearly exams for all of our pets over 8 years of age? No. Perhaps we should. I know other clinics are doing this. It’s an education issue. It’s a confrontation issue. It’s a level-of-concern issue that rests on the owner’s shoulders. Is it good medicine? Of course it is. I read an interesting study a few weeks ago that said that 90 percent of pet owners in the U.S. consider their pets to be family members but that only 30 percent would take their pet to a veterinary clinic twice weekly for 8 weeks if it meant life-saving treatment. Talk is cheap.     One thing we do have in place here is a really good HEP (Health Exam Plus) modeled after plans in place at many clinics nationwide. Pets getting an HEP receive the     An act of honesty, without following: a physical exam, any compassion, is an act of hostilcore vaccines needed, a Lyme/ ity. — C.S. Lewis

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10

The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Week of the Young Child celebrated

Submitted photos

Palos Park Episcopal Daycare & Learning Center, at 12219 S. 86th Ave., recently hosted events for the National Week of the Young Child, sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The center’s 14th annual art show spotlighted children’s art and project documentation all about pirates.

Patti Malzone and daughter Ava, age 5, of Palos Heights enjoy a parent-child tea Wednesday last week.     The Palos Park Episcopal Daycare and Learning Center celebrated Week of the Young Child last week with a series of events dedicated to children.     Week of the Young Child is a national event sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children to draw awareness to the needs of early childhood.     The center hosted a parent-child tea, it’s 14th annual art show, and a march to the mayor to pick up a proclamation from the mayor of Palos Park in addition to activities celebrating children and the staff at the center.     The Palos Park Episcopal Daycare and Learning Center had been Maeve and Bridget Begley, of Palos Heights, pose in front of school Steven and Rebecca Castellarin, of Palos Park, look over a photo serving children in the Palos area for 29 years. They can be reached artwork. book with their daughter, Cali, age 2. at 361-4066.

Houses of Worship     The church will celebrate the second of its special 125th anniversary services this Sunday, April 28.     The guest speaker will be the Rev. Noble Lach, a son of the congregation. Pastor Lach received his early schooling in Orland Park. His father, the Rev. Adolph Lach, was pastor of Christ Lutheran Church from 1931 until 1964.     A luncheon will follow the 11 a.m. service on the 28th.     The church is at 14700 S. 94th Ave. (349-0431)

    Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Game starts promptly at 7 p.m. Cost is $10 per person at the door.     To register yourself or a team of 5-8 people, call the church at 444-8560 by Monday, May 6. Prizes will be awarded to the winning team. All proceeds will benefit the summer mission trip to New York.

Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church

    Registration for Vacation Bible School continues. All cowboys and cowgirls are invited to SonWestRoundup, June 17-21.     Joshua Price Concert will be given Saturday, May 4, at 7 p.m. Joshua will also participate in Sunday morning worship serFaith United vices on Sunday, May 5, at 8:30 Methodist Church and 11 a.m. Orland Park     Infant nursery and child care     Trivia Night at the church, are provided at all services. 15101 S. 80th Ave., will be held     The church is at 12312 S. 88th Friday, May 10. Ave. (448-0819; pppcc.org)

Arthur Anderson

    Arthur Anderson, 94, of Orland Park, died March 23. Visitation was held at Schmaedeke Funeral Home in Worth. A funeral service was held at Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery in Elwood on April 3. Interment was at Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery.     Mr. Anderson is survived by his

CLEWS preschool adds two-day morning classes

SW Special Rec. invites Walk, Run or Roll racers

group of four and get a 5th person for free.     Participants may use assisted mobility devices such as a walker, cane or manual/motorized wheelchair. A “buddy” is also allowed to assist an athlete for free and may purchase a “buddy” T-shirt for $5.     To become involved with the race and help raise money for SWSRA, you can become a “Charity Runner,” by registering for the First Midwest Half Marathon and raise a minimum of $100. The funds are raised will allow SWSRA to continue to provide quality recreation programming and scholarship opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Runners will receive a SWSRA running bib to wear during the race. To signup or get more information, contact Justin Waters at jwaters@swsra.com or call the

kler Fitters Local 281.     Beloved husband of Linda, née Hardies; loving father of Andrea, Kenny (Sarah) and Matthew (Melissa) Hopf; cherished step-father of Johnathon Statham; proud grandfather of Kenny and Emma Kenneth J. Hopf Hopf; devoted son of Patricia, née     Kenneth J. Hopf, 59, of Palos Dunlap and the late William T. Park, formerly of Palos Heights, Hopf; dear brother of Bill (Diana) passed suddenly. Hopf, Claudie (Ken Kalafut) Hopf     He was a member of the Sprin- and Cathi (Bernie) Kay.

    Visitation was held April 21 at Krueger Funeral Home in Blue Island. Funeral service April 22 at Mission Covenant Church in Blue Island. Cremation private.     In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Mission Covenant Church greatly appreciated.     Mr. Hopf was born in Blue Island. He was a Ducks Unlimited member.

Billy Graham’s “My Answer”

    Q: I think my husband may have a problem with alcohol. He’ll go for weeks with just a few drinks a day, but then he’ll go on a binge and be wiped out for several days. Should this concern me? — Mrs. R.S.     A: Yes, it definitely should concern you — and your husband, as well. I’m not a doctor or other expert in such matters, of course, but your husband’s binge drinking certainly proves that he’s not in control of his drinking, but his drinking is in control of him. The Bible warns that “a man is a slave     CLEWS has added a new class to 10 children with a qualified to whatever has mastered him” offering for the 2013-14 school teacher and an aide. (2 Peter 2:19). year.     CLEWS is a faith-based pro-     What can you do? First, talk     Due to the demand for two- gram offering parent involvement frankly with your husband about day morning classes, a new option and numerous hands-on age ap- this problem and urge him to face for 3-year-olds has been opened. propriate learning experiences for his need for help to overcome it. If They can attend a class that meets the very young child. you need other family members or Monday and Wednesday, from 9:30     Plan to schedule a visit, call friends to join with you, don’t be to 11:30 a.m. 349-0171. CLEWS is located in the ashamed to ask them. Sometimes     Children must be 3 years old Christ Lutheran Church, 14700 S. alcoholics will only admit their by Sept. 1. Class size is limited 94th Ave. in Orland Park. need for help if others confront

    South West Special Recreation Association will hold its 5th annual Walk, Run or Roll ½ Mile Race on Sunday, May 5.     In conjunction with the First Midwest Half Marathon, the Walk, Run, Roll is specifically geared towards those that individuals with special needs ages 8 and older.     The Walk, Run or Roll Race will begin at 7:45 a.m. (participants must be checked in by 7 a.m.), at the Palos Heights City Hall, just west of Route 83 and 76th Avenue.     Athletes can bring home a bronze, silver or gold medal in one of the following five categories: Overall Race, Ambulatory, Assisted Devices, Non-Motorized Wheelchair, or Motorized Wheelchair.     “This is a feel-good opportunity for anyone involved. From our athletes, to our volunteers and spectators,” said Executive Director Lori Chesna. “We look at this race to showcase our athlete’s abilities and not their disabilities. We hope you can join us in May and support any way you can.”     Registration is underway and can be completed through the SWSRA office, at 12521 S. Kostner Ave. in Alsip, or can be found online at swsra.com. Register a

daughters, Betty Alsvig and Nancy Baillie; and five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.     Mr. Anderson was born in Chicago. He was a retired tool and die maker.

SWSRA office at 389-9423.     Information and registration for the half marathon can be found at firstmidwesthalfmarathon.com. The half marathon will begin at 7:30 a.m. and will cover 13.1 miles weaving through forest paths and plat pavement through the cities of Palos Heights, Palos Park and Palos Hills.     South West Special Recreation Association (SWSRA) is a special recreation cooperative comprised of the following: Alsip Park District, Blue Island Park District, Justice Park District, Village of Merrionette Park, Midlothian Park District, Palos Heights Recreation Department, Posen Park District, Summit Park District and Worth Park District.     SWSRA was formed in 1981 to provide year-round quality recreation programs and services for individuals with disabilities or special needs. SWSRA programs are designed to increase independence and enhance the quality of life for each individual. SWSRA is now in its 32nd year of providing recreation for special populations in the south suburban area. A wide variety of programs are available for individuals from early childhood through adulthood.

them directly and demand they seek help. Your pastor or doctor should be able to direct you to agencies or organizations in your community that may be able to assist him.     I also urge you to turn to God for the wisdom, help and patience you need. God knows all about your situation, and He loves you and your husband and doesn’t want to see him destroy his life and the life of your family. Pray for your husband, and encourage him to open his heart and life to Christ’s love and transforming power.     Don’t assume that your husband will get better on his own. He probably won’t; if anything, his situation may only get worse. But God is able to heal the hurt in his heart that he’s trying to numb with alcohol, and with your prayers and encouragement it can happen.    (Send your queries to “My

Answer,” c/o Billy Graham, Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, 1 Billy Graham Parkway, Charlotte, N.C., 28201;

call 1-(877) 2-GRAHAM, or visit the Web site for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association: www. billygraham.org.)

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The Regional News invites couples or their parents to submit for publication engagement or wedding announcements. There is no charge for this service offered to community residents. The announcements must be typed, double-spaced and sent with a photograph of the couple. JPEGs or high quality photographs are preferred. (Sorry, photographs cannot be returned)

E-mail announcements to: TheRegional@Comcast.net Mail announcements to: The Regional News 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463


The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013

11

Celtic Cottage selling its last Irish imports by Jeff Vorva staff reporter     There wasn’t enough green coming in this past Christmas or St. Patrick’s Day seasons, so now Celtic Cottage and Wm. Simon Jewelers will close its doors Saturday after nearly 10 years at its Palos Heights location.     Owner Lorie Stone wrestled with the decision a long time.     “Business has been going down for about four or five years now,” she said. “This year, it’s down again. It was down to the bare bones. But when Christmas was not good and St. Paddy’s day was not good, it was time.”     She tried to keep it going as long as she could. In 2009, she had to address rumors that the store at 12244 S. Harlem Ave. was closing. In a letter to The Regional News, she wrote: “We have no intention to move or close. We like our location, we love customers and intend to be here many more years.”     Four years later, she couldn’t continue.     Merchandise is 40 percent off

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Lorie Stone shows some of the paintings that have reduced prices in the closing days of the Celtic Cottage. and some of the paintings in the store will likely be sold at even a higher discount.     Stone started selling artwork in 2007, bringing in paintings and photographs from the area and Ireland.     The merchandise will be gone and so, too, will the turtles.

Fiona and Finbar, two turtles who have been a part of the Celtic Cottage for more than seven years, will find a new home at Lake Katherine.

    Finbar and Fiona have been at the store for more than seven years and Stone said that they have been a big hit with kids and adults alike. She plans on donating them to the Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens.     “The kids who loved to visit them here can still go to Lake Katherine to visit them,” Stone said.     Stone said she was always trying to be optimistic the economy would recover and the store would start making money. With the writing on the wall, she decided to take some classes in medical coding at Moraine Valley so the Orland Park resident could have a fallback plan.     “I figure if things got really bad, I could use that but I was hoping I wouldn’t,” she said. “So anyone out there who needs a medical coder, I’m available.”     Stone started in business with a William Simon Jewelers in Orland

Celtic Cottage worker Donna Crowley and owner Lorie Stone hoist some empty glasses under a painting of two gents with filled glasses in the Yellow Room of the soon-to-be-closed Celtic Cottage. Park 16 years ago and opened the Celtic Cottage and jewelers in 2004. Since word of the closing, Stone has seen plenty of old customers. She is counting on an emotional final couple of days be-

fore she locks it up for good.     “Most people have been really nice,” she said. “The people of Palos have always been great to me and a lot of people are sad that I’m going. Over and over people

are telling me how sorry they are to see me go. The hard part was to make this decision. It took a couple of years. But I have to thank everyone in this community who has supported me.”

Nourish ‘roots’ of your investment strategy     On Arbor Day, which we celebrate this week, people across the country plant trees. Of course, trees provide us with many benefits, including beauty, fruit and oxygen, as well as protection against land erosion. But the act of planting and nurturing trees can also guide our behavior in other areas of life — such as investing.     First of all, consider the vision and patience exhibited by tree growers when they plant their saplings. As an investor, you, too, need this type of perseverance and long-term outlook. When you invest, you should be focused on the long term yet be prepared for the inevitable short-term market downturns. How long is “long term”? Many investors hold quality investments for decades. It’s a long process, but the potential growth you seek will need this time.     What else can you, as an investor, learn from tree planters? For one thing, be aware of how they keep their orchards healthy. By providing proper irrigation and disease-prevention measures, they help their trees stay on the long path toward maturity. Similarly, you need to nurture your investment portfolio by continually providing it with the financial resources it needs to stay “healthy.” During periods of market volatility, it can be tempting to take a

Jim Van Howe

“time out” from investing — but if you do, you’ll miss out on the potential growth opportunities that may follow. Since no one can really predict the beginnings and endings of either “up” or “down” markets, you’re better off by staying invested. Also, just as horticulturists take steps to keep their trees from being subject to disease, you can keep your portfolio in good shape by periodically “pruning” it of investments that no longer meet your needs.     Here’s something else that tree planters can teach us: diversification. Consider an orchard that contains several different fruit trees; its commercial benefits may be greater than a comparable orchard that only grows apples. Plus, the presence of a variety of trees can prove beneficial if disease strikes one type. In some areas of the country, for example, Dutch Elm Disease wiped out thousands of trees,

leaving entire streets treeless. If some other species had also been planted, these streets would still have had the benefits provided by mature trees, even if the elms were gone. As an investor, you don’t want to own just one type of financial asset, such as growth stocks, because if a downturn hits this segment, your entire portfolio could take a big hit. A better strategy would be to populate your “financial orchard” with a variety of investments — such as stocks, bonds and government securities — that are suitable for your situation. (Keep in mind, though, that while diversification can help reduce the effects of volatility, it can’t guarantee a profit or protect against loss.)     As an investor, you can learn some lessons from Arbor Day that could prove “tree-mendously” helpful to you as you chart your course for the future — and you won’t even have to “go out on a limb” to put these strategies in place. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones Investments, in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Photo by Laura Bollin

Riley’s Trick Shop owner Jim Riley and his son, Jim, stand behind the counter at the store, 6442 W. 111th St. in Worth. Riley is moving the shop in June to a storefront at 8086 W. 111th St. in Palos Hills The plaque behind the Rileys reads, “A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.”

And that’s no joke Orland moving firm honored for deliveries to food bank     Out of 500 moving companies across the country, Thompson Moving and Storage of Orland Park is being recognized for their outstanding efforts to help the less fortunate with the Mover of the Month Award for March of 2013.     Move For Hunger, a nationwide hunger-relief organization that works with the relocation industry to fight hunger, presents the Mover of the Month Award to the moving company that has gone above and beyond to support their local food bank and community.     Since joining Move For Hunger in 2011, Thompson has delivered over 7,900 lbs. to the Together We Cope Food Pantry, enough

to provide over 6,000 meals to the less fortunate.     “The crew at Thompson have proven to be some of the most dedicated to Move For Hunger’s mission,” said Gavin Christiansen, operations director of Move For Hunger. “Of the 23 months that Thompson has been apart of Move For Hunger, they have made 26 donations to the food pantry. They are making their community a better place each and every month.”     Movers in the Move For Hunger network urge their customers to donate any food not going on the move to the local food bank. Since founding in 2009, over 475 movers have joined Move For Hunger, and 1,080,000

lbs. of food have been delivered to food banks all across the United States.     In addition to their daily hunger relief efforts, Thompson has also participated in a number of local food drives and community events within the past year, lending their support to a food drive at the Sears Logistics offices and at a real estate office.     Move For Hunger is a nonprofit organization that works with relocation companies to pick up unwanted, unopened food from those who are relocating and deliver it to local food banks. For more information or to find out how you can help support Move For Hunger, visit MoveFor Hunger.org.

Business Notes Marquette Bank food drive

    Bank employees, customers, neighbors and local businesses are encouraged to donate non    As part of its Neighborhood perishable food items at any of Food Drive, Marquette Bank Marquette Bank’s 23 locations will be collecting non-perish- or to make an online donaable food items at all 23 bank tion. locations between May 2 and     Food items collected through June 30. June 30, will be distributed to

local pantries and neighborhood food banks through the Greater Chicago Food Depository and the Northern Illinois Food Bank. Bank employees will also be spending several days volunteering at the depository by sorting and packing donated food items.

Riley’s plans move to Palos Hills by Laura Bollin     Riley’s Trick Shop, a beloved magic and gag-gift shop that has resided in Worth for 40 years, is getting a new name and leaving town for a new location.     The store, longtime tenant of the familiar building at 6442 W. 11th St. in Worth, is planning a grand opening for June just more than two miles west at 8086 W. 111th St. in Palos Hills. The store will be rebranded with the name Riley’s Tricks and Gifts.     Owner Jim Riley said he is hopeful the new site across the street from Stagg High School in the Valley Plaza will benefit from its proximity to other businesses including a tanning salon, hair salon and Aladdin’s restaurant. Riley, whose father opened Riley’s Trick Shop in Chicago in 1937 and moved it to Worth in 1973, says he might even hang the “Future Home of Riley’s Trick Shop” sign he found while sorting through stock at the new shop. His father hung the sign outside the Worth store before moving there.     Riley and his family love Worth, he said. His wife, Judy, and son, Jim, help him run the store.     “We love it here, but we can’t pay to heat and cool the whole building when we’re not using it,” he said.     The store’s new name will em-

phasize its selection of birthday and gag gifts; Riley’s will no longer sell Halloween costumes. The new store will be about half the size of the current space at 2,500 square feet instead of 5,000; and will increase its inventory of Halloween accessories such as masks and makeup.     “One of the best costumes we did was when a whole family dressed up as The Incredibles, and we helped them with makeup,” Riley said. “Another year, the father and son dressed up as Dr. Evil and Mini Me from ‘Austin Powers,’ and we helped them with bald caps.”     Riley’s favorite part of the job is showing people how to apply costume makeup, so he is looking forward to the larger selection.     “I like showing people how to do a cut or a burn,” Riley said. “I did a burn on my hand for someone, and then was working the printing press. A woman came in and told me I should get it looked at. She said she knew a burn when she saw one because she was an emergency room nurse. I pulled off the burn, and she told me I’d fooled her. I felt good about that.”     The store will be liquidating its Halloween costume selection before the doors close at the end of May. Adult costumes will be $15 to $25, and children’s costumes will be $10. Riley hopes

to be moved into the new space by June 1.     “It’s going to be a lot of work,” Riley said. “We’ve got to move everything into a smaller space and try not to kill each other, because we’re family. It’s not going to be easy.     Riley plans to expand the store’s printing capabilities as far as personalized t-shirts, tote bags and drinking mugs. The Palos Hills store will have joke cases filled with fake vomit, spilled ice cream, snapping gum and other practical jokes, and two large display windows to show off Halloween accessories.     “The main thing I’m looking forward to is the carpeted floor,” Riley said. “I’ve worked on cement my entire life, and my ankles are killing me. I’m looking forward to being around other businesses, too. People will stop in the plaza and go to Riley’s, or come to Riley’s and then stop in at another store.”     Riley said he is looking forward to seeing more children and families coming into the shop.     “Some people have been coming here for three generations,” Riley said. “Kids come in and just say, ‘wow,’ looking at all the jokes and the giant spiders on the ceiling. Their parents say that Riley’s looked a lot bigger when they were kids, and I tell them no, you were just a lot smaller.”


12

The Regional News

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Palos Community Hospital offers da Vinci robotic-assisted surgery

Caroline’s Fashion Chat by Caroline Foreman

Spring: What’s it all about?     The warmth is timidly peaking its head out of the dungeonous winter cavern. We readily stand at the frostbitten threshold, eagerly poised and alert. We will express the flourish of spring with our heavenly garb! We seek to become its kindred spirit; a friend with whom we can share our intimate and light-hearted wardrobe dreams.     …Enough of that. Let’s explore the wondrous designer campaigns of Valentino and Chanel and tie it all together by discussing what the season is all about.     Valentino put together a magnificent presentation of spring’s delicate whites. In one image, a pale model sits in a transparent, Lucite chair angled to the camera’s right. She is fashionably slouched with her hand resting on the arm of the chair. Her hair neatly pulled back, she wears all white, including an airy, translucent collared shirt with solid white fabric only on the collar, lapel and broad cuffs. The shirt is tucked into a soft, tweedy skirt buttoned at the top and opening a third of the length down revealing a crepe-hemmed inner layer. She holds a see-through clutch with gold studs intriguingly juxtaposing the outfit. She looks polished, airy and effortlessly celestial.     Another image of the Valentino campaign shows the top half of a model as she wears transparent framed sunglasses, the white buttoned shirt and a transpar-

ent trench coat with the edges and seaming outlined by strips of metal studs on ivory vinyl. The bottom half of the model is seen in the accompanying image in which we see her “barely there” ivory-grey pointed heels with a t-strap and ankle straps of rhinestone circles. Above this, we see the pleated translucent hem of a skirt and the asymmetrical hem of the transparent studded trench.     Perhaps the most stunning of all the pieces shown in the Valentino campaign is the ethereal column gown the model wears as she stands in front of two Lucite chairs. She is an angelic sight to behold as elegant crepe motifs are decorating the hem up the sides and down the long sleeves. The front of the bodice is formed by a more solid construction of crepe and lace up toward the gently sloping small turtleneck collar. She gently holds her clutch in front of her as the triangular panels out through the hem allow the skirt of the dress to sway forward and billow around her ankles.     Chanel’s spring 2013 campaign includes a broad range of scenes in which we see Stella Tennant along with fellow models Yumi Lambert and Ondria Hardin in a Japanese tea house-like setting with tatami mats and traditional, low Japanese tables. In the images, Tennant wears a large pointed hair piece in red, white or black, matching her jet black hair. The clothing ranges

from black suit pieces with satin trim to pink sportswear dresses with box patterns. The shoes are either chunky and strappy platform wedges or pointy, captoe, ankle-strapped stilettos with transparent sides. There are clear Japanese inflections in the pieces, most notably reflected in the voluminous shapes, the contrasted trims and simplistic cuts.     So what can we take from these thoughtful campaigns we have been discussing for the past few Fashion Chats? What does this spring call to mind for your wardrobe? Some things are certain in the attempt to conjure forth a fresh perspective of spring.     Some things are not black and white, but this spring certainly is. The ultimate color yin and yang is everywhere and feels bold, vibrant and exciting. Spring 2013 is a voluminous and artistic cuts and construction. This season is effortlessly light and ephemeral, dainty and graceful. Spring is bold, aggressive and fun. Admiring nods to western aesthetics bring clean and chic looks and colors to fashion. The swinging 60s are back in cute and lively graphics and feminine styling, while femininity is also reflected in large ruffle embellishments.     Spring is not only an awakening of nature; it is an awakening of our outfits. We shed the winter wear and as we soak in these diverse campaigns, we can turn our wardrobe into our own capsule of spring freshness and vivacity.

    Palos Community Hospital combines its rich tradition of attentive patient care with the latest technology, offering accomplished medical teams in roboticassisted surgery for gynecological, prostate, gallbladder and bowel disorders.     Denise Cerrito, 57, knows she made the right choice by selecting this approach to correct her pelvic organ prolapse. She had reached the point where her discomfort and constant trips to the bathroom made it almost impossible to accomplish normal everyday activities.     Praise from her does not come easy. An Emergency Department nurse at Palos, Cerrito expected the same high standards of her care team that she gives her patients. She still recalls the confidence she felt about everyone in the operating room as they wheeled her in under the direction of Sandra Culbertson, M.D., a board-certified surgeon who specializes in robotic surgery to treat pelvic floor disorders.     “I felt very comfortable because Dr. Culbertson is very proficient, and so was everyone else who cared for me — from the moment I walked in the door to the moment I left the hospital,” says Cerrito, a Tinley Park mother of two grown children.     Robotic surgery is accomplished with the da Vinci surgical system, named after Leonardo da Vinci, inventor of the first robot and master of anatomically accurate drawing. Robotic surgery uses a minimally invasive approach that puts less stress on the body than

PLOWS seminar on elder care legal issues

A teacher remembers (From April 25, 1985)     A school teacher forgets most of the children she teaches. She remembers only the very good and the very bad ones, the very bright and the very dull ones and the ones with special personalities that make them outstanding.     Such a one was Mary Anne. She was of just normal intelligence, but she tried very hard. She took her school work seriously and she was anxious to please her teacher.     She sat on a front seat, near my desk, and whenever I looked up, Mary Anne would give me her sweet, adoring smile. I really think she loved me.     Mary Anne was always ready to help. She appointed herself the caretaker of the 16 geranium plants in our room. She kept them watered and removed any yellow leaves.     One day she announced that

her parents were moving to Iowa and she would be leaving school. I was sorry.     On her last day at school, Mary Anne brought me a parting gift. It was a little ceramic lady in a pink bouffant skirt. In her arms she held a black and white puppy. Tied to the lady’s arm was a card bearing this note: “To a wonderful teacher, Love, Mary Anne.”     Twenty years later, that little doll still stands on my dresser. The note is still attached. I’ll never forget Mary Anne.     And then there was Andy. He was purely an imp of Satin, bad as he could be. But he had an endearing quality, too. I could be mad enough to kill him and he would grin at me with his black eyes twinkling and I would melt.     At first, when I could stand him no longer and he was disrupting the class, I would send him to

Paragraphs From This Old Stump by Carl Richards (1906-1988)

(From April 24, 1980)     This is the 33rd birthday of the Palos Regional.     Now, 33 years isn’t very long in the life of many newspapers. The Chicago Tribune is more than 125 years old and there are several in the country that are considerably older.     We sit by the window in our cabin and look out over the lake and re-live 25 of the Regional’s 33 years.     Last week we reminisced with an old-timer.     Mostly we talked about the old days in the Heights. The days when our kids were growing up; the days when the community was small; how we all helped each other with the problems brought on by pioneering in a suburb that, in those days, was a long way from Chicago.     Then we reviewed the battles that took place each time an attempt was made to incorporate and form a local government.     There was more bitterness generated on that subject than there ever was in the Civil War conflict.     Even today there are several old-timers who have never forgotten or forgiven us for the Regional’s stand in favor of incorporation.     When the proposition was defeated the first time, those

against it formed a victory parade, decorated their cars, and among other acts of celebration drove around the old Regional building shouting at the editor. Later they went around our home.     Those were spirited times.     Those were also hard times for the editor who had taken the stand for what he thought was best for the community. Subscriptions were cancelled, printing customers were lost, another newspaper was started, all at a time when the editor was barely making a living.     Once we cried out against what we thought was unfair and a resident answered, “Carl, nobody asked you to start that newspaper and nobody is keeping you at it.”     That was the last time we ever cried aloud about our lot.     Now in retirement we look back at the old problems and wonder how we ever thought they were bad.     Then in our thinking we make long lists of the friends we made during those 33 years; the encouragement they gave us; the money they spent to keep the paper going; the kindnesses they have shown to Mrs. R and the wonderful way they have accepted our son Charles. We are grateful for all of it.

the principal’s office, but I soon learned that he liked that. The principal made him sit on a chair and he watched all the comings and goings.     It was better than being in class. He didn’t learn much, but I promoted him at the end of the year. There was nothing to be gained by holding him back.     The Eddlemon brothers were the dumbest kids I ever taught, except for George, whom I’ll discuss later. Billy and Johnny Eddlemon couldn’t learn anything. I sent them to special reading classes and gave them as much private time as I could, but they couldn’t read, got their arithmetic problems wrong, and seldom got a spelling word right.     When their mother came to school for conferences, she would tell me that she sat at the kitchen table with the boys every night and made them write their spelling words and do their arithmetic problems. I didn’t believe a word of it. I pushed them along, as the teachers before me had done. They were hopeless.     And then there was George. He couldn’t learn anything, but he had a saving grace. He was a very fine artist. After several weeks of working with him and getting nowhere, I gave up and let him sit and draw all day.     The drawings he turned out were remarkable. He had a good sense of color and line, and his shading was superb. He seemed to understand the laws of convergence without ever having been taught them.     When we had parents’ night at school, I put up the other children’s arithmetic, English, spelling and geography papers. But I put up George’s drawings, all over the place. His parents beamed with pride, as well they might.     I like to think that today George is making a living as a commercial artist.     Both George and the Eddlemon boys should have been in a special school where the teachers have very small classes and can give pupils individual attention. In that town at that time there was no such facility.

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© 2009 Hometown Content

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    PLOWS Council on Aging will present a free program for older adults and their caregivers on Legal Elder Care Issues and Financial Benefits this Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to noon, at the Orland Park Public Library, 14921 S. Ravinia Ave. Continental breakfast will be served.     Featured speakers are an attorney and the assistant director of PLOWS.     This seminar will address estate planning, wills and trusts, advanced directives and Medicaid issues. In addition, you will learn about property tax benefits, Medicare Parts B and D subsidies — known as Medicare Savings Programs and Extra Help, SNAP (food stamps) and assistance available to offset utility costs.     For questions and to register, call PLOWS at 361-0219.

SALT on the Road day trips for seniors

of classes includes Behind the Headlines, Introduction to the iPhone and iPad, the Evolution of Welfare, Painting with Color

and much more.     For more information or to register, visit trnty.edu/salt or call 597-3000.

Mortgage Rates Around the Area United Trust Bank (as of April 23) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES 3.500 2.750 2.625

APR 3.490 2.761 2.640

POINTS 0  0  0

RATES 3.625 3.250 2.875

APR 3.662 3.301 2.939

POINTS 0  0  .25

Prospect Federal (as of April 22) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

    SALT (Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity) invites folks 55 and over to register for one of the many day trips and classes being offered this spring at Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights.     Travel near or far to places like Wheaton College’s Billy Graham and C.S. Lewis museums on Monday, May 20. A delicious meal is included in the cost of each trip.     On-campus events include the Tulips and Tea luncheon with master gardener Nancy Kuhajda (for men and women) on Wednesday, May 22. The wide variety

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to prolapse, including childbirth, hormonal changes with aging and heavy lifting.     “Prolapse is a lot more common than women realize,” Dr. Culbertson says. “The big problem is that women don’t talk about it and think that no one else has this issue.”     Cerrito knows the hard recovery that comes after conventional surgery, and she wanted no part of it. “I am not a person who wants to be down in bed. I’ve got a busy life, and people depend on me,” she says.     Following a six-week recovery from robotic surgery, she is left with five small scars and has regained her ability to accomplish what she wants, when she wants — without interruptions.     “This is a very big deal in my life that I had this done, and I could not have asked for a better experience,” Cerrito says.     Robotic surgery at Palos builds on the hospital’s dedication to expert, compassionate care. Along with board-certified physicians trained in robotic surgery, nurses guide patients every step of the way — from the first phone call before you arrive, to constant bedside monitoring, to follow-up visits after you return home.     Palos’ Hospitaller Pavilion is the new home for the da Vinci surgical system. Procedures are conducted in the pavilion’s large operating suites with state-of-the-art monitoring and imaging equipment that enhance patient safety. Patients will recover in private rooms.     For more information, visit http://bit.ly/davincisurgery.

Senior Notes

Virginia Richards (1914 - 1995)

traditional surgical methods. The traditional approach often involves a long incision. Healing can take months, be extremely painful and leave long scars.     Instead, the da Vinci system enables surgeons to work in confined spaces in the abdomen and pelvis by using small instruments inserted through quartersized holes. Surgeons direct thin, specially designed robotic arms equipped with cameras, intense magnification and surgical tools through the holes. The robot’s pinpoint accuracy and computer-controlled system enable the surgeon to execute high-precision movements and differentiate between tiny nerves and blood vessels that are important to avoid during delicate procedures.     During the entire operation, the surgeon sits at a console controlling every move of the robot, while the rest of the surgical team is at the patient’s side overseeing the procedure.     With her track record of more than 200 robotic procedures, Dr. Culbertson performed a sacral colpopexy on Cerrito.     “Palos has the top-of-the-line model, which makes it easier to visualize anatomy. The team here is also very well trained,” Dr. Culbertson says.     Pelvic organ prolapse occurs because the connective tissue supporting the bladder and other pelvic organs weakens, causing it to fall – essentially causing a hernia. Dr. Culbertson urges women not to ignore symptoms because they are often treatable. A variety of factors can contribute

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