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My life is incredibly blessed. I am surrounded by amazing friends who are musicians, designers, stylemakers, models, surfers, skateboarders, publishers, producers, directors, artists & photographers. “Modern Creatives” I like to call them. We are a tight-kint group who support and collaborate with each other. In this issue I share a few of them with you. All of them doing their thing. All of them sharing a bit of their soul. All of them creating. Not because they want to, but because they have to. It’s who they are. It’s who I am. Enjoy.

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215 s. lamar ste. c austin, tx 78704 shopbowsplusarrows.com


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Who/what were your influences when you started writing music and lyrics? My writing influences aren't very obscure, I draw most of my influence from artists like Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen; Bob Dylan, Jackson Browne, the Beatles, nothing to far off the radar. What are your thoughts of being signed to a major label, Epic Records in 2004. We all feel incredibly fortunate to be working with epic records, and to have worked with them over the past 7 years...it's a very fruitful relationship, and I've certainly learned quite a bit over the years about the in's and outs of the record industry. REFUELED


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They have always been so supportive of us through thick and thin, and absolutely critical in helping us continue to move forward making records and moving our visions and goals further down the line.

Describe the craziness that was the song “Boston”. "Boston" was something that I couldn't have predicted...looking back now, it was so hard to fully comprehend really just how special and rare it was to have a song do so well commercially and at radio, especially at such a young and inexperienced age...I absolutely and completely appreciate that moment we had there to step out and try to make the best of what can be a very small amount of time in the spotlight. What have you learn about songwriting since the release of All The Stars and Boulevards & Can’t Love, Can’t Hurt? Songwriting can be such a tricky thing, the moments when you are trying to write can be so fickle and fleeting but a song idea or melody or lyric can also hit you in the gut at the oddest of times...and places...I think I've learned over the course of the past few records to try and take a little longer, put in more focus and energy into the details, I think making sure you hit all your’re checkpoints along the way to the finish line of a song is important, its easy to get distracted by the music or guitar hooks or drum fills or the big chorus idea and forget to focus on some of the themes and words between the lines, that if given the right

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amount of attention, can help give the song and special moments a bigger payoff. The new album, simply titled Augustana - what went in to the recording of it? Producer? We took 3 years between this upcoming self-titled album and our last release "can't love, can't hurt"...there were a multitude of reasons and steps that made the process of releasing this new record a bit slower than usual...but the most important of these was the amount of time taken to develop the songs and songwriting process...we

wrote and wrote and wrote til we couldn't write anymore... we widdled down dozens of ideas into a select and focused bundle of 10 songs. We also wanted to explore the options of using different producers on different songs, to see if we could take each song to it's own really special place...Jacquire king (kings of Leon, Norah jones) was really important in laying down the framework and vision and production for one half of the record, the rest of the songs were developed and recorded by a few other different producers, all of whom were really enjoyable to work with and very integral in creating an atmosphere of unique, positive progress on a song.


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I hear bits of alt-country in your voice, a rootsy vibe on the new record. I'm alt-country at heart, when I was 16 my stepfather handed me a record by Ryan Adams (gold) and it just spun me out, I fell in love with anything and everything in that vein...from Lucinda Williams to the Jayhawks to Wilco etc...and until now it's been a bit difficult to showcase those influences in a more obvious way...I feel like we were able to split the difference of genres on this record and that was absolutely our intention, we didn't wanna get pegged as one thing or the other...we wanted it to be "Augustana" which to me feels like a small example of something that I'm seeing all around me these days...a large melting pot of influences filtered thru the hands and voices of younger folks that are part of a new generation of American songwriters and musicians. What are you listening to that inspires you? I'm influenced by all sorts of events and ideas and feelings...but generally I tend to pull ideas and emotions from my life and pour them into our songs...in a live setting i really pull influence from artists that have proved to withstand the test of time...Bruce, Tom, and Bob...they have that

special something that's hard to describe and it just lures u in...it's that thing that really idolize about artists like them...and that certainly has an inspirational effect on me. As a songwriter, what is your process? Music first? Lyrics first? Generally music and lyrics come together at the same time, I've found from my experience that the longer the music lives without the words and vice versa...the harder it is to make them co-exist peacefully down the road...I need to line it all up as it comes usually for me to feel happy with the song. Next for Augustana? Who knows what the future holds for augustana, all I know is we wake up everyday and are happy to be alive and have the opportunity to go do an interview or play a show or whatever it is...if time has taught me anything it's that you never know whats around the corner...be it joyous or heartbreaking, I guess that's life as we know it, and it ain't gonna change anytime soon...all i know is we'll put our clothes on everyday and keep driving to the next gig...and swing for the fences.

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Where did the name Strawfoot come from? Strawfoot is the name of a song by 16 Horsepower, an Americana /Folk Rock band that broke up six or seven years ago but have since begun a group called Woven Hand. The music of David Edward (of 16 Horsepower) has influenced me greatly over the past decade and I gather a lot of creativity through listening to it. It can be dark and heavy, but has many redemptive qualities as well. I read somewhere that “strawfoot” was a Civil War term that was used when referring to a rookie soldier, or as the stories go, a rather simple-minded soldier. I’ve felt that I can relate to that on some level and to David Edward’ s music. How did you come to make bags? Sewing is something that I had always left to my mother and grandmother. They would always hem my pants, fix holes in my jeans, or help me make gifts. It wasn’ t until after college that I realized that sewing was something that I wanted to pursue as a hobby, but I was starting pretty late. I grew up on a farm and watched my father and grandfather work on tractors all day. My grandfather was a machinist and

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self-taught tractor mechanic. My father knows how to wrench on most things, weld, and is an excellent farmer. Sewing just never really fit into my skill set as a kid. I learned to drive tractor and operate a forklift at a young age, then raced motorcycles and shot guns for fun. When I got a sewing machine as a wedding present and was shown how to thread it, I wanted to make everything. I began making surfboard bags for my wife and friends. I was inspired by old army bags, seed bags, and hunting gear. When I bought the old industrial sewing machine, things began to fall into place. I started finding antique fabrics and torn tarps at flea markets to cut up for projects. The local awning shop sold me scraps to make board bags and duffels. When I bought my first remnant of waxed canvas, I lost my mind. It was the best material I’ d ever used and I fell in love with it. Unionmade in San Francisco was the first store to buy the bags and they’ ve sold really well there. When Todd decided to carry the bags in his shop it was exciting and sort of validating in a way, but the first pieces I brought to him were pretty rough and have since been refined. You've also made some rad

covers for surfboards, right? Surfboard bags were some of the first things I made when we got a small home machine. I’ ve never liked those silver reflective surfboard bags because they’ re hideous and the zippers always rust. I wanted something really simple to keep the wax off our longboards when we stacked them in our van. I was using lightweight duck canvas and denim at the time. When I got the industrial machine, I began making them out of awning fabric because the material is moldresistant. I don’ t typically make them anymore because it takes so much material. But whenever I find large scrap pieces I try to use it for board bags for friends and family. Strawfoot Handmade is a oneman operation. Do you enjoy working alone? I do enjoy working alone, but only to a certain extent. My main job is managing farmers’ markets and I’ m constantly around people. Sewing bags offers time for me to be by myself and allows me to focus on my creativity. So far both jobs have built a nice balance between being forced to be an extravert and a quasi-hermit. It’ s good. It can be pretty lonely


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after multiple hours in a windowless shop, but I’m my own boss, so I can’ t complain.

get all the materials, so I buy as local as possible. What's your design process?

Where do you source your fabrics /materials from? Currently, all materials that are used in my bags are made in the US. Most of my fabric comes from New Jersey or San Francisco. The rivets, thread and leather are all sourced domestically. I’m not opposed to supplementing some special fabrics or leather that’ s from another country, but I want to directly support the economy that I rely on and contribute to. Plus, I try to minimize the amount of transport it takes to

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I don’ t have a proper design background, meaning that I didn’ t go to school for design. I studied agriculture. I guess I have a rather crude way I go about design. Typically, all my products are a result of a need that I have or a friend has had. For example, I needed a bag to carry my daily essentials in, but I didn’ t want to look like a car salesman or a fourth grader, so I made my first tote bag from waxed canvas and cut leather straps. A friend needed a case for his Polaroid SX70 that

attached to his belt, so we designed something that worked for him. Specifically, with size and dimensions, it’ s been a trial and error process. No patterns are ever made, but lots of notes are taken. I try to keep it as simple as possible. I rarely use zippers because they’ re the first things to break, so I try to use snaps and buckles. Although I get inspiration from other companies, I try not to look at other bags too closely because I want my products to be unique. There’ s only so many ways of designing a tote bag, but if you stay true to what’ s functional, durable and your own ideas, you can’ t really go wrong. Let’s be honest, my bags


aren’t too difficult to sew, it’ s all straight lines. Let's talk ink. Can you run down your tats for me? What inspires them? Tattoos are interesting topic because in most cases I tend to not like them. I enjoy mine because I know the story or meaning behind each one and I have chosen a specific style that I like, but I don’ t like most tattoos. I guess that’ s how it should be. If you choose to get tattooed, get them for you, not for anyone else or to get attention. Besides my first tattoo, I’ ve only gotten work from my friend, Cris Cleen, and he’ s been tattooing me for

seven or eight years now. Initially, most designs were based around biblical poetry and literature. I felt that they could stand on their own as an outlet for spirituality and creativity. Over the years, though, I’ ve had things tattooed that don’t necessarily have a deep story or spiritual significance, but are beautiful and interesting. Sometimes the best thing we can do is run with our gut feeling and the imagery that inspires us, otherwise things get can get stale. Cris and I work well together because I can give him an idea or show him a piece of flash and he’ ll know exactly how to draw it and not make it look like random imagery thrown

together. He’ s great at building upon my ideas and we generally have similar taste in where we find inspiration for drawings. I have everything from a ship, birds, a snail, a carrot, a horse, some wheat, grapes, a butterfly/rose, a “ Dear John” piece, girl heads, and ornamental stuff. The last thing Cris finished was a large stomach piece of a nurse head with a soldier and large horse head. How important is American made to you? It’s one of the main reasons I decided to sell the things I made. I wanted to offer a unique American handmade product

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that was inspired by things of the past, but had modern qualities. America has had such an amazing history with regards to manufacturing high quality products, but sadly most goods are now made someplace else. My products are made by myself, one bag at a time. This means that the details are not overlooked. If the tension of the machine is off and the stitching is weak, I’m not going to throw it into the batch and hope nobody notices. I want this stuff to last a lifetime. I’ d like to purchase materials that are USA made because in most cases, they’ re going to be the best quality that you can buy and it’ s going to support a culture that appreciates quality. I don’ t use US-made materials because it’s “ heritage” or “vintage” ….there’s no gimmick involved. I simply don’ t want to participate in a throw-away society and I believe our country manufactures some of the highest quality materials. But at the end of the day, I understand if someone buys a pair of cheap shoes made in China if that means that they can afford to buy good local produce. You have to

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choose what is important to you because we’re all voting with our dollars. Who is the Strawfoot customer? I’ m not sure anymore. I thought I was making bags for men, but just as many women buy them now. Maybe people buy them because they like the way they look or feel, but I hope they appreciate quality. I was raised to take care of everything you had because it was cowardly to take things for granted. Let’s hope that comes across in the craftsmanship. Best thing about living/working in Northern California? The mild climate, relatively uncrowded surf and abundant access to local, organic produce. I get to wear pants and long sleeves almost year around and surf point breaks with my wife. We have some of the best food in the world grown in our county, so I can’ t ask for much more. What tunes do you listen to while making bags?

The Merle Haggard station on Pandora is great! Also I often listen to Sunbeam, Nick Cave, Woven Hand, Damien Jurado, Little Wings, John Vanderslice, Richard Swift, Vetiver, and Hank Williams. What's in the future for Strawfoot? I have no idea. I’ m torn between making bags and being involved in sustainable agriculture. But, as it stands now, I’ d like to keep making small batches of bags for the shops that I respect and appreciate the work I am doing. If I could sell more through my online shop, though, that would be nice because it would help pay the bills. I’ m really happy with the response I’ ve gotten so far, and I’ ll probably slowly expand into new types of bags. When I get bored, it’ s hard to stay motivated, so creating new things and having new inspiration helps keep things interesting.


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Made Out West, USA 2ETN.com 916.995.1629


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What do you think makes people keep come back to Billykirk? I think somewhere along the way we have done a good job giving people pride in ownership. Well made and made in America. What is the favorite part of going to work each day?

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Solving the issues in the present and the possibility of things to come. If you weren’t an accessories designer what would you rather be doing? Painting, though I’m not sure how good a painter I would be if it were my job. I would imagine it

can be a very lonely profession. I do feel my work is worthy and if I were more prolific there’s no telling where it could take me… When we were just starting out describe working in your little 30’s apt on Westgate and then driving the 10 to Arnolds? I was working nights at the coffee


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house and then trying to get up early to figure out what we were doing, what we were going to make and what our identity was going to be. I remember having to lay shit all over the floor because we had no work tables. You used to come over on your lunch breaks, you were pretty tired of your job at that point and this was a lot more exciting and creative. We would load up the Mazda everyday and drive 18 miles, which seemed like an eternity in LA, to go work with at Arnold’s. Describe the first magic tradeshow and the nuttiness that surrounded getting there

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and having to wear the shirts, etc…. Oh, man…The whole ordeal was pretty chaotic but I felt like we were prepared pretty well, especially for not knowing what we were getting into. The ordeal part of the trip happened when I got picked up by the guys who allowed us to use a small part of their space. I’m not going to name names here but these guys liked to party pretty heavily… I knew something was off as soon as I got into the big black Suburban. It was packed to the gills and there was just enough space for me to cram myself in the back seat. For the next 5 or

6 hours I had to endure the smell of body odor, cramped legs and the fact that both the guys in the front were tripping on god knows what while blasting Prodigy and other aggressive techno dribble. Other than having to don shirts from there label, that frankly just looked silly on us, I really can’t complain much. They did let us use some space and we did write our first legitimate orders at the show. Lucky for you, you got to hop on a plane back to LA and I had to take the ride from hell all over again.


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How have you maintained being such an asshole for nearly 12 years? OK seriously, how has having children and a family affected your out look of Billykirk? It can be daunting at times. When you know that your companies success is in

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direct proportion to how much food your family will eat or if the medical insurance can be paid you bet it has to affect your outlook. Luckily, I am a pretty optimistic person so I know that things are in place and the outlook is good. It's great having kids and now that Matilda is 5 she is starting

to better understand what daddy does and it's fun to take her to the studio and show her around and make little leather things for her. Tracy and the girls really keep me grounded and that helps me stay focused on what is important. Making time for business events needs to be


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thought out and I have to take the family into account. It's no joke that if the home life is in disarray and out of balance then the business life will suffer. I also want to be there for my kids and not one of those fathers who only sees them briefly in the mornings and on the weekends. I am pretty steadfast in getting back at a reasonable hour so I can help out and see that routines are established. I would have it no ther way or my outlook for the business would be severely trested. When I visited your office to talk about starting a business making leather cuffs did you ever think we would still be doing this 12 years later? Absolutely! That is the Gods honest truth. You know that you and I both could have walked away and done other things but once we start something we stick with it. It's our nature. We are dedicated

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to this brand and it's legacy is something we take seriously. Having a supportive family and a terrific list of vendors, manufacturers, mentors and Billykirk advocates on our side has made it pretty easy to keep this brand moving forward. Increasing sales each year even in tough economic times says something about the track we are on. We haven't had earth shattering growth and in a way I think that has kept our longevity going. We weren't this fly by night company that had a phenomenal year and then fizzled into the ether. Likewise, with any family business I think we both feel we have an obligation to see it continue and thrive. Who knows but maybe my kids will have a part in it at some point. What is your least favorite thing about your job? All the endless International documentation for shipping orders overseas. It's such a

time consuming ordeal. When I have to do it I soldier through it but it man do I want a drink after a day of that. I am not built to do data entry. You know we have had some workers that can sit and do this sort of thing without moving for a couple of hours straight. I can give it a solid 30 minutes than I get distracted and onto something else. What part of your job gives you the most satisfaction? Certainly seeing all the orders come rolling in after a market is satisfying. When you and I get on a roll designing fro a new season, Seeing our product being used by someone on the street is a great feeling. Getting positive emails from happy customers or people just staring out who know of us and want advice is always rewarding.


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alabamachanin.com


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What is your design background and how did it lead into working with wood? I went to Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) for a BFA in graphic design. Afterwards I moved to San Francisco and worked for a music and culture magazine called XLR8R for 4 years, had a few different titles but ended up being their senior designer. Ive always been into art. Growing up in the skateboard culture, I became exposed to design. It’s a rich community of artists. After working for the magazine for 4 years I was tired of being behind a computer all day long and that’s when I started to become more interested in 3d art/sculpture. I wanted to create ideas that

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were utilitarian ,something one could use. I wanted to work with space, material and texture. I wanted to create a feeling. You walk into a space and you can feel it. Furniture, structures, art and design, take us through your process. They all start from the same process. It all stems from an idea. The idea is connected with the feeling. Usually when I go into an idea or have an inspiration, it’s all about a feeling. From there, it’s in my head non stop, breakfast, lunch and dinner… basically around the clock. I’ll start noticing places , materials even items that fit with my project …. That inspire other parts of the project.


The whole process is very organic. Sometimes when I get into the middle of the project, I realize that something’s not fitting, certain parts may not work… and I’ll have to scratch it and re-create. It’s a process of being connected. If you Listen to the feeling, You’ll create something beautiful.

Where and how do you source your materials. I ain’t telling. What are your favorite woods and why? Pecan/HIckorybecause it’s a beautiful hardword that is semi cost efficient Black Walnut – beautiful colored grain, really easy to work with but expensive. They’re all cool. What kind of question is that?

Let’s talk tattoos what do they mean to you? They don’t mean anything to me. Tattoos are a joke. I started off getting tattoos as a youngster, they were all deep and meaningful. Then it quickly turned into getting tattoos for shits and giggles. I find it funny how being covered in tattoos gives strangers an immediate assumption that I’m mean or aggressive or crazy. All negative connotations. When really if they looked at my tattoos they realize that they say and mean sweet things. The most recent tattoo says Just Today. It looks kind of shitty but I got from listening to a Willie Nelson song. Who is the Kartwheel client. Anybody who’s down with good design and excellent craftsmanship.

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TABLE // SPARTON

LAMP DESIGN

CREDENZA // DANISH MODERN

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Where does your inspiration come from? All over the place, lately it’s been coming my friend, Arron Mikolovic. He’s a fellow woodworker. Michalovicwoodart. Check him out. He’s in the pictures with me that were taken by the amazing and gifted, Alexandra Valenti. I come from a creative family. My mother is an interior designer and my father is a furniture designer and one of my sisters is a graphic designer. When I moved to Austin I started working with a master craftsman. I fell into a job with an incredible wood worker named Gabe Lewin. He taught me how to build and everything I know came from him. That’s where I

learned the techniques. My designed style is very graphic but I just moved into a new medium so I’m interested inwhere its going. I like to fuse my graphic design/art sensibilities with my wood working skills.

What tunes are filling the air while you work? I’ve been on a big reggae kick. Especially this jam called No Cocaine by Slightly Stoopid. What’s next for Kartwheel? Good question. Perfecting my craft and keep learning.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARI WAYMAN


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Tell us about your grandfather. My grandfather first started working for a company called Aprons For Industry. The owner of that store eventually decided to close the shop, and my grandfather wanted to take it over. The owner wasn't interested in selling, so my grandfather rented the space across the street and when the boss closed, my grandfather moved all of the equipment across the street and hired all the women who'd been sewing there to come work for him. The following month he moved back into the original space (47 Second Ave in Manhattan) and began Apron and Bag Supply Co. My grandfather died when I was younger and although I visited his shop, I was too young to take a real part in it. Since he

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did most of his business with a handshake etc, my family had to sell off all of the equipment and fabric and basically throw stuff out. He did a lot of the work in his head, and without him it was impossible to keep the business afloat. Why follow in his footsteps? Surprisingly, I didn't make a conscious decision to resurrect the company. I'd been sewing from a young age — repairing clothing, making small tool pouches and bags for myself and friends. Later my friends and I started repairing bicycles, so I made aprons for us to wear while working. I realized, "Wait. I'm making aprons and bags. My grandfather made aprons and bags..."


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From then on I was aware that i was doing something that my grandfather had done. I had been imagining how cool it would be if I could make bags to sell and not just as a hobby. Then my friend Luke, who owns Luddite in Brooklyn offered to sell them. At this point I had a full time job and was making aprons and bags for fun after work and on the weekends, literally sewing in my bedroom. Once I started acquiring more industrial machines I realized it was time to get a real work space. I made a choice, left my job and began doing Stanley & Sons 7 days a week. Luckily, it's been the best decision I've ever made. I've started taking on larger wholesale orders and selling to restaurants, but I think this company is of a different mind. I'm hoping to make something very personal that lasts a lifetime and is passed on. I do use his aprons to make my templates but I've updated them by attaching iphone pockets etc. I also based my basic tote bag on the shape of a bag he made. He did not use any leather with his goods; they all were fabric based. I also have been using rivets to secure points of strainbasically just trying to make a stronger apron/bag.

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Is it important to you that everything be made by hand? And in limited quantity? I think that the time and effort I put into each piece comes through to the consumer and they appreciate the fact that someone is doing this the slow way and paying attention to the details and the quality of each piece. Also, we have limited quantities because I can only make so much. I prefer to keep it all "in-house" for the time being just because I am very particular about the quality and construction and am not ready to even consider dealing with those types of problems at a factory. Where are your materials/fabrics sourced? I get all of my waxed canvas from Fairfield Textiles in NJ and all of the selvage denim and duck cloth comes from Cone Denim. From where do you draw inspiration? I take a lot of inspiration from my grandfather's aprons and bags that I still have but also just old aprons and bags that I come across. What vintage vinyl do you play while creating? Not all of my records are old but currently I like listening to Sonny & the Sunsets, Little Wings, Michael Hurley, Abner Jay, Bob Dylan and the Band, Woods, Babies, etc. Military pup tents, selvage & herringbone denim - great material for aprons. Thanks!!

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Who is buying your aprons? At first I was making the aprons because I was getting into their construction and details but didnt think that anyone would actually be interested. When people actually started buying them I thought it was great! I sell to woodworks, bookmakers, photographers chefs and cooks etc. I think an apron can feel like a uniform so people seem to like to make them unique. Describe the men & women who carrying your bags. There doesn't seem to be a typical customer. We receive orders from all over the world, from old and young, and for various uses. I think for all the people who buy my aprons and bags, it's that these items feel personal. They can appreciate strong quality goods made by someone with a real interest in what he is doing. What does the future hold for Stanley & Sons? In the future I plan on just maintaining my current stockists and adding only a few more. I can only produce so much and I don't want to lose focus on the detail and quality of each piece. I have ideas for new bags and aprons but I am taking it very slow- otherwise we are not really going to change anything we do- just more aprons and more bags.


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2ETN would like to redefine the concept of "precious" jewelry. How do you accomplish that goal?

all that beautiful about a clear hunk of stone sitting in the middle of a bunch of metal, anyway. There are a whole lot of lobbyists and ad agencies and PR firms that have been telling us over the years what a symbol of marriage, luxury and beauty “should” be. We are much more attracted to the idea of art and true sentiment. When we began creating jewelry we also were studying about the negative effects that the jewelry industry has on culture (especially indigenous people) and the environment and did not want to be apart of that. It was from that education that 2ETN was born: seeing imagery, as the focal point in jewelry and seeing value in that. The fact that over 20 tons of waste are created to make one gold ring and that lives are lost to mine a diamond were facts that we could not overlook. Two sources that we stay closely aligned with while creating our jewelry are Ethical Metalsmiths and No Dirty Gold.

First and foremost by staying aware and educated. Mostly by not buying in to traditional marketing in regard to what we “should” see as “valuable and precious”. Besides the fact that we don’t see what is

Our first line of jewelry, the now defunct line: Pamela Tuohy Jewelry, was created by sourcing vintage pieces and placing reproduced images with in those pieces. Supply and demand became

Let's start with the name 2ETN. Explain. The truth is that 2ETN Jewelry was the name we began with, but we were warned that it just was too difficult to remember, not “catchy” enough, has a chemical reference (Crystal structure of Thermus Aquaticus ...what???),not “easy” to pronounce, etc. So we went with Pamela Tuohy Jewelry and well, it just never felt quite right. 2ETN Jewelry tells stories (ours and yours) and we believe our best work comes from collaborative efforts, so it is only fitting that our name reflects that philosophy: The 2ETN moniker comes from the fusion of the phonetic spelling of Pam’s last name, Tuohy (2E) and Ed’s initials, Edward Thomas Novinsky (ETN). Pam & Ed are husband and wife…collaborators…partners.

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an issue when sourcing vintage pieces became “trendy”. We were not able to compete (nor did we want to) with retailers and jewelry companies that were going oversees and having “vintage-like” pieces created for pennies. So we responded to that “problem” by creating a line of jewelry that ignores those demands and responds to like-minded people that want a piece of jewelry that is one-of-a-kind, created by a few artisans with all materials sourced ethically. We purchase our metals (mostly sterling) from a ”green” supplier, we only use gold when it is the form of a vintage piece that we have collected, or have a sterling piece covered in “green” gold (vermeil). When using diamonds they come from a conflict free source and mostly from other vintage pieces. And instead of a huge center stone we place a oneof-a-kind hand painted or drawn image. We gather huge inspiration from the portrait miniatures from the 17001800’s and their highly personal associations. Our hope is that as consumers become better educated and more aware of the effects of their purchasing power that they will gravitate towards


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choosing items with value that are long lasting and created ethically. Things that can be handed down from generation to generation and tell a certain story. What is the belief behind the 2ETN philosophy? Finding balance and quality of life through love and respect and work. We also believe that precious stones and metals are not the sole element from which jewelry derives its value. This belief and deep interest and respect of Native American culture informs the philosophy behind our jewelry. That we do for “work” and how we live our lives are one. Finding that balance between what we do for a living, how we live and who we are. They are all connected. The lines are magically blurred. Work (2ETN), family, friendships, gardening, exploring, etc., all tell the same story of interconnectedness and respect for each other and the environment. Our hope is that 2ETN tells stories, weighted with meaning - obvious or not so. Expressions of joy, beauty, bereavement, joinings, separations, bonds, friendship,

love, power, respect, healing, sentiment, birth…we believe that those stories should be told authentically and with care in a personal and in a “quiet” non-exploitative , nontrendy fashion. Tell us about your design process. We feel our design process is an ongoing every second of the day endeavor as we are always reading or listening to music or listening to stories that move us to create. We don’t have TV and have no interest in celebrity or pop culture. 2ETN is not interested i n t re n d s , b u t r a t h e r i n permanence, romance, sentiment, heritage, emotion, the environment and collective stories. Our work is handmade, limited and a collaborative process. Most of the work is done by us (Ed and Pam), a handful of other artists that are our family and friends. We source all of our materials in the USA..down to our boxes which are made by a small family owned company…and then the velvet inserts and velvet pillows that secure the work inside the boxes are created by us and our friends.

We create a (very) limited amount of jewelry...maybe 3 p i e c e s a m o n t h o n average….our design process is slow and there are usually a few pieces in the “works” at a time. Along with the jewelry there is usually a painting or two in a large format (generally 5’ x 8’ or so) being worked on by Ed in our studio…so with our kids and friends coming in and out of our studio (off of our garden) and our dog underfoot we begin creating by either being inspired by an image, a story or a piece of jewelry that we have found. If it is a found/collected piece of jewelry we see what image fits best and then begin to create a “canvas” for that piece, sometimes using reclaimed wood, or bone…specifically for the work that we do inside of a Crystal Eisenberg piece from the 1930’s: we work with our friend/metal smith to transform this piece from a brooch to a cuff or necklace, then we remove the center stone (which is then used to create a “frame” of Eisenberg Stones in another piece of jewelry), pour a foundation, gesso the foundation, create the image and then resin over the image.

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This process takes from 4-8 days. If an image or story inspires us or we are creating a custom piece of jewelry, we create the frame out of metal that best suits the image, this usually takes between 7-12 days and then we add the image. When the piece is a necklace or a bracelet there is more design work in creating the stone/crystal work to go with the piece. This process usually takes 2-8 weeks from start to finish and a bit longer if someone was us to create a custom piece using a vintage piece of jewelry that they supply. 2ETN creations have been seen on a lot of major runways recently. Can you talk about

some of the designers you've been collaborating with? This is an area that we are extremely excited about…In Austin we had the honor of having our jewelry apart of Gail Chovan’s “13 Years” show inside of her Atelier: Blackmail. In Nashville we worked with Steven Oo , a knitwear designer. We were apart of Nashville Fashion Week and Steven and I were sponsored by Project Artisan, our online retailer. Recently we collaborated with Sylvia Heisel (also of Project Artisan) for a photo shoot to promote our visions of “Bridal” wear and jewelry. We frequently collaborate with Justin and

Nicole of Van der Neer Clothing. All of these designers create one-of-a-kind or limited edition garments that are created responsibly in the USA and by hand. What tunes float through the 2ETN studio? Mainly (but not exclusively): Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Iris Dement, John Prine, Tony Joe White, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Jonsi, Dead Can dance, CSN&Y, The Cure, The Smiths, John Le Hooker, Van Morrison, Pearl Jam, Willie Nelson, The Beatles, The Stones (in that order, Mr. Brown ..always the Beatles before the Stones), Sister Crayon, Sea of Bees, Cream,

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The Band, The Doors, Little Walter, Florence and The Machine, and thanks to you, Chris: Amy Cook and William Fitzsimmons. A percentage of all 2ETN jewelry sales go to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation's Adopt-A-Buffalo Campaign. Tell us a little about the cause and why you feel so strongly about it. 2ETN gives a portion of our proceeds to The Village Earth Adopt-a-Buffalo campaign ww.villageearth.org. My husband and I are greatly influenced by Native American Philosophy. We want to honor the fact that the Native Americans were the first indigenous people on this continent. By contributing to the revival of this Native industry we feel we are giving back to the resources (and people) we have taken advantage of. In support of the land recovery and restoration, Village Earth is supporting the restoration of the traditional ecology,

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economy and culture surrounding the buffalo. In 2004 Village Earth initiated an Adopt-ABuffalo Campaign to help purchase buffalo for families on the Pine Ridge wanting to sustainably utilize their lands. To date, they have helped restore over 90 head of buffalo, creating two new herds and expanding two existing herds on the reservation. They have also helped to establish a marketing cooperative to assist with processing, marketing, and sale of buffalo raised on the P i n e Ridge Reservation. Furthermore, by supporting the highest standards for care and management of the buffalo and the land, the Lakota Buffalo Caretakers Cooperative is setting a positive example on and off the reservation. What's the future hold for 2ETN? In the immediate future we are working on outreach…looking for places to display and sell our work. We are hoping to establish connections with spaces/places similar to those

we already have: Grange Hall, Project Artisan & Blackmail Atelier. Ultimately we are looking to have representation in a dozen or so cities in the US and in Europe…with launch or opening events that combine Art + Music + Fashion + Food, creating a specific atmosphere of the handmade, slow, intimate, rare, eccentric, provocative, thoughtful culture that we want to be apart of and promote. Mostly we are looking forward to more collaborative projects with “like kind”…we would especially like to work with Native American Artisans and team up with Gail Chovan and other ethical clothing designers. We are still in the dream stages of doing a special project w i t h t h e B r a y B ro t h e r s . Thanks to the Refueled team for providing a ton of inspiration in this regard, as the collaborative adventures that we have had together are exactly what we hope to continue with in the future.


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You both pull such great creative inspiration for your family, namely your grandparents. Tell us about them. Carrie: Whew. I get a lump in my throat even starting to write about this. Both matt’s and my grandparents all played such an enormous role in our lives. And by the way… Many people that come in the shop now and tell us the story of their grandparents. It makes me so happy to listen. Really, most all of us have the same quilt of a life. Anyway.. With the exception of Willie, (he died when I was really young), I can recite the look and feel of every single inch of my grandparent’s faces. and their hands. I used to sit on the arm my granddaddy sights’ recliner until it broke off and rub his peach fuzz on his bald head. I just couldn’t ever get enough of being close to him… to all of them. Matt, the same. We both would take a weekend at our grandparents over a slumber party in grade school. One of my favorite stories that matt tells me is about the day he ran away. To his grandparent’s house. What most valuable lessons did you learn from them that have stuck with you? Carrie: We were needing a “biography” for this company. Our resume, per say… and stuff about starting the company.

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When and why and how. All of that. We tried to write it ourselves. It was so irrelevant. Then had someone else write it, and even then, it just didn’t seem right. Who cares what we did and what we are doing now. We finally realized that if we had to have a bio, they only way to convey to anyone the core of our project, was to tell the stories and lessons of our grandparents. Matt's parents and my parents gave us the most amazing gift ever when we were young…and that was easy access to our grandparents. Willie and Imogene, my maternal grandparents, signify our relationship with all of our grandparents - Leo and Sally, Anthony and Hazel, and James H. and Gladys. Imogene let me eat colored marshmallows and sticks of butter, played gin rummy with me…and we watched soap operas, all at the same time. Matt sat in a throne in the kitchen and drank RC Cola for breakfast at Leo and Sally's during the week. And then lived the weekend life that every boy dreams of… hanging with BOTH sets of his grandparents at the river camp. They were all best friends. Leo taught Matt to appreciate and curate vintage. He was an authentic American picker.


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He taught Matt about the truth. He was trying to tell Matt to do something when Matt was little… and Matt said, "No, I don't want to do that". Leo said, "It won't hurt you". Matt said, "Yes, it will". Leo said, "I will not lie to you or tell you something that will hurt you." That was the truth. Leo also passed to Matt one of the most simple and beautiful, albeit most frustrating qualities about my husband… Matt asked Leo once, "Why don't you and grandma ever fight?" Leo said, "Because it takes two to fight." Sally taught Matt how to knit, how to make things with his hands. And how to just laugh it all off. She was so funny. I would give anything to have known her. Hazel taught Matt how to say his name…. From who he thought he was, Matt Medicine…to Matt Eddmenson. And then she taught him how to really realllly take care of things. And she still teaches us both, by example, how to work really, really hard even when we are worn down and tired. And to not complain. Anthony taught Matt how to roller-skate. He skated until he was 82! Anthony also taught Matt to keep a really clean shop. When I was ten years old or so… I told my Grandaddy Sights (James H.), that I wanted to learn how to type really fast. So he built a computer (really)… and then built a typing tutor program to teach me. It's the only class I excelled at in high school. Better than teaching me to type really fast… He told me and taught me by example, that racism is an awful, horrible thing. In the 1950's, he walked Mable Ruth

Armstead, one of their family friends who happened to be black, down the isle during the opening hymn at church and sat her down on the front row. He was a social liberal, particularly in the area of civil rights, and was an outspoken activist. Gladys taught me to love deeply. To not hate. TO NOT HATE. To scratch backs. And to cook for and entertain your friends and family. And to just do a lot of stuff for others. And that it was ok to work hard and then rest and enjoy nice things. Imogene taught me to fight. She laughed it off when I was six years old when she was given three months to live when diagnosed with cancer. Instead, she tried thirteen more years with no larynx and a tracheotomy and a feeding tube and enjoyed every minute of it ‘til the very end when she got a little worn out and grumpy. She at least enjoyed every minute of being a part of our growing up.

Willie is the only one out of all of them that we didn't really know. He died when I was little. But my Mom and Dad tell me all of the things about him and loved him very much. And his ten siblings from Virginia have been an important part of our life… so it's just like I knew him and love him well. I think what he taught me is that we can't give up. The other thing that those eight passed down through our parents and to us: how to work.

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Leo was a steel mill worker, a logger, a picker, a fisherman and a hunter. Sally was an assembly line worker at a plastic company for over 30 years. Anthony was a sergeant in World War II, then a roofer, and worked at the power plant for many years. He piddled in his shop, separating nails and stuff, until he died last year. Hazel was the head nurse in a family practice and is still a volunteer caregiver today. Willie was a sergeant in World War II, as well… and then an ironworker. Imogene worked in a plastic factory, just like Sally…. And then on an automotive assembly line and then was a tollbooth operator and a gift shop attendant. James Harold was a grain harvester with my Grandmother, an electrician for an airplane manufacturer and a ship builder, started a grocery and hardware store, was a researcher for a polymer manufacturer, and then founded a textile rental firm. He also was an inventor. Gladys was a nickel and dime store clerk, a clerical on an army base, and then the operator of all things entrepreneurial that she and grandaddy tried… A restaurant, a beauty shop, and the grocery and hardware store. So, Matt and I and our team are working hard on this little business to tell Imogene and Willie and the rest of that crew that we watched them and listened to them and learned from them… And that we will try hard and have fun carrying it on. Carrie, your family was in the denim business.

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Talk a little about that experience. Carrie: I was a little hellion. Really not as a child or teenager, but as a young adult. I just couldn’t get my program right. I couldn’t focus. I quit going to college (literally!), I burned out on jobs. I really sucked. But really, I was just really sad and lost. so my dad and brother got me back to our hometown and asked me if I would like to work for the company. (when I was younger, my brother always asked if I would come home and work. I always told him to pencil me in!) Anyway, I took them up on the offer, more out of desperation. And it was boot camp from that moment on! It was at that point that I learned how to really work hard. Like, really hard. I pretty much learned every part of the company. My first years of jobs were very labor intensive. And then I sort of fell into loving the creative development process. And then I learned to really love the process of helping build brands. I never wanted to leave the plant. I liked to stay there through the night. that experience has come in handy. But, I think, without a doubt, the very best part of my experience and the greatest gift of all was working with so many wonderful people in our hometown. When I joined the company, there were, I think 500 of us. And as united states manufacturing shifted out of the southeast to the west coast and to oversees, we dwindled down to 200 then 100 then 50 then… One of my last jobs at the company was managing the production team. ugh, it was so hard and so fun. So hard for one reason because our philosophy of manufacturing, even in bulk, was very much rooted in craftsmanship. So hard for another reason, because craftsmanship was becoming less and less important and considered inefficient in our culture at the time, which meant I had the hardest job of all… laying off the production team, little by little.


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But I like to remember the “so fun” part. The summary of my memory of learning how to make blue jeans was working side by side with all of people that made it happen. Matt, you and Carrie have known each other since you both were ten years old. What eventually brought you together as a couple? Matt: Carrie and I sat down the other day and really thought back and seems that we have only known each other since we were 12 years old. Haha! I’ve always loved Carrie! It was a mutual friend who told me that both Carrie and I had moved back to our home town at the same time. I ran down to where Carrie was working (sights denim) and we reconnected. We started hanging out quite regularly and that’s pretty much it…..we were never really apart after that. She is the best thing that has ever happened to me! Your interest in denim started in New York, right Matt? Matt: I went to NY for the first time when I was studying fine art in college. I had a very romanticized view of the art word at that time. I was wearing trouser pants and button down shirts much like my favorite artist from the 50’s. When I arrived in new york I was shocked to see almost everyone in rigid levis jeans with 5 inch cuffs. I loved the look! I came home got a pair of “HARD JEANS” and I don’t think I have wore anything else since. This and the history of jeans is what first got me interested in denim, but of course it was carrie’s brother Bart who taught me about the fabric what it can do! Matt, tell us about your development with Sights Denim Systems.

Matt: I started working for sights denim in 2004. I was doing freelance projects for them. I was always there and I guess it just sorta became cheaper to put me on salary. Really I went to Carrie’s dad Dale and begged him to hire me full time! I just loved working there. I still miss it sometimes. The people, the projects and living close to our families. This is where my real interest in design came out. I was so interested in the construction. So Bart allowed me to start working with our customers on fit. Carrie and I are so fortunate to be able to still work with our tailor Nestor. Nestor and I have been working together long enough now that it’s become pretty to explain to him what Carrie and I want when we design our collections. What is it that you love about blue jeans? Carrie: I love that they are our second skin and can tell the story of your life. You've become somewhat of an historian when it comes to vintage clothes Matt. How does your studies play into your designs? Matt: “Somewhat” is key word here. I really have an interest in history. So it’s only natural for me to explore these histories when it comes to making clothes. I reference this history all the time. Carrie and I don’t see ourselves as “fashion” designers so when it comes to designing our collections it really starts by necessity. We often think about what we can design that will have a life with the person that wears it. We think about timeless things. Articles of clothes that people will still be wearing many years from now only because it’s from necessity as opposed to fashion. I love to incorporate vintage pieces into my wardrobe but a lot of times it’s hard because of fit. Too boxy, too

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little too long, we really start with fit first at I+W and this is really how we think! Fit will keep someone in something for many years to come!’ The old Granny White Service Station in Nashville became the Imogene+Willie creative lab, think tank, manufacturing headquarters, storefront and a hangout for denim lovers. Talk a bit about making the space what it is today. Matt: It was never really our intention to create a “space.” Carrie has such an amazing eye for putting things together old and new. When we came to Nashville, we had rented our house out in Kentucky, and we had to have a place to put these things we have collected over the years. The Imogene+willie space is just a continuation of our life, things we like, and things that we find. People always talk about how comfortable they feel in the shop, I really think that’s because it’s our home. Carrie loves to host more then anyone I have ever met…..she really loves when people come in and plop down on the couch and just hang! Carrie, we've had long conversations before about the importance of "Being Made in America". You both hold that close with everything Imogene+Willie does, don't you? Carrie: I think in explaining my experience of working in our family’s business gives you this answer. We are just so happy to be able to be a small part of the movement going on now that is seriously committed to bringing back production to America. Amen. You've created a brand that encompasses a true Americana feel, from embracing customers as models to giving

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exposure to folks who inspire you. Let's talk about Imogene+Willie's collaboration LOVE FADES with photographer Joshua Black Wilkins. Matt: We have to give credit where credit is due……The whole idea behind Love Fades was Joshua’s idea. We were sitting around talking about how we could show case the progress of wear on our customers jeans, and out of no where Joshua said “it should be of their face and their jeans and that’s all.” Of couse Carrie and I were floored! We both looked at each other and said “that’s It!” The rest was coming up with a name that suited this project and I believe Ian came up with that. Like everything at I+W, it’s a collaboration. There really aren’t any egos floating around so we like to make decision as a group. It just works for us. Love fades is a perfect example and something that we are really proud of! What's next for Imogene+Willie? Matt: That’s a great question….it really changes from day to day depending on who you are talking to. I think that we really want to expand and open up more stores but like everything that takes time and we are working towards that goal. But in the mean time we really are committed to our customer service and making the best possible clothes we can.


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What inspires you when designing? I get inspired by everything and anything. Depends on the job. I really try to put myself in the shoes of the clients consumer, not the client. What would THEY want to see? Sometimes that's hard to convince the client as they're so close to their own products. But mostly they approach me because of type of voice I bring to the work. I try to inspire myself to not just design something, but tell a visual story and give it a real sense of it's own personality with layers of interest for people to study. Curiosity is imperative to design! You've got to give into your own curiosity and try stuff you're not comfortable with if you think it'll suit the work. So I'm always inspired by the story I want to tell, and the process itself - it's always different. Who is the ideal client? The ideal client is the one willing to take risks. It's not about money, it's about confidence. I love helping smaller clients start out, and giving them a brand to build off of. That really is the most satisfying thing I can do. When someone starting up has that new identity all of a sudden they're a business, not just dreaming of being in business. I feel like I'm helping to change their lives. Tunes blasting through your speakers? Tunes these days... always the latest thing we're working on with Black Owls. We're perpetually recording so I'm always studying our demos. I listen to Guided by Voices more than anything else, by far. Bob Pollard and any incarnation of his musings. Normally may also include Wolfmother, Black Keys, Hearless Bastards, Bowie, T Rex, Gang of Four, Smoke and Feathers, Clash, Buffalo Killers, the Who, Mott the Hoople, Iggy & the Stooges, and we recently played a festival with Flaming Lips and Yo La Tengo so I've been rolling that a bit too. Influences? I can honestly say I don't have too many 'graphic design' influences. I just don't study what other people are doing frankly. My wife Amy is an amazing artist and has always done her own thing with the utmost passion and I'm always inspired by what she is doing. My friend from way back in jr. high school Shawn Wolfe out in Seattle is the one that convinced me to get into it in high school. He remains an amazing fine artist and designer who really follows his own muse as well. This Chris Brown guy from Refueled is a pretty amazing designer I must admit!! I like them there fine artists too, Joseph Cornell, Schwitters, Rauschenburg, that sort of thing.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARI WAYMAN

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Š 2011 Automatic Buzz. All Rights Reserved.

Refueled Issue 7  

Style. Music. Adventure. Spring//Summer 2011 Issue.

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