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FEBRUARY 2011 / VOL. 02 ISSUE 02 www.professionaljeweller.com

NEWS , ANALYSIS AND TRENDS TREND D S FOR F OR R JEWELLERY J E W E L L E R Y & WATCH W AT C H PROFE SSIONAL S

BACK FOR GOOD Missoma founder talks exclusively about the benefits of going missing

NEWS REVIEW KIT HEATH INTERVIEW NEW PRODUCTS DIAMOND STUDS

LUCK OF THE IRISH We ask Irish jewellers how business is faring in the shadow of an EU bailout

JEWELLERY SHOW PICKS Our show guide makes sure you won’t miss a beat in Birmingham

G UPCY ET C LI NG ONE B R

I WHY S DE EXPLAI N H S S O M E E WA N T E D TH I NG OLD MAD SOM E E I NTO TH I NG NEW

BRIDES REVISITED We delve into the world of the modern bride to discover the trends and spend driving the market


Hall 18 G30/H31 www.kitheath.com Tel 01271 329123 Email sales@kitheath.com


FRONT

62

3

News Review A round up of this month’s jewellery industry news.

6

Bench Fresh We take a look at the work of Holly Wilcox from DJCA.

8 9

8

3

Voice of the Industry Hannah Martin writes about working with Pete Doherty. Speakers’ Corner Leading jewellers tell us why they love working with opal.

12

ON THE COVER 12

Celtic Tigers How Irish jewellers are faring in the face of an EU bailout.

16

Your Guide to The Jewellery Show Our round up of the Birmingham trade fair.

28

Wining and Dining in Birmingham Where to let off steam after a long day at the show.

33

The Reappearance of Missoma Marisa Hordern on taking time out and 2011 plans.

16 33

BRIDAL SPECIAL 36

Here Comes the Bride We fi nd out what’s hot in wedding jewellery this year.

42

A Wedding Shoot Without the Meringue Forget the dress, this bridal shoot is all about the jewels.

48

Best of Bridal The desires of the modern bride from pearls to sapphires.

52

Bridal Upcycling As remodelling becomes more popular we ask one bride what encouraged her to upcylce a 1920s Lacloche hatpin.

REGULARS 60 62

Trends Move over chandeliers, simple diamond studs are back. Products Showcase An inspiring selection of fashion and fi ne jewellery.

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42

34

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THIS MONTH’S COVER SHOOT Photographer :Jon Baker Stylist: Rebecca Sammon Hair & makeup: Lucy Gibson using Nars and KMS Model: Lucy Jaques at Nevs Model wears: Necklace and ring set by Van Cleef & Arpels, diamond rings by Charles Green, gown by La Perla, fl owers used in headdress from Jane Packer

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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COMMENT

ITP PROMEDIA PUBLISHING

They say fashion always comes full cycle. What has fallen out of vogue doesn’t drop out altogether, it just plummets to the bottom of a never-ending cycle waiting for its chance to rise back to the top. But it’s not always true, is it? When fashions come back, they come back with moderation and alterations. Just as fashion innovates as it regurgitates, jewellery is doing the same as the practice of upcycling becomes increasingly popular. For those not up on the lingo, this is a clever(ish) take on recycling, i.e. making old jewellery into new. Brides want the sentimental comfort of a family heirloom, but the wearability of a fresh, modern design. Why go for something old or something new when you can combine the two? Or go all out for old, new, borrowed and blue in one if your stone happens to be blue and you intend

16A Baldwins Gardens, London, EC1N 7RJ, UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 31 764228 Fax: +44 (0) 20 31 764231 EDITORIAL EDITOR Rachael Taylor, rachael.taylor@itp.com ASSISTANT EDITOR Kathryn Bishop, kathryn.bishop@itp.com CONTRIBUTORS Jon Baker, Rebecca Sammon, Lucy Gibson, Hannah Martin, Abby Trow COMMERCIAL SALES MANAGER Terri Woodhams, terri.woodhams@itp.com STUDIO

passing it down the line. Fashions come and go, and come and go again, but never in exactly the same way. So innovate, replicate and make sure you offer your customers the opportunity of combining the old and the new. RACHAEL TAYLOR EDITOR rachael.taylor@itp.com

GROUP ART EDITOR Daniel Prescott, daniel.prescott@itp.com DESIGNER Lucy McMurray DIGITAL CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER Hitendra Molleti, hitendra.molleti@itp.com ONLINE PRODUCTION Ernesto Ceralde, Rose Yorobe, Bryan Silva PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION GROUP PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR Kyle Smith, kyle.smith@itp.com DEPUTY PRODUCTION MANAGER Matthew Grant, matthew.grant@itp.com DATABASE MANAGEMENT Manju Sajeesh, manju.sajeesh@itp.com CIRCULATION CIRCULATION CUSTOMER SERVICE +971 4 286 8559

THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS Jon Baker has

Rebecca Sammon

shot photographs

is a freelance stylist

Web: www.professionaljeweller.com

for top titles such

and in the past has

Printed by: The MANSON Group Limited

Vogue and the

worked as a staff

Guardian, and cam-

stylist for Elle magazine. This month Re-

paigns for retailers including Asos and House of Fraser.

becca styled our bridal shoot, creatively

As well as a plethora of fashion and

layering jewels, selecting lingerie and

music stars, he has also snapped Prince

even hand-making floral headdresses to

Charles. This month Jon was the photog-

make sure the shoot had a fun, modern

rapher on our cover and bridal shoot.

feel with a vintage edge.

COMMENT OF THE MONTH Emmess on SHOP IN SHOPS: Battle of the brands (edited) “Shop in shop is where the retail jewellery trade is going, the problem is suppliers. Some are dictatorial, unhelpful and completely lack integrity. These sorts of new brands are at odds with the jewellery trade which is a trade built on

As comment of the month Emmess has won a sterling silver pendant with Swarovski crystals and Swarovski crypea by Yvette Ries worth £120. To be in with a chance of winning in March’s issue all you have to do is join the online community at professionaljeweller.com and make your opinions known.

trust.”

2

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication, which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the readers’ particular circumstances. The ownership of trademarks is acknowledged. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the permission of the publishers in writing. An exception is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review.

Published by and copyright 2011 Promedia Ltd, incorporated and registered in the British Virgin Islands under company number 1559854.


NEWS REVIEW / FRONT

THIS MONTH IN THE JEWELLERY INDUSTRY

NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN QUOTES STUDENT FOCUS VOICE OF THE INDUSTRY SPEAKERS’ CORNER PEOPLE MOVES WEB HIGHLIGHTS

4 5 6 8 9 9 10

LONDON JEWELLERY WEEK ADDS TREASURE TRADE DAY TO ADDRESS JUNE BUYING GAP

L

ondon Jewellery Week (LJW) selling show Treasure has added a trade-only day for industry retail buyers. Treasure founder and LJW director Della Tinsley (above) exclusively told Professional Jeweller she believes the contemporary jewellery show could fi ll a gap in the buying cycle. “June is becoming a bigger buying period,” said Tinsley. “It seems to be that retailers are saying they want to buy in June as it will help their cash flow and

allow them to be more reactive to trends. We feel as though London Jewellery Week should help to facilitate this.” The trade-only day will be held on the fi rst day of Treasure, Thursday June 9. The show will be made available to the public the following day but there will be a lounge for retail buyers throughout the whole of Treasure. With an increasing amount of support in 2011 LJW could be getting one step closer to its goal of becoming a high-profi le event like London Fashion Week,

although Tinsley was keen to stress that LJW will never be a trade-only event. “We want it to be the best bits of London Fashion Week and of the London Design Festival,” she said. LJW is now in its second year of being run as a non-profit organisation by a board of directors from within the jewellery trade. The 2011 event has attracted big names in the jewellery industry including Stephen Webster, who was notably absent in 2010. LJW is also planning to involve watches for the fi rst time in 2011

and is in talks with brands. London retailer PureJewels will unveil its Platinum Heritage Collection 2011 during the week. The Green Street store launched the initiative last year and worked with designers including Katie Rowland and Cindy Dennis Mangan on a range of platinum jewellery that reflected the heritage of the designers mixed with that of the business. PureJewels will work with a new set of designers this year and has teamed with Professional story continued on page 7

FOR MORE ON LONDON JEWELLERY WEEK AND DAILY BREAKING NEWS VISIT www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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FRONT / NEWS REVIEW

NEWS REVIEW

Theo Fennell issued a profit warning after claiming snowy weather adversely affected its Christmas sales. The jeweller said it is anticipating its full-year results to be below market expectations after its like-for-like sales dropped 7% in December. The brand had a strong start to the festive period with like-forlike sales up 22% in the fi rst week of December but the wintery weather conditions went on to reduce footfall at its stockists. Abbeycrest said it was working closely with Burdale Finance to reset broken covenants. Shares in the company, which is one of the UK’s most venerable jewellery manufacturers, plunged 30% on December 31 after it disclosed it had broken covenants agreed with its key backer. Abbeycrest has recently appointed Julie Large as creative director.

The CMJ reported a record turnover in 2010, with sales at their highest in the company’s 30-year history. CMJ chief executive Willie Hamilton suggested rising membership numbers and the arrival of new brands and retailers had helped increase sales. 4

The Tesco Gold Exchange upped the ante in the bullion market by offering its cash-for-gold customers £10 per gram on 9ct gold. The supermarket soft launched its cash-for-gold service at the end of November online and in 15 stores. Its initial price offering was £7.81 per gram for 9ct gold but increased this to £10 per gram for 9ct gold during January. Positive growth over the Christmas period was reported at Tiffany & Co, where overall net sales rose by 11% like-for-like, compared to 2009. Within Europe Tiffany & Co sales increased 13% to a total of £73.4m, due to new store openings in London and Barcelona.

Aurum announced it held a successful Christmas incentive scheme in which 42,000 staff members took part. Based on a points system awarded for selling diamond-set jewellery and watches, prizes included a Fiat 500 car, iPads and travel vouchers.

The AWDC was announced as official sponsor of the Antwerp Diamond Trade Fair. The sponsorship means the AWDC has increased its support of the fair, following its support at the fair’s “premier edition” in January. Luxury jewellery brands Cartier and Montblanc have reported price rises due in 2011. Montblanc chief executive Lutz Bethge said retail price increases were a “certainty” owing to rising metal and gold prices.

Jewellery business Lebeado went into liquidation last month with debts of £749,343 owed to unsecured creditors, according to documents fi led with Companies House. The business was founded by mother and daughter Jill and Kate Watkin, who closed their three shops before Christmas. Investment fund Bernheim, Drefus & Co reported that Tiffany & Co could be subject to a takeover bid by a luxury conglomerate in 2011. The Parisbased hedge fund manager said that there are three “likely acquirers” for the brand – Richemont, Swatch Group and LVMH.

Online shopping giant Asos announced its fi rst-ever Facebook shopping platform. The platform allows shoppers to search for products, undertake transactions and share favourite items with Facebook friends, without the need to leave the social networking site. Sales at Richemont ’s watch and jewellery divisions rose by 20% and 21% in the three months to December 31. The sales were positively impacted by the group’s acquisition of Net-aPorter. Richemont said sales in December had grown by 17%.

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

The FSB announced that small businesses in the UK “lost confidence” in Q4 of 2010. It expects 12.4% of businesses to decrease staff levels, this is an increase in Q3 when the figure was 10.4%. A Buckinghamshire jeweller was fi ned for using the National Association of Goldsmith ’s logo without “necessary authorisation”. Bradley’s Fine Jewellery was fi ned almost £1,500 after complaints from disgruntled customers who noticed the falsified use of the NAG emblem. Barratt’s Homes founder Sir Lawrie Barratt was left shaken after an armed robbery at his Northumberland home on January 10. A “quantity of jewellery” was taken, including a ruby and diamond suite said to be worth several thousand pounds. Signet Group reported a drop in UK sales in December. The group blamed the heavy snowfall for slow sales during the Christmas period, which fell 4.2% like-for-like in the nine weeks to January 1.

Alankar Jewellers in Leicester was targeted by robbers for the second time in six months. The store owners blamed the high price of gold for the robbery on New Year’s Day. Four men smashed their way into the shop and escaped with an undisclosed sum of jewellery.


NEWS REVIEW / FRONT

NEWS IN QUOTES

“Have you seen a diamond bracelet? I’ve lost one that looks like this.” Mad Men actress CHRISTINA HENRICKS on momentarily losing one of the Chopard diamond bracelets pictured above, worth more than £530,000 each, at The Golden Globes.

“When I was told it had gone through my jaw just dropped.” Goldcrest Jewellers co-owner NEIL STRUDWICK on finding out that his application to make Kate and Wills’ wedding bands had been shortlisted by Clarence House.

“It’s a great idea to have the pair theme. It makes more personal, more involved which is what Valentine’s is about.” Renaissance Life designer and founder LINNÉA GÖTSTAV on Selfridge’s Valentine’s pop-up shop that celebrates products that come in pairs.

“We’ve been here for 40 years and nothing like this had happened to us until June. It’s all down to the high value of gold at the moment.” Alankar Jewellers partner BIHESH PALA on its Leicester shop being robbed for the second time in six months.

“Certainly, there will be price increases this year. The price increase of metals such as gold has an impact on our business.” Montblanc chief executive LUTZ BETHGE on the inevitability of passing on price increases to consumers.

>> Something to say? Email info@professionaljeweller.com

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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FRONT / NEWS REVIEW

NEWS REVIEW

London and Alexander Davis.

BENCH FRESH

CELEBRATING EMERGING TALENT

Christina Hendricks, star of hit TV show Mad Men, reportedly lost an $850,000 Chopard diamond bracelet at the Golden Globes. Hendricks realised she had misplaced the 124ct diamond and platinum bracelet after walking up the red carpet. She returned to look for it but found the bracelet safely handed in. Jacobs Jewellery Design raised £3,000 for Save the Children by creating a bespoke brooch for a fundraising auction. The piece designed by the Hatton Garden jeweller was an 18ct white gold brooch in the shape of a branch, finished with a frost effect and set with a rose-cut diamond.

Danish company Aagaard has become the latest jewellery brand to create a shop-in-shop concept. The store furniture is available in a selection of sizes and can accommodate Aagaard’s other brands including Lovelinks, Petite, Blog and Men’s Jewellery. Jewellery brand Dower & Hall announced a new up-cycling scheme, enabling customers to recycle gemstones and diamonds from old jewellery. The scheme allows customers to have their own diamonds set into Dower & Hall rings.

Model and university student Amber Atherton announced the launch of her online jewellery boutique My Flash Trash. The 19year-old student has encouraged a number of jewellery designers join her venture, including 8LA, Pebble 6

Police are on the hunt for two men after a robbery at jewellery shop Titu Boutique in Kettering, Northamptonshire. Two men entered the shop and stole 10 gold and silver rings of “considerable value”, according to Nothamptonshire Police. The men are said to have hovered next to a ring display and took advantage of a busy time in the shop when staff were distracted to cut the wire securing the rings.

HOLLY WILCOX Duncan of Jordanstone, Dundee Holly created this sterling silver ring,

Wilcox says: “The piece was inspired

which she has dubbed Emerging, for

by nature’s life cycle. In particular, the

her degree show. The designer, who

moment in spring when tiny buds

graduated in 2010, has employed

begin to emerge.”

granulation and press forming

Contact Holly: 077854550097,

techniques to make the ring and has

hollyjkwilcox@hotmail.co.uk,

plated the main bud with 22ct gold.

hollywilcox.co.uk

>> Are you a student or recent graduate and want to be featured in Bench Fresh? Email info@professionaljeweller.com

STORE ENVY

Dark Horse Ornament and Yu-Lan Burkmar were announced

as winners of the BJA’s cuff competition. Burkmar’s 18ct gold Ocean Wave bangle took the precious cuff prize, while Dark Horse Ornament – aka Jenny Hattersley – scooped the fashion cuff prize with a leather and chandelier crystal creation. Both cuffs will be on show at the Pandora Cafe Catwalk at The Jewellery Show. Hampshire’s Cove Jewellery launched a loyalty scheme encouraging customers to refer a friend in return for a £500 commissioned piece. The Platinum Loyalty Card allows Cove customers to build up points by introducing new clients to the jewellers. Each successful introduction will award those on the scheme with 10 points.

VERSACE China Central Place, Beijing This Versace boutique in Beijing’s

mix of white lacquer and black

most exclusive shopping centre is

leather. Clever use of light boxes

a joint venture between the Italian

gives the shop a fresh modern feel

luxury brand and its Swiss watch

while opulent furnishings maintain

and jewellery distributor Vertime.

its positioning as a luxury brand.

The 80sqm store is the brand’s

Product is shown within a system

third dedicated watch and jewel-

of display niches set within the

lery store and is an invigorating

store’s walls.

>> Got a Store Envy suggestion? Email info@professionaljeweller.com

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


NEWS REVIEW / FRONT

story continued from page 3

Jeweller as its media partner to document the creation of the 2011 collection and follow the new PureJewels diff usion lines of the 2010 designers. A dedicated online channel for the project will launch this month on professionaljeweller.com. LJW has already planned a series of events for the week, including a catwalk event at the Royal Exchange in London on the Wednesday evening. A series of talks will be held at The Goldsmiths’ Hall in the city during the week. One of the days will be curated by Vogue jewellery editor Carol Woolton who will focus on contemporary jewellery and a second will be hosted by former Sotheby’s jewellery director Joanna Hardy who will lead discussions on the history of jewels. Fair trade jewels will be a major focus during LJW with the event dedicating a whole day to the area, which it is dubbing Fair Trade Friday. A curated selection of fair trade jewellery will be on show at Treasure’s dedicated ethical pavilion Essence where a collection of Fairtrade gold jewellery will be launched. The Hatton Garden Festival will return on the Saturday of LJW. The family-friendly festival last year led to the pedestrianisation of the famous London street while it offered a variety of activi-

ties including open workshops and street entertainment. As well as getting the trade on side, LJW has successfully attracted a number of sponsors for the event. New sponsors include drinks brands Bicardi and Th ienot and the tourism department for the Bahamas, which will give away a string of conch pearls and a £5,000 holiday as prizes during the week. The Select Card will also return to LJW in 2011. The card was launched last year and allowed members to receive information about special deals, competitions and events. Tinsley said there have been tweaks made to the card to address concerns that it was perceived as a discount card. The card will now be promoted as the London Jewellery Week Select Club Card, with the emphasis on an exclusive membership rather than access to discounts. As official LJW trade media partner Professional Jeweller will be running in-depth coverage of the build up and of the week itself. For a second year we will run a competition in association with Treasure offering designers who have been in business for three years or less the chance to win a stand at the show. Entries are now open. Designers should send three images of their jewellery, one of themselves and a biography to info@professionaljeweller.com.

NEWS REVIEW

Fashion jewellery brand Monica Vinader will increase its pres-

ence in Selfridges. Said to reflect “ongoing success”, the brand will move to a larger display area in a prominent central position within Selfridges’ jewellery room. The Office of Fair Trading cracked down on celebrities who are paid to endorse products on blogs and through Tweets. Numerous celebrities could be facing court action over claims they are endorsing luxury products on sites such as Twitter without making a declaration that they are being paid to do so. Such activity is considered to be a possible breach of the consumer protection laws laid down in the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008.

Diamond jewellery e-tailer Serendipity Diamonds has overhauled its website in an attempt to improve user experience. One of the key upgrades to the site has been the introduction of hand, product and packaging animations. Managing director Mark Johnson said that the revamp of the site, which has been trading from Ryde since 2007, was done in line with customer feedback. Aurum Holdings posted likefor-like total sales increases of 14.5% in the five weeks to January 9 and 16% in the 49 weeks to January 9. Sales at the group’s chain Goldsmiths jumped 19% while sales at Mappin & Webb was not far behind with a sales increase of 11%. Watches of Switzerland posted a less impressive rise of 1% with Aurum claiming the chain, which has a number of airport locations, was more affected by the poor weather over Christmas. Aurum’s online sales also boomed over the festive period with an increase of 53% and the group said that its new click-and-collect service, which enables people to buy products online and them pick them up in store, had proved popular.

Lindsay Lohan met with red car-

pet jeweller Pascal Mouawad to discuss the creation of a collaborative jewellery collection. Despite previous discussions falling flat, sources insisted that the collaboration will go ahead. Mouawad is reported to have gifted Lohan a heart-shaped 10ct diamond necklace worth an estimated £16,000.

London retailer PureJewels started its hunt for new designers to work on its Platinum Heritage Collection in January. This is the second year that PureJewels will run the initiative, which last year saw the retailer collaborate with designers such as Katie Rowland on showcase pieces unveiled at London Jewellery Week. PureJewels has teamed up with Professional Jeweller to document the progress of the collections with a dedicated online channel launching on professionaljeweller.com soon.

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

7


FRONT / NEWS REVIEW

VOICE OF THE INDUSTRY

What it’s really like to work with Peter Doherty

NEWS REVIEW

Sharps Pixley announced the

revival of the Sharps Pixley name which it has re-established to sell gold bars and coins to the UK public. The new business has been launched by gold entrepreneur Ross Norman who is one of the original founders of the precious metals website TheBullionDesk.com. Sharps Pixley was founded in 1778. Its bullion business was acquired by Kleinwort Benson and subsequently Deutsche Bank but the company name was allowed to expire.

Silver jewellery brand Renaissance Life will take part

HANNAH MARTIN jewellery designer

I

t was about this time last year

experience was going to live up to all

that Peter Doherty’s stylist

my rock ‘n’ roll expectations.

first came to me with the idea of working on a jewellery

We spent a day wandering round his place together. Peter showed

collaboration with the musician.

me all his collections, ranging from

My first reaction was surprise and

taxidermy and vintage tobacco tins

curiosity. What I didn’t know then

to military uniforms and rosaries.

was the depth of Peter’s knowledge,

One room was filled entirely with

fascination and infatuation with

elephants of all shapes and sizes,

collecting jewellery, trinkets and

which inspired the inclusion of

antiques of all sorts.

mammoth ivory in the collection. To

Music has always played a big

be honest, it was a designer’s dream

part in my creative process and

– enough inspiration sat in that

in my life. The Libertines featured

house for my next 10 collections.

highly in my playlist during my time

The design process then began.

studying at Central St Martins and

My real focus was to create pieces

continued as I started up my brand.

that reflected Peter’s style, his love

I have always had true admiration

of vintage and trinkets, but without

for Peter as an artist and towards the

simply recreating something old

end of the last decade his sense of

or something that has been done

style really began a whole movement

already. I’d draw my ideas then

that swept like wild fire through east

meet with Peter and we’d talk

London, and still hangs around today.

through them, with him sketching his

Our project really began when

thoughts on top of mine. Between us

I visited Peter’s house in rural

I think we reached something with

Wiltshire. Pulling up outside his

this collection that is a true mixture

rambling country pile, complete

of both our tastes.

with a few vintage Jags parked up

It has been an honour to work

at jaunty angles on the front lawn

with Peter, who is a true gentleman

and a legless mannequin swimming

and creative who has surprised me

face first in the pond, I knew the

at every turn.

8

in a Valentine’s pop-up shop at London department store Selfridges from February 7. The Swedish brand will showcase its 1952 heart pendants at the Together Shop, a themed popup store designed to showcase products that come in pairs. New research by the British Retail Consortium has suggested retailers are not yet reaping the fi nancial rewards of heavy investment in crime prevention . While it claims improved crime prevention has resulted in fewer incidents of crime, this has yet to make a dent in the £1.1bn UK retail crime bill. The high price of gold continued to impact fi ne jewellery sales as hallmarking volumes through the four UK assay offices for the whole of 2010 hit their lowest since 1974, showing a drop of nearly 8% on 2009. For the second year running more silver articles were struck than gold, representing 58% of the total. Gold volumes down 17% on 2009 and 45% down on 2008. Platinum fared better, up 1.1% on the previous year and silver dropped by only 1.7%. The new Palladium hallmark, introduced in July 2009 was struck on 114,000 articles in its fi rst full calendar year as a compulsory mark. The downturn in gold steepened in the last quarter.

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

Northampton jeweller Steffans was subjected to a vio-

lent raid by an armed gang just before Christmas who attacked the company’s senior goldsmith before scooping £200,000 worth of jewellery and watches. One member of the gang was arrested and a diamond ring was recovered in Leicester.

A Dorset jeweller has been shortlisted to design Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding rings. Neil Strudwick of Goldcrest Jewellers in Dorchester heard he was shortlisted after a call to Clarence House. Clogau Gold has also put in an application to design and make the rings for the wedding on April 29.

>> Got a story? Email info @professionaljeweller.com


NEWS REVIEW / FRONT

SPEAKERS’ CORNER

PEOPLE MOVES

Ex-Smythson boss Paddy Byng has accepted a managing

STEPHEN WEBSTER jewellery designer

SOLANGE AZAGURYPARTRIDGE jewellery designer

BEN DAY jewellery designer

OPALS ARE SET FOR A RESURGENCE – AS JEWELLERY DESIGNERS, WHY YOU LOVE WORKING WITH THEM?

“ I love the chaos black opal

“ The appeal is the psychedelic

“ My collections are all inspired

has about it and I feel like it’s a

quality and multiple colour

by my gemstones and the colour

revived stone. We introduced it

combination found in opals,

combinations I can create from

to our Jewels Verne collection

particularly black opals. There’s

them. Opals are unlike any other

last year using our Crystal Haze

the legend that ancient jewellers

gemstone in every way. The

technique of setting it under

or setters had to pay for any

range of colour and patterns is

a layer of faceted rock crystal

opals they damaged, so the

extraordinary and no two opals

which gives it this amazing play

stones developed an unlucky

are the same. They each have

of light and colour. When you

reputation. When you work with

their own illuminated fingerprint

do that it’s almost like you have

opal there is a little bit more of

- I love that. When used properly

introduced something for the first

a risk, but that’s what makes it

the effects of opal are electrifying

time. We had to explain to people

all the more precious because it

and people love that.

that this new stone we had used

requires a talented craftsperson.

was actually black opal.

Its fragility is part of its beauty.

NEWS FLASH KIT HEATH shot an ethereal new ad campaign on location at Hartland Abbey. The Abbey, which dates back to the 12th century, was once used by legendary fashion photographer Mario Testino for a Vogue photoshoot. Kit Heath said it chose the location because of its quintessential English herFor more itage. The campaign will galleries visit promote the brand’s spring professional jeweller.com range. Highlights in the

director role at Asprey, where he will oversee the interests of the brands at a worldwide level. Asprey chairman John Rigas said: “We are pleased to have found a leader with a well-established reputation, and experience in the luxury industry.” Sarah Eddlestone left her post as PR manager at Stephen Webster and Garrard. She had been with the jewellery brands for two and half years and left on Christmas Eve to join Harrods’ press department as head of jewellery.

The CMJ appointed new branding manager Lucy Hill , who freelanced with the company during 2010. She will now manage CMJ buying meetings, retail tours and trade shows. She is also branding manager of Mastercut, CMJ’s own diamond brand. Julie Large left Hot Diamonds in December, where she had been creative director, and has taken on a role with Abbeycrest. She will now be in charge of leading a rebranding strategy at Abbeycrest’s Brown & Newith as well as designing new collections for Abbeycrest’s other brands.

collection include semi-precious stones set in statement cocktail rings, pendant necklaces and drop earrings, all accented with flashes of colour in rose quartz, turquoise, midnight black and opaque white.

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

9


FRONT / NEWS REVIEW

MOST READ ONLINE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

EDITOR’S CHOICE

Tesco ups cash for gold offer to £10

Lebeado goes into liquidation with £750k debts Hedge fund claims Tiffany is 2011 takeover target

Julie Large leaves Hot Diamonds in shock exit

Opinion

VIDEO

Don’t blame the weather

Behind the scenes at our bridal shoot

Rob Corder doesn’t believe that the weather was a factor in poor festive retail sales, he thinks it’s a smokescreen for general dismal retail conditions.

Our camera crew take you behind the scenes for a glimpse of gorgeous jewellery, a girl in her pants, a cute baby and lots of horseplay.

What’s hot in jewellery this Valentine’s Day SHOP IN SHOPS: Battle of the brands

Violent robbers hospitalise Steffans goldsmith

Julie Large joins Abbeycrest as creative director

PHOTOS

IN DEPTH

Store fined for NAG falsification

Red carpet at the Golden Globes

WatchPro channel

TRENDS: Friendship bracelets

Join us as we scrutinise the jewellery choices of the rich and famous as the awards season kicks off with the Golden Globes.

Find all the latest news, product launches, videos and party pics from the watch industry in one place with our new dedicated mini site for WatchPro.

JEWELLERY TWEETS WHAT FOLLOWERS OF @PJEWELLER HAVE BEEN TWEETING THIS MONTH Counting down the days until The Cou

Happy Friday everyone! We are visiting

Fair, our apts. are booking fast! Basel el F

Scotlands trade fair on Sunday hoping

@carlfbuchererNA @carlf

to find you more goodies! What are your plans?

decided decide ded d on the business bank account

@pebblesjeweller

y n... now I can get back to making yaw yawn... charms ms :) @EHJ @EHJewellery

#FF @RosMillarj who is an amazingly creative and wonderfully talented jewellery designer. Do it now!! @ajshill

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


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IRELAND / HOT TOPIC

Beware the calm before the

GIVEN THE PARLOUS STATE OF THE EMERALD ISLE’S ECONOMY IT MIGHT SEEM SAFE TO ASSUME THE BOTTOM FELL OUT OF ITS JEWELLERY MARKET. WHILE SOME BUSINESSES HAVE GONE BUST, ABBY TROW DISCOVERS EXORBITANT RENTS OF THE PRE-BUST BOOM ARE TO BLAME, NOT A SHOPPER EXODUS.

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o one is saying the jewellery sector in Ireland is having an easy ride, but it’s by no means all doom

and gloom. “Forget the EU fi nancial bailout, what made life a bit tricky for us over Christmas was the snow, which kept people away,” says Chris Andrews, marketing director of Weir & Sons, a long-established Dublin jewellers. “And while sales are down over the past year, they’re not hugely so. On the whole we feel it’s business as normal, and we’re positive about 2011.” Andrews says while he’s aware of competitors that have gone into liquidation – last year Dublin jewellers 12

West of Grafton Street closed after 290 years in the city and more retailers in the city have since ceased trading – he says there’s no deck of cards scenario in the jewellery business, where one falls and they all start to go down. The problems, it seems, haven’t been a result of the bust, but rather the boom. “The boys over there are suffering badly but they made a fortune before the crash,” says Stuart Laing, chief executive of jewellery and watch buying group Houlden, which has a number of members in Ireland. “When we were making 5 percent to 10 percent growth on our businesses [in the UK] they were making 15 percent to 20 percent.” Andrews concurs, saying the difference between sinking or swimming in the Irish jewellery trade has little to do with how skilled a sales team it had. He believes it was more about whether a business was unfortunate enough to have signed up in the boom years to sky-high rents with property developers that then defaulted on their loans once the global crash hit in 2008. “In my view, it’s rents that have put people under,” he says. “Jewellery is competitive and margins are tight, but people do, in fact, keep on buying it. But that doesn’t matter if you can’t meet the rents.”

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

Peter McDowell of McDowells jewellers on Dublin’s north side agrees that it’s businesses such as theirs, which own their premises, that have been able to weather the recession. “It’s been hard, and we have made some redundancies over the past two years, but I do feel the downturn has bottomed out and I’m confident sales will start to increase this year, albeit slowly,” he reveals. “I do actually feel that the EU bailout has given people confidence that the economy will now be run according to strict ground rules. People say Ireland was running on credit, but there is also a huge amount of money on deposit here, some €16 billion. People have been wary of spending their savings because of the uncertainties, but I get a sense that attitudes are changing.” Jerome Ryan runs a business consultancy in Dublin and he has worked in with jewellers that have recently gone into liquidation. “It’s a shame because it’s not that Ireland is overrun with jewellers,” he says. “The ones I feel most sorry for are those that took leases in expensive shopping centres and had to have their shops open for long hours and so employ a lot of staff . They already had very high running costs and when the property bubble burst they were still tied in to ridiculous rents.” And Ireland’s upward-only rent policy does retailers no favours, he adds.


HOT TOPIC / IRELAND

Ryan goes on to suggest that some of the newer businesses that have met their demise may, perhaps, not have had a clear picture of their customer base, nor did they seek to attract new customers. “They might have felt it was safer to serve the over-60s market, but in fact those people are spending less on jewellery,” he explains. “Yes there is a lot of unemployment, but the younger market sees jewellery as a fashion accessory and will buy a costume piece to cheer themselves up. Look at the success of the Pandora brand here, it has really struck a chord with the younger market. So there is a need to diversify in jewellery, just doing one thing can be very dangerous, because situations change.” McDowell agrees, and says his business has kept going through these lean times thanks in no small part to its repair service. “You do need to offer a variety of services as people haven’t had so much money to spend, so they’ve decided to get that

necklace granny gave them repaired, or that broken watch mended,” he says. “Yes, the spend is smaller, but volume in the repair business is high.” The retailer is also expanding its online offer to bolster its turnover. McDowells’ has recently increased the selection of product it sells through its online store to incorporate watches and some pieces of traditional Irish jewellery. McDowell and Andrews point out that jewellery is, all things considered, a fairly safe business to be in because demand will probably never totally diminish. “In Ireland, people get married and before they wed they get engaged,” says McDowell. “The engagement ring is very important to Irish couples, and spend remains

high at around €1,000 to €1,500. I understand the spend on an engagement ring in Ireland is about three times higher than it is in the UK.” Andrews also notes that Ireland is experiencing something of a baby boom at the moment, which means increased demand for christening gifts. “We need to think cradle to grave and give customers what they want,” he muses. “People are no longer buying the big necklaces with diamonds or precious stones, but they are buying more sterling silver pieces or costume jewellery instead. We’re still selling watches, the TAGs and Tissots, and I’d say they are our bread-and-butter product. Sure they are fairly expensive, but people do like them, they are a status piece and

“Jewellery is competitive and margins are tight but people keep on buying it, but that doesn’t matter if you can’t meet the rents.”

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1 Crippling rents have been blamed for failing shops. www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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IRELAND / HOT TOPIC

they are a way to treat yourself.” Returning to the recession, Andrews says the old adage “it’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good” applies. “Well, for us, we’ve been able to refurbish our shop because labour costs have come down massively,” he explains. “And we’ve also been able to get our e-tailing costs down, so from that point of view, we’ve benefitted from the situation.” From the jewellery wholesaler’s perspective, the Irish business is stable at the moment, says Roger Chamberlain of fi ne diamond jewellery supplier Sharman D Neill. “Levels of business in Ireland have reduced, of course, since the recession started, and Ireland is a small marketplace,” he says. “The A-B socio-economic

group no longer has so much disposable income and many in it may be facing negative equity. But the engagement ring market is strong – because rings are a necessity for anyone getting married – and the gift end, what you might call the lower end of the jewellery market, is also growing. It’s sales of the very top-end product that have fallen off .” James Boyd of London-based brand Daisy sells to retailers throughout Ireland, including the Fields chain, and says he has noticed very little drop in demand for his company’s products over the past two years. “Certainly nothing that mirrors the economic disaster we’ve been hearing about,” he says. “Th at might be because our pieces are affordable

“They are suffering, but they made a fortune before the crash. When we were making 5 to 10 percent growth in the UK they were making 10 to 20 percent.”

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2 Protests as the EU bailout caused upset in Ireland. 3 A number of jewellers have shut up shop in Ireland.

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

and on-trend, with prices starting at around £20 and going up to £150. We do have a distributor in Ireland, which helps, but I think the mid-price jewellery market remains fairly constant no matter what.” Chamberlain notes that the commodity markets are increasing in value, so putting your money in diamonds will have given you far better returns than investing in property. “From a global perspective, the jewellery industry is growing,” he explains. “Business may be down in Ireland, but overall jewellery is very resilient, with growth being led by demand from the US and China.” Bailout headlines might be setting a grim stage for Irish retail but it seems that the confidence and price hikes of the pre-bust boom did more to damage the Irish jewellery retail market than the recession or bailout has. While fortune may favour the brave, in the case of jewellers of the Emerald Isle it has been the cautious who have prospered.


From the heart. Designed for today’s woman who desires beautiful jewellery that reflects her own style. Created in sterling silver and 14ct gold, the collection is classic, yet fresh and versatile for personalising with combinations of hundreds of beads. With Chamilia, you are creating more than a sale, you are creating a customer for a lifetime. To learn more about our collection and our retailer programmes please contact Chamilia at chamiliauk@chamilia.com or call 0844 811 21 42. You can also visit us at The Jewellery Show, 6-10 Feb 2011, NEC Birmingham.

MADE WITH SWAROVSKI® ELEMENTS SWAROVSKI® is a registered trademark. © Disney.

© Chamilia Europe Limited 2010. All rights reserved.


THE JEWELLERY SHOW AT SPRING FAIR / SHOW GUIDE

THE JEWELLERY SHOW, SPRING FAIR, 6-10 FEBRUARY 2011, BIRMINGHAM NEC THE JEWELLERY SHOW FACTS WHERE: Halls

17, 18 & 19, Birmingham NEC WHEN: Sunday

6th February to Thursday 10th February 2011 Sunday to Wednesday 9:00 – 18:00, Thursday 09:00-16:00

OPENING TIMES:

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he Jewellery Show at Spring Fair International at the Birmingham NEC plays host to more than 400 exhibitors, who offer more than 40,000 new product launches. The show is split into three sectors with precious jewellery in Hall 17, semi-precious and silver jewellery in Hall 18 and fashion

jewellery, watches and clocks in Hall 19. As well as a large offer of new jewellery on display,

visitors also have access to a seminar program and catwalk shows at the Pandora Catwalk Cafe, and curated area Design Quarter is a showcase of fashion-aware designers.

DON’T MISS...

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CMJ Awards – A brand new award for 2011. CMJ retailers will pick out their favourite new jewellery collection with the winner announced at 5.20pm on Tuesday at the Pandora Catwalk Cafe. Houlden Design of Excellence Award – Another new accolade created for 2011. Up to 12 pieces of jewellery will be selected to become part of a roving exhibition travelling round Houlden retailers. The winners will be announced at 4pm on Monday at the Pandora Catwalk Cafe. Design Quarter Gems – Th is innovative new area, sponsored by

Houlden, features up-and-coming designer jewellers such as Professional Jeweller Hot 100 NexGems Ana De Costa, Alexander Davis and Katie Rowland.

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Jewellery Show Freebies – The Jewellery Show will provide free water for all visitors in Hall 20, a free show catalogue, free car parking and free pastries for early visitors – doors open at 9am. Pandora Catwalk Cafe – Th is popular feature has returned for a second year and will again be a showcase of jewellery design talent from within The Jewellery Show.

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

Catwalk shows will be held at 12pm, 3pm and 5pm every day.

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BJA Cuff Award – View the winning designs from Burkmar Jewellery and Dark Horse ornament on the BJA stand, as well as cuff designs made by the runners up. The cuffs will also be part of the catwalk shows. Seminars – The Jewellery Show will host a wide selection of seminars at the Pandora Catwalk Cafe with speakers offering advice on trends and business. Win an Emerald – Exhibitor AG & Sons will be giving away a precious carved emerald at the show. All visitors are eligible to win.


SHOW GUIDE / THE JEWELLERY SHOW AT SPRING FAIR

LOLA ROSE

OUT OF THIS WORLD DESIGNS FROM FIRST TIMER LOLA ROSE

The J ew Show ellery , Sp Fair, N ring EC Stand R28/S Hall 1 29, 7

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his is the first time Lola Rose has exbitited at the show, and will bring two new collections entitled Planet Earth and Out of This World, which are based on the earth and the stars with a focus on natural hues. Its trademark style of chunky gemstone jewellery is continued in the new collections, which feature chocolate-coloured quartzite, grey obsidian and green and blue dyed quartz. The Out of This World collection also features goldstone in blue and brown, known for its glittering properties, to add a futuristic edge. HALL 18, STAND B40

HOULDEN GROUP

HOULDEN TO CREATE TRAVELLING EXHIBITION FROM DESIGN QUARTER Jewellery buying group Houlden is launching a new competition at Spring Fair for designers in the Design Quarter Gems section, which includes the work of Alexander Davis (pictured below). Houlden will pick out up to 12 pieces of jewellery from the designers to form a travelling exhibition called Designs of Excellence that will tour its retailer members’ boutiques. The collection will spend two weeks in each store, creating a brand awareness boost for the designers. Designers taking part in the competition must be working in precious materials. Houlden boss Stuart Laing said: “We’re not interested in oxidised steel or gift shop jewellery – there’s a market for that too of course, but it’s not what we personally are looking for.” HALL 18, STAND B40

Looking for an exciting new men’s jewellery and watch brand? Then take a look at Pranda. See all that’s new

The Pranda Group 020 8979 3896 | prandasales@pranda.co.uk

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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THE JEWELLERY SHOW AT SPRING FAIR / SHOW GUIDE

ELEMENTS GOLD

ELEMENTS GOLD LOOKS TO SUMMER WITH HUMMINGBIRDS AND FLOWERS

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lements Gold, distributed by Gecko, is playing on the impending change of season to introduce a new collection of 9ct gold jewellery featuring hummingbirds and flowers. The Hummingbird set features a pendant and drop earrings “perfectly poised to glimmer in the early spring sunshine”. Owing to legend, the hummingbird is an indication of the warmer, sunnier weather of spring. Elements describes it as “classically wearable”.

HALL 18, STAND G20/H21 (GECKO)

ORTAK

BABETTE WASSERMAN

BABETTE WASSERMAN MOVES ON ORTAK TAKES INSPIRATION FROM FROM TRADEMARK CRYSTALS SAFARIS AND THE US Babette Wasserman’s jewellery brand will turn 13 this year and to Scottish jewellery brand Ortak will launch several new collections including contemporary silver sets and a romantic enamelled heart collection. New collection Urban features polished silver jewellery with accents of gold and black ruthenium plating, inspired by American industry with “a handmade aesthetic to create a touch of metropolitan beauty”. Its Satin necklace and earring set is inspired by “ethnic exhibition”, playing on the annual trend for safari. HALL 18, STAND L19

celebrate it will use the show as a launch pad for three new collections. In a move away from its trademark crystal-set pieces, the new collections – Entwine, Seven Deadly Pleasures and Maman BéBé – will be launched in full at the show. Inspired by Celtic love knots, the Entwine collection is a pared-down range of silver jewellery centred on the classic knot design. Seven Deadly Pleasures collection takes friendship bracelets as its base, adding a range of stack rings based on seven pleasures. Maman BéBé has been designed with mothers and daughters and features matching heart and locket charms. HALL 18, STAND DQ42

MISSOMA

MISSOMA MAKES COMEBACK WITH IBB PARTNERSHIP Missoma – which announced its revival last month in partnership with jewellery manufacturer IBB – is back with an army of new collections. Creative director Marisa Hordern described the new collection as “a variety of bold statement pieces and glamorous designs” that remain true to the signature style of Missoma’s previous collections, which combined colourful gemstones with bold cuffs, large hoop earrings and long multicharm pendants. The new ranges are said to include more everyday pieces and Missoma will unveil its fi rst silver collection at the show. New designs include and a range of stud earrings and jewellery that gives a nod to the stacking ring and friendship bracelet trends, including its Serpent stacking rings set with semi-precious gemstones such as turquoise and amethyst. It will also launch a geometric range of statement jewellery called Hex (pictured). HALL 17-18, STAND P30/Q30 (IBB) 18

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


THE JEWELLERY SHOW AT SPRING FAIR / SHOW GUIDE

DOWER & HALL

SPARKLER COLLECTION UPDATED TO MARK 20TH ANNIVERSARY

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fter celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2010, Dower & Hall will launch three new collections. Entitled Candy, Sparkler and Winter Bloom (pictured), the collections have been designed with the autumn/winter season in mind with a cool, monochrome theme including multi-chain silver and pearl necklaces, onyx and rock crystal earrings

FRED BENNETT

MEN’S JEWELLERY THAT’S NOT FOR THE FAINT HEARTED Influenced by the ferocity and attitude of sharks, jewellery supplier Gecko will launch a new men’s brand collection called Fred Bennett. Made in rhodium-plated silver and set with black agate, the new collection is described as “not for the faint hearted” and is targeted at the boom male market. Enamel accents pick out the detail in the designs, which include a shark-jaw ring, dog tag necklace and agate-set cuffl inks. HALL 18, STAND G20/H21 (GECKO)

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and black and white pavé diamond stacking rings. Dower & Hall has updated its original Twinkle stacking ring designed two decades ago with black, white, pink and blue diamonds set in yellow, rose, white or black rhodium-plated 18ct gold. Curled hoop earrings set with black diamonds add a quirkier feel to the collection. Co-founder Diane Hall describes the new Sparkler collection as “the perfect presents”. HALL 18, STAND

DONNS JEWELLERY

CLOGAU GOLD

DONNS LAUNCH DISNEY PRINCESS GIRLS’ COLLECTION

CLOGAU CREATES MEN’S LINE TO RAISE FUNDS FOR CANCER

Manchester-based Donns Jewellery will launch an exclusive diamond-set collection of charms inspired by Disney princesses. Based on the personalities of Disney’s favourite princesses, including Jasmine, Cinderella, Belle and Snow White, the silver charms have been designed to “grab the imagination of all young girls who dream of fairy tales”. Designs include hearts, bows, stars and birds with enamelled details in pinks and blues. The collection features six charms crafted in sterling silver, set with a single diamond. The jewellery will retail from £32. HALL 17, L 101

Clogau Gold will launch a new nine-piece men’s jewellery collection, the proceeds of which will be donated to the Marie Curie Cancer Care. Created in silver and rose gold with black enamel, the new 737 Collection is aimed at the men’s market with a selection of rings, cuffl inks and friendship bracelets. Pieces are engraved with the proverb “The horizon is only the limit of our sight”, and feature Roman numeral detailing. The collection has been made in partnership with ex-Welsh international rugby player Richard Parks who, following a career-ending injury, has focused his energy and time on the 737 Challenge – a mission to climb seven mountain summits in seven months, with the aim of raising more than £1 million for Marie Curie. Joining the challenge, Clogau has created the 737 Collection as a way for jewellery fans to show their support. Clogau Gold said that 20 percent of sales will be donated to Marie Curie’s cancer trust. HALL 17, STAND L18/M19

HOXTON LONDON

IBB EXPANDS HOXTON LONDON RANGE FOR SHOW After launching at IJL in September, IBB’s men’s jewellery brand Hoxton London is set to show at The Jewellery Show with additional pieces not seen before. Originally founded as an edited collection of silver cufflinks, the Hoxton London range expanded into a men’s jewellery collection last year, taking on several stockists in the lead up to Christmas. IBB’s Josh Kovacs describes the collection as “classic and contemporary in an industry where men’s jewellery has become quite rocky in recent years”. The range is made using silver, leather and semi-precious gemstones. HALL 17-18, STAND P30/Q30 (IBB)

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


SHOW GUIDE / THE JEWELLERY SHOW AT SPRING FAIR

HEDVA ELANY

TRIBAL DESIGNS LEAD HEDVA ELANY’S SS11 COLLECTION

DOMINO

RESEARCH CULMINATES IN HUGE NEW BRIDAL RANGE

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edding rings specialists Domino will launch a 52-piece wedding ring collection for both men and women. Having carried out “extensive market research into current wedding ring trends”, the new collection includes gent’s wedding bands in new and unusual textured finishes, alongside diamond-set and multi-stone wedding bands for women. Domino has also picked up on the stacking trend in bridal jewellery, suggesting “why have just one band when you can have two, three or even four?”. Speaking of the new collection’s background, Domino marketing manager Andrew Sollitt says: “This is the culmination of a great deal of carefully targeted research into what today’s brides and grooms require from their wedding jewellery.” The collection also includes his ‘n’ her bands, set with discrete diamond details, and Domino’s shaped wedding bands have been updated to suit new styles of engagement rings. HALL 17, STAND N40

SHO FINE JEWELLERY

COCKTAIL RINGS AND ACQUATIC COLLECTION TO STAR AT SHO SHO Fine Jewellery is set to launch two new collections within the Design Quarter. Renowned for luxurious, fashionforward collections, SHO will showcase the new Splash collection alongside its Clementina cocktail rings, exclusively launched last November at London retailer Kabiri as part of Vogue’s Fashion Night In. The Splash collection, part of SHO’s wider Mari line, plays on the movement of water,

Hedva Elany will be showing a tribal-inspired collection for spring/summer 2011 at the show. Elany’s work combines ethnic styles and colour for “a bold statement look” and has produced a collection based on texture and multicultural motifs. Each piece is handmade using silver and 9ct gold, with some gemstoneset pieces. This is Elany’s second time at Spring Fair and she will also be exhibiting with bestselling pieces from her previous collections. HALL 18, STAND D41

KATIE ROWLAND

KATIE ROWLAND TO UNVEIL NEW FINE COLLECTION Named as one of Professional Jeweller’s Hot 100 in 2010, Katie Rowland will be showing at The Jewellery Show for the fi rst time with collections including statement knuckleduster rings and multi-charm necklaces. Awarded the Coutts New Designer Award in 2009 and Lonmin Design Innovation Award for Platinum in 2010, Rowland will use the show to launch a fi ne jewellery collection in 18ct gold and rose gold, and set with diamonds. Rowland described the new collection and her fi rst appearance at the show as “very exciting”, Her jewellery has been worn by the likes of Cheryl Cole, and her St Tropez Knuckleduster rings have become a standout design with their chunky, faceted gemstones. HALL 18, STAND DQ102

with rings and earrings in silver and gold vermeil studded with gemstone droplets of citrine, amethyst and white and blue topaz. The new Clementina rings have already received a positive reaction over the Christmas period, and SHO hopes to give the range a greater exposure within the trade. The collection of cocktail rings is inspired by SHO founder and designer Sarah Ho’s glamorous grandmother who is said to own an “enviable collection of jewellery”. HALL 18, STAND DQ43 www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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THE JEWELLERY SHOW AT SPRING FAIR / SHOW GUIDE

BJA

BJA TO SHOWCASE WINNERS OF ITS CUFF DESIGN COMPETITION

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he British Jewellers’ Association (BJA) has announced the winners for this year’s BJA competition to design an “innovative and commercial cuff ”. The two category winners are Yu Lan Burkmar of Burkmar Jewellery, who won the precious category, and Jenny Hattersley of Dark Horse Ornament, who won the fashion category. Both designs, and those of runners up Rachel Galley and Abigail Keefe, will be on display at the BJA’s stand and all four designs will feature three times a day on the

catwalk at the Pandora Catwalk Café in Hall 17. Burkmar’s winning entry – a solid 18ct gold cuff with an unusual corrugated design – was praised for its lightweight feel, strength and clever use of metal. Hattersley’s winning cuff is a chunkier, fashion-led piece handcrafted in premium leather, featuring vintage chandelier crystal embellishments. Describing the piece as both glamorous and edgy, Hattersley spoke of her win with excitement. She said: “I was thrilled when I got the call to say I’d won.” HALL 17, STAND S44

BJA

BALAGAN

LAW FIRM TO OFFER JEWELLERS INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ADVICE Law fi rm Royds will be on hand at the British Jewellers’ Association’s (BJA) stand to provide its members with advice on protecting intellectual property to members of the BJA, the British Travelgoods and Accessories Association and the Jewellery Distributors Association. Royds head of intellectual property and Professional Jeweller columnist Stephen Welfare said: “We go to protect our clients’ interests by keeping an eye out for possible infringements and to provide immediate advice with any issues that arise. Royds has produced a comprehensive guide to agency and distribution for international buyers and distributors who are seeking UK agents and distributors. HALL 17, STAND S44

KLESHNA

KLESHNA MAKES A BRIGHT STATEMENT Kleshna is set to unveil a new range of brightly coloured crystal-encrusted jewellery called Prism. The range has been inspired by the way light dances through hanging crystals and has been crafted in a spectrum of jewel colours. Designer and founder Kleshna Handel said: “The collection is energetic and makes you smile.” She added that she expects “sparkling sales” for the Prism collections. The range includes simple strands of crystals with magnetic clasps and these Gyroscopic earrings with concentric circles. HALL 18, STAND D39 22

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

BALAGAN UPDATES WISH BRACELETS WITH SILVER LINE Balagan is tapping into the friendship bracelet trend with its One Wish range of sterling silver bracelets that its describes as “modern wish bracelets”. The elasticated bracelets have a silver bead enscribed with words such as “hope”, “love” or a personal message. The concept behind the bracelets is that the wearer’s wish will come true once the bracelet has worn away and the bead falls off of its own accord. HALL 18, STAND G28/H29

TROLLBEADS

TROLLBEADS UNVEILS MAGICAL NEW BRAND IMAGES Trollbeads will unveil dramatic new point-of-sale material depicting a magical fantasy world that evokes the ethereal mysteries of Norse mythology. The new look for 2011 will be supported by a number of new product launches that will be seen in the UK for the first time at The Jewellery Show. The new designs will sit amongst a huge range of 760 pieces on display at the show on UK distributor Fable Trading’s stand. HALL 18, STAND F58/G59 (FABLE TRADING)


THE JEWELLERY SHOW AT SPRING FAIR / SHOW GUIDE

FIORELLI SILVER

FIORELLI CREATES MODERN REWORK OF FLORAL JEWELLERY

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ecko will debut Fiorelli Silver’s new Spring Blossoms range on its stand at The Jewellery Show. The f loral jewellery collection has been crafted in rhodiumplated 925 silver and decorated with white enamel f lowers and cubic zirconia. Gecko has described the collection as “a trendy rework of ever-popular f loral accessories”. HALL 18, STAND G20/H21 (GECKO)

TI SENTO

CMJ

TI SENTO GOES AQUATIC WITH UNDERWATER-THEMED RANGES Ti Sento will be showing a new range of whimsical, playful and precious nature-inspired silver jewellery with its spring/summer 2011 Aqua collection. The range includes underwaterthemed mini collections: the bejewelled Stardust line with fine-cut zircons, the glittering pavé-set Coral line, the big and bold Water Drop line with lavender-coloured statement gems, and the Water Bubbles line that is boldly textured for a modern look.

To mark the end of its first year in business, which the brand has dubbed “a very successful launch year”, Mancini will unveil a new range of leather wrap-around charms bracelets at the show. The Jewellery Show will also be a showcase for the fashion-led jewellery brand’s Little Angels childrens’ bracelet and charm collection with pretty colour injections and its Bellezza fashion ring collection. The company said the Bellezza range in particular is continuing to “cause huge excitement by amalgamating a mixture of old-time glamour with up-to-date trends”.

The Company of Master Jewellers (CMJ) will launch a new award for the best new jewellery collection at The Jewellery Show. The award will be judged by CMJ member retailers attending show, who will vote on their preferred new jewellery collection based on criteria according to design quality, innovation, commercial appeal and price. The winner of the award will be announced by CMJ chief executive Willie Hamilton during a champagne drinks reception at 5.20pm on the Tuesday of the show at the Pandora Catwalk and Café area. The winner will receive a trophy and the chance to showcase the winning collection at the next CMJ Buying Meeting, which will be held on March 13-14. “We want to give an award that not only recognises the importance of good and original jewellery design, but also looks at the quality of craftsmanship and the commercial appeal of the collection, including the retail price point,” says Hamilton. “Th is is the formula for a bestselling collection. The winner of this award will be getting The CMJ stamp of approval, which will give retail buyers added confidence to make an investment in buying the winning collection.”

HALL 18, STAND B31

HALL 17, STAND Q44

HALL 18, STAND G28/H29

MANCINI

MANCINI MOVES INTO SECOND YEAR OF BUSINESS WITH NEW LINE

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CMJ HUNTS FOR BEST JEWELLERY COLLECTION IN NEW COMPETITION

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


Hall 18, G30/H31 www.kitheathkids.com

Tel 01271 329123 Email sales@kitheath.com


THE JEWELLERY SHOW AT SPRING FAIR / SHOW GUIDE

BENOR

BENOR TEAMS UP WITH ISRAELI JEWELLER AVRIAM TOLEDO

BROWN & NEWIRTH

BROWN & NEWIRTH TO UNVEIL NEW BRITISH-FOCUSED REBRAND

Israeli jewellery designer Avriam Toledo has joined forces with Benor and the fruits of the collaboration will be on display at Spring Fair. Toledo is the latest in a long list of designer to work with Benor. Other designers include Talma Keshet, Silvia Rozenffeler, Lior, Beit Nor, Dganit Hen and Stera. Benor will showcase a range of jewellery designs in 9ct gold and sterling silver with wholesale prices ranging from £5 to £200. HALL 18, STAND B31

W

edding band expert Brown & Newirth, part of the Abbeycrest group, is undergoing a complete image overhaul, which will be unveiled at The Jewellery Show. The new branding will emphasise the company’s Britishness and this will be reflected across all of its merchandising. Brown & Newirth sales and marketing manager Amber Saunders said: “With many companies switching to the Far East for manufacturing, we felt it was important to underline the fact that our wedding rings are all hand made in our workshops in Hatfield and that we can give our retail customers a personalised service of made-to-measure rings that no-one else can provide at such a high quality.” Brown & Newirth, which is now under the creative direction of former Hot Diamonds creative director Julie Large, will also launch a range of design-led collections. HALL 17, STAND N28/P29

VIZATI

FATLIP

SHINY AND SATIN GEMSTONE BLOCK COLOUR AND CAPIZ JEWELLERY LAUNCH SHELL MAKE FOR BRIGHT FATLIP COLLECTIONS For the spring season Vizati

26

will introduce a new collection of organic and delicate designs in both shiny and satin-fi nish sterling silver. The brand said the emphasis of the new range “will be on high quality, different looking jewellery with a very reasonable price tag”. The jewellery has been decorated with stones such as tanzanite, ruby and opal. Most designs are created in house with hand-picked stones of a high quality. Vizati will also be offering a new range of vibrant and colourful silver-set dichroic glass jewellery.

Fatlip has brought together a variety of f loral and block colour designs to make for a bold and bright offering at The Jewellery Show It will debut new styles added to its Amarella range that have been crafted using capiz shell and lightweight aluminium. The Carme Collection of glass and crystal dress jewellery has also been expanded for 2011. The brand has said that after a long, hard winter it expects bright colours to be popular in spring.

HALL 18, STAND D05

HALL 19, STAND K51

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


THE JEWELLERY SHOW / WINING AND DINING

AFTER A LONG DAY TREKKING THE HALLS THERE’S NOTHING LIKE A GOOD MEAL AND A STIFF DRINK TO REVIVE THE SPIRITS. JON LYSONS ROUNDS UP THE BEST WINING & DINING BIRMINGHAM HAS TO OFFER.

EATERIES

F

rom quick bites to Michelin-starred restaurants, the cosmopolitan culture

menu. The traditional Indian decor complemented with a dash of Bollywood-style music help to create a real Indian experience.

of Birmingham is a foodie heaven, offering a wide choice of

Popular Balti

dishes from world-famous baltis

139 Ladypool Road, B12 8LH, 0121 440 0014 Situated right in the heart of Birmingham’s balti triangle, the simple decor creates an informal, friendly atmosphere, while the excellent Kashmiri cooking has helped it develop a cult following that means it’s really earned its name.

to tasty Italian. If you’re stuck for a restaurant then try one of our favourite places to eat in the city.

INDIAN Grameen Khana 310-312 Ladypool Road, B12 8JY, 0121 449 9994 Grameen Khana uses a careful mix of Indian and Bangladeshi recipes that can’t be found anywhere else, served up in a stylish atmosphere.

Adils 353-355 Ladypool Road, B12 8LA, 0121 449 0335 Established in 1977, this wellestablished Birmingham restaurant claims to have been the fi rst to introduce the balti to Birmingham. The eaterie and now offers more than 90 different dishes from mild as you like kurma-style baltis to dangerously hot vindaloos.

Plaza Tandoori 278-280 Ladypool Road, B12 8JU, 0121 449 4249 The owners of Plaza Tandoori are of Punjabi origin, which gives this restaurant its distinctive 28

ITALIAN Carluccio’s The Water’s Edge, Brindleyplace, B1 2HP 0121 633 9262 The seasonally changing menu features an array of traditional Italian dishes with a selection of antipasti, fresh pasta, risottos and meat or vegetarian choices. Plus for those who just have to have with dessert, there are some decadent options.

Cielo 6 Oozells Square, B1 2JB, 0121 632 6882 Located at the prestigious and award-winning Brindleyplace development and regarded as one of Birmingham’s fi nest Italian restaurants, Cielo offers

a range of classic dishes given a contemporary twist in a relaxing, enjoyable setting.

San Carlo Ristorante 4 Temple Street, B2 5BN, 0121 633 0251 San Carlo Risorante boasts authentic Italian food and a stunning setting. Based in the heart of Birmingham, the restaurant uses only the freshest ingredients, many imported from Italy, to create a menu of 140 dishes, ranging from pasta and salad to a renowned choice of fresh fish. The atmosphere is electric and is a favourite haunt of celebrities visiting the city.

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

FRENCH Côte Brasserie 120-122 Wharfside Street, B1 1RX, 0121 631 1587 Located in The Mailbox Shopping Centre near the quayside, Côte Brasserie is open all day. Inspired by the latest Parisian trends, it offers a modern approach to classic French dishes, such as steak frites, moules marinières and poulet Breton, a corn-fed French chicken from Languidic in rural Brittany, at competitive prices. The wine list is selected from the regions of France and the atmosphere is informal.


WINING AND DINING / THE JEWELLERY SHOW

JAPANESE Shogun Sushi & Noodle Bar 27 -29 Wharfside Street, B1 1RD, 0121 632 1253 Located in The Mailbox Shopping Centre, this restaurant offers a wide variety of dishes, with ramen soups, sashimi, sushi, noodles and vegetarian offers, not forgetting the TeppanYaki cooked at the table.

BRITISH FUSION Apres 39 Summer Row, B3 1JJ 0121 710 4233 For a more relaxed eating experience, try Apres. With no clear boundary between bar and restaurant, you can eat, drink and mingle with ease. The menu is a selection of pizzas and pastas while house specialities include sausage batons and spicy chilli chicken wings. The large clay ovens add a touch of the theatrical to the night’s proceedings.

Apres 39 Summer Row, B3 1JJ 0121 710 4233 For a more relaxed eating experience, try Apres. With no clear boundary between bar and restaurant, you can eat, drink and mingle with ease. The menu is a selection of pizzas and

pastas while house specialities include sausage batons and spicy chilli chicken wings. The large clay ovens add a touch of the theatrical to the night’s proceedings.

Lisons 11-13 Newhall Street, B3 3NY, 0121 773 7575 An urban-inspired take on Oriental dining, Lisons fuses the sleek and contemporary Western styles with the culinary delights of the Orient resulting in a unique dining experience. With low-level seating and rich colours the interior is glamorous yet low-key. A range of dining choices are offered but dim sum is a specialty, so much so that an entire menu is dedicated to it. Meanwhile the a la carte menu provides a wide range of Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese dishes.

wild fish delivered daily from Brixham on the coast.

StageSide Hurst Street, B5 4TB 0844 338 9000 StageSide is a casual, brasseriestyle experience that’s located just over the road from the Birmingham Hippodrome. The menu boasts a wide selection of modern British dishes, such as pave of sirloin, soda battered haddock and salmon fi llet, all attractively priced.

The Queens Arms 150 Newhall Street, B3 1RY For traditional pub fare, try the The Queens Arms located in Birmingham’s historic Jewellery Quarter. Easy on the pocket, this pub is a good place to relax at the end of a stressful day. Offering traditional homecooked food washed down with a changing selection of real ales.

Opus 54 Cornwall Street, B3 2DE 0121 200 2323 Located in the heart of the fi nancial district, Opus offers a modern take on the tradional British menu. Using fresh and seasonally available ingredients, the menu is changed twice a day to reflect what is being sold at the local markets. Committed to free range meats, Opus also has a selection of freshly caught

DESSERTS Heavenly Desserts 369 Ladypool Road, B12 8LA, 0121 449 4946 Defi nitely one for those with a sweet tooth, Heavenly Desserts, offers a wide range of smoothies, juices, non-alcoholic cocktails, milkshakes and ice creams. Daily specials also feature a selection of cheesecakes and fudge cakes.

Simpsons 20 Highfield Road, B15 3DU, 0121 454 3434 Th is posh restaurant is just as delightful for main courses but when it comes to dessert, it makes a delectable pud. A particular highlight is the hot pecan soufflé served with banana ice cream.

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Freephone: 0800 021 7150 or apply for an account at www.pay4later.com www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

29


THE JEWELLERY SHOW / WINING AND DINING

DRINKING DENS & DISCOS

W

hether you’re looking for a quiet drink

are decorated with the artworks by local artists and there is a homemade food menu.

or setting

out to party the night away,

The Figure of Eight

Birmingham has a drinking

236-239 Broad Street, B1 2HG The Figure of Eight is one of the oldest bars Broad Street and is much loved by its regular clientele. Th is pub is also famed for its excellent breakfasts.

haunt for you. We’ve picked out some of the best in the city, from gastro pubs to cocktail bars.

PUBS The Old Fox

The Brasshouse

54-56 Hurst Street, B5 4TD Opposite the Hippodrome, this is a good bet for a decent pint in the city centre. Dating back to 1891, the Old Fox is a classic example of the Victorian pub with a selection of ales and big comfy armchairs.

44 Broad Street, B1 2HP Th is massive L-shaped pub has a distinct urban feel, while a good selection of beers and spirits. Good place to start a night out before sampling some of the city’s more opulent bars.

30

Island Bar 14-16 Suffolk Street, B1 1LT With a focus on cocktails, DJs and live music, the Island Bar has taken a rock’n’roll attitude to the city’s bar scene. Featuring Birmingham’s fi rst Tiki Bar in the upstair’s area, cocktail and rum lovers can now fi nd their own tropical paradises. Drinks are big and fruity, often served in wacky drinking vessels.

Nuvo

COCKTAILS

The Victoria 48 John Bright Street, B1 1BN The Victoria is a traditional pub that modernised. In addition to its list of cask ales and bottled lagers, the drinks menu features a selection of cocktails. The walls

The bar features an innovative cocktail menu, handpicked wines and a selection of local cask ales. Also check out at the courtyard at the rear of the bar as it has been given an Alice in Wonderland makeover.

The Jekyll & Hyde 28 Steelhouse Lane, B4 6BJ The Jekyll & Hyde has recently undergone a renovation with the upstairs bar converted into a gin parlour, which has a range of more than 50 different gins.

2 Brunswick Square, B1 2LP If champagne is your tipple of choice or you want to celebrate closing a deal then head over to Nuvo, an elegant lounge bar located in the Brindleyplace complex. Offering exclusive champagne, wine and cocktail lists, Nuvo prides itself on being

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

an exclusive night for people that want a party without the attitude – it’s all about the music, people and atmosphere.

Boujee Rooms 193-194 Broad Street, B15 1AY Tucked away above an old restaurant on Broad Street is the city’s latest loft-style venue. In a previous life, Boujee Rooms was a Chinese restaurant and it has retained many of the luxurious features to become an exclusive club. Taking its cue from the New York’s members’ clubs, the club features six rooms with various lounges, champagne and cocktail bars, chill out zones, dance floors and booths. Perhaps the best feature for a chilly February is the Mediterraneanstyle heared roof-top terrace.

Mechu 47-59 Summer Row, B3 1JJ For a scintillating cocktail or an ice-cold beer in a laid-back bar, try Mechu. Deep purple timber flooring and exposed brickwork


THE JEWELLERY SHOW / WINING AND DINING

decor. A wide selection of world lagers, deluxe spirits and cocktails cater for whatever mood you’re in.

Arca

are complemented with fl aming candles and slouchy seating. The downstairs bar and grill is an ideal spot to enjoy grazing platters, salads or streaks. Upstairs is a private VIP lounge which has a stylish nod to the 1960s and a Champagne bar with Dom Perignon By Night status. Th ink Mary Quant deluxe with a dash of Paco Rabanne.

NIGHT BITES

CLUBS & DANCING Mono Bar The Arcadia Centre, Hurst Street, B5 4TB The Arcadia Centre is home to many bars and restaurants, with Mono Bar being a favourite of the city’s chic crowd. The stylish decor and ambience allows for a relaxing drink early evening, and later the bar becomes a truly vibrant experience making it an essential venue for a night out

Old Orleans

The O Bar

80 Broad Street, B15 1AU Try Old Orleans for a change of pace from the hustle and bustle of Broad Street. Th is bar is a blend of the American South, Creole and Cajun cultures. The food and drinks menu reflects its Louisiana and Cajun heritage with Jambalaya and Gumbo being the house specialities.

Broad Street, B1 2DS Birmingham’s Broad Street is crammed with pulsating bars and clubs and the opulent O Bar certainly stands out from the crowd. Split over two rooms, each with its own DJ playing an eclectic mix of tracks, it caters to the clubbing crowd.

The Arcadia Centre, Hurst Street, B5 4TB Located in heart of Birmingham, Arca is a funky and vibrant concept bar serving up an eclectic mix of great music and cocktails. A venue suited to the more serious dancer, the music is a cross of house, electro and funky house mixed with commercial beats and it is certainly a place to be when the sun goes down.

Bar Risa Quay Side Tower, 259-263 Broad Street, B1 2HF Bar Risa is one of the larger venues on Broad Street, housing seven bars split across six rooms. It has been designed to ensure that there is an area to suit every mood. Th is stylish bar is open until late most nights and it also incorporates Highlight, which is the UK’s largest comedy club, where you can eat, drink, laugh and dance all night long.

Air Heath Mill Lane, B9 4AL If you’ve brought your dancing shoes to The Jewellery Show, then this is the place you’ll want

Poppyred Red Bar and Lounge Temple Street, B2 5BN 0121 643 0194 Red Bar and Lounge is one of the smaller bars to have made it onto our best of Birmingham list. Located right in the heart of the city centre, this stylish bar offers an impressive wine and cocktail list in a stylish, relaxed environment. And if you get peckish late during the evening then make sure you sample some of the delights on its Nite Bites & Tapas menu. 32

The Arcadia Centre, Hurst Street, B5 4TB Listen to some of the city’s best DJs as they play a mix of funk, soul and party tunes. Th is is the place to head to if you want to party until well past bedtime.

Sobar The Arcadia Centre, Hurst Street, B5 4TB Serving the city with a vivacious atmosphere and a good selection of music, Sabor caters to chic crowd that matches its chic

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

to be. Air is situated in a former warehouse and is one of the city’s superclubs. Spread over three floors, the club contains two dance floors, four bars, and a VIP lounge. It’s best known as the home of Babooshka and Godskitchen music brands.

The Factory Gibb Street, B9 4AA The Factory nightclub is based in a converted Bird’s Custard factory, hence its Andy Warholesque name. With a capacity of more than 1,000, the venue hosts regular events and club nights in its three-tiered glassfronted building set around an ornamental lake. The Factory is part of a larger complex, which houses a range of creative companies, galleries, artists and independent shops, making it well worth a visit during the daytime too.

Q Club 212 Corporation Street, B4 6QB Located on Corporation Street in the Gun Quarter of Birmingham is the Q Club. Featuring seven rooms in the Grade II listed building, this club has a reputation for hosting some of the city’s best party nights and has hosted events organised by the Ministry of Sound, Bassline, Heaven, Atomic Jam and Cream.


WatchPro FEBRUARY 2011 / ISSUE 02

www.professionaljeweller.com

NEWS, TRENDS AND MARKET INTELLIGENCE FOR THE BRITISH WATCH INDUSTRY

OMEGA ON GOING IT ALONE

NEWS PEOPLE PRODUCTS OPINION & COMMENT GPS MEETS MECHANICAL MOVEMENTS BJA EYES W WATCH BIZ POLI POLICE’S NEW C CAMPAIGN FESTI FESTINA BACK IIN THE UK


www.policebeyounique.co.uk


14 FRONT

6

3

News Review A round-up of this month’s watch industry news.

6

News in Quotes Who said what in the world of watches this month.

7

Watch Watch Paul Harry returns and asks whether online watch retailers are friend or foe.

3

8

ON THE COVER 8

Omega on Standing Alone Omega’s brand director Frederic Nardin answers questions about expanding the brand’s standalone network.

10

Police Has a New Trick Up its Sleeve Could Police’s new campaign be the Orange Wednesdays of the watch market?

12

Festina Arrives Back in the UK We take a look at the successful Spanish watch brand as it returns to the UK.

7

REGULARS 14 16

New Products A fresh selection of timepieces above and below the £1,000 mark. Tech Spot Reconvilier marries GPS technology with a mechanical movement to create a golfer’s dream watch.

10 12

16

THIS MONTH’S COVER The Skeleton Central Tourbillon Co-Axial Platinum Limited Edition by Omega.

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / WATCHPRO

1


COMMENT

ITP PROMEDIA PUBLISHING 16A Baldwins Gardens, London, EC1N 7RJ, UK

It’s always good to try something different. Sometimes you fail, sometimes you succeed, but most of the time you’ll find yourself classed as an innovator. Psychologically, there is no better time than the start of a new year to break out and try to push in new directions. You feel fresh and the world seems full of possibilities. The UK watch market, it would seem, has been swept away by this enticing new year’s wind of change. As we prepare ourselves for the onslaught of trade show season and the universe of new product choices that will bring, some companies are looking within their own ranks for areas of risk that could bring rewards. Police is risking £500,000 on a new campaign that could provide the watch industry with a membership scheme to rival Orange Wednesdays while Unique Jewelry is taking a risk by stepping out of its jewellery com-

fort zone to become the UK distributor for Festina, a successful brand in the Europe and the US but one that has been absent from the UK for years. The BJA is also taking a risk and innovating. Historically an organisation for jewellers, the association is now widening its scope to include watch businesses in the UK. Festina could flop, the BJA could fail to break into the watch market and Police’s campaign could be an expensive learning curve, but the chances are that by stepping out and taking a risk their businesses will be in a better position by 2012. And then who knows what risks they might be willing to take? While it’s important to learn from your mistakes, it’s also important to allow yourself to make some to discover just how much you can achieve when you push yourself.

Tel: +44 (0) 20 31 764228 Fax: +44 (0) 20 31 764231 EDITORIAL EDITOR Rachael Taylor, rachael.taylor@itp.com ASSISTANT EDITOR Kathryn Bishop, kathryn.bishop@itp.com CONTRIBUTORS Paul Harry COMMERCIAL SALES MANAGER Terri Woodhams, terri.woodhams@itp.com STUDIO GROUP ART EDITOR Daniel Prescott, daniel.prescott@itp.com DESIGNER Lucy McMurray DIGITAL CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER Hitendra Molleti, hitendra.molleti@itp.com ONLINE PRODUCTION Ernesto Ceralde, Rose Yorobe, Bryan Silva PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION GROUP PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR Kyle Smith, kyle.smith@itp.com DEPUTY PRODUCTION MANAGER

RACHAEL TAYLOR EDITOR rachael.taylor@itp.com

Matthew Grant, matthew.grant@itp.com DATABASE MANAGEMENT Manju Sajeesh, manju.sajeesh@itp.com CIRCULATION CIRCULATION CUSTOMER SERVICE +971 4 286 8559

THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS Simon Rainer is

Kathryn Bishop is

chief executive of

new to the editorial

the British Jeweller’s

team at WatchPro

Association. This

and Professional

month he popped

Jeweller. She joined as assistant editor

into our offices unannounced to give us an exclusive on

in January and in her first month work-

the BJA’s plans to include watch brands

ing on the magazines she has officially

in its organisation for 2011. Having

swum after being thrown in at the deep

worked at watch companies such as ICW

end. In WatchPro this month she has

and Burton McCall in the past WatchPro

delivered an exclusive on the re-entry of

is confident he’ll do a sterling job.

Festina to the UK market.

COMMENT OF THE MONTH

Web: www.professionaljeweller.com Printed by: The MANSON Group Limited The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication, which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the readers’ particular circumstances. The ownership of trademarks is acknowledged. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the permission of the publishers in writing. An exception is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review.

Cindy Plain on Raymond Weil unveils BRIT Awards watches “I love the ladies watch. It’s unusual to see a watch that is elegant enough for dress but isn’t on a bracelet strap. I’ll be interested to see what RW has to offer retailers

As comment of the month Cindy Plain has won a bottle of Snow Leopard vodka. To be in with a chance of winning in March’s issue all you have to do is join the online community at professionaljeweller.com and comment on a watch story..

from this line.”

2

WATCHPRO / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

Published by and copyright 2011 Promedia Ltd, incorporated and registered in the British Virgin Islands under company number 1559854.


NEWS REVIEW / FRONT

TOP STORY NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN QUOTES WATCH WATCH COLUMN PARTIES

3 4 6 7 7

THIS MONTH IN THE WORLD OF WATCHES

SEIKO UK ON BOARD AS BJA MAKES MOVES TO BECOME VOICE OF THE UK WATCH INDUSTRY

T

he British Jewellers’ Association (BJA) is making inroads into the UK watch industry by opening its membership to watch companies and has already signed up Seiko UK. The BJA has historically mainly dealt with jewellery companies but new chief executive Simon Rainer is leading a widening of the association’s scope by inviting members of the British watch community to join. Rainer, who took over leader-

ship of the BJA this summer, has a past history working in the watch industry for companies such as ICW, Burton McCall and Bulova. “By default we’ve had companies that are involved in watches but what I’m aiming to do is create distinct trade categories for watches and clocks,” Rainer exclusively told WatchPro. Rainer said that while there are a number of official bodies in the UK that look after the technical aspects of the watch trade, the BJA is

seeking to work with watch retailers and watch distributors. He said that the BJA will aim to strengthen the UK watch industry by helping its watch members to run more efficiently by offering advice and assistance and campaigning on its behalf over legislative issues. There are key areas that the BJA is focusing on: advising on auditing frequency and costs; costs and legislation associated with product certification; advice and help with product packaging; providing

access to expert advice on restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) and registration, evaluation and authorisation of chemicals (REACH) standards; keeping members abreast of changes and conditions of manufacturing in the Far East. The BJA sits on the British Standards Institute’s (BSI) Jewellery and Horology committee and Rainer claims that this will give it a voice to influence decisions story continued on page 6

FOR DEDICATED WATCH INDUSTRY NEWS ONLINE CLICK THE WATCHPRO TAB AT www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / WATCHPRO

3


FRONT / NEWS REVIEW

NEWS REVIEW GFK: WATCH SALES HIT £912M IN 2010

Market research company GfK reported that watch sales hit £912 million in the UK last year. The figures for 2010 suggest a positive growth in the watch market, with more than 10.8 million timepieces sold during 2010. Department stores saw a near 20 percent rise in watch sales, however the heavy snowfall has been blamed for a drop in sales at multiple retailers during the Christmas period when compared to the sales in 2009.

OMEGA INCREASES CO-AX WARRANTY Omega has increased the warranty on its Co-Axial movement to four years. The brand said it has been able to extend the warranty due to improved stability and long-term timekeeping performance created by the introduction of its Si 14 silicon balance spring. Previously Omega had offered a three-year warranty on its Co-Axial calibre watches and offers a two-year warranty on all other models.

OMEGA OPENS 7TH UK STANDALONE SHOP ON LONDON’S REGENT STREET

O

mega has opened a new London boutique in on the city’s Regent Street. The two-floor shop is the Swiss watch brand’s seventh standalone boutique in the UK and Ireland. It offers a mixed range of new and classic Omega timepieces, jewellery and branded leather goods. President Stephen Urquhart said: “We are delighted to continue our expansion in the UK and our new flagship boutique on Regent Street demonstrates what an important market this is for us.’’

FESTINA BACK IN UK BRITS WATCHES 2011 Raymond Weil has designed two fashion-led watches as part of its sponsorship of the 2011 BRIT awards. The Swiss watch brand has created 60 of the limited-edition watches, which will be gifted to performers and award winners at the BRITs ceremony on February 15. The brand said that it will be creating a wholesale version of the designs at a later date.

Spanish watch brand Festina has arrived in the UK after several successful years in the European and US markets. The brand was founded in Switzerland in 1902 and currently sells in 75 countries with more than 4.5 million watches sold each year. Festina is a long-term sponsor of sporting events including the Tour de France. The timepieces will be distributed in the UK by Unique Jewelry. 4

WATCHPRO / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


NEWS REVIEW / FRONT

RICHEMONT WATCH SALES RISE 20% AS GROUP REAPS BENEFITS OF N-A-P

S

ales at Richemont’s watch divisions rose by 20 percent in the three months to December 31. The Swiss company reported 23 percent growth in total sales to €2.1 billion (£1.8bn), excluding any change in exchange rates. Th is figure was positively impacted by the group’s acquisition of Net-a-Porter, but excluding sales from the luxury e-tailer the group’s total sales were still up 19 percent. Richemont’s European sales rose 17 percent in the quarter from to €791 million (£662m).

EDOX TEAMS UP WITH FREEDIVER Edox has teamed up with freediver Christian Redl for the launch of its latest limitededition watch, the Iceman I. The watch, which is water resistant to 1,000m will be available in a limited edition of 700 pieces. Edox has said that Redl will wear the watch, which is a successor to the brand’s Ice Shark, during his dives.

HIGHEST EVER SALES AT SWATCH GROUP Sales at Swatch Group exceeded CHF 6 billion (£3.91bn) for the fi rst time in 2010 in what was a “record year” for the company. Sales were up 21.8 percent on 2009’s fi gures and up 12.7 percent on 2008. The group’s watch and jewellery sector performed particularly well with sales growth of 21 percent in December. Swatch Group said there were indications in January of continued doubledigit growth and added that it believes the outlook remains optimistic for further strong organic sales growth in 2011.

CARTIER TO RAISE PRICES

BUY LECOULTRE ON FACEBOOK SHOP

Luxury watch brands Cartier and Montblanc have stated an intent to increase prices in 2011. Montblanc chief executive Lutz Bethge said retail price increases were a “certainty” owing to rising metal and gold prices.

ASOS.com has created a new app that will allow shoppers to buy watches from brands such as Jaeger LeCoultre, Longines and Omega through Facebook. The online fashion retailer has unveiled its fi rst fully integrated Facebook store that allows customers to shop from the social networking site, with a fully functioning e-commerce facility. Customers can share, review and comment on products. Other Asos watch brands include Armani, Casio and D&G.

SKAGEN UK JOINS CMJ TO GROW BIZ The UK division of watch brand Skagen has become a member of buying group CMJ, following a fi nal agreement before Christmas. Richard Hill, brand manager for Skagen UK expressed his delight at the move. He said: “CMJ have the kind of customers we want to align ourselves with, they are our target market and they fit with the Skagen brand.” The watch brand was founded in 1987 on the principle that beautifully designed, highquality objects can be created at reasonable prices.

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / WATCHPRO

5


FRONT / NEWS REVIEW

NEWS IN QUOTES

“The motto of Baume et Mercier is ‘life is about moments’, [which] very much reflects my personal philosophy.” GWYNETH PALTROW on her own unique passage of time while attending SIHH in her new role as a Baume et Mercier ambassador.

“The CMJ will be our focus this year, reaching more independent retailers is key.”

story continued from page 3

and put its members’ points of view to the institute. “All new European regulations come through BSI and then we as a group agree or disagree to modifications,” he said. Rainer cited regulations for disposing of watch batteries as dictated by the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) regulations as an example of an area of legislation that the BJA could help watch companies to deal with. He added: “We have a presence on a number of EU legislative bodies and can perhaps ensure that when new legislation comes along, sense and sensibility is to the fore. There is a whole host of things we can get involved in but collectively we can work on [the UK watch industry’s] behalf. Companies can’t sit on regulatory bodies, they can’t get the access that we can.” Funding for UK watch companies to attend international trade shows is another members’ benefit that Rainer is developing. The BJA has already negotiated with UK Trade & Invest-

Skagen UK brand manager RICHARD HILL on joining buying group CMJ and continuing its expansion into the UK market.

“The team is our most important asset and therefore we are passionate about maintaining a great working environment.” Aurum chief executive JUSTIN STEAD on his Brilliance Incentive scheme, which saw 42,000 members of staff member win points for selling diamond-set watches and jewellery.

“They must find slightly quirky ways to express their personal tastes.” SIMON CARTER describing City gents following the opening of his second acessories-only store close to London’s stock exchange.

“We put Patek Philippe and Rolex shop-in-shops in two locations and they have worked very well.” KARL IRWIN, manager and watch specialist at retailer David M. Robinson, on the trend for shop-in-shops after his original reluctance to do so in case the retailer lost its identity.

>> Something to say? Email info@professionaljeweller.com

6

ment (UKTI) to secure a small number of grants to help with funding for Baselworld 2011. The BJA is part of the British Jewellery and Gift Federation, which Rainer described as having “a strong export section and links with the government” and he said the organisation can use this partnership to offer members export opportunities. He added: “[The BJGF] gets funding and providing companies meet criteria they get funds towards a stand. Before they go out [to an international show] we would make sure that the product is right for the market.” The BJA already runs an export division, called London Jewellery Exports, which supports London-based designers, and gives them fi nancial aid to exhibit at international shows such as Kara in France and Inhorgenta in Germany. Whereas these expeditions have been a collective stand showing wares from a arrange of designers, Rainer said that the BJGF funding would provide costs towards a standalone stand for watch companies rather showing stock on a BJA stand. Seiko has already signed up to become a member of the BJA, a major coup for the organisation. Seiko UK sales and marketing director David Harnby said: “For Seiko UK, it is the reassurances that the BJA can provide help and guidance on a wide range of industry-related issues. Their presence on a number of EU legislative bodies should help the watch and jewellery industry to have a clearer understanding of the implications of proposed legislation in advance of becoming law. It is good to know there is a body which can present a voice of authority on industry topics which ensures that relevant compliances are better understood.”

>> Got a story for WatchPro? Email info@professionaljeweller.com

WATCHPRO / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


NEWS REVIEW / FRONT

WATCH WATCH

Watches online: Is the internet a friend or foe?

THE GUEST LIST

WHO WAS WHERE AT THE HOTTEST WATCH PARTIES OF THE MONTH

I WC L AU N H PO RT O F I NO R A N G E AT S I H H WHERE? Geneva WHEN? January 18 WHO? Model Elle Macpherson, singer Ronan Keating, tennis legend Boris Becker. PICTURED: Actors Kevin Spacey and Cate Blanchett with IWC chief executive Georges Kern

PAUL HARRY sales and marketing director, Peers Hardy

W

hether

shorten the life of a watch brand,

traditionalists

what effect will the huge number of

like it or not, the

sites available on a single screen at

internet is a fact of

the click of a mouse have?

business life in the 21st century. King

In physical shops, imposing

Canute would no doubt replicate his

window displays, personal service

previous result if trying to stop the

and the history of a retailer play

tide of this phenomenon.

a huge part. Online is a different

Another Christmas has passed

story. Service is more and more

with reports of exponential growth

a key element in this sector with

in online sales. Success was far

choice, secure payment, money-

and wide across the board with

back guarantees, flexible deliveries,

the independent and multiple retail

etc, becoming the norm. Some

sectors in rude web health as well as

sites are also investing in the latest

online-only businesses faring well.

technology such as augmented

But how best can watch suppliers serve their brands, retailers and consumers? When looking for

reality so that the online experience is more akin to a physical shop. For many of the remaining sellers,

physical doors, distributors try to

price tends to be the method of

avoid having too many in one place,

standing out from the crowd. While

thereby maximising the revenue for

morally, not to mention legally,

the stockist in that location but how

distributors welcome the fact that

to replicate this online?

consumers can enjoy value, they

Although the internet is vast, in a few key strokes the whole market can be brought to the consumer’s

B AU M E ET M E RC I E R S E A S I D E PA RT Y AT S I H WHERE? Geneva WHEN? January 17 WHO? Actor Vincent Perez, dancer Mathilda May, olympic swimmer Thomas Kretschmann PICTURED: Baume et Mercier chief executive Alain Zimmerman with new brand ambassador Gwyneth Paltrow

prefer that value is not just reflected purely in price. In answer to the opening

computer screen. This then includes

question, the internet has to become

all national account, department

a friend because it is the future, but

store and independent retail

for the sake of a brand’s longevity,

e-commerce sites, not to mention

it is wise to choose online partners

the internet-only sellers. If flooding

carefully and work with those adding

a town with physical doors can

value or it may quickly become a foe.

G-SHOCK AT BERLIN FASHION WEEK WHERE? CLVVII concept store, Berlin WHEN? January 21 WHO? Girl band Queensberry PICTURED: TV presenter Nandini Mitra www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / WATCHPRO

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OMEGA / INTERVIEW

BRANCHING OUT OMEGA NOW HAS SEVEN STANDALONE BOUTIQUES IN THE UK AND IS RAMPING UP ITS LIFESTYLE PRODUCT OFFER. RACHAEL TAYLOR PUTS SOME TOUGH QUESTIONS TO FREDERIC NARDIN ABOUT WHETHER THE BRAND STILL NEEDS OR WANTS RETAILERS.

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1 Omega’s shop on Regent Street is its seventh in the UK and Ireland. 2 Omega has just extended the warranty on its CoAxial watches from three to four years. 3&4 Inside Omega’s Regent Street shop, which includes a watch repair workshop and exclusive VIP area.

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hen Omega opened its seventh standalone boutique in the UK and Ireland on London’s Regent Street in December, the luxury watch brand’s president Stephen Urquhart told the press he was “delighted to continue expansion into the UK” and that the store opening reflected how important the market was to the Swatch-owned brand. That the UK market is important is a given, but which spectrum of the market has been up for debate. With a series of standalone store openings – the brand now has four in London, one at Heathrow, one in Dublin and one in Manchester – there have been murmurings in the industry that the brand is shifting its reliance away from independent retailers. When WatchPro puts these questions to Omega brand director Frederic Nardin the unease in his voice is clear, but while he remains suitably vague about future strategies – “who knows how it will be in 100 or 10 years?” – he is clear about the message he wants to deliver: that the opening of standalone stores is a marketing tool for the brand that retailers will benefit from. “[Our retail partners] are quite happy, they understand what we want to achieve,” he says. “[The boutique openings] have helped everyone by raising awareness of the brand.” Brand awareness is certainly something that the new Regent Street boutique will deliver. Set near to retail attractions such as Topshop’s flagship store within a shopping area that claims to attract 200 million shoppers a year from all over the globe, Omega will no doubt pick up a few extra customers.

While the brand already has other London locations, Nardin believes that the diversity of the city will lead to a fresh shopper demographic. “It is a prime retail location and every time it is a different kind of customer,” he says. “It has a really high footfall so we think it will be a really successful boutique.” As well as raising awareness of its brand, Omega is deepening the brand. On sale in the Regent Street boutique next to a mixed range of classic and new timepieces will be branded Omega jewellery, leather goods and perfume. These products have been designed, according to Nardin, to give shoppers “the whole Omega experience”. He adds: “We are not just a luxury brand, we go into lifestyle.” Nardin says that Omega wants to involve its customers in the lifestyle activities it associates itself with, such as its support of space exploration, sporting activities and celebrity partnerships. It feels that by offering supporting

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WATCHPRO / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

products to its watches it will widen its appeal from a Swiss watch brand into a consumer experience. Quality remains important to Omega when creating offshoot lines; these lifestyle products are not cheap promotional sales tools but luxury goods. Omega’s perfume has been created in Switzerland by master perfumer Alberto Morillas and prices for the scent start at £70. Its range of leather goods, which include bags, wallets and watch winders, have been crafted in Italy using fine calf leather and have a minimum retail price of £200. Brand integrity is very important to the Swiss watchmaker and may well affect the relationship it has with retailers as its network of own stores continues to grow. Nardin says that Omega has no immediate standalone store openings in the diary but he does say that the brand’s store expansion programme will not be taking a break.


INTERVIEW / OMEGA

2

While Nardin flatly denies that Omega would cut off retailers because it is expanding its own retail network, he does say that the brand will move away from retailers it feels are not positioning the brand properly. Nardin says that retailers need to give the brand a “special theatre” in stores. When asked if this means that Omega will be requiring its current retail stockists to take shop-in-shop furniture to continue as stockists he answers no but makes it clear he expects Omega to be on a par with its competitors in a retail environment. “We will keep working with [stockists] if it is the right location and we are treated on a level basis with our competitors but if the retailer is not ready to give us the same space then we will go,” he says. “We always need to think about the end consumer and give them the right experience. We review our distribution all the time to ensure we have the right location and the right partner.” Nardin claims that Omega is not trying to protect its brand through this constant review, but instead is “making sure the customer has all the right information”. But surely the best way to ensure quality control of its brand

image is to close down relations with its retail stockists and focus purely on its own retail business? Nardin pauses before answering and delivers a balanced answer that neither rules out a heavy focus on its own retail arm or continuing to work with independent retailers. “Who knows how will it be in 100 years or 10 years – I don’t,” he says sagely. “I know for sure we will never open a boutique in a remote part of the coun-

try and nowadays I can only think if 10 luxury brands that people will travel 300 miles to purchase. But will Omega be a brand like this someday? I don’t know.”

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4

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / WATCHPRO

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POLICE’S BEYOUNIQUE / MARKETING

COME FLY WITH ME

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NOT ONLY IS POLICE SPENDING £500K ON GIVING AWAY EXPERIENCES OF A LIFETIME THAT INCLUDE FLYING A FIGHTER JET IN RUSSIA, IT IS ALSO LAUNCHING A MEMBERS-ONLY CLUB THAT COULD BE THE ORANGE WEDNESDAYS OF THE WATCH INDUSTRY. GET YOUR PO S AT THE READY, IT’S GOING TO BE ONE HELL OF A RIDE.

A

1 One of the Beyounique prizes is flying a fi ghter jet in Russia.

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t some point in their lives nearly every man has indulged in his own private Top Gun fantasies. And who hasn’t dreamed of taking a dip in the Indian Ocean to swim with tropical fishes? Or maybe the celebrity lifestyle is more your thing, in say Cannes, LA or Barbados? All these experiences and more make up what is, to date, Police Watches’ most expensive consumer marketing campaign, branded Beyounique. At a cost of £500,000, it is hoping for some serious return on invest-

ment, but with such awe-inspiring prizes on offer it is hard to imagine this campaign flopping. The brand will give away one of 12 holiday experiences each month, starting this month. The competition is open to any consumer who buys a Police watch and has received a Beyounique membership card. To enter, all they have to do is log on to the dedicated website and tap in the code. If customers fail to win one month, their entry is rolled over to the next. While Police and UK distributor Inter-City Watches (ICW) are hoping for stellar sales as a result of the cam-

WATCHPRO / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

paign, they won’t be expecting shoppers to buy a watch each month, jokes ICW Swiss divisional manager Gareth Somers. He adds: “They can also get another shot at the competition by referring a friend.” Somers says that running the campaign is not just about driving sales, but about building brand awareness and creating a little club that shoppers can feel part of. While the 12 holiday experiences are the headline attraction of the competition, the Beyounique card acts as a loyalty card throughout the year, giving members discounts on everyday experiences


MARKETING / POLICE’S BEYOUNIQUE

such as renting fi lms from Blockbuster, buying gifts from retailer Mankind or visiting an Odeon cinema. Police will also be giving away free subscriptions to GQ magazine as part of a regular prize draw. While ICW is keen to build the brand, at a retail level the competition and membership scheme could be a very clever way to get shoppers in stores. Much like the Orange Wednesdays cinema scheme has mushroomed over the past eight years, with friends – particularly the teen and young adult market – joining the telephone network to keep up with contemporaries, the Police campaign has the potential to have a similar effect and the necessity to be a part of Beyounique could even become more important than owning a Police watch. While this is a scenario that most brands would baulk at, including Police no doubt, it has worked wonders for Orange. When hesitating between service providers the allure of Orange Wednesdays has no doubt swayed many a decision more than the tarriff offers from Orange itself. The scheme has also since rolled out the deal through a partnership with Pizza Express to offer a two-for-one deal on pizzas, encouraging customers to go for pizza and a movie on Wednesdays. Police has created a wide range of point-of-sale materials to support the campaign and communicate it effectively at a retail level. Branded Beyounique goods include pens, keyrings, cabinets, cardboard cut-outs, window displays and sales guides for staff In a world of social networks, group discounts websites and a demand for multi-faceted products, the creation of an exclusive club that stretches further than the big-prize competition and beyond the watch sphere to offer members everyday offers that they will want to take advantage of on a regular basis could cause an unprecedented spike in brand loyalty. And while the brand might shudder at the thought of the fad becoming bigger than the product, it would be highly unlikely it would feel the same about the associated sales figures.

THE PRIZES  Drive a super jeep in Iceland  Live the A-list lifestyle in Cannes  Go snowmobiling in Bulgaria  Live it up on a private island off the coast of Rio  Fly fighter jets in Russia  Learn how to make cocktails in Barbados  Go skiing in the desert in Dubai  Go diving in the Maldives  Take a helicopter ride over Chicago  Take a bullet train in Tokyo  Drive a convertible from LA to Las Vegas  Fly a Microlight aircraft in Cambodia

2 Beyounique will be supported by a consumer ad campaign. 3 Could Beyounique be the Orange Wednesdays of the watch industry?

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3

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / WATCHPRO

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FESTINA / BRAND WATCH

1

HASTEN SLOWLY NO MORE AFTER SEVERAL YEARS’ ABSENCE, WATCH BRAND FESTINA IS BACK IN THE UK WITH NEW COLLECTIONS AND A DETERMINED OUTLOOK, WRITES KATHRYN BISHOP. 1 Colourful Festina models. 2 Promo Festina cars at the Tour de France.. 3 German cyclist Marcel Wust celebrates a win for Team Festina during Tour de France.

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atch brand Festina has been enjoying a successful few years with watch sales hitting 4.5 million pieces a year, but despite its commercial wins it has failed to win over the UK market. In fact, it hasn’t even been trying. The brand was founded in Switzerland in 1902 and was bought by Spain’s Lotus Brand in 1980, with the Festina brand name fully acquired in

1984. Today the Festina Group owns six brands including Jaguar and Lotus watches and has operated successfully in France, Italy, the US and Switzerland since the mid-90s. Despite widespread international success, the brand has been absent from the UK market for several years. The brand’s motto festina lente translates as hasten slowly. With a 109-year history it certainly has been slow to crack the UK market, but plans are afoot to change this in 2011.

WATCHPRO / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

Unique Jewelry, which to date has specialised in the wholesale of jewellery, has broadened its scope to watches and has started by taking on the UK distribution of Festina. “They’re a great brand,” says Unique’s Daniel Ozel. “Very sporty, fresh and young, but with a wide spectrum of watches from very classic pieces to ceramic fashion watches and sportier men’s watches.” Ozel describes Festina as offering original designs and materials at com-


BRAND WATCH / FESTINA

3

petitive prices, with a commitment to current trends. Its timepieces retail from £59 for a simple everyday watch, to £299 for the sportier gents’ timepieces, with an average retail price for a Festina watch about £150. The brand has succeeded in markets outside of the UK and sells its wares in 75 countries. Especially popular in Europe, Festina not only has a developed stockist network, it also has standalone stores in France, Germany, Italy and Switzerland, to name just a few. The UK marketplace is currently crowded with fashion watches in Festina’s bracket but Ozel says that Festina will stand out with a sportier offer in that price range. The brand sponsors a number of sporting events including the Tour de France – of which it is official timekeeper – and the Berlin and Hamburg marathons. “The popular ChronoBike watches are Festina’s official Tour de France

watch”, says Ozel. “Festina design a new one each year for each tour, so the 2011 watch will be unveiled soon.” The details on the ChronoBike watches play on the cycling theme, with subdials designed to look like bike cranksets and a bicycle chain engraved on the back of the watch case. It’s these details which have no doubt popularised the brand across Europe, especially within France where the brand’s sponsorship of the Tour de France dates back more than 15 years. Festina insists it has a strict focus on quality and craftsmanship, something it says is evident in its Special Collections, which include the ChronoBike watches and a range of modern, sporty ceramic timepieces. Th is is a re-entry, not an entry into the market; Festina has entered and exited the UK before. While it has evidently found it tough here before, Unique is determined to make 2011 the year Festina flourishes in the UK.

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FESTINA’S DEVELOPMENT UNDER LOTUS OWNERSHIP 1980 - Festina watches, founded in Switzerland in 1902, are taken over by Spain’s Lotus Brand. 1994 – Festina becomes the official sponsor of the Tour de France. 1995 – Festina’s first titanium watch is launched, bringing the then exclusive metal within the general public’s reach. 1996 – The brand first appears in the US and opens a subsidiary in Switzerland.

1999 – Festina launches its first gold watch line, called Festina Oro. 2002 – The brand name celebrates 100 years and launches the Century Edition watch combining both modern and traditional watchmaking skills. 2009 – The brand unveils its Ceramic collection of fashion-forward watches. 2011 – The brand arrives back in the UK under distributor Unique Jewelry.

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / WATCHPRO

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WATCH SHOWCASE / OVER £1,000

MEMOVEX TRIBUTE TO DEEP

DB28 BY DE BETHUNE

SEA BY JAEGER-LECOULTRE

This titanium timepiece makes use of a

Jaeger-LeCoultre has returned to its roots

spherical moon, blued steel, silicon and

with a re-edition of its first diver’s watch,

palladium balance wheel, triple pare-chute

the 1959 Memovex Deep. Like its pred-

shock-absorbing system and patented

ecessor the Memovex Tribute to Deep Sea

floating lugs to create an avante-garde

has a European version (pictured) and

delight. The dial serves as a window onto

an American version. The case size has

the movement while the delta-shaped

been upsized from 39.8mm to 40.5mm

polished steel mainplate and De Bethune

and production has been limited to 959

stripes are combined with a blue chapter

timepieces.

ring to ensure optimal readability.

RRP: £8,100

RRP: POA

Contact: Richemont, 0207 491 6870,

Contact: De Buthene, +41 21 454 2281,

richemont.com

debuthene.ch

CERAMIC CROMA BY TECHNOMARINE TechnoMarine has dipped into the popular ceramic watch trend with its latest creaSPIDOSPEED BY LINDE WERDELIN

tion, the Ceramic Croma. The Swiss-made

Two years ago Linde Werdelin made a splash in

chronograph has a white ceramic case but

the industry when it created the first fully skel-

still makes use of the brand’s trademark

etonised watch. Now it claims to be pushing

silicone strap. The rotating stainless steel

the boundaries even further with the launch

bezel has been set with 24 diamonds and

of its first chronograph. The thin but strong

there are 33 diamonds packed into the dial

LONGINES

skeletonised steel case has a multi-layered dial

which is colour-coded to match the strap.

This watch, with its distinctive 24-hour

to create a 3D effect and has a see-through

RRP: £2,195

dial, was originally designed exclusively

case back and textile strap with steel ardillion

Contact: Nuval, 0121 2334680, nuval.co.uk

for Swiss airline Swissair in the 1950s

buckle.

but Longines is reissuing it this year

RRP: £10,000

for “both historical and functional

Contact: Linde Werdelin, 020 7727 6577,

reasons”. It is fitted with calibre L704.2,

lindewerdelin.com

TWENTY-FOUR HOURS BY

a self-winding movement whereby the hands make one full circle of the dial in 24 hours. The stainless steel case has a diameter of 47.5mm, the dial is matt black with 24 white Arabic numerals coated with Super-Luminova and it has a railway-track minute circle. RRP: TBC Contact: Swatch, 0845 272 3200, swatchgroup.com

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


UNDER £1,000 / WATCH SHOWCASE

D FOR DIAMOND FROM GECKO Girls’ jewellery brand D for Diamond will be launching a new girl’s watch at The Jewellery erShow at Spring Fair that it describes as the “perh fect starter watch for young ladies”. Made with te easy-to-read Roman numerals and hour, minute land second hands differentiated by vibrant colours, the brand is marketing the watch as the e perfect tool to help young girls learn to tell the ne time. The D for Diamond watches have a genuine leather strap and single diamond set into the watch face. RRP: £29.95 Contact: Gecko, 0207 534 3222, geckojewellery.com WIZE & OPE FROM DMJ Another new signing for DMJ, Wize & Ope is a Parisian brand of fun fashion watches aimed at the teen market. Bright colours and cartoon graphics characterise the range of digital and analogue watches that have interchangeable design features allowing owners to change the colour of straps or parts of the case. RRP: £80 Contact: DMJ, 01388 770 870, dmj.info

TIMEBEADS FROM DMJ These miniature timepieces have been designed to fit with any brand of bead bracelets, allowing wearers to add a time-telling charm to existing bracelets with the brand’s patented screw-and-clip fastening. Fitted with Seiko’s rare YL50 movement, which DMJ claims is the smallest in the world, the Timebeads are available in five different styles and made in stainless steel. RRP from £79-85 Contact: DMJ, 01388 770 870, dmj.info PREMIUM G BY CASIO

ESSENCE BY BREIL In a first for the brand, Breil has used a

Part of Casio’s new premium line Premium G

glass case to create an intriguing design

this MTG-1500 450 is radio-controlled to ensure

aesthetic. The dial and the movement

accurate time and is presented as a chronograph

have been placed together in a central

with digital day-date display. Like the rest of

cylinder that is the covered by the glass

the range it has a 10-year battery life, 10-bar

case, with the bezel and crystal glass

water resistance and can withstand a 10

face added on top. The collection has a

meter drop. The launch of Premium G has al-

number of monochrome rubber strap

ready attracted Goldsmiths, Rox, Selfridges

and steel bracelet variations.

and Liberty as stockists.

RRP: £255

RRP: £450

Contact: Binda, 01628 770 988,

Contact: Casio, 020 8450 9131, casio.co.uk

breil.com www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / WATCHPRO

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RECONVILIER HERCULES GOLF MASTER / TECH SPOT

AT FIRST GLANCE THE HERCULES GOLF MASTER LOOKS LIKE A SIMPLE ANALOGUE TIMPIECE, BUT FLIP THE BEZEL AND YOU’LL DISCOVER A GOLFER’S DIGITAL DREAM THAT USES GPS TO ACCURATELY MEASURE THE DISTANCE TO THE GREEN.

T

here are watches named after golf courses and watches promoted by golfers, but the Hercules

Golf Master is a true golfers’ watch. Off the green the timepiece is a slick, sporty mechanical timepiece but on the course it offers golfers an added advantage over competitors through GPS technology. By flipping the watch face over, the timepiece is transformed into a digital rangefinder. The gadget is powered by GPS technology to accurately measure the distance from the wearer to the middle or beginning of the green, allowing for smart play on the course.

THE STATS Automatic ETA 2892A movement COSC-certified chronometer Integrated digital module for LCD display Rotar mechanism Analogue movement with hours, minutes, seconds and date Digital module with hours, minutes, seconds, and distance to green measured with GPS technology Titanium 44mm case Water-resistant to 50m White, black or grey dial Black or white rubber or black leather strap with titanium folding clasp

The watch uses a base station that can be kept on the golf bag to obtain golf course data before the start of the game. On course, the data is relayed automatically from the base station to the watch. The distance can be read in either meters or yards and displayed digitally on an LCD screen. This techo-savvy rangefinder side of the watch face also tells time digitally, activated by the touch of a button. To realise this mix of analogue and digital in a single timepiece Reconvilier had to develop a new housing alternative with an innovative rotar mechanism. Far from being a cheap thrill of a gizmo, the analogue aspect of the watch face has been executed to the highest Reconvillier standards. It is a mechanical, water-resistant, shock-absorbing watch

white strap options. The combination of traditional Swiss

displaying minutes, hours and seconds,

watchmaking and ultra-modern tech-

plus date window. Made in Switzerland,

nology is a joy to behold, making the

the timepiece has been fitted with an

Hercules Golf Master a technical triumph

ETA movement.

in terms of both mechanical and digital

certainly is the most stylish and luxuri-

engineering.

ous, making the Reconvilier Hercules

This double act of a watch face is presented in titanium on a rubber or leather strap and is available with either black or

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It may not be the first watch to take advantage of GPS technology, but it

WATCHPRO / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

Golf Master a golfer’s dream both on and off the course.


BASELWORLD THE WATCH AND JEWELLERY SHOW MARCH 24 – 31, 201 1

WWW.BASELWORLD.COM


INTERVIEW / MISSOMA

WHEN MARISA HORDERN STALLED MISSOMA AT THE HEIGHT OF ITS SUCCESS, FEW COULD UNDERSTAND WHY. NOW SHE’S JUMP STARTING IT IN PARTNERSHIP WITH IBB AND TELLS RACHAEL TAYLOR WHY A BREAK HAS MADE THE BRAND STRONGER.

B

y early 2010 Marisa Hordern had reached the end of her tether. Working solidly for six years and feeling as if she had taken her brand Missoma as far as she could, she decided that enough was enough and left to go travelling. “I did it at the end of the season once I had delivered all the orders,” she says. “It was perfect timing.” While Hordern jetted round the world enjoying four months of experiences that “took me outside my comfort zone and tested me”, such as climbing Machu Picchu in Peru, she left behind a confused and saddened UK jewellery scene. “Everyone was very sad and confused,” she remembers. “Most people thought I was ill. I had lovely letters from retailers and editors.” It is safe to say that Hordern and Missoma’s disappearance didn’t go unnoticed in the industry. While she describes it as “perfect timing”, she left at a moment when Missoma was skyrocketing to success. The brand had just picked up awards at the Italian Jewellery Awards and UK Jewellery Awards and was a firm consumer press favourite with a healthy stockist list of jewellery shops and fashion boutiques, both in the UK and internationally. The year before Hordern had also been involved in founding jewellery design collective Rising Gems with other members who included SHO, Ana De Costa and Leblas. But for Hordern, it was this success

that led to her departure from the industry. She explains: “I knew we’d created a coveted brand and a recognisable brand, but how to scale that up? We were a very small team but we were perceived to be a larger brand than we were. I very much felt that I was chasing my tail.” By taking a complete break from business Hordern was able to “refresh and re-energise”. “Time out makes you clarify, gives you time to reflect,” she affirms. She was also able to get some muchneeded inspiration, something that she had been lacking in. While Hordern is the business face of the brand, she works on the creative aspects with her mother Michele and sister Sophie and the women’s three individual styles meld together to create Missoma. However, one of the trio had been missing from the creative process. “I was doing so much on the business side that I didn’t have time to design,” she explains. Hordern says that her travels definitely inspired her, particularly graffiti that she saw while travelling in South America. So she returned to the UK in June energised, refreshed and inspired, and there was a surprise waiting for her. During her travels, an article appeared on Professional Jeweller’s website about the disappearance of Missoma and Hordern says that afterwards she was contacted by people who had read it and wanted to help her get back in business. “People approached me after the article and it gave me the confidence

1 Missoma has an instantly recognisable style that melds 18ct gold vermeil with brightly coloured 1

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

semi-precious and precious stones.

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MISSOMA / INTERVIEW

2

2 Missoma founder Marisa Hordern says she feels refreshed, energised and inspired by her break that took her on a four-month trip around the world to exotic locations such as South America. 3 A selection of Missoma jewellery including the new Hex cu (bottom) that will launch at The Jewellery Show. this month

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


INTERVIEW / MISSOMA

to approach others,” she reveals. “We had so much good will towards us but I knew I needed the right partner.” After weighing up her options, which included some dubious partnership offers and one offer to become creative director at another brand, Hordern decided to team up with industry stalwart IBB. The partnership is a complete 50-50 split with half the business belonging to the Horderns and the other half to IBB, and all decisions made together. By teaming up with IBB, Missoma will have the cash injection it so desperately needed, but Hordern says her choice to team up with IBB was never just about the money. “Money doesn’t solve everything ,” she says wisely. “IBB have the contacts and 30 years of industry experience.” Working with an established company will also help Hordern to develop as a businesswoman. “Every decision is made together but I get a sounding board,” she says. “Before it was me learning as I went.” Missoma and IBB are working together to refine the brand’s image, making it more of a luxury brand than it might have been perceived as before. Hordern explains: “The brand look we are developing will evolve. Now it will be the luxury branding that I dreamed of.” Trade shows are also on the agenda, with the brand showing at The Jewellery Show at Spring Fair this month and Baselworld in Switzerland next month. Hordern says that the brand’s focus is on the UK market, and in particular the UK jewellery market, not a mix of fashion and jewellery as it had been before. Before Hordern’s break, Missoma had been targeting fashion boutiques and jewellers alike but she believes that by doing so she was stretching the brand’s resources too thinly. She is now planning to move away from fashion. “We were trying to straddle fashion and jewellery before, but we’re not trying to do that anymore,” she says. “We might go back to the fashion route one day but we don’t want to take away from our main focus as a luxury designer jewellery brand.” Even the brand’s present office location reflects this shift from fashion to

jewellery. Before Hordern’s disappearance from the industry Missoma had been based in Chelsea, surrounded by fashion brands; now she is working out of IBB’s offices in Hatton Garden, surrounded by jewellers. While she was only out of the market for less than a year, Hordern believes that it has changed since Missoma was last competing for consumers’ hearts. She says: “The market is very saturated with the same styles. It’s become very competitive and I would be cutting off my nose to spite my face if I didn’t look at that but I do think very much of it is quite samey. There is room for a bit of a change – more bold and fun jewellery. The jewellery industry is ready for that as they’ll be bored. We can fill that space in the market.” Hordern says that while her travels have influenced her creatively and her own personal style has changed to become more demure, fans of the brand will still be able to instantly recognise a Missoma piece. But, taking note of the market conditions, she will be making some changes by designing more daytime pieces and “more wearable offshoots of our more press-worthy statement pieces”. The brand has also created its first ever silver line, which it will unveil at The Jewellery Show at Spring Fair. “On a design level, the world is my oyster [because of the partnership with IBB freeing up her time],” says Hordern. “I feel we were only showing about 10 percent of our potential before.” With a solid investor at her side, more time to design and a sounding board offering more than 30 years of experience, it would seem that Hordern and Missoma have done nothing but benefit from temporarily crashing out of the jewellery market. “Someone said to me, ‘I remember reading about it when you exited the market and I remember thinking it was a clever strategy’,” laughs Hordern. So was it? The categorical answer is no; she did it for her own sake, not to further her business, but looking back she says she now realises that going AWOL at the height of her success wasn’t such a crazy move after all. www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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MARKET UPDATE / BRIDAL

Vinta ge MODERN

THE RECESSION HAS CAUSED A WEDDING BOOM AS COUPLES SEEK OUT SECURITY, AND IT SEEMS THAT BRIDES ARE ALSO ON N THE HUNT FOR THE FAMILIAR THROUGH VINTAGE-INSPIRED RING CHOICES. KATHRYN BISHOP REPORTS ON THIS AND D OTHER TRENDS DRIVING THE MODERN BRIDAL MARKET.

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trend for sapphires.

n this sudden age of austerity, being a bride in 2011 might seem like a daunting prospect. Aside from the recent VAT rise which will affect all aspects of a wedding budget, there are rising metal and gemstones prices to consider when purchasing those all-important wedding and engagement rings. With the average wedding estimated to cost almost £20,000, many couples are facing the tough decision of splashing out on their special day or saving for the permanence of property and children. Of course, weddings will continue to happen, even if a tighter budget is necessary. In 2009 The Telegraph suggested that more couples were getting married during the recessionary period for that feeling of security and closeness. Now, with the royal wedding set for April 29, there has been a re-awakening to the positives of marriage. But retailers are still asking - just what are the bride and groom of 2011 looking for?

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

1 Brides are shopping for jewellery that they will wear beyond their wedding day. 2 Diamond-set wedding bands from Charles Green. 3 The Kate and Wills effect has sparked a

K t Mid ddl t was proposed d to t with ith Kate Middleton Princess Diana’s engagement ring, an 18ct blue sapphire and diamond cluster designed by Garrard in 1981. The style is perhaps not what the public expected ex-Jigsaw accessories buyer Middleton to choose, but the heart-warming story is

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th h t will ill go d i history. hi t one that down in As a result, blue is big news, suggests Claire Gallagher of Pandora. “The continual year-on trend for brides is simplicity, but with the royal wedding this year we’re expecting the traditional look to be huge, with a big focus on blue”, she says.


BRIDAL / MARKET UPDATE

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Philippa P hilip ip ppaa W William Williams ms of W Welsh elsh el sh jjew jewellery ewelleery b bland land d Clogau Clo loga gau ga u Gold agrees. agrees. She She says: “In light of recent events, sapphires are obviously going to be a huge bridal trend in 2011.” The use of the word tradition is ubiquitous among jewellery retailers and designers alike, who are experiencing a resurgence of the classic, demure bride. For this month’s Professional Jeweller bridal photoshoot stylist Rebecca Sammon selected lingerie and bridal accessories with an evident vintage feel through cream-coloured lace and delicate details. The jewellery used at the shoot evoked the same feeling. Diamond cluster engagement rings set with 0.4ct to 0.5ct central stones were key to the style – modern rings with a demure, classic design. Wedding ring designer Charles Green has taken note, with head designer Philip Beale constantly trying out new design ideas. “This year’s trends are already becoming clear,” he says. “I think clusters of diamonds will be a preference, often accompanied by small attentions to detail such as mille grain effects around the settings.” He says that such styles evoke the detail of Edwardian jewellery. British jewellery designer Lindsay Pearson takes Victorian jewellery as her inspiration, and asserts that the vintage trend is big news. “I’m getting married this year and I’ll be making my own rose-cut diamond engagement ring,” she reveals. “It’s the perfect opportunity for me to design some vintage-inspired, very pretty and affordable engagement rings, which is something I’ve wanted to do for some time.” And there’s a chance that the royal engagement has inspired gents to consider proposing with their own mother or grandmother’s rings, saving on the cost of purchasing a new ring but maintaining the ever-important tradition. Jos Skeates, owner and goldsmith at EC One, has experienced a rise in such thrifty proposals. “In the past year or so I’ve seen an everincreasing number of women with inherited, modestly sized diamond engagement rings who want us to design a bespoke wedding ring to complement the design or fit snugly around it” he says. The result, Skeates says, is a bespoke diamond-set wedding band with a vintage-style. The notion of remodelling or so-called upcycling is becoming more widespread. With the rise in cash for gold schemes, recycling old jewellery for something new and improved was foreseeable by many designers. In reply to queries from brides, Dower & Hall recently launched its Sentiment range, allowing customers to take in dated diamond jewellery and have the stones set into modern rings. Dower & Hall co-founder and designer Diane Hall explains: “We saw a rise in brides coming into our stores with family diamonds they wanted to use, or they had been proposed to with the groom’s family ring. They felt they needed to add their own style so we designed the Sentiment range to www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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MARKET UPDATE / BRIDAL

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4 Reports have suggested more couples have gotten married during the recesssion. 5 Vintage-inspired engagement ring by EC One. 6 Clogau Gold has noticed a shift to less traditional wedding bands.

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allow them to do this.” Trends within metals have also changed in the past year, with rose gold achieving a revival of interest due to its traditional, vintage look. Pearson asserts: “Brides will always go for a demure, timeless look. The soft feminine colour of rose gold seems to fit perfectly. It suits almost every skin tone and looks even better with wear.” Pandora has been quick to pick up on the rose gold trend, creating a softly curved, diamond-set collection of rose gold jewellery with its Love Pods collection. Within wedding bands, tradition continues to hold fast for women, but most are keen to stamp some personality on their wedding band. Jewellery designer Laura Gravestock typically works in silver, but has taken on several bridal

ccommissions with a personal touch. “I’ve h had brides who want an original ring,” sshe notes. “They’re still going for wedding b bands in gold and platinum but are optiing for unusual textures, like the beaded ffeel of my Promise ring.” Clogau Gold has also noticed a shift aaway from the traditional. “We are inccreasingly finding that brides-to-be are cchoosing less traditional wedding rings” ssays Williams. “For them it’s all about p personal taste and, of course, budget.” Cindy Dennis Mangan of Dennis & L Lavery designs and hand-makes higheend platinum bridal jewellery. For her, d demand for diamond-set wedding bands h has jumped from 50 percent of clients to 100 percent of clients. “People want matching bridal sets and diamond-set wedding bands”, she explains. “I’m also getting more and more gay couples who want matching designs. Their spend is higher as they don’t have kids.” It seems that the trend for the traditional in the bridal market doesn’t carry through to grooms’ wedding band choices. Gents’ wedding jewellery appears to be growing and evolving simultaneously to suit individual styles and taste. Gone, it seems, are the days of the plain, mattfinished wedding band. Beale notes the current trends in male wedding jewellery, describing the changing tastes and growing confidence of men to choose their own wedding jewellery. “For gents, the wedding band is becoming more important both on the day

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

and beyond,” he says. “We’re finding palladium has become the metal of choice at Charles Green, while geometric patterns on the rings, and straight lines and angles are popular.” Pearson recalls an unusual commission for a gent’s ring undertaken last year. “I helped my friend to make a wedding ring for her partner,” she recalls. “She wanted to be as involved as possible, so I gave her some casting wax and a set of files and she carved out a simple but organic ring, which I finished off and we had cast in gold. The design completely suited her boyfriend’s personality and the emotional attachment they both feel towards it is so much more than if she’d bought a ready-made ring.” However, Dennis Mangan has experienced gents opting for classic court shape rings, often with details of their own choosing. “Men are turning away from flat bands, and they’re also looking for diamond accents”, she notes. Skeates agrees that there has been a change in gents’ wedding band choices, noting a shift in the demand for metals that fit smaller budgets. “There’s been a higher demand for classic-shaped wedding bands” he says. “Gold and platinum are still common but we have made a number of silver wedding rings in the past year, and palladium is big news, especially among guys.” The emotion evoked by wedding jewellery is a strong one. Beyond the symbolism of the rings, the bond built by giving


For almost a century the Royal Family have been wearing wedding

wedding ring. The same nugget has subsequently been used for

rings made from rare Welsh gold from the Clogau Gold Mine and

later generations of the Royal Family, including Queen Elizabeth

with Prince William’s marriage to Catherine Middleton scheduled

II, Princess Margaret, Princess Diana, Prince Charles and The

for April, we wait anxiously to see if this time-honoured Royal

Duchess of Cornwall.

tradition is set to continue. It is a touch of this very same rare Welsh gold used in Royal The tradition was founded by The Queen Mother on her marriage

wedding rings that is contained in every item of Clogau Gold

to King George VI in 1923, when a nugget of pure Clogau Welsh

jewellery and it has made Clogau Gold some of the most sought-

gold donated by a Mr. Bartholomew was used to fashion her

after jewellery in the world.

Containing the very same rare Welsh gold as used in Royal wedding rings www.clogau.co.uk/retail

www.clogau.com

0845 606 88 77

National Sales Manager: Kevan Jenkinson Mobile: 07795 615 108 Email: kevan.jenkinson@clogau.co.uk Head of International Sales: David Butler Mobile: +44(0)7595 733 379 Email: david.butler@clogau.co.uk


MARKET UPDATE / BRIDAL

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7 Civil partnerships are creating a new client base with a higher spend. 8 A royal-inspired engagement ring from EC One. 9 Non-traditional wedding band from Ungar & Ungar.

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and receiving wedding jewellery can be valuable one, something especially true for retailers. When a bride and groom purchase wedding bands together – or even the engagement ring together, as is common today – they are potentially beginning a life-long relationship with their jeweller. Not long after the wedding brides will often be on the lookout for thank you gifts for bridesmaids or family. “I’m often commissioned to create personalised pieces by brides as extra-special thank you gifts,” says Gravestock, who has a collection of rings and pendants that can be personalised with names, initials or bespoke phrases. Pandora and Clogau Gold are finding that pendants and charms are frequently given as bridesmaids’ gifts. “At Pandora our classic charm bracelets and beads are always popular, especially if the bridesmaid already has a bead bracelet. A charm which reflects the wedding day is always idea,” notes Gallagher. For the groomsmen, the traditional set of cufflinks is still regarded as an ideal

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gift, though Skeates offers that they are much less in demand compared with five years ago. Conversely, Gravestock notes: “I have grooms buying gifts for their best men, especially cufflinks. Sometimes they have them made with stones to match the colours of the wedding or the groom’s personal taste, while maintaining a masculine manner.” At Clogau Gold, traditional tie pins and signet rings are choice gifts. “We’ve made sure best men and grooms are catered for, with a classic selection of men’s watches, signet rings and tie pins,” notes Williams. “These make generous keepsakes for the groom, the best man and father of the brides.” The bride herself will, in most cases, wear a necklace or a pair of earrings to match her dress and wedding jewellery. But with many couples working to a budget, smart brides are shopping for pieces they can wear on the day and beyond. Dennis Mangan notes the number of brides opting for necklaces over earrings, which suggest the trend for

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

statement earrings is on the way out and likely to be replaced by the clean, classic diamond stud. Pearson, however, disagrees. “For me, earrings are at the top of requirements for brides,” she states. “I’ve been asked to commission earrings before, including classic freshwater pearls clustered with semi-precious stones. They were made to complement the bride’s dress and add some colour.” It seems that trends, as the word itself suggests, are changing. New metals are causing a stir, but the desire for tradition in wedding jewellery still seems to hold fast. Diamond sizes may be modest, but it’s personality and little detail that will draw brides and grooms to make choices. The effect of the recession may be noticeable on the extravagance of weddings today, and there’s the suggestion that many ceremonies are being scaled-down. In return, however, brides and grooms are able to afford well-made wedding jewellery, something many designers and retailers will be relieved to hear.


Classic . Timeless . Breathtaking

“In dreams as in love there are no impossibilities”

-Janos Arnay

WWW.CHARLES-GREEN.COM / 0121 236 1874


BRIDAL / PHOTOSHOOT

Jewellery: Silver, rose gold and pearl bracelet and white gold necklace by Clogau Gold; Morganite, diamond and rose gold ring, sapphire diamond and white gold ring, platinum and diamond ring, all by Mappin & Webb. Fashion: Hat by Piers Atkinson, basque and garter by Fred & Ginger, pants by Fauve, socks by Chaussettes. Flowers: McQueens

EGO FORGET THE MERINGUES AND DATED JEWELLERY, MODERN BRIDES JUST WANT TO HAVE FUN. GET INSPIRED BY FASHION-FORWARD RELEVANT JEWELS WITH OUR ECCLECTIC MIX OF ROYAL-INSPIRED WELSH GOLD AND BLUE SAPPHIRES, MUST-HAVE POWER BRANDS, MINIMAL LUXURY, REWORKED VINTAGE AND UP-AND-COMING DESIGNERS.

CREDITS Photography :Jon Baker Styling: Rebecca Sammon Hair & makeup: Lucy Gibson using Nars cosmetics and KMS haircare Model: Lucy Jaques at Nevs

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


PHOTOSHOOT / BRIDAL

Jewellery: 18ct gold and diamond pave ring (right), two white gold and diamond pave rings and 18ct gold and diamond pave necklace, all by Love Pods at Pandora. Fashion: Veil by Brides Revisited, bra and skirt by Made by Niki Flowers: Purely Roses www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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BRIDAL / PHOTOSHOOT

Jewellery: Silver, enamel and diamond Cherry Blossom pendant by Shaun Leane, silver Hummingbird pendant with pearl by Lindsay Pearson. rings (right hand) and bracelet by Dennis & Lavery, platinum Hydra ring by Katie Rowland. Fashion: Underwear and suspender belt by Mimi Holiday, stockings by Jonathan Aston.

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


PHOTOSHOOT / BRIDAL

Jewellery: Yellow and rose gold locket by Clogau Gold, pearl ring by David Marshall, gold and morganite Lola ring by EC One. Fashion: Headband with veil by Piers Atkinson, underwear and suspender belt by What Katie Did, gloves by Cornelia James, vintage stockings. www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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BRIDAL / PHOTOSHOOT

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Jewellery: 18ct white gold and diamond Feather ring and diamond brooch (in hair) by David Marshall; silver and amethyst Majestic pendant by Laura Gravestock Fashion: Lingerie by Lascivious, blouse by American Apparel, floral hairpiece by Olivier Laudus .

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


PHOTOSHOOT / BRIDAL

Jewellery: Diamond-set wedding bands by Charles Green (upper) and diamond-set ring from the Nid de Paradis range by Van Cleef & Arpels Fashion: Gown and pants by La Perla. Flowers: Jane Packer www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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BRIDAL / SOURCE THE LOOK

Belles AS WE ENTER WEDDING SEASON AND THE ORDERS START FLOWING, MAKE SURE YOU’VE GOT THE RIGHT JEWELLERY FOR THE RIGHT BRIDE. WE DETAIL THE KEY LOOKS AS SEEN IN OUR PHOTOSHOOT.

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


SOURCE THE LOOK / BRIDAL

Vintage Glitz BRIDE TYPE: Classical, retro, elegant. LOOKING FOR: Refined timeless sparkle that won’t look dated when the wedding photos are dusted off to show the grandchildren. Glamour from the golden age has been a strong trend for many years and jewellery styles that don’t age have huge appeal for brides conscious of making a fashion faux pas on the big day. Neat diamonds in classic settings, such as these diamond set wedding bands from Charles Green or this Nid de Paradis ring and pendant set from Van Cleef & Arpels, provide an understated elegance that will hit the spot with more classical brides, while providing all the pared-down glitz a girl could want.

Fashion-forward Glamour BRIDE TYPE: Fashionista, youthful, non-traditionalist. LOOKING FOR: Something glamorous but on trend, a selection of jewellery that is modern and chic and will be worn long after the wedding ceremony is over. For the modern bride, it’s not about following traditions but creating a beautiful look that signifies who she is. For fashion-forward shoppers who wouldn’t dream of wearing great aunt Hilda’s triset there are more striking, fresh, precious alternatives such as these diamond and gold rings and bracelet from Pandora.

Dazzling Wedding Bands BRIDE TYPE: Luxury lover, confident, affluent. LOOKING FOR: More sparkle than her engagement ring alone can muster, this bride is seeking to pack in extra rocks on her wedding band too. Demand for diamond-set wedding bands has been rising despite similarly escalating materials prices. The traditional combination of rocks on the engagement ring and a plain band has fallen by the wayside and diamond-set bands are no longer just for eternity rings. This could be reflected in one or two minute diamonds set subtly into the band or you could go all out, like these diamond-heavy rings from Clogau Gold (bottom) and Charles Green. www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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BRIDAL / SOURCE THE LOOK

Perfect Pearls BRIDE TYPE: Fashion-conscious, traditional, girly. LOOKING FOR: The opportunity to recreate girlhood wedding fantasies with the most classic of bridal jewellery. Pearls and brides are inseparable, and the enduring allure of pearl jewellery on a woman’s most special day is still going strong. Modern brides are moving away from classic strings of pearls and are looking for innovative, fashion-forward ways to keep this jewellery tradition alive. Pearls with a twist, such as this ocean-inspired silver and rose gold bracelet or 18ct white gold and diamond pendant from Clogau Gold, are perfect pearl options for modern brides.

Don’t Forget... Something Blue

Well Groomed BRIDE TYPE: Well, every bride should have one! LOOKING FOR: More than just an afterthought, soon-to-be brides and grooms want design-led men’s rings now too. Ladies have always craved excellence and romance when fixating on engagement rings and wedding bands but in the past men have often picked up a much less expensive ring with little design features. These attitudes are changing, however. Alongside traditional plain bands, make sure that you have some subtly quirkier designs such as these men’s wedding bands from Charles Green. 50

With royal wedding mania descending on the nation at the end of last year jewellers instantly reported a surge in demand for blue stones as true romantics tried to recreate their own prince and princess moments by selecting copycats of Kate Middleton’s sapphire and diamond Garrard ring. The market has since been flooded with advertising and promotion for similar rings, such as this sapphire ring from Mappin & Webb’s new range as seen on p42. Whether the trend for blue-stone engagement rings is a selffulfilling prophecy or not, it might be unwise to neglect such a royal opportunity and there are a wealth of suppliers, such as Slade & Kempton, with just such stock at the ready.

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


LOVEPODS. THE MAGIC IN YOUR LIFE IS AS PRECIOUS AS YOUR MOST TENDER MEMORY. LOVEPODS 18CT GOLD AND WHITE GOLD BRACELETS, EARRINGS, RINGS AND NECKLACES CELEBRATE YOUR STYLE AND YOUR STORIES. WHAT’S YOUR MOMENT? BE INSPIRED AT WWW.PANDORA.NET


BRIDAL / UPCYCLING

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


UPCYCLING / BRIDAL

Something New INSTEAD OF BUYING SOMETHING NEW, SOME BRIDES ARE DIPPING INTO THE FAMILY JEWELLERY BOX TO REJUVENATE SOMETHING OLD. ONE NEWLYWED TELLS RACHAEL TAYLOR WHY SHE TURNED A 1920S LACLOCHE HATPIN INTO EARRINGS FOR HER BIG DAY.

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hen Rosie Goddard stood at the altar in August, hand in hand with her husband-to-be Arion Baranowski, she stood steeped in family history. While many family and friends filled the pews of Seend church in Wiltshire to support her on her big day, she also managed to involve some relatives that could not attend the ceremony through her choice of jewellery. Rather than buying new earrings to match her new dress and shoes, Rosie and her mother Joanna Goddard worked together to rejuvenate a family heirloom especially for the wedding day. The heirloom was a white gold Art Deco-style hatpin with a tear-drop shape paddle set with diamonds on either end. The hatpin was designed in the 1920s by jewellery house Lacloche Frères and has remained almost completely unused by Joanna since it came into her possession in the 1970s, handed down to her from her great aunt’s jewellery collection. Lacloche Frères was founded in 1875 by four brothers – Fernand, Jules, Leopold and Jacques Lacloche – in Madrid and became famous in the 1920s and 1930s for Art Deco jewellery and object d’art, including brightly coloured geometric lacquered and enamelled cigarette and vanity cases set with diamonds and precious stones, and a series of pendants that depicted the fables of French poet La Fontaine.

The house went on to open stores in Madrid, Sébastian, Paris and Barriatz. During the First World War Lacloche Frères bought Fabergé’s London store and remaining stock when the Russian government repatriated the brand’s personnel and assets, and set up shop in its place. Certainly a brand with a rich history, but how wearble is it now? “My mum has a lot of jewellery she has inherited and a lot of it is not very wearable currently,” says Rosie. “I was thinking about what earrings I wanted to wear and I knew I didn’t want small earrings, as I wasn’t going to wear any other jewellery, but I never thought about the hat pin at all. Then about three months before the wedding my mum came up with the idea.” The Goddards decided to have the Lacloche hatpin turned into a pair of

earrings for Rosie’s wedding and visited Coppins of Corsham in Wiltshire. The jeweller is a haven of more unusual precious jewellery items and the premises also acts a space for working jeweller John Coppin to create bespoke creations. The Lacloche hatpin had been valued at £20,000 and there was some trepidation on the part of the Goddards that severing the 10cm white gold bar holding the two diamond-set paddles and breaking apart the original design to create the earrings would devalue the piece. Coppin, however, assured the mother and daughter that this was not so, explaining that the value of the piece was locked in the diamonds and gold. He said that creating a fresh, more modern and wearable design, but retaining the original setting, meant it would not affect the base value of the soon-to-be earrings.

2 1 Rosie Goddard shows off her upcycled earrings. 2 Joanna Goddard puts on her daughter’s earrings before her wedding . 3 (following page) Rosie Goddard and Arion Baranowski. www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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BRIDAL / UPCYCLING

MAKING A COLLECTION OUT OF BRIDAL UPCYCLING The demand for upcycling of old, unwanted jewellery into wearable pieces has become so popular that London jewellery brand and retailer Dower & Hall has created a dedicated new jewellery range to the practice. The collection, which it has aptly named Sentiment, is a selection of 18ct gold claw set rings sold without stones. In terms of design, Dower & Hall say the rings are very much a twist on the brand’s popular Twinkle stacking rings. Traditionally, Twinkle rings, which have been in production at Dower & Hall for more than 20 years, are pre-set with an eclectic array of coloured jewels.

And so the Goddards left the hatpin in the careful hands of Coppin. When they returned to collect the earrings shortly before the wedding, they were thrilled with the results. Coppin had carefully divided the hatpin in two pieces and transformed each half into an earring by adding diamond studs, which can be detached and worn individually, to the end of the stems. “When it came back he had hinged it so that the earrings weren’t rigid, they were fluid,” says Rosie. “We had thought we could make a pair of earrings but never thought he would make the studs, so that was a real surprise.” Rosie remembers the adoration the revived family heirloom instantly garnered from her family and friends. “When I first put them on I was inside my mum’s house and I was moving my head from side to side and my friend Zoe and aunt Sally shouted in to say they could see the sparkle from the garden,” she says with a smile. But the earrings meant more to Rosie than a bit of sparkle on her wedding day; they were a way to celebrate her family history as she joined with her partners’. “I had something that has been in the family for a long time, with real sentimental value to it,” she says. “I don’t have any grandparents that are alive so the earrings were a link to my mum’s side of the family.”

But with Sentiment Dower & Hall will reset diamonds from old, unwanted jewellery into the stacking rings. The brand says it hopes that by creating the Sentiment collection it will help to transform “inherited jewellery with tremendous sentimental value that can often be outdated and lie unworn in jewellery boxes into pieces ranging from a contemporary bespoke design to pretty stackable rings to wear and treasure”. Dower & Hall creative director Diane Hall (pictured above) adds: “We crafted our Sentiment collection specifically to bring new life to old jewels, as we saw a rise in brides coming into our stores with family diamonds that they wanted to use, or they had been proposed to with the grooms family ring, but they felt they needed to add their own style. Sentiment will be a great way to do this.” 54

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

Rosie’s wedding day came and went and after the last few guests had left her parent’s home, where the reception was held in the garden, she retired to her bridal suite at a nearby hotel and removed the earrings that had brought her and her family so much pleasure that day. She has since returned the earrings to her mother Joanna’s possession and the mother and daughter have agreed to share them, although Rosie is unsure as to what type of special occasion would merit removing the earrings from the jewellery box. For Rosie the experience of upcycling was so magical that she says she would consider doing it again. “Mum had the hatpin for nearly 40 years and had hardly worn it and it seemed a shame to keep it locked up,” she says. “Now we’ve made it into something wearable that we get pleasure from now. I was worried about making a mistake but it’s been done so beautifully that it does make me think that if you can retain the value and the design then why not do it again?” Rosie’s introduction to upcycling was driven by the sentimental allure of wearing a piece of family history and the desire for something special that could not be bought from a jeweller’s shop window. She says: “I wasn’t looking for something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue, but it is something totally unique.”

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KIT HEATH / INTERVIEW

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CHOP

&

CHANGE

KIT HEATH CHIEF EXECUTIVE JEFF LANCASTER IS AN ADVENTURER IN HIS PERSONAL LIFE AND IS NOW TREKKING INTO THE UNKNOWN AS HE REPOSITIONS THE BUSINESS. RACHAEL TAYLOR QUIZZES HIM ON CLOSING RETAIL ACCOUNTS, CREATING SHOP IN SHOP FURNITURE, CRACKING THE US AND INTRODUCING GOLD TO A SILVER BRAND.

A 1 Kit Heath chief executive Jeff Lancaster.

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n adventurer, a wine connoisseur, a restaurant fanatic – all adjectives that fit perfectly to Kit Heath chief executive Jeff Lancaster. But a jewellery expert? Not in the slightest. Lancaster fell into jewellery after a returning to the UK from a spell travelling. After a hectic job in the restaurant business that left him with “my phone surgically attached to my hand”, he decided to quit his job, pull his children out of school, grab his wife and “go walkabout for a while”. The Lancaster family travelled the world spending three months in southern America and three months in Australia with a passport full of stop-offs in places such as Samoa, the US, Mexico and Johannesburg. When the fun was over and the family

returned to Britain, Lancaster reluctantly realised that it was time for a steady job. And for the strikingly self-assured jewellery boss, it never crossed his mind that it would be a challenge to get one. “I tarted myself about, as you do, and I was offered three jobs within a week,” he boasts. Out of the three it was Kit Heath that caught his eye. “There was a little bit of nepotism at play,” jokes Lancaster, while sipping a glass of wine. “My wife’s uncle is [Kit Heath’s sister] Katie’s godfather. She hadn’t seen her godfather for 35 years but he was at her wedding and he stepped in as chairman.” He suggested that Lancaster apply for the role of chief executive at Kit Heath. “I said to him, you don’t want this CV, it’s leisure management,” recalls Lancaster. But it turns out that despite Lancaster’s past career, Kit Heath did want him. So

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

it was time for some market research. “I went to Croydon and I walked the street looking at jewellers, as I knew nothing about it,” says Lancaster. “I wasn’t approached, nobody helped me, I didn’t understand, and I thought, I can do something about this.” This scenario took place in 2005, a time when, according to Lancaster, the jewellery industry was just discovering branding and “was a bit confused about what it should be doing”. Lancaster knew exactly what to do about it. While he hadn’t worked in jewellery before, he believes the principles of creating a restaurant brand, for example, are exactly the same as building a jewellery brand. “It’s very similar,” he says with poise. “It’s all about building consumer confidence, making sure that people trust in your quality and integrity.”


INTERVIEW / KIT HEATH

Not being a jeweller allows Lancaster to bring steely business savvy to Kit Heath, something it was perhaps lacking in before. “Kit and Katie are amazing entrepreneurs but when a business has to become a bit more sophisticated entrepreneurs struggle with that, but I can make sense of it,” explains Lancaster. “The business had been developed over 20 years and ways of doing things were hit and miss.” Lancaster has lots of experience in business, but after 20 years did Kit and Katie struggle to pass over control to a suave new chief executive with no experience of the jewellery trade and a bag full of revolutionary ideas for the brand? He smiles wryly. “For any entrepreneur there needs to be an establishment of trust and my job is to work with them,” he says. “It took time but it is fantastic now. I saw Katie every day at the start. Now, I see her once a month as they trust me with their business.” What Kit and Katie are trusting Lancaster to do, he says, is devise a strategy that will ensure the brand is “still around in 10 years and well respected not just in the UK but in the US and internationally”. Export is a key factor in Kit Heath’s long-term strategy. The brand already has a subsidiary in the US that first started seven years ago and Lancaster hopes to develop this part of the business. He says: “Here we’re known but in the US we have a blank piece of paper. It’s early days.” In 2010 Kit Heath exhibited at a US trade show for the first time, and Lancaster said it was a steep learning curve. “The US isn’t branded in jewellery,” he says incredulously. “For a country that is at the cutting edge of branding, they are five years behind Europe. You talk to the retailers and they haven’t yet embraced branding.” Back in the UK market, the brand is already successfully established. Now what it needs, according to Lancaster, is to be repositioned. He explains: “One of the challenges is that Kit Heath as a wholesaler had never targeted and you could find the brand anywhere. The place for us is the jewellery market, so we’ve had to loose some

of the more gift-orientated stockists.” He stresses that he is not cutting gift shops out of Kit Heath’s distribution plan entirely, it will still make its original wholesale offering Dew and Celtic brand Heritage available to these shops. “The lower-priced lines we’ll target at gift shops, but those pieces with a higher level of design we’ll call Kit Heath and target at jewellers,” he says. “The original success of Kit Heath came from these lines and there is still a place for them.” The reaction to this move from the gift end of the market has not been favourable. “Some retailers are still getting over it and I’m sorry about that,” says Lancaster. “There was a feeling of 2 3

2 Silver ring and necklace from Kit Heath’s latest lines. 3 A shot from the brand’s new campaign shot at Hartland Abbey. www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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KIT HEATH / INTERVIEW

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4&6 Examples of Kit Heath’s first goldplated jewellery. 5 A model poses for the brand’s new campaign shots. 7 Fashion-forward silver cuff.

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why change something that’s working but I had to look ahead and you want to be associated with retailers that offer something positive to your brand.” Kit Heath has made some headway with the repositioning strategy, taking on 100 new mid- to high-end jewellers in the past 12 months. As well as the decluttering of its stockist list, Lancaster feels that the high price of gold has helped to boost the brand’s standing in the market. “Because of what has been happening in gold, jewellers have been left wanting for an entry-level silver brand,” he says. To keep the momentum in retail stores going, Kit Heath is planning to get into one of the more controversial areas PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

of jewellery retail – shop in shops. It hopes to get the first furniture installed in retailers’ stores in spring. “We will hopefully offer something compelling, something exciting; we’ll look to raise the bar,” reveals Lancaster. “There is demand for this so we’ll come up with something appealing.” In the past jewellery brands have used shop in shops as a testing ground before opening standalone stores, so is this the plan for Kit Heath? The answer, Lancaster says, is categorically no. “I think you’ve got to stay focused on your strengths and ours is doing great collections, we’re not retailers,” he says firmly. But a new area that Kit Heath is planning is a move into is gold-plated jewellery. The brand will launch its first 18ct gold plate collection at The Jewellery Show at Spring Fair this month. “It’s a great market opportunity; people are going for gold as a colour or just to be on trend,” says Lancaster. However, he insists that Kit Heath is and always will be silver brand. Lancaster is optimistic for 2011. “We have at last got our foundations solid and next year is all about pushing forward,” he beams. Top of the list on Kit Heath’s list of New Year resolutions are to upgrade its internal IT system, trebling its supplier base and continuing to refresh its image. The brand made a striking start to the latter with a dreamy campaign shoot on location at Hartland Abbey, a location previously used by Mario Testino for a Vogue shoot. As the restaurant empties and we wind up our conversation, Lancaster returns to talking about his love of travelling and his preferred tactics. “My instinct is to get off the beaten track and push the boundaries and that’s when exciting things happen,” he says. Lancaster has certainly taken Kit Heath off its beaten track by introducing new collections and applying business acumen to a creative company, and he’s pushed boundaries by having the courage to strip away retail accounts in order to strengthen the brand. While he talks of his dreams of slinging on his backpack once again, it seems for now Lancaster is having his own little domestic adventure at Kit Heath.


Seven million reasons to use T.H. March’s Customer Insurance Solutions

As well as looking after the business insurance needs of our clients in the trade, many of our jewellers also introduce their own customers to us. This has resulted in T.H. March paying over £7 million to jewellers in commission, replacement jewellery and jewellery repairs over the last four years. Two thousand retail jewellers earn commission on any introductions to us as well as benefitting from replacement jewellery sales and repairs following a claim. This keeps customers coming back and spending in their shops, increasing both turnover and customer loyalty. In today’s tough markets, you know how important this is.

To find out how you can benefit, call any of our six branches nationwide, or John Watson on 01822 855555. You can also visit Your Customer’s Insurance at

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DIAMOND STUDS / TRENDS

DEMURE THE RED CARPET WAS ALIGHT WITH A FRIGHTENINGLY HIGH CARAT COUNT AS THE GOLDEN GLOBES KICKED OFF THE AWARDS SEASON LAST MONTH, BUT IT WAS ALL PACKED INTO DEMURE DIAMOND STUDS. IT SEEMS LITTLE SPARKLERS ARE IN VOGUE ON LOBES.

D

uring awards season last year, Professional Jeweller issued a lost property report for lavish neckware on the red carpet. Despite hours of picture research we struggled to come up with a good example of a stylish celebrity accessorising her neck as she humoured her minions. Fast forward nearly a year and we’re still waiting for the return of outlandish, oversized bobby dazzlers round the necks of the rich and famous that we’ve come to love guffawing at as they are flashed to the cameras. And as we vaulted into the 2011 awards season with the Golden Globes in LA last month, it was clear that we should stop sitting by the phone. Big bling isn’t coming home any time soon. But just because we needed a telescopic lens to pick out the jewellery 60

choices of most red carpet starlets doesn’t mean they are skimping on luxury; it just means they are getting sneaky about it. Stylists to the stars might be dishing out warnings that flaunting success through jewellery won’t help popularity rankings in a recession but stars will always gravitate towards glamour. So it is to the classic diamond stud that natives of the red carpet have turned. Necklines still remained almost unanimously bare at the Golden Globes, but diamond stud earrings were seen on some of the chicest of lobes. And while the ear baubles might be less in size, the luxury factor is certainly more, with stars opting for maximum carat in a demure, classic setting. Halle Berry managed to pack more than 3ct into her Harry Winston set, only to be outdone by fellow actress Eva Longoria who squeezed 5ct into her pair

PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com

from Neil Lane. Other actresses on the red carpet to don diamond studs included Michelle Williams in an understated pair from Fred Leighton and Natalie Portman who looked elegant in Tiffany. But when it comes to hidden luxury, the award most certainly had to go to go to Scottish actress, and face of Italian jewellery brand Pomellato, Tilda Swinton. She selected a Jil Sander dress with a white shirt top that completely covered a Fred Leighton diamond necklace, weighing in at a massive 100cts. For understated glamour nothing beats a pair of diamond studs, be they lower quality stones teamed with silver or top quality rocks swathed in platinum. As the fashion pack swap statement for subtle, be sure to have a range of demure diamond studs in your product range. Diamonds are forever, but 1 diamond studs are very right now.


TRENDS / DIAMOND STUDS

6-10 February 2011 NEC Birmingham UK

ANA DE COSTA £1,620

Pr

i

Q

or uo PR ity C te O ode FJ :

T H E

S H O W AT S P R I N G FA I R I N T E R N AT I O N A L

Designs to inspire and seduce

IDJC £839

PRODUCT CREDITS: Domino rings; Dower & Hall cuffs; Katie Rowland necklace

GEMEX £2,775

Book a stand by calling +44 (0)20 7728 4290 or email: sales@thejewelleryshow.com Register for free by visiting thejewelleryshow.com/register

Quote priority code: PROFJ

www.professionaljeweller.com / FEBRUARY 2011 / PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER

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SHOWCASE / FINE JEWELS

STARS OF AFRICA BY REENA AHLUWALIA FOR ROYAL ASSCHER Canadian designer Reena Ahluwalia has teamed up with Royal Asscher to create a patented collection of 18ct white gold jewellery that creates a snowglobe effect with sillicone-filled globes containing floating diamonds encircled by free-spinning circles. A proportion of the sales generated by this collection will be donated to the Diamond Empowerment Fund. RRP: £17,500 Contact: Royal Asscher, +1 212 922 1908, royalasscher.com

WATER LILY BY GIOVANNA BROGGIAN FOR MIKIMOTO The Water Lily collection is a new line that has been added to the collaborative ranges developed by Mikimoto and Italian jewellery designer Giovanna Broggian. This necklace has been crafted from gold with a goblet-shaped cultured South Sea pearl and subtle smattering of diamonds. RRP: £5,000 Contact: Mikimoto, 0207 399 9860, mikimoto.com

BEAUTY AND BALANCE BY DESIGNS BY WINIFRED Winifred Adams is an American designer new to the UK and is launching this side of the pond with her Beauty and Balance collection. This faceted ring has a blue topaz and 18ct white gold scalloped diamond-set trim set on a 14ct rose gold band. The ring is also available with a pink tourmaline or amethyst. Wholesale price: £1,625 Contact: Designs by Winifred, +1 213 489 1804, designsbywinifred.com

PLATINUM DIAMOND WEDDING BAND BY CHARLES GREEN Reflecting the increase in demand for diamond-set wedding bands, Charles Green has created this delightfully

LIMELIGHT BY PIAGET

contemporary twisted grain band set

This cupcake-inspired ring is part of a

with 0.25cts of diamonds. The ring

new haute joaillerie collection dreamed

pictured has been cast in platinum but

up by luxury jewellery Piaget. The mass

the manufacturer also offers a version in

of this white gold couture cocktail ring is

18ct yellow gold, and says that the ring

made up by a 25.5ct chrysoprase, with a

will fit snugly against most single-stone

0.47ct round pink sapphire in the centre

engagement rings.

to represent a cherry on top.

RRP: £1,285

RRP: £9,000

Contact: Charles Green, 0121 236 1874,

Contact: Piaget, piaget.com

charles-green.com

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / JANUARY / www.professionaljeweller.com PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 20112011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


SHOWCASE / FASHION FIXES

LOVE ME TENDER BY PHOEBE COLEMAN Phoebe Coleman’s whimsical, delicate jewellery has already caused a stir at London Fashion Week. This fine gold-plated silver bracelet combines a simple trace chain with a tiny hammered heart and fits perfectly with the ongoing trend for friendship bracelets. The Love Me Tender collection also features rings, charm necklaces and chandelier earrings. RRP: £70 Contact: Phoebe Coleman, 020 7586 2182, phoebecoleman.com

FLOWER BANGLES BY MOUNIR These pretty, stackable fair trade silver bangles feature pastel-hued gemstones, WINTER BLOOM BY DOWER & HALL

perfect for layering up with summer dresses. Inspired by freshness and

These simple studs are part of Dower & Hall’s

lightness of spring blossom, Mounir’s

new Winter Bloom collection, designed for

bangles feature a peppered surface and

AW11/12 and set for launch at The Jewellery

are studded with white keshi pearls and

Show. Made in brushed sterling silver with

gemstones, including grass green peri-

rose gold accents, the new collection of

dot, inky iolite, bright pink tourmaline

rings, earrings and necklaces are inspired by

and sea blue aquamarine.

a 20-year-old Liberty print. It is one of three

RRP: £55 each

ranges designed to celebrate the company’s

Contact: Mounir, 020 8780 5373,

20th anniversary.

mounir.co.uk

RRP: £75 Contact: Dower & Hall, 020 7377 5544, dowerandhall.com

CHARMS BY ROYAL LONDON Royal London has launched a range of silver charms with colourful enamel accents. The collection of 92 charms includes a set of Londonthemed charms designed to coincide with the Olympics, the forthcoming royal wedding and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. Each charm is supplied with its own pouch and gift box. RRP £14-£40 Contact: Royal London, 0208 370 430, royallondonwatches.co.uk

SPHAIRA BY TATEOSSIAN These stand-out gold plated mesh earrings are a new addition to Tateossian’s range, designed to be simple, symmetrical and wearable. The Sphaira collection features silver and gold-plated bracelets, earrings and rings available in a range of shapes and styles. RRP: £165 Contact: Tateossian, 020 7384 8336, tateossian.com

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PROFESSIONAL JEWELLER / FEBRUARY 2011 / www.professionaljeweller.com


Come and see us at the NEC Stand F58/59 www.trollbeads.co.uk


UK Sales Manager Judith Wade - T. +44 7834 490060 - www.tisento-milano.com - All Ti Sento Milano Jewellery is made of sterling silver - prices form ÂŁ 35,-

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