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MAGAZINE

15

December 2006 | January 2007

Tips & Tricks Blowout!

What you need to know about layout, text, graphics, tables, objects, and more

Plus:

❱ Reviews of new products ❱ Table of Contents how-to ❱ Solve an indent mystery

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MAGAZINE Editorial Editor in Chief Terri Stone, tstone@indesignmag.com Editorial Director David Blatner, david@indesignmag.com Senior Contributing Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Pariah Burke, Scott Citron, Anne-Marie Concepción, John Cruise, Rufus Deuchler, Erica Gamet, Jeff Gamet, Keith Gilbert, Larry Happy, Ted Locascio, Bill Lynch, Claudia McCue, Christopher Smith, Eda Warren, Brian Wood

From the Editor

De s i g n & Te c h n o l o g y Design and Production Rufus Deuchler, RD Communication Design Director of Operations Cindy Samco, info@indesignmag.com Business Director of Advertising & Marketing Jeff Lalier, jlalier@indesignmag.com Publicity Helene Smith Public Relations Contact Information www.indesignmag.com/idm/contactus.html Subscription Information www.indesignmag.com/idm/purchase.html Published by Creativepro.com, a division of PrintingForLess.com. Copyright ©2007 Creativepro.com. All rights reserved. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information contact permissions@indesignmag.com. This is a subscription magazine. Please do not distribute it.

Welcome to Extreme Makeover, Magazine Edition. When InDesign Magazine began in 2004, founding editors Pamela Pfiffner and David Blatner debated the best page orientation: landscape or portrait? Landscape would fit the computer screen better, but the more-familiar portrait might be more comfortable psychologically. In the end, portrait won out. Come the spring of 2006, David and I were itching to change the page orientation and, potentially, everything else. Once we decided what we wanted to accomplish with a redesign—a more enjoyable reading experience for you and more efficient production for us—we sent out requests for proposals to a bevy of graphic designers. The bids we received went in several directions, all of them intriguing. But in the end we had to choose just one. Our choice: Rufus Deuchler, already known to long-time readers as the author of several InDesign Magazine articles. (For more about Rufus, see page 5.) As soon as we told him he had the job, Rufus came up with two separate approaches to the

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redesign. We chose one, then worked through a series of iterations that went on for months. Rufus continued to refine the templates until we arrived at what you’re viewing today. From pulling together this issue, I’ve already seen that the new templates let us lay out articles and generate PDFs much more quickly and with fewer errors. Now I’m anxious to hear whether the redesign meets your needs. How do you like the horizontal page? What do you think of Myriad Pro for body copy? Can you read it on-screen more easily than before? How does a printed page look to you? Do you give the new nameplate a thumbs up, thumbs down, or somewhere in-between? Please let me know your thoughts by sending an email message to tstone@indesignmag. com. Don’t hold back; I realize that you’re a talented lot with strong opinions, and that’s what I want to hear.—Terri Stone, editor in chief

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The InDesign Conference

Contents

PoDCasT!

5

Guest Designer: Rufus Deuchler

7 InTips & Tricks: A hatful of tips & tricks It’s magical how much time they’ll save you! 28 InStep: Automate Tables of Content After reading Brian Wood’s how-to, you won’t even dream of making a TOC manually. 34 InQuestion: Sandee Cohen Sandee answers your questions and poses a mystery for you to solve. MENU

39 InDesigners: Fossil Terri Stone talks to Fossil designers about modern page layout.

9

43 InReview: Gluon ProScale ID 7.0 and LinkOptimizer 2.0 Christopher Smith, Larry Happy, and John Cruise put two productivity enhancers through the wringer.

: 4;

50 InBrief: Helpful Products Jeff Gamet gives you the basics on what’s new and improved.

9

:

57 In the News InDesign CS3 demo, your magazine survey results.

The InDesign Conference and InDesign Magazine are proud to present the InDesign Conference Podcast. This bi-weekly video podcast is presented by InDesign expert Sandee Cohen. In each episode we’ll show tips, tricks and cool techniques for InDesign users of all levels. In addition, speakers from the InDesign Conference and Terri Stone, editor in chief of InDesign Magazine, will also bring you the latest InDesign information available.

4;

53 InPerson: Matt Phillips David Blatner interviews Adobe’s senior computer scientist.

Subscribe to the podcast and join fellow InDesign users in this vibrant community. www.idusers.com

58 Calendar

MENU

60 InDesign User Groups The InDesign Conference

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December 2006 | January 2007

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Finish before you start.

TM

Graphic Design Templates. Pre-designed layouts with photos and artwork, royalty-free and fully editable. Individual templates $29-$99. CD collections $249-$499. Template packs $249-$499. When you’re faced with time limits, budget constraints or need creative content fast, let our templates do the work. Our library of designs is packed with brochures, newsletters, flyers, postcards, ads, stationery and more. Visit our website to view designs and download the free sample template today.

1-877-833-3305 www.stocklayouts.com

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December 2006 | January 2007

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Guest Designer

Rufus Deuchler

Man of many countries leads InDesign Magazine to the next phase

By RUFUS DEUCHLER and terri stone Rufus Deuchler redesigned the templates for this new incarnation of the magazine, and for that we’re very grateful. He’s also the first graphic designer to populate those templates with fresh, “live” text and images. As such, his profile marks the debut of a long series of guest designers. To give you greater insight into your fellow InDesigners, we plan to spotlight one guest designer in each future issue. Rufus Deuchler was born in Köln, Germany; raised in New York and Switzerland; and attended high school in Britain, where he gained A-Levels in French, German, Art, Economy, and Geography. In 1989, Rufus began studying at the European campus of the Art Center College of Design at la Tour

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December 2006 | January 2007

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de Peilz in Switzerland (an extension of the ACCD in Pasadena, California). During his time there, Rufus was involved in many student projects, the most significant of which was the gathering, organizing, and delivery of graphic design supplies to the school of graphic design of Cluj Napoca in Romania. While at ACCD, he won many industry-sponsored design awards. A year after graduation, Rufus moved to Florence, Italy, where he enrolled in a class of classical painting and drawing to get away from computers for a while. The stay was supposed to last three months, but, hit by a rare form of the Stendhal Syndrome, Rufus remained in Florence, a place he loves deeply. The first years in Florence were spent networking and freelancing. In 1995, Rufus helped structure one of the first Internet service providers in Florence. A few years later, he initiated a collaboration with an advertising agency and developed the corporate image for the Florentine public transport system. In 1999, Rufus opened his own graphic design agency, RD Communication Design. Rufus, who is an Adobe Certified Expert - Print Specialist, collaborates with Adobe Systems Italy as a cross-media guru. He also manages the first Web site and mailing list dedicated to Italian InDesign users, and he speaks at international conferences, such as the InDesign and the Creative Suite Conference. Between his company and his other activities, Rufus has been teaching graphic design at Studio Art Centers International since 1995.

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iWork Encore DVD

Adobe

Motion Office Windows

Picasa

iPhoto

PHP

Excel InDesign

Apple Page Layout

Web Design

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InCopy

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Draw

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Access

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CSS

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Word

XHTML

Acrobat Tables

Animation

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Digital Photography

RGB

www.lynda.com/freepass/InDesign/1206

LAB

TM

Maya

Perl

Microsoft

PowerPoint

Or use this free 24-hour pass for a full access to all the videos in the Online Training Library :

ASP

iDVD

Carrara

Color

InDesign CS2 Professional Typography

WordPerfect

iTunes

iLife

InDesign CS2 Power Shortcuts

Director

Flash

Blogger

InDesign CS2 Beyond the Basics

Prepress

Corel

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InDesign CS2 Essential Training

December 2006 | January 2007

Javascript

Keynote Pages

Watch sample videos of these popular InDesign tutorials:

3DS Max

OS X

Great for visual learners Video-based tutorials that provide software training on products from Adobe, Apple, Macromedia, Microsoft and more. New tutorials published every month Unlimited access to over 15,800 tutorials on hundreds of subjects. No long term commitment Subscriptions start at just $25 a month.

M A G A Z I N E 15

Photoshop Elements

Contribute

GarageBand

HTML

Painter

GoLive

Paint Shop Pro

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FrontPage

Fireworks

Online Training Library

Final Cut Pro

After Effects Dreamweaver

DVD Studio Pro

Guest Designer

Google

Photoshop

Premiere

Databases

Illustrator

ColdFusion CYMK FileMaker

Scripting




InTips & Tricks

★★

★ ★★★

★★

★★

★★ ★

Dip into this collection of shortcuts and solutions from some of our favorite contributors.

★ ★★★ ★

A hatful of tips and tricks from the Houdinis of InDesign

★★★

In this article Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Look and Feel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Extras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Character and Paragraph Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Spell Checking and Auto Correct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Just InCopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20–22 Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Printing/Exporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

One of the most gratifying aspects of being part of the InDesign user community is that so many InDesigners are genuinely curious, even hungry to learn new techniques and better understand this rich and wonderful program. It’s like being back at college, where learning is fresh and fun, not just a means to get our job done. And best of all, we get to explore it all together. That’s why it’s so fun to read this grab-bag of tips and tricks from some of our favorite InDesign Magazine contributors. There’s a little of everything in this article: From hidden layer tricks to hints for working with graphics, from useful keyboard

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shortcuts to clever typographic solutions. I’ve been learning and teaching InDesign for seven years, and I still discovered a couple of great new techniques! This article is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg: There are hundreds (thousands!) of tips to help even the most seasoned InDesign user become more efficient. For more tips, sign up for our free Tip of the Week email, or subscribe to one or more free podcasts and videocasts. Our favorites are at www.idusers.com (The InDesign Conference), www.indesignsecrets. com (InDesignSecrets), and www.theindesigner. com (TheInDesigner).—David Blatner

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InTips & Tricks

Layout Two-For-One Guides Everybody knows that you get ruler guides by dragging from the rulers—dragging from the horizontal ruler begets horizontal guides, dragging from the vertical ruler creates verticals. If you need both a horizontal and a vertical guide you must drag twice, right? Wrong. See the intersection of the two rulers? Hold Command/Ctrl as you drag from that intersection to simultaneously create a horizontal and vertical guide.—Pariah S. Burke Select Layer Objects Need to select every item on a layer? Option/ Alt-click a layer name in the Layers palette to select everything on that layer (but only on the current spread).—Claudia McCue Can’t Figure Out the Points? Use Pica Decimals InDesign understands decimals in all its measurement units. That’s especially handy when you need to enter fractions of a pica, the base-12 underpinnings of which could confound an Einstein (Figure 1). So

Figure 1: You don’t need a calculator to enter fractions of a pica. Use decimals, and InDesign will convert them to picas.

the next time you need to increase a 2-pica measure by a quarter of a pica, just enter “2.25” in the field and InDesign will convert that to “2p3” (two picas, three points).—Anne-Marie Concepción Page Margins To change margins for any page, select it in the Pages palette, choose Layout > Margins and Columns, and input the information you want to change. To change the margins across multiple pages, select those pages in the Pages palette first. To change the margins on a master page, select the master page in the Pages palette, then choose Layout > Margins and Columns.—Erica Gamet Create Multipage Spreads A gatefold spread contains more than two adjoining pages and are commonly used for large brochure or ad designs. To create a gatefold spread in InDesign, select a page (single-sided document), or a spread (facing pages document), and choose

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Figure 2: You can create a spread of three or more pages (such as this gatefold) in InDesign.

Keep Spread Together from the Pages palette menu. Notice the page number(s) for this page or spread now appear in brackets in the Pages palette thumbnail display. In the Pages palette, click and drag a document page or master page icon into the bracketed spread (sometimes called an island). Continue to add additional pages to the spread as needed (Figure 2).—Ted Locascio New Layer Position By default, new layers always appear at the top of the list in the Layers palette. However, if you’d like to create a new layer directly underneath the layer currently selected, press ~Command+Option/Ctrl+Alt and click the Create New Layer icon or choose New Layer Below from the palette fly-out menu. To create a new layer directly above the one currently selected, ~Command-click/Ctrl-click the Create New Layer icon at the bottom of the Layers palette.—Ted Locascio

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InTips & Tricks

The same tricks work on the layer locks: click and drag or Option-click/Alt-click on a layer’s lock icon (second from left).—Pariah S. Burke Apply a Master Page to Multiple Document Pages at Once One fast way to apply a master page to several document pages is to select the pages in the Pages palette and Option-click/Alt-click the Master page icon.—Ted Locascio Figure 3: Change the color of [Paper] get a feel for what your design will look like on different stocks.

Fast New Docs If you use the same document preset frequently, you can save time when opening new documents by pressing Option-Command-N/Alt-Ctrl-N. This opens a new document using the last Document Preset that you chose, bypassing the New Document dialog box altogether.—Erica Gamet Isolate Layers You can turn consecutive layers on or off simply by clicking in the Layers palette’s visibility (eyeball) column and dragging up or down. To hide all layers except one with a single click, hold the Option/ Alt key as you click on the layer’s visibility icon in the Layers palette. This is a toggle: If all layers are visible, for example, Option-clicking/Alt-clicking once will hide all but the clicked-on layer; doing it a second time will make all layers visible again.

December 2006 | January 2007

Look and Feel

Resize Objects with a Keyboard Shortcut You probably know that text increases in size if you select it and press Command+Shift+>/Ctrl+Shift+>. But if you instead press Command+Option+>/ Ctrl+Alt+> the text frame increases in size by 5 percent, and it uses the selected anchor point in the Transform proxy as an anchor. The text itself is not resized.—Claudia McCue Convert Document Pages to Master Pages To convert a document page into a master page, select it in the Pages palette and then choose Save As Master from the palette menu. You can also select it in the document pages portion of the Pages palette and drag it into the master pages portion. The converted master automatically appears at the bottom of the master page list with the next available prefix (A, B, C, etc.) applied to its name. If you convert a document page that has a master page applied to it into a master page, it automatically becomes a “child” to the “parent” master.—Ted Locascio

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Figure 4: Change the neutral gray of the Preview background to simulate the background color your design will be displayed against.

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Simulate Your Paper Color You can change the color of [Paper] in the Swatches palette to simulate what your page elements will look like on a particular color of paper. To change the color, double-click on [Paper] to bring up the Swatch Options dialog. Choose a Color Mode from the pulldown menu and mix the color sliders until you’re close to your desired color. Then, choose Overprint Preview from the View menu to see how everything interacts. This is no substitution for accurate color proofs, but you might decide that the salmon stock you were planning on won’t look so good with those Grand Canyon photos after all (Figure 3).—Erica Gamet More Functional Previews When you’re designing something that will be displayed on a known background—a poster in a tradeshow booth, for example—change the neutral gray background in Preview mode to a color closer to the background your design will be on (Figure 4). The setting is easy to miss: Look for the last dropdown menu in the Preferences > Guides and Pasteboard’s Color panel.—Anne-Marie Concepción

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InTips & Tricks

Bifocal Page Layout Sometimes you zoom in, zoom out, zoom in, zoom out just to do close-up detail work while keeping an eye on the effects upon the whole page. Other times you want to see and work on a master page while you’re watching and working on document pages that depend on that master. How? Simple: Choose Window menu > Arrange > New Window. Ta da! A whole new view of the same document, updated in real-time with changes made in the other view. And why stop at two? Go for three, four, or a dozen views of the same document if doing so will help you.—Pariah S. Burke Redraw Your Screen Use the shortcut Shift-F5 to force a redraw of your screen. This comes in handy when you’re working with transparency effects and changes you’ve made aren’t reflected immediately. For example, I find that when making changes to type with a drop shadow applied, the drop shadow is not immediately added to the newly entered type. This shortcut is a quick fix for that.—Erica Gamet More Efficient Pages Palette View Figure 5A shows a common view of the Pages palette with a multi-page document. Cute and conventional, but it’s not the most efficient view. How about viewing pages horizontally, as in Figure 5B? With that view you could have a very short Pages palette stretching across the entire monitor, enabling doubleclick access to dozens of pages without scrolling. To change the Pages palette view, select Palette Options (Figure 5C) from the palette’s

A

C

Figure 5: Go from the standard vertical Pages palette (A) to a horizontal palette (B) in the Palette options dialog box (C).

B

flyout menu. Uncheck Show Vertical on either or both the Pages and Masters to make them lineup side-by-side like little iconic Rockettes. Bonus: the Resize dropdown refers to which section of the Pages palette remains fixed at its current size when resizing the palette (thus, resizing effects the other part).—Pariah S. Burke Watch Text Wrap in Real Time As you move a text wrap object, you can watch the surrounding text shift. To do this, select the object and hold the mouse button down for a second, then drag it to a new location on the page. As you drag, the surrounding text rewraps in real time.—Ted Locascio Horizontal Scroll Wish you could scroll across a spread, side-toside, as easily as you scroll up and down between Figure 6: Turn on the PageMaker toolbar to expose shortcuts that don’t exist anywhere else, such as Increase/Decrease paragraph indent.

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pages? Although some mouse utilities offer that optional ability, you can do it almost as easily with any scroll wheel-equipped mouse. Just hold the Shift key as you crank the scroll wheel to move horizontally.—Pariah S. Burke

Tools The Other Tools Palette If you’re better with toolbar icons than with menus, give InDesign’s PageMaker toolbar (Window > PageMaker Toolbar) a shot. It has shortcut buttons to often-used palettes (Text Wrap, Swatches, Tabs), commands (Check Spelling, Text Frame Options), and even some features found nowhere else in the program, such as Jump to Photoshop, and Increase/ Decrease paragraph indent (Figure 6). You can tuck the single-row toolbar in the corner where the Tools and Control palettes meet—it snaps into place.

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InTips & Tricks

Double-click the title bar on its left side to collapse the toolbar into an unobtrusive icon; double-click again to reveal it.—Anne-Marie Concepción Fast Starbursts To create polygons on the fly, double-click the Polygon tool, set the number of sides and star inset (if any) in the dialog box, then click OK. Click and drag across the page to create a polygon. Pressing the Up or Down Arrow key while dragging increases or decreases the number of sides. Alternately, use the Left and Right Arrow keys while dragging to create starbursts. The Right Arrow pushes corners in towards the center and the Left Arrow pushes them out. These shortcuts work only while creating a starburst, not while editing later.—Erica Gamet Make Boxes Easy to Select (or Not) When you use the Rectangle Frame tool (shortcut: F) to create a box with no fill, the resulting frame can still be selected by clicking on its interior. When you use the Rectangle tool (shortcut: M) to create a box with no fill, the resulting box can only be selected by clicking on its edge. Turn this to your advantage by using the Rectangle Frame tool to create tiny boxes that are still easy to select. Use the Rectangle tool when you are creating complex forms with many overlapping boxes, so that you can more easily select just the items you want.—Keith Gilbert Quick Tool Access Did you know that double-clicking the Gradient tool in the toolbox opens the Gradient palette?

2. Use the Selection tool to select the objects you want to apply the drop shadow to. 3. Press I to switch to the Eyedropper tool and click directly on the frame edge of the object containing the drop shadow you’d like to sample. InDesign places the sampled drop shadow on all of the selected objects at once—and you don’t have to re-enter any dialog settings!—Ted Locascio

Figure 7: Create your own shortcut to change to the Selection tool while you’re typing or editing text.

Or that double-clicking the Type on a Path tool brings up the Type on a Path Options dialog? How about that Option/Alt-clicking the kerning icon in the Control Palette opens the Preferences dialog box set to the Units and Increments panel, where you can set Keyboard Increments for kerning? Try double-clicking and Option/Alt-clicking on other icons to see what happens!—Scott Citron Sample Drop Shadows Sure, you can copy your favorite drop shadow settings to multiple objects with an Object Style, but sometimes it’s faster to use the Eyedropper tool: 1. Show frame edges in the document by pressing ~Command+H/Ctrl+H.

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Add this Shortcut When you’re typing or editing text, there’s no keyboard shortcut to quickly choose the Selection tool. You can create your own by choosing Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Create a new set (if you haven’t already), and then choose Tools from the Product Area dropdown menu. Choose Selection Tool in the list of Commands, click in the New Shortcut field, and press whatever key you want for your shortcut. (I use the Esc key.) Finally, choose Text from the Context dropdown list and click the Assign button (Figure 7).—Keith Gilbert

Objects Repeat Your Transformation When applying a transformation (Rotate, Skew, Scale, etc.) in the Control or Transform palette, your first choice is often incorrect. To avoid having to reinsert your cursor into the field a second time, hold Shift when typing Return or Enter. Doing so keeps the focus on the selected field so you can immediately enter a new value.—Scott Citron

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InTips & Tricks

Figure 9: You can download free scripts from the Adobe Web site.

Creative Corner Effects Corner effects generally work best with rectangle frames and shapes. But if you’re feeling adventurous, try applying any of these effects to a triangle or polygon shape.—Ted Locascio

Figure 8: Apply Object Styles to elements, such as these arrow heads, that you may need to change globally.

Lock Objects Securely To lock an object securely so that it can’t be selected or edited at all (as in Adobe Illustrator), place the object on its own layer and click the Lock toggle icon in the Layers palette.—Ted Locascio Harness Arrows Scenario: You’ve created an elaborate layout with arrows pointing to important information. You’re ready to go to press when the client calls to say that he doesn’t like your arrow heads and that, furthermore, the arrows should be pointing the other way! Lucky for you, arrows in InDesign can have Object Styles applied to them. As long as you’ve assigned an Object Style to the arrows (Figure 8), you can change all instances of your arrows in one convenient window.—Rufus Deuchler

Rounded Corners that Scale Creating frames with rounded corners is simple: Object > Corner Effects > Rounded. The only problem is that when you go to scale your frame larger, the corners remain the same size as when they were applied. Here’s a trick to make them scale with your frame. Create your frame with rounded corners. Inside that frame, draw a small box that fits inside. Select both frames and go to Pathfinder > Add to create one box. Now your corners scale with the size of the box.—Scott Citron Relocate the Reference Point The crosshair target that appears in the center of an object (or over one of the corner or side handles) when you select it with the Rotate, Shear, or Scale tool indicates the reference point for rotation. You can reposition the crosshair anywhere in the document window (even the Pasteboard area) by clicking and dragging. That point is the “center of transformation.”—Ted Locascio

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Suppress Printing of Placeholder Items The Attributes palette lets you make selected items within your document or master pages nonprintable. This is particularly useful when you are in the early stages of a design and many of your page items are still FPO (for placement only). The Nonprinting feature also lets you suppress printing of any individual placeholder items or extraneous screen notations.—Ted Locascio

Extras Want the Scripts But Can’t Find your Installation CD? The InDesign (and Creative Suite) installation discs contain scripts, including over a dozen free scripts for InDesign. If your installation discs are a distant memory, or your IT manager locked them in a safety deposit box, don’t fret. You can download all the bundled scripts from Adobe’s Web site. Go to the XML and Scripting Resources page at http://www.adobe. com/products/indesign/xml_scripting.html and scroll down to “Scripting resources” subhead to find the Download InDesign Scripts link (Figure 9). For help installing and using the scripts, see the instructions in Cari Jansen’s article at http://downloads. indesignmag.com/supportfiles/InDesign_Magazine_ Issue8_Excerpt.pdf.—Anne-Marie Concepción

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InTips & Tricks

Round Only Some Corners of a Frame An easy way to round just one or two corners of a frame is to use the CornerEffects script. This script is included on the InDesign installation CD (and on the Adobe Web site), but is not installed during a default installation (Figure 10).—Keith Gilbert

Figure 10: Snag a free script to round just one or two corners of a frame in a flash.

Pass Notes to Each Other When you buy InDesign CS2, you get a free Notes plug-in, but it’s not part of the default installation. Though the plug-in is meant to be used in an InCopy workflow, InCopy isn’t required—multiple InDesign users who open each other’s layouts can use Notes, too. They’re great for inserting comments in the text flow (via the Note tool or commands from the Notes menu, all courtesy of the plug-in) that can only be read by other InDesign users with the plug-in. Notes don’t print, so they won’t end up in print or in a PDF. They don’t affect word count or line breaks, either. You can install the Notes plug-in by copying three files (Note.framework, NotePref.framework,

and Username UI.framework) from the installation CD’s Goodies > InCopyWorkflow folder and pasting them into the default InCopyWorkflow plug-in folder on your hard drive (Adobe InDesign CS2 > Plug-ins > InCopyWorkflow). Restart InDesign and you’re good to go (Figure 11).—Anne-Marie Concepción Customize the TextCleanup.jsx Script One of the free cross-platform scripts that comes with InDesign is TextCleanup.jsx. Double-clicking the script while a text frame or range of text is selected runs a series of Find/Changes on the selection, including changing double spaces to single spaces, double tabs to single tabs, and so on. How can you find out exactly what Find/Change operations are run, and how you can customize them? Look in the Scripts folder on your hard drive (Adobe InDesign CS2 > Presets > Scripts) and you’ll see a text file called JSFindChangeList.txt (Figure 12). (This file should have been installed at the same time as the script; if it’s not there, you’ll have to grab it from the resources listed above.) Open it in any text editor for plain-English instructions on how to add, remove, and modify the Find/Change instructions that the script pulls from, further down in the text file. For much more about this script (which can do everything from a simple clean-up of badly typed text to finding all the prices in a 100-page file, coloring them, formatting the dollar signs and digits, and superscripting the cents), download the free article at http://downloads.indesignmag. com/supportfiles/InDesign_Magazine_Issue8_ Excerpt.pdf.—Anne-Marie Concepción

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Figure 11: The Notes plug-in is not just for InCopy!

Figure 12: Open JSFindChangeList.txt for plain-English how-to’s on modifying the series of Find/Change actions the script performs.

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Text Extend a Rule Beyond the Frame Custom anchored graphics are not the only InDesign elements that can exist outside of the text frame while still moving with the text flow. You can make Rules Above/Below extend outside of the frame, too. To extend a rule above (or a rule below) a paragraph outside the right edge of text frame, set the rule’s width to Column and enter a negative measure in the Right Indent field. The greater the negative value of the Right Indent, the more the rule will extend beyond the right edge of the frame (Figure 13). If you enter a negative indent in the Left Indent field, the rule will extend beyond the left edge of the frame.—Anne-Marie Concepción

Rounded Corner Rules A box with rounded ends can set apart the headings in a publication. You can easily create these boxes in a paragraph style using paragraph rules (Figure 14A). First, open the Paragraph Style Options dialog box, click on Paragraph Rules in the left-hand pane, and make a rectangular box using Rule Below. Set an appropriate weight and character color. In the dropdown Type menu, choose Dotted, which nicely rounds the ends but leaves gaps between (Figure 14B). Fill the gaps by choosing a gap color identical to the dot color, and you have a finished heading. You can add a second color by using Rule Above in the same way and making the rule a bit larger (Figure 14C).—Bill Lynch

Figure 14A: Paragraph rules created what looks like a box with rounded ends.

Figure 14B: Modify Rule Below in the Paragraph Style Options dialog box.

Figure 14cC Modify Rule Above to add a second color to the rounded box.

Figure 13: One simple value extends rules beyond text frames.

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Drag and Drop to New Frame You may have already used InDesign CS2’s drag-anddrop text editing. But did you know that you can also drag and drop to a new frame? Begin by highlighting the text you want to move. Then start dragging with your text tool. As you drag, add the Command/Ctrl key. You’ll see a little frame icon appear under your cursor. Let go when you’re ready to drop your text into a new frame. If you want to copy the text to a new frame, simply add the Option/Alt to the same recipe. One last thing: None of this will work unless you enable drag and drop text editing in Layout view, in the Type panel of InDesign’s Preferences dialog box.—Scott Citron Hidden Split-Screen View This will sound like heresy, but there’s one feature in Microsoft Word InDesign should add: Split Screen view. Turning on this feature in Word creates two “halves” of the same document, each with its own scroll bar. It’s much easier to copy/paste or compare text from one location in the document to another far away when you can see both locations in the same window. In InDesign, I was forever jumping between pages with Command-J/Ctrl-J (Go to Page) to see the beginning and end of a story that threaded through multiple pages, and it was driving me crazy. But here’s what I figured out: 1. Click inside the story and open the Story Editor (Edit > Story Editor, or Command-Y/Ctrl-Y) to see the entire threaded story in one scrolling window. 2. Resize the window so it takes up half of the vertical space.

3. Duplicate the Story Editor window (Window > Arrange > New Window) and drag it below the first (Figure 15). Each Story Editor window contains the same text but scrolls separately from the other, just like in Word!—Anne-Marie Concepción

Figure 15: You can kludge together a Split Screen View in InDesign.

Set Tab Stop Types When setting tab stops in the Tabs palette, you can cycle through the four kinds of available stops (Left Justified, Right Justified, Centered, and Align to Decimal or Specified Character) by simply Option/ Alt-clicking on any placed stop.—Scott Citron

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Access Auto Bullets and Number Characters Normally, the bullets and numbers that InDesign inserts as a result of applying the Auto Bullets or Auto Numbering feature aren’t editable in the layout—you can’t even select them. If you need to get at these characters to apply a Find/Change or a change an indent, you’ll have to convert them to “real” text first. Select the text, right-click (or Control-click) to open the contextual menu, and choose Convert Bullets (or Numbering) to Text. The characters and their formatting remain intact, but now you can select and edit them (Figure 16). Note that the Convert Bullets (or Numbering) to Text command is also available from the Paragraph palette menu. In Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts, it’s in the Text and Tables product area.—Anne-Marie Concepción

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Figure 16: Convert InDesign’s Auto Bullets to text when you need to edit them.

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InDesign Fonts Folder What if you can’t get a troublesome font to load properly on your system and appear in the InDesign font menu? Don’t panic. Try placing the problem font in the InDesign Fonts folder, located in the InDesign CS2 application folder. Any fonts in this folder are managed from within InDesign rather than from an outside application or through the operating system. Fonts that don’t load properly through the operating system (such as multiple master fonts or Windows fonts on an OS X system) may work in InDesign if you put them in the application Fonts folder.—Ted Locascio How Many Words is This? The Info palette shows you a total word count in a text frame (as long as your Type cursor is blinking somewhere in the text). That’s probably old news to you, and you may also know that the Info palette shows you how much text is overset—everything after the plus symbol in the Info palette represents overset text (Figure 17A). What you may not know is that when you make a text selection, the Info palette displays the number of words, characters, etc., you’ve selected (Figure 17B). This feature comes in handy when, for instance, a story is 60 words too long, and you’ve selected a few sentences that could be sacrificed. A quick glance at the Info palette will tell you whether the selected sentences are 60 words.—Anne-Marie Concepción

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B Figure 17: The Info palette’s plus symbols indicate how much text is overset in a text frame (A). It can also show you the number of characters, words, and lines in a text selection (B).

Make Leading Work Like QuarkXPress One of the most common complaints from former Quark users is the difficulty of applying leading in InDesign. There’s a reason: Leading is a character attribute in InDesign! By default, when you want to change the leading of a paragraph, you must highlight all the characters, from the first through the return character at the end. When you’re used to simply clicking an insertion point anywhere in the paragraph, that’s a lot of work.

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Change leading to a paragraph attribute by going to Type preferences (Command-K/Ctrl-K). In the options list, one is not checked: Apply Leading to Entire Paragraph. When you check that box, you can apply leading to a paragraph with one click. Note that Adobe does not reconstruct its palettes to put the leading field with the paragraph attributes. It’s still to be found with the character attributes on the Control palette.—Eda Warren The Find/Change Feature That No One Finds Did you know that Find/Change remembers everything you’ve ever entered into its Find and Change fields? (Well, everything since you last rebuilt Preferences.) To access your Find/Change history, open Find/Change and click on the Up/ Down arrow icon immediately to the right of either field (Figure 18). Don’t go all the way to the right; those are the metacharacter dropdown menus. Find/Change history can be useful when you need to run the same Find/Changes in a series of layouts.—Anne-Marie Concepción

Figure 18: Check out your Find/Change history.

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Rotate Your Text, Not Your Text Frame How many times have you wanted angled text inside a normal, non-angled text frame? Start by creating a standard text frame. Inside the text frame, place a small box and rotate it to the angle you want your text to assume. Then combine the two by selecting both and choosing Pathfinder > Add. Now click into the new frame and begin typing. Voila, your text will now flow at an angle inside a regular “straight” frame.—Scott Citron See the Overset Text Without Changing the Frame Wondering what’s causing a text frame to be overset? No need to enlarge the frame or thread it to another one just to see the hidden text. Instead, select the frame (or click an insertion point in its text) and press Command-Y/Ctrl-Y. That opens InDesign’s Story Editor, revealing the full text of the active frame, including any threaded frames. Overset text is demarcated by a hard-to-miss red rule going down the left side at the end of the story (Figure 19). Press CommandY/Ctrl-Y again to close the Story Editor window and return to the layout.—Anne-Marie Concepción Eyedropper Trick Most folks know that the Eyedropper tool can pick up text attributes from any formatted text and apply them elsewhere in the document by dragging. Here’s an easier method. Next time you need to apply attributes to a word with the Eyedropper tool, instead of dragging over the word, simply double click on it. Similarly, three clicks applies your formatting to the entire line, four clicks the paragraph, and five clicks the whole story.—Scott Citron

Figure 19: That red line means the text next to it is outside the visible text frame.

Preview Applied Fonts Not sure which font you’d like to use? Try scrolling through the font menu and previewing each one as it’s applied to your text selection. To do so, select a text frame with the Selection tool, press T to switch to the Type tool, and click inside the Font field located in either the Control or Character palette. To preview available fonts as they’re applied to all the text in a selected frame, scroll through the list by pressing the Up/Down arrow keys.—Ted Locascio

Character and Paragraph Styles Auto Bullet and Numbering Styles InDesign’s Bullets and Numbering dialog box lacks a crucial feature: a Character Style dropdown menu. How could Adobe leave that out? While we wait for the engineers to fix this problem, here’s how to work around it: 1. Create the Character style you want to apply to the auto-generated bullets or numbers. Perhaps

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you want to apply a baseline shift to the bullets (something the dialog box doesn’t let you do), so you create a Character Style that just does that. 2. Double-click the Paragraph style you’re using to apply the Auto bullets (or create one if necessary) to open the Paragraph Style Options dialog box, and go to the Drop Caps and Nested Styles section. 3. Add a nested style that applies your Character style up to the first End Nested Style character (Figure 20). (You can’t specify just the first regular “character” because the bullets and numbers aren’t counted as characters when they’re applied automatically.) 4. Finally, either manually or via Find/Change, insert the End Nested Style Here character in front of the first “real” character in every paragraph that you want bulleted or numbered.—Anne-Marie Concepción

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Figure 20: There’s no Character Style dropdown menu in the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, but you can work around that limitation by applying it via a Nested Style. (Look for the End Nested Style Character in Type > Insert Special Character and in the dropdown list of special characters to the right of the Find/Change fields.)

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Safe Style Editing If you have the Type tool in a text frame and need to work with Paragraph or Character Styles, but don’t want to apply styling to the selected text or paragraph, select Shift-Option-Command/ Shift-Option-Ctrl and double-click on the style you wish to change. Alternately, you can simply right-click/Control-click on the style name in the palette and choose Edit.—Erica Gamet Clean Out the Overrides Overall If you’re mucking out the local overrides (manual formatting) from a long story using dozens of different paragraph styles, you don’t have to do the Option/ Alt-click-on-paragraph-style-name routine for each paragraph. Instead, just select all (Command-A/CtrlA) the text and choose Clear Overrides from the Paragraph Styles menu (Figure 21), or click the Clear Overrides button at the bottom of the Paragraph Styles

Figure 21: Choose Clear Overrides from the Paragraph Styles menu to delete manual formatting without harming existing Paragraph and Character Style formatting.

or Control palettes. The Clear Overrides command leaves existing Paragraph and Character Style formatting intact, even when the selection contains a mix of them, while removing any manual formatting. Here’s something that the Clear Overrides button can do that its palette menu equivalent can’t. If you hold down the Command/Ctrl key while you click the Clear Overrides button, InDesign clears out only character overrides from the selected text, leaving paragraph overrides (indents, space above/ below, etc.) intact. Do you want to just clear out the paragraph overrides but leave character formatting (bold, italic etc.) as is? Keep the Command/Ctrl and Shift keys pressed down while clicking the button. Like its palette menu twin, the Clear Overrides button ignores existing Paragraph and Character styles linked to the text selection, so you can safely use this technique on large selections of text containing mixed styles without losing their links to their styles. By the way, this stuff only works in CS2. If you’re still using CS1, you’ll need to download and run Dave Saunders’ Reassert Paragraph Styles script to do similar things: http://pdsassoc.com/index.php?Nav= downssub&Ban=InformalUtilitiesForDownload&Inf o=downloads/index.php—Anne-Marie Concepción Quick Apply with a Twist Quick Apply is a great way to apply Character, Paragraph, and Object style sheets. Type Command/ Ctrl + Return to bring up the Quick Apply window. To apply a style and clear existing overrides at the same time, start by typing Command/Ctrl, but then navigate to the style you wish to apply.

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Before typing Return, add either the Option/Alt key or Shift-Option/Alt to clear paragraph overrides or character level overrides.—Scott Citron Easier Text Style Mapping If you’ve tried using CS2’s style mapping feature when placing Microsoft Word documents (by clicking the Customize Style Import button at the bottom of the Import Options dialog box), you’ve probably found that InDesign often tells you the Word file contains many more text styles than it actually does, even if you’ve disabled the Import Unused Styles checkbox. I don’t know why this is, but I know how to fix it. First, place the Word file as is (with all its styles) into a clean, new InDesign document. Click inside the text and export it to RTF (File > Export > Rich Text Format). Now switch back to your working layout and place the RTF file, making sure that Show Import Options is turned on. When you click the Customize Styles Import button at the bottom, you’ll see a much shorter list of only the actual styles used in the Word document, making them much easier to map to your InDesign styles.—Anne-Marie Concepción

Spell Checking and Auto Correct How to Correct Autocorrect The Autocorrect feature (Edit > Spelling > Autocorrect) is a godsend for those of us who type with ten thumbs. But occasionally the feature “corrects” something that was just fine as it was. When this happens, simply choose Edit > Undo

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(Command-Z/Ctrl-Z) and continue typing. Since Autocorrect only applies as you type, you don’t need to worry about it going back and changing that instance of the offending word again.—Keith Gilbert It’s Not In-Design, Du-de Ok, so only Ashton Kutcher would hyphenate “dude.” For the most part, InDesign does a great job on hyphenation, but it can really punk proper names when proper names run near the end of a line. For example, it hyphenates its own name: In-Design. Bogus! Consider the embarrassment of hyphenating the CEO’s name or the new product line brand name in a press release. Fortunately, there’s an easy way to tell InDesign to not hyphenate certain words, which you’ll want to do with any proper names you routinely use. To dehyphenate (more properly, create a hyphenation exception), in InDesign CS2 and InCopy CS2, go to Edit > Spelling > Dictionary to open the Dictionary dialog (Figure 22). In the Word field, enter the word that should not be hyphenated, and then click Hyphenate. The squiggly lines (tildes) show where InDesign might break the word. Since you don’t want any breaks, remove all the tildes, and insert one at the front of the word. (Should your word be in a language that requires a tilde as part of its proper spelling, type a backslash before the tilde within the word.) Click the Add button. If the exception is document-specific, set the Target drop down to the current document name. Leaving it as “ENG.UDC” will install the hyphenation exception for all documents, old and new.—Pariah S. Burke

Figure 22: In the Dictionary dialog box, you can tell InDesign to not hyphenate its own name.

Spellcheck Capitalization Select the Case Sensitive option when you enter a word into a spelling dictionary (Edit > Spelling > Dictionary) if the word you’re adding is a trade name, proper name, or a word with intercaps, such as “InDesign.” This way, if the word is used in your document with improper capitalization, it will be flagged as a spelling error.—Keith Gilbert

Tables Easy-to-Modify Grids To create an easy-to-modify grid over just part of your page, start by creating a Text frame slightly larger than the desired grid. With the Type tool in the frame, choose Tables > Insert Table. In the Insert Table dialog box, estimate how many body rows and columns you’ll need to fill the frame. (You can

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change these amounts later.) Next, click in the table’s upper left corner to select the entire table. For the Figure 23 example, I set the grid lines 1/8-inch apart by choosing Table > Cell Options > Rows and Columns and indicating Row Height to be exactly .125”, maximum .125” and the Column Width to be .125”. If you need to add or delete rows or columns, choose Tables > Table Options > Table Setup. You can change the color of the table border here as well. To change the color of the cell strokes, choose Table > Cell Options > Strokes and Fills.—Erica Gamet

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Figure 23: You can create an easy-to-modify grid over just part of your page.

❱ For InCopy tips, go to the next page. ❱ For the rest of the main article, go to page 22.

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Just InCopy By Anne-Marie Concepción InCopy usually plays second fiddle to InDesign, but we’ve got an entire sidebar devoted to the app. Quickly Focus on Your InCopy Story Suffering from scrolling madness in InCopy’s Story or Galley View? Find the Story Bar at the top of the story you’re working on and Option/Altclick on its triangle. That collapses all the other stories into neat little story bars, while leaving the one you clicked on expanded (Figure A). It’s a fast way to isolate the story you’re editing, especially when the Assignment or layout file you’re working on has dozens of editable stories.

Figure A: Hide everything but the InCopy story you’re working on.

Figure B: In InCopy, Load All Styles to add a publication’s Paragraph and Character Styles to every new InCopy document.

Apply Publication Text Styles to Unlinked InCopy Stories If some of your writers like to use InCopy as a word processor (they start articles in them before the layout is ready), help them and yourself by adding your publication’s Paragraph and Character styles to their stand-alone InCopy documents. From InCopy’s Paragraph Styles palette menu, choose Load All Styles (Figure B), and at the prompt, double-click a current or previous InDesign file of the publication to import them all. You might want to prune the list of styles down to just the basic ones they’ll need (body, subhead, bullet list, caption) so as not to freak out your editors. Now your writers can quickly apply styles as they write, giving you a head start in formatting the text when you import their files. More importantly, the writers benefit because they’ll get more accurate copyfit feedback if they’ve set the document depth to a certain line, page, or, column inch amount (see the next tip). You can save this document as an InCopy template via File > Save As, so you only have to set up the styles once.

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Copyfit without a Layout in InCopy When you create a new, stand-alone InCopy CS2 document, you can include some features that help editorial do preliminary copy fitting even before the layout is ready. In the New Document dialog box, specify a Text Area Width that’s equivalent to the frame width (or column width) of the InDesign document into which the story will be flowed, and a Depth that is a rough approximation of the final story’s optimum word, line, page, or column inches count (Figure C). Click the Okay button. Now editors will receive constant feedback on how many words, lines, etc., they’re over/under as they write.

Figure C: If you help editors with preliminary copyfitting, you may have more time for design!

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A Better Story/Galley Font in InCopy Like InDesign’s Story Editor, InCopy’s Galley and Story views of a layout story employ an “editing typeface” that makes it easier to work with heavily formatted text. In InCopy, users choose the one they want to use from their list of active fonts via the Galley & Story Appearance palette. (In InDesign the choice is made in Preferences > Story Editor Display.) The editing font is limited to showing users when Bold and Italic have been applied to text; it can’t show formatting like Condensed or Heavy, even if the editing font contains those styles.

Figure D: InCopy users can accurately preview every active style of the editing typeface if they choose the right font in the Galley & Story preference.

But InCopy users have a feature InDesign lacks: They can specify a second typeface for Galley and Story view, one that the program will display only if it’s the same typeface as the one used to format the story they’re editing. Furthermore, Galley/Story accurately previews every active style of the font (Heavy, Condensed, Semibold, etc.) if that’s what the layout text is using. InCopy users can activate this feature by going to Preferences > Galley & Story Display, turning on the Override Preview Font checkbox, and choosing the style-laden typeface from the adjacent dropdown list of active fonts (Figure D). Move Frames… in InCopy! InCopy users can only edit the contents of frames, not move frames around on the page, right? It’s kind of the point of the program—Adobe didn’t even give InCopy a Selection tool. But evidently the team working on InDesign CS2’s Custom Anchored Objects feature didn’t get the memo. To create a text or image frame that your editors can reposition on the page, embed it in the text flow of an InDesign story as a regular inline object, then select it with the Selection tool and choose Object > Anchored Object > Options > Position: Custom. Make sure the Prevent Manual Positioning checkbox is turned off. Click OK and use your Selection tool to move the anchored frame where you want it to go on the page. Finally, export the story containing the anchored object to InCopy as usual.

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Figure E: It is possible to move frames within InCopy.

Now, when InCopy users open the layout or Assignment file and check out the story, they can move the anchored frame around on the page in Layout view by selecting the Position tool and holding down Command-Option/ Ctrl-Alt as they drag it around (Figure E).

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Figure F: Don’t need InCopy Assignments? Then leave stories in InDesign’s “Unassigned InCopy Content” section of the Assignments palette.

A Simpler InCopy Workflow Few users who are new to an InDesign/InCopy workflow realize that Assignments (.inca files) are optional. Once a story has been exported to InCopy, you can leave it in its “Unassigned InCopy Content” section of the Assignments palette in InDesign (Figure F). InCopy users can view the story in the layout and edit it there by opening the InDesign layout file (.indd) from a server. Multiple InCopy users can open and work on different parts of the layout file at the same time. So if your group is finding that the extra layer of complexity that Assignments adds to your workflow (more files to create, track, modify, and update) outweighs their benefits (smaller InCopy layouts, ability to keep the InDesign layout on the designer’s local hard drive), just ignore Assignments all together and use a layout-based workflow instead.

Add a Row at the Bottom of the Table You can add a single row to the bottom of a table by placing the Type tool cursor in the last cell of the existing bottom row and pressing the Tab key.—Ted Locascio Resize Table Columns Interactively To resize a column interactively, insert the Type tool anywhere in the table, then position the cursor over the right or left edge of a cell. When the cursor icon changes to display a horizontal, double-headed arrow, click and drag to change the column width. Note that columns can be expanded beyond the edge of a text frame. To resize a column without expanding the table beyond the boundaries of the text frame, hold down the Shift key as you drag. Or, to change the width of all columns proportionately, hold down the Shift key as you drag the right edge of the table.—Ted Locascio 3D Table Cells Tables in InDesign can have any stroke style applied to column and row strokes. You can even give them a 3D look: 1. In the Stroke palette, choose “Stroke Styles…” and create a new striped style. Don’t be too concerned about its looks; you’ll adjust it later. Call it something like “3d_table.” 2. Apply the newly created Stroke Style to your table and increase the stroke weight so you can see the stripe. Deselect by clicking outside of the table. 3. Reopen the Stroke editor, turn on the Preview checkbox, and start moving the Stripe

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Figure 24: Give a table a 3D look.

boundaries around. It takes some fiddling around to find the right percentage for your stripe, but the result can be very interesting. To create the table in Figure 24, I used the Stroke Style on a [Paper] colored stroke, and a Gap Color of 25% [Black].—Rufus Deuchler

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Graphics Convert Clipping Paths to Frames You can convert a clipping path (applied from Photoshop or created in InDesign) into a graphic frame. To do this, select the image with the Direct Selection tool, Control-click/right-click to access the contextual menu, and choose Convert Clipping Path To Frame. Once the command is applied, InDesign removes the clipping path and replaces it with a graphic frame of the same shape.—Ted Locascio Soften a Clipping Path The problem with clipping paths is that the edges of the silhouetted image they contain can look unnaturally hard, especially when the image is over a background color or image (Figure 25). To make

Figure 25: When clipping paths are too hardedged (left), feather the edges (right).

the silhouetted image blend more naturally, apply a light feather of just a few pixels to its edges (Object > Feather). Using a more generous feather amount is a great way to fix clunky-looking clipping paths generated by InDesign’s own Object > Clipping Path command. Before fiddling with the feathering in either operation, be sure to set the image’s Display Performance to High Quality, then turn on Overprint Preview from the View menu and zoom in closely. You’ll get a much more accurate preview of the feathered edges this way.—Anne-Marie Concepción Gather Original Images Without the Package Command Sometimes, way before you get to the File > Package stage of a project, you need to quickly gather a few or all of the layout’s linked high-res images in one place and do something with them—e-mail them to a freelancer, for example, or back them up to an external drive. The fastest way I know to do this is to select the images you want to gather in the Links palette (Shift- or Command/Ctrl-click to select more than one) and choose Copy Links To from the Links palette menu (Figure 26). Specify a folder where you want the files copied to, click OK, and you’re done. The path to the copies replace the path to the originals in your layout, so it’s a good way to do a little organizational pre-packaging too.—Anne-Marie Concepción Is it Vector or is it Raster? To tell whether a placed graphic is vector (made up of Bezier curves) or raster (made up of individual pixels), select the graphic and look at the Info

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Figure 26: When it’s not yet time to Package a project but you want to gather images, select them in the Links palette and choose Copy Links To.

palette. Near the bottom of the Info palette, you’ll see a field that says “Effective ppi”. If this field is blank, the graphic is vector. If the field has a number in it, the graphic is raster.—Keith Gilbert Determine the Color Space of Placed Graphics To determine the color space of a placed graphic (RGB, CMYK, Grayscale, or LAB), select it with the Selection tool (shortcut: V) or Direct Selection tool (shortcut: A), then refer to the Info palette.—Ted Locascio Clipping Paths without “Clipping Paths” While a Photoshop file can have only one clipping path, InDesign can read and use as a clipping path any path in a Photoshop file. You can choose any path inside a Photoshop file (if it’s a TIFF or PSD) by choosing Object > Clipping Path, and then picking Photoshop Path from the Type popup menu.—Scott Citron

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Vacuum Up Extra Text Wrap Points Editing a contoured text wrap (like those defining an image’s alpha channel) can be a nightmare because of the seemingly hundreds of points the text wrap path contains. To clean them up, change from the Direct Selection tool, which you needed to show the wrap, to the Pen tool without deselecting the wrap, and zoom in closely. If you hover the Pen tool over an existing point in the wrap’s path, the Pen cursor will show a minus sign, indicating that if you click on the point, the point will be deleted (Figure 27). So just spend a minute hovering over and clicking extraneous points to delete them, until you have something you can edit more easily with the Direct Selection tool. If you went overboard, you can always add points back to the path by moving the Pen tool cursor over part of the path (not over a point). When you see the plus symbol appear in the cursor, click to add a corner point (or drag to add a curve point).—Anne-Marie Concepción

Figure 27: Hover the Pen tool over a point in a text wrap’s path. When it shows a minus sign, you can click on the point to delete it.

Apply Photoshop Paths and Channels at Image Import Clipping paths and alpha channels let you extract part of an image from a photograph. If the image you’re importing contains a Photoshop clipping path or alpha channel, the Image panel of the Image Import Options dialog allows you to apply and edit the path in InDesign. To do so, check the Apply Photoshop Clipping Path box or choose an alpha channel from the menu. This means you can set up different alpha channels in Photoshop and choose which should be applied as the image’s transparency mask when you import it into InDesign.—Ted Locascio Truly Portable Snippets and Libraries You can ensure that your colleagues will always be able to access any high-resolution native files linked to snippets and library items you share with them by embedding the image in the layout file first (Links palette menu > Embed file) before you make a snippet or library item out of it. If you like, you can then unembed the image from your layout file via the Unembed File command in the Links palette—the snippet/library item you made will still have the image embedded into it. Now that the entire file is embedded, your colleagues will always be able to print the high-res image, even if it’s not on your local network (Figure 28). Similarly, when you’re creating documents for in-house using low- to mid-res images, there’s really no reason to treat the file as though it were going to a commercial printer. After placing your images, select them all in the Links palette and

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Figure 28: Embed images in your layout file before you make a snippet or library item out of it. Then anyone can print or make a PDF from the snippet or library item and produce full-resolution results.

choose Embed File from the Links palette menu. As long as you’re okay with the increased file size (an alert will ask you first), you’re good to go. You can still crop and transform embedded images, and they’re still listed in the Links palette (with an embedded icon), but now you don’t have to keep track of the original images’ locations, since they’re embedded in the layout file itself. If you ever need to extract an image, select it in the Links palette and choose Unembed from the palette menu. Even if you’ve deleted the original image, InDesign can use the embedded data to create it from scratch.—Anne-Marie Concepción

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InTips & Tricks

Figure 29: Do you need to find an original image but don’t remember where it came from? Select its name in the Links palette and go to Reveal in Finder/ Windows Explorer/Bridge.

Find the Needle in the File Haystack When you place images into a layout, you don’t care where the original artwork is because you know that the final PDF will embed the full data, or running the File > Package command will copy everything to a common folder. But what if you do need to find the original image while you’re working in the layout—to rename it, for example? You could double-click the image’s link in the Links palette to open Link Info and see the path to the image, but nobody wants to copy down all that gibberish. Instead, select the image’s entry in the Links palette and choose Reveal in Finder (or Windows Explorer, or Bridge) from the palette menu (Figure 29). Release the mouse button and bam, you’re there.—Anne-Marie Concepción

Use Metadata in Graphics You can view any metadata (such as keywords, photo credit info, and captions) that’s added to placed graphics and photos by selecting the graphic and choosing File Info from the Info palette menu or Link File Info from the Links palette menu. You can copy and paste information from the File Info dialog box into InDesign.—Keith Gilbert Scale a Placed Image from Within Its Frame With the Direct Selection or Position tool, you can scale a placed image proportionately within its frame by Shift-clicking and dragging any one of its boundary nodes.—Ted Locascio Figure 30: Embed an InDesign file’s title and keywords, and they’ll always appear in an exported PDF, no matter how many times you export.

Printing/Exporting Improve Your Search Engine Ranking and Bridge Results If you’re making PDFs that will be uploaded to a Web site, you can enhance the site’s search engine ranking by embedding title and keywords in the PDF. You can do this in Acrobat, but why not do it in InDesign? Just go to File > File Info and fill in the fields for Title, Author, Description, and Keywords (Figure 30). When you export the file to PDF, these entries are retained; and when you upload the PDF to a Web site, most search engines (including Google) index the text in these fields. Filling in these fields also makes InDesign layouts and PDFs findable by metadata in Adobe Bridge, too.—Anne-Marie Concepción

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Use Snippets To save an object or group of objects for use elsewhere (such as in another file), use InDesign CS 2’s Snippets feature. A Snippet is an XML file that contains information from your InDesign file. For instance, if you have an entire page full of objects and text, and you want to re-use a particular graphic and text frame, you could save them as a Snippet. To do this, select the object(s), choose Export from the File menu and select InDesign Snippet from the Format pull-down menu. Alternatively, you can simply select the objects and drag them to the desktop. Snippets can also be stored in Object Libraries for easy access in the future.—Erica Gamet

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InTips & Tricks

Print a Grayscale Version To print a grayscale version of your color InDesign layout, go to the Print dialog box’s Output panel and change the Output Color dropdown from Composite CMYK to Composite Gray. If some images still come out in color, that means they’re locked (probably because they’re .eps files) so InDesign can’t get in and change the colors. Luckily, InDesign has a skeleton key that can unlock just about any image during output: the Transparency Flattener. To unlock the stubborn images, select them in the layout and change their Opacity to 99.9 percent in the Transparency palette (Figure 31). Print again and the images will be in grayscale. The tiny amount of transparency you applied will be undetectable, even if the modified images are overlapping other items.—Anne-Marie Concepción

Figure 31: EPS files can be locked, which prevents InDesign from changing their colors. You can foil this limitation in the Transparency palette.

Double-check your Files Before you send your InDesign file off to a vendor for offset printing, do one last check: 1. Choose View > Overprint Preview. 2. Click on the Preview button in the bottom right corner of the tool palette (shortcut: W) to enter Preview mode. 3. Page through your document and examine each page. Overprint Preview will alert you to color ink overprinting problems that might be hidden in your file, and Preview mode will hide any objects that might have inadvertently been set as non-printing (common in converted QuarkXPress files).—Keith Gilbert Create a Grayscale PDF To make a grayscale PDF out of your color InDesign layout, you could follow the steps in the tip “Print a Grayscale Version” but specify the virtual Adobe PDF 7.0 (or 8.0) printer as your output device instead of your actual printer. However, it’s faster to export a color PDF using any of the usual PDF Presets and then convert the file to a grayscale PDF in Acrobat Pro itself. Unlike InDesign, Acrobat has no problem converting color .eps files or spot colors to grayscale. To convert a color PDF to grayscale in Acrobat Pro 7, choose Tools > Print Production > Convert Colors, and set all the Document Colors listed in the top section to Convert via the Action dropdown menu directly below (Figure 32). Then choose one of the Gray Gamma presets at the bottom of the Destination Space dropdown menu, set any other options you’d like (pages, conversion options), and click the OK

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Figure 32: To quickly convert a color PDF to grayscale, do the job in Acrobat.

button to convert the PDF. To verify that everything is grayscale, open the Output Preview dialog box (Tools > Print Production) and check that nothing is on the CMY plates, just the K plate.—Anne-Marie Concepción

Have a cool tip you want to share? We’d love to see it! Send it to us at editor@indesignmag.com. If included in a future issue, we’ll give you full credit.

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InStep: Table of Contents

By Brian Wood

Automate TOCs Nothing’s more boring than building tables of contents by hand. Let InDesign do the work for you.

A good table of contents is like a work of art. I know someone said that once—I just can’t remember the geek’s name. Working with a table of contents (or TOC) from start to finish can feel like a daunting task. But with a few helpful pointers, you’ll be able to construct them more quickly and less painfully than a manual cut-and-paste process could ever hope for. The best way to make a TOC is to first create and apply paragraph styles to your document so InDesign knows what to include in your TOC. Next, you create your TOC style. Then you set up and format the TOC and save those settings. Then you can generate the TOC and place it on a page. Finally, you can update the TOC if content or styles change; in fact, InDesign may do the updating for you automatically.

2

Working with styles InDesign can also pull graphics into a TOC, provided that you’ve applied a paragraph style to the graphics. Suppose you’re designing a guide to your city’s tea houses, and you include an inline graphic of a tea cup next to the subheads with names of the author’s favorite places. You want to include those marks of approval in the TOC, and happily, because those inline graphics are in the paragraphs with the subhead style, they’ll be included in the table of contents when InDesign auto-generates it (Figure 2). Bulleted and numbered list that you’ve applied paragraph styles to can also appear in the TOC.

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The need to be style-ish InDesign generates a table of contents from text within your document that you’ve applied certain styles to. So the first step is to create paragraph styles and apply them to the text you want in the TOC. For example, you might apply the styles to headlines and subheads (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Use the Paragraph style palette to set up styles named anything you want. I name mine “headline,” “subhead1,” etc., so I can easily identify them.

Figure 2: You can include nested objects (the tea cup in the subhead here), bullet lists, and more in the TOC.

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InStep: Table of Contents

Tip: Character Limit There’s a limit to how much text InDesign pulls into a TOC from a single paragraph: the first 255 characters. Sometimes you want more than that; for instance, the TOC of a scientific document might call for a lengthy synopsis to accompany each subhead. In these cases, just insert a text anchored object (Object > Anchored Object > Insert) and type or paste text into it. Because InDesign considers that anchored object to be a single character, you can sneak around the 255-character limit.

3

Styling the TOC Now it’s time to create the Entry Style, which determines the look of the text within the TOC. If you don’t create an Entry Style, the text formatting defaults to the paragraph styles you used in the body of your document. To make this easier, I sometimes mock up a dummy TOC (Figure 3), then format it with tabs and nested styles. In the process of styling the dummy, I end up building styles that I can later apply to the real TOC. While this may seem preliminary, there’s a good reason for it. You can wait until the TOC is on the page before applying styles to it, but then you may lose that formatting should you use the Update Table of Contents command.

5

Name it and add paragraph styles Keep that document open and go to the Table of Contents dialog box (Layout > Table of Contents). Start by entering a Title, which will appear at the top of the TOC (Figure 4). For instance, the title might be “Contents” or “Table of contents.” You can apply a paragraph style to the text in the title here as long as you create the style before opening the Table of Contents dialog box. Next, you tell InDesign how to create the TOC by specifying which paragraph style(s) to look for. I call those “included styles.” In the Include Paragraph Styles area (which is blank by default) and the Other Styles area (which lists the paragraph styles in your document), add each individual style you want to use to generate the TOC by choosing a style

Tip: Roll Your Own When creating a TOC, InDesign automatically generates an Entry style called “TOC Body Text” that you could use in step 5 when you choose Layout > Table of Contents and add your included paragraph styles. However, I prefer to make my own at this stage so I can style the TOC before it’s generated.

Figure 3: Set up styles ahead of time and style the TOC once it’s built. I set up a dummy TOC to accomplish this. I name my paragraph styles “toc-something” to remind myself.

4

Locate a blank space Identify or create a page (or pages) with a blank area large enough to accommodate the entire TOC. You don’t need to create a text frame in advance because InDesign will make one for you. Figure 4: The top section of the Table of Contents dialog box includes the TOC title.

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InStep: Table of Contents

name from Other Styles, then clicking Add to add it to the Include Paragraph Styles list (Figure 5). It’s important to add the styles in the order in which they will appear in the final TOC. In this case, the headline style will be first, with the subhead style nested underneath, and so on.

Figure 5: This pane of the dialog box is the most crucial.

6

Choose more options in the middle pane In step 3, you created the Entry Style that formats the TOC text. Now you need to choose that Entry Style. If your Table of Contents dialog box doesn’t have the middle pane shown in Figure 6, click More Options to make the pane appear. Then select an included style from the Include Paragraph Styles and choose an Entry Style such as Subhead from the middle pane’s drop-down menu. For Page Number, you have three options: Before Entry (page number appears to the left of the associated TOC text), After Entry (page number appears to the right of the associated TOC text), or No Page Number (page numbers are not included in the TOC). In the Style dropdown menu, you can apply a character style to the page number as InDesign builds the TOC. The Between Entry and Number option puts a tab between the page number and TOC entry, but you can pick other characters, such as bullets, as well. If you check Sort Entries in Alphabetical Order, InDesign will sort the TOC in alphabetical order once it’s built and flowed into the document. By assigning a Level to each included style, you create a style hierarchy that determines which style is nested under or over which others. In Figure 6, the included style Subhead is Level 2, which means it’s nested under Level 1 and above Level 3. To increase the indent of TOC elements, increase the Level; to decrease the indent, decrease the Level.

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Figure 6: Because you styled the TOC ahead of time, you can apply those styles here in the Style section of the Table of Contents dialog box.

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InStep: Table of Contents

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Choose more options in the bottom pane The Options at the bottom of the Table of contents dialog box (Figure 7) are where you turn the TOC text into clickable bookmarks in a PDF, or make a TOC run-in, which means that the TOC flows together in a single continuous text block. Note that Replace Existing Table of Contents will be dimmed unless your cursor is in a TOC that has already been created.

8

Save the TOC settings for later After you finish in the Table of Contents dialog, you can click Save Settings to retain these settings for future TOCs. In the Save Style dialog, name the TOC settings and click OK (Figure 8). To edit, delete, or add to TOC settings, choose Layout > Table of Contents Styles.

Figure 8: Name the style settings so you can use them again later.

Figure 9: Once you click OK in the Table of Contents dialog box, you can go to a page and click to flow the TOC, as you see here.

9 Figure 7: The Options area includes such refinements as including text from hidden layers.

Generate the TOC Now that you’ve made all of the necessary selections, click OK in the Table of Contents dialog box to generate the TOC. (InDesign may ask if you want to include overset text. If you choose Yes, the TOC will include all text outside of text frames.) When the Loaded Text Cursor appears, click to flow the TOC on a page. And magically, the TOC will appear (Figure 9).

10

Update the TOC Chances are, there’ll be changes in your document’s content or styles, so you’ll have to update the TOC later. To update the TOC using the last saved settings, place your cursor in the text frame that contains the TOC, and choose Layout > Update Table of Contents (Figure 10).

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Figure 10: With the cursor in the TOC, choose Layout > Update Table of Contents to auto-update the TOC.

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InStep: Table of Contents

$BDJEJÂ&#x2C6;-JWF#SPXTF To change any of the Table of Content dialog box options, place your cursor in the TOC and choose Layout > Table of Contents. Note: I highly recommend using the Table of Contents dialog box to make any changes and updates to the TOC text. If you take what seems the easy way out and make text formatting changes directly on the TOC page, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be mighty sad when those changes are lost after you update the TOC using Layout > Update Table of Contents.

11

Extra: TOCs for Books Building a TOC for a multi-file book is very similar to creating a TOC for a single document. Before beginning the process, however, make sure that the included styles (paragraph styles used to create the TOC content) are identical across all of the documents in the book. Create a book by choosing File > New > Book, and associating (Adobeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s term for â&#x20AC;&#x153;addingâ&#x20AC;?) InDesign files to the book. You then open the book by doubleclicking on the proper document name in the book list. To build a TOC for the book, refer back to steps 1 through 10 of this article. The only additional step when creating TOCs for multi-file books is to check the option Include Book Documents in the Table of Contents dialog box. This option tells InDesign to generate a TOC from all of the documents within the book you just created. To access the Include Book

Cacidi LiveBrowse is your visual filebrowser, which makes it so simple to browse through your files, and easily drag the image or text file to your document. All placeable file can be viewed in four different preview sizes, up to 200x200 px â&#x20AC;&#x201C; great quality makes it easy to choose the right file! $BDJEJÂ&#x2C6;-JWF#SPXTF



 Figure 11: After you make a book file (File > New > Book) and add documents, open the document that will contain the TOC and choose Layout > Table of Contents. Check the option for Include Book Documents.

$BDJEJÂ&#x2C6;-JWF.FSHF LiveMerge allows you to create and re-use design group objects â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and totally innovating â&#x20AC;&#x201C; receive a live feed of text and images from your mySQL database. Focus on design and layout and let LiveMerge control the content in your document - live updating right in front of your eyes. No need for checking if your document content is up to date, LiveMerge handles that part for you!

documents option, the book must be open when building the table of contents to (Figure 11).

Brian Wood is the Director of Training at eVolve computer graphics training(www.evolveseattle.com), and the author of Adobe InDesign CS2 Hands On Training (Peachpit Press)

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InStep: Table of Contents

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

By Sandee Cohen

Indent Mystery, Extended Extensions, Aligning Tables, and Pantone Color Confusion. InQuestion is a regular column devoted to answering subscribers’ questions about working with InDesign.

Indent Mystery It was 8 pm as the phone ring jolted me awake from snoozing on the couch. The creative director at an ad agency where I had taught InDesign was on the phone. They had discovered a problem with the alignment of some text with hanging indents. They emailed me a screen shot. The text had hanging indents set manually with bullets (Figure 1). Nothing seemed wrong until I zoomed in and looked next to the guide. Instead of the second lines aligning to the text after the tab, they were slightly indented (Figure 2). At first I thought it was a font thing, then we wondered about something causing a text wrap. But suddenly I knew exactly what the problem was. It was right there in plain view. Can you solve the mystery? The answer and the way to fix the problem is at the end of this column.

Figure 1: An example of the type of text was aligning incorrectly.

Figure 2: Looking closely at the text, I could see that the hanging indent was not aligned for the second line of the text.

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

Extended Extensions?

Aligning Tables

Q

Q

Why did InDesign decide to have a four-letter extension instead of the usual three? I understand that TIFF and JPEG are four, but their extensions are only three when appending them. –D. Rahim

A

You’re right, InDesign uses four-letter extensions for documents (indd), templates (indt), libraries (indl), books (indk), and snippets (inds). Most people think there’s a requirement that all extensions must only be three letters. That dates from the old days when DOS required filenames in the “8.3” format: eight letters for the filename followed by three letters for the extension. But with only three letters for extensions, software companies soon found that their applications would run into extension conflicts with other applications. For instance, the letters “ind” are used by IBM, Foxmail, Windows shared database files, the Well of Souls game, the LaTeX or TeX index, dBASE IV, Delorme index, and the Windows Applog index. Obviously, Adobe would have problems if it stuck with only three letters for InDesign.

When I create a table inside a text box, the top of the table aligns with the top of the text box, as I would expect. If, however, the table is part of a chain of text, it refuses to align, and sits just below the top of the box (Figure 3). Is there a way around this other than raising the text box slightly so that the table aligns where it should relative to the trim? –Jim Weaver

A

December 2006 | January 2007

This one is tricky. I fixed the alignment of the table in the second column by selecting the table and then chose Table > Table Options > Table Setup. Then I changed the Space Before field to 0 (Figure 4). But the more important question is, why did the Space Before field set the table below the top of the column? It doesn’t if you simply insert a table at the top of a column. In fact, the default setting for all new tables is to apply a small Space Before setting. If the table is at the top of a column, the space is ignored. If the table is in the middle, the space is applied. I discovered that when a table is forced to the top of a next column by any of the break characters (frame break, column break, page break, etc), the table sits at the top of the frame honoring its Space Before setting. I’m not saying it’s logical, but it’s true: When an ordinary paragraph with a Space Before setting is forced to the top of frame or column, that paragraph is not lowered. The Space Before amount is ignored. Yet the same thing doesn’t happen with a table.

Figure 3: A table, set in threaded columns, appears lower than the text in the other column.

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Figure 4: Use the Table Spacing control for Space Before to force a table to the top of a text frame.

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

Pantone Color Confusion

Q

My printer and I stumbled into a weird color swatch problem. While building a CYMK brochure in InDesign, I added a new color swatch. I chose the process color type and then chose Pantone Process Coated from the Color Mode Library. I selected 316-1, which is a brown color built from 70, 80, 100, 0. When the printer ripped the file direct to press, the color was green. The build was incorrect. Since time was short we ran with the green. Luckily for us, the client liked it as much as the brown. The prepress department became aware of the naming on the new brown swatch as having a prefix of DS. The printer thought that indicated a European color system. I do not. Could you shine a light on this issue? –Gayle Anderson

A

First of all, there is nothing wrong with your setup or your Pantone color libraries. You did the right thing. The only problem is that Pantone has made its color libraries so confusing I’m surprised they haven’t been run out of town on a rail. The problem starts with the fact that Pantone has created two color libraries from which you can choose process colors. You chose the Four–color process library (Figure 5). This library contains more than 3,000 CMYK colors that are not part of the PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM. They do not have any relationship with the solid (spot) color system. These colors start with either DS or DE, followed by a one– to three–digit number, a dash and a single digit number (i.e., PANTONE DS 316–1). The DE designation is used in the European version. I think someone along the line looked at the number 316 in your swatches palette and said, “Hey, that’s not right. Pantone 316 isn’t brown. It’s a green color.” So that well-meaning technician changed the color from process to the Pantone solid to process library color 316 (Figure 6). It wasn’t your fault. You did the right thing. In fact, you are probably the only person in your shop who has ever done it this way—which is why someone else thought it was wrong.

Figure 5: The Pantone process coated library can be used to pick CMYK colors. It has no relationship to the Pantone solid (spot) color matching system.

Figure 6: The Pantone solid to process library is used to find the closest CMYK color that matches one of the Pantone solid (spot) colors. These numbers are totally different from the numbers in the process coated library.

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

Indent Mystery (continued)

AUTOMATE OUTPUT

EASIER, FASTER & MORE SECURE PRINTING & FILE EXPORTING

Did you figure out why the lines didn’t hang correctly? To find the answer, look over at the right side of the frame. I noticed a slight irregularity in the blue line that draws the text frame. This meant that the frame wasn’t a clean rectangle. That little discrepancy was all that was needed to screw up the alignment. Fortunately, there’s an easy way to turn mis-aligned frames back into rectangle. Just select the frame with the Selection tool (black arrow), and then click the Rectangle button in the Pathfinder palette (Figure 7). This will clean up the problem.

enhances printing + file exporting with InDesign CS + CS2 prints, proofs + exports in one go

addresses multiple output devices simultaneously creates custom-made output Figure 7: Click the Rectangle button in the Pathfinder palette to automatically convert mis-aligned frames back into rectangles.

Sandee Cohen is the only third-party author to have written educational materials for all five versions of InDesign. Her latest books are the InDesign CS2 Visual QuickStart Guide and Real World Creative Suite 2. Have a question for Sandee? Send your questions to sandee@ indesignmag.com. Please indicate if you don’t want your name used. We reserve the right to edit questions for space and clarity. Not all questions can be answered, nor will they be answered privately.

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

InDesigncs2: Extensible by Design Adobe InDesign software provides third-party developers with unprecedented power, enabling them to create plug-ins that can be integrated seamlessly into the application. In fact, all of its type, color, printing, and other features are provided through plug-ins to this core application. Virtually every aspect of the program is a plug-in, giving third-party developers extraordinary freedom in customizing InDesign and adding functionality.

Page Control for InDesign CS and InDesign CS2. With Page Control, your InDesign documents are no longer limited to a single page size. Inserts and foldouts can be created without complex workarounds involving multiple documents, the Book palette, or extra imposition work. Resize an entire spread or the left and right pages independently. Build and apply master pages of different sizes. Expand the pasteboard for more working room. All from InDesign’s own Pages palette. And, the free reader plug-in means never worrying about compatibility with service providers. Take control of your pages with Page Control for InDesign CS and CS2.

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Adobe Systems Incorporated 345 Park Avenue San Jose, CA 95110-2704 USA www.adobe.com Adobe, the Adobe logo, and InDesign are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © 2006 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.

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InDesigner: Watch Out!

Fossil

InDesigner: Position: InDesigner: Position: Contact:

Since 1989, the tin packaging of Fossil watches has garnered many design awards. Recently, the company’s design team let their skills loose on a new medium: the direct-mail catalog. I spoke to senior art director Shay Ometz and senior designer Nosheen Iqbal about their work on the Fossil catalogs, which are created in InDesign. Photography is obviously central to the catalogs, which showcase Fossil’s clothing, handbags, and sunglasses, as well as the watches. “I use low-res JPEG photos for position-only purposes,” Nosheen says. “The great thing is that I can turn off Photoshop layers in InDesign without having to go back and forth between programs. Then I replace the images as they come back from prepress. As each Photoshop file is completed, it’s saved into a shared folder my InDesign document is linked to. With just one click, I can update my InDesign document. The only problem I have when it comes to photographs is more of a memory issue. I place so many high-res photographs that InDesign has a tendency to not refresh the images when I scroll through the document.” The design team is looking into InDesign’s Data Merge or other variable-data tools to create the catalogs. For now, Nosheen says, she receives text from the copywriter as she lays out the photography and graphics. During layout, that text can change three or four times. “I keep all my copy formatted in style sheets,” Nosheen says, “so it’s easy for me to make accurate changes without losing the flow of the paragraph.”

Shay Ometz Senior art director Nosheen Iqbal Senior designer http://www.fossil.com

Most of the catalog spreads mix in line drawings with the photos. Shay Ometz notes that “illustration helps to capture a creative modern vintage Fossil even if the photograph itself does not.” The phrase “modern vintage” is Fossil’s brand theme, and the design team goes to great lengths to be true to that slogan. For one spread, Shay explains, the designers used vintage newspapers as a backdrop and created retro-looking ads that related to each bag on the spread. “We also manipulated some of the imagery in Photoshop to incorporate relevant brand imagery, such as mid-century chairs, TVs, and radios,” Shay adds. Some elements are first drawn by hand, then scanned, brought into Photoshop or Illustrator, and finally placed in InDesign. “I like that I can bring in vector graphics from Illustrator and still be able to make shape and color modifications in InDesign,” Nosheen says. In any catalog, product color accuracy is a big issue. Nosheen notes, “Our apparel team gives us an Illustrator file of all the swatches, from which we have an in-house proof made. We then match that proof to fabric swatches to make sure we have the right color mix.”

Terri Stone is the Editor in Chief of InDesign Magazine and the Creativepro.com Web site.

A mix of old and new: The Fossil direct-mail catalogs convey the “Modern Vintage” brand theme.

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Julia Tee Fitted tee with twill tape detail on square neckline and cap sleeves. 100% Cotton. Machine Wash. Sizes: XS-XL. Imported. Brittany Blue (shown) WC1890177 $28

b

Burnt Toast WC1889200 $28 Insignia Blue WC1891400 $28 Dove WC1892098 $28

c

Burnt Toast

Insignia Blue

Dove

Veronica Skirt A-line skirt with elastic waist, raw hem and lurex detailing. 100% Cotton Voile. Machine Wash. Sizes: 0-12. Imported. Burnt Toast Print (shown)

Women’s Belts

a. Woven Plaque Braided leather with a dramatic faux gold finished rosette buckle with stone detail. Sizes: S-L. Imported. BT2988200 $55

Tunnel Blue Print WC4670401 $48

Brittany Blue WC4676420 $48 Brown Ash WC4676200 $48 Tunnel Blue Print

Brittany Blue

a

A finishing touch.

WC4670200 $48

b. Embossed Floral Embossed leather with metal studs, cutaway details and antique brass-plated hardware. Sizes: S-L. Imported.

Brown Ash

Beverly watch see page 17

d

a

b

c

a

c

BT2987231 $48

a

a

c. Woven Links Embossed linked leather with brass hardware. Sizes: S-L. Imported. BT3010200 $42 d. Western Studded Leather with a metal-studded diamond pattern and antique brass-plated hardware. Sizes: S-L. Imported. BT2986001 $58

Women’s Pink Dial Watches

b

a. Tea Cup Crisscross-stitched dark brown leather strap, brushed silvertone rectangular cushion case and pink dial. 25mm case width. Imported. JR9167 $65

c

b. Strawberry Stitched leather strap with red and light pink floral embellishments. Polished pink dial with brushed silver-tone case. 26mm case width. Imported. JR9151 $65

This page:

c. Mia Stainless steel bracelet and case featuring a distinctive pyramid crystal over the pink dial. 20mm case width. Imported. ES1569 $55

Opposite page:

Women’s Blue Dial Watches Blue becomes you.

a. Tea Cup Crisscross-stitched dark brown leather strap with a brushed silver-tone rectangular cushion case and teal dial. 25mm case width. Imported. JR9166 $65 b. Mia Stainless steel bracelet and case featuring a distinctive pyramid crystal over the blue dial. 20mm case width. Imported. ES1570 $55

Alana Blouse Sheer and lightweight, fitted, cap-sleeved button-front shirt. 100% Cotton Dobby. Machine Wash. Sizes: XS-XL. Imported. Whisper White (shown) WC1143156 $38, Pumpernickel WC1143200 $38, Barn Red WC1143600 $38 Pumpernickel

Sienna Urban Pocket Bags

Wish there was blue? see page 4.

Find the style that fits you.

a

Barn Red

Rosemary Skirt Knee-length knit skirt with embroidered detail at the waist. 100% Cotton Jersey. Machine Wash. Sizes: XS-XL. Imported. Pine Bark (shown) WC4671240 $48, Insignia Blue WC4671545 $48

c. Blueberry Stitched leather strap with dark and light blue floral embellishments. Blue dial with brushed, silver-tone case. 26mm case width. Imported. JR9149 $65

b

Mischa Tall Tote Woven, washed leather bag with shabby brass-plated studs on the upper panel and strap. Interior is fully lined with matching twill fabric. 15"L x 13"H x 4.5"W. Imported. Teal (shown) SHB9404468 $168, Tan SHB9404231 $168, Brown SHB9404200 $168, Cream SHB9404111 $168

Wish there was pink? see page 7.

c. Messenger Front flap with zip compartment. Large side pockets and spacious interior pockets. 70% Cotton Canvas, 30% Washed Leather. 15.5"L x 12"H x 6"W. Imported. Espresso (shown) SHB9406206 $118, Tan SHB9406231 $118, Black SHB9406001 $118

Brooke watch, see page 24

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1.866.510.4460

a. Hobo Short shoulder bag with contrast stitching and large front zip pocket. 70% Cotton Canvas, 30% Washed Leather. 15"L x 9"H x 3.5"W. Imported. Black (shown) SHB9408001 $98, Tan SHB9408231 $98, Espresso SHB9408206 $98 b. Cross Body Large shoulder bag with front and side zip pockets. Detailed with stitched panels on top and bottom. Fully lined with zip closure. 70% Cotton Canvas, 30% Washed Leather. 12"L x 13"H x 3"W. Imported. Tan (shown) SHB9407231 $108, Espresso SHB9407206 $108, Black SHB9407001 $108

Insignia Blue

Free Shipping *see page 25 for details

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13

Above, left: Nosheen Iqbal drew the words “stand out” by hand and bought the drawing into Photoshop, then saved it as a transparent bitmap file for importing into InDesign. Above, middle: To make it look like the photo of blue wall tiles is morphing into a drawing, the illustration team drew some tiles by hand, then resized and colorized the graphic in Photoshop. Nosheen imported it into InDesign and aligned it with the photo. Above, right: For the background of this shot, the team scanned old newspapers into Photoshop and replaced some of the original advertisements with graphics and copy to relating to Fossil’s “Modern Vintage” theme. After printing out the doctored papers, the designers hand-tinted them with paint. Right: You’ll see certain symbols, such as the antique camera and retro chair, throughout the catalogs. a

b

c

a. Titan Modernistic stainless steel case with hints of sci-fi. Negative digital display. Stained, wood-grain leather strap. 35mm case width. Imported. JR9122 $75 b. AnaDigi Streamlined stainless steel case case features negative digital display, contrasting wood and black metal analog dial. Pebbled leather strap. 43mm case width. Imported. JR9121 $75 c. Josh Positive digital display shows time and date. Also includes backlight and stopwatch feature with world time. Double-constructed leather strap and polished stainless steel case. 39mm case width. Imported. JR9120 $75 Opposite page:

Leo Polo Classic polo with alternating colored stripes, three-button closure, side vents at bottom opening. 100% Cotton. Machine Wash. Sizes: S-XL. Imported. Total Eclipse (shown) MC2119419 $38, Faded Denim MC2119423 $38, Pumpernickel MC2119914 $38 Faded Denim Pumpernickel

Continental Jeans Low rise, fitted thigh and bootleg opening. Zipper fly and vintage wash. 100% Cotton. Machine Wash. Regular Sizes: Waist 28"-36". Imported. Light (shown) MC3065580 $58, Dark MC3065582 $58

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See fossil.com for additional denim washes.

1.866.510.4460

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December 2006 | January 2007

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InDesigner: Watch Out!

Below: Different catalog, same camera and chair. The repetition reinforces the company’s brand. Right: The words “Holiday 2006” and “Fossil” were hand-drawn, then modified in Illustrator.

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M A G A Z I N E 15

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InDesigner: Watch Out!

Join a chapter near you!

AdobeInDesign U S E R

G R O U P S

Ten Steps for Building Your InDesign Expertise

Canada

1. Subscribe to InDesign Magazine for tips and techniques from industry experts.

United States

2. Keep up-to-date on the latest InDesign news at InDesignSecrets.com, an independent website with expert podcasts, blogs, techniques, and more.

Atlanta • Boston • Chicago • Dallas • Denver • Detroit • Des Moines • Los Angeles • Milwaukee Minneapolis • Melbourne • New York City • Orlando • Portland • Reno • Rochester • San Francisco Seattle • Sydney • Tampa • Toronto • Washington, D.C. • and growing!

3. Sign up for a free InDesign tip of the week at www.indesignmag.com/ idm/tipofweek.html. 4. Check out Total Training for Adobe InDesign CS2 with 16 hours of in depth video training at www.totaltraining.com. 5. Visit Element K at www.elementk.com for self-paced online training. 6. Skip over to Lynda.com to try their essential InDesign training. 7. Drop by Adobe Studio for in-depth tips and techniques from the experts at Adobe at www.studio.adobe.com. 8. Visit your local or online bookstore to find InDesign books by industry experts, such as David Blatner, Sandee Cohen, Galen Gruman, Deke McClelland, Olav Martin Kvern, and others. 9. Locate Adobe Certified Instructors and Adobe Authorized Training Centers in your area at partners.adobe.com. 10. Check out the next date for the InDesign Conference, a gathering of leading InDesign experts, at www.theindesignconference.com.

Australia

The momentum behind InDesign is contagious. As you and other designers move to InDesign, you may be looking for a knowledgeable community to help make the most of this world-class page layout program. You’re invited to join one of the InDesign User Groups that have formed in major cities in the U.S., Canada and Australia, and to visit our website for information about: • • • • • •

Upcoming meetings and events, notes, presentations, and information from prior meetings Tips, tutorials, and training resources Member discounts on books, conferences and third-party software Third-party plug-ins Service provider support materials Worldwide resources… and more!

Expand your InDesign skills at a meeting near you! w w w.indesignusergroup.com/idmag

Adobe, the Adobe logo, and InDesign are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © 2006 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.

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InReview: Productivity Enhancers

By Christopher Smith and Larry Happy Gluon ProScale ID 7.0 Gluon, Inc. www.gluon.com $139 Rating:

Ratings Key

Not worth it even if it’s free

Not recommended

Average

Exceptionally good A must-have

Adobe InDesign provides many ways to scale objects, including the Scale tool, the Transform tool, even the Selection tool can be used with some modifier keys. So you might think that a scaling plug-in is a crazy idea; kind of like selling an Eskimo a refrigerator. Yet Gluon has identified workflow bottlenecks and needs that the current array of scaling tools don’t address. Say you have an advertisement that you publish in several publications, and the size changes slightly based on the newspaper or magazine. ProScale ID 7.0 (for CS2) lets you take your original document and easily resize it for distribution to multiple publications. It can take 30 minutes or an hours worth of work and reduce it to a few seconds. ProScale ID can scale an entire layout nonproportionally without distorting type or graphics, and it does so with speed and precision of Gluon’s ProScale ID. It can handle both single and multipage documents. Because you can create presets, it’s easy to repeat recurring transformations. How It Works Once you download the plug-in, drag ProScale.pin. framework into the Plug-Ins folder in the InDesign application folder. We tried both the free trial version and the purchased, registered version. We found that heavy-duty work, like trying to convert an entire document from U.S. Letter size to Tabloid size, worked best with the registered version of the product, and ran into a few crashes with the trial version. But after registering the plug-in, we found it to be quite stable. (Moral of the story: Don’t judge the app by its trial.)

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Figure 1: The ProScale interface is easy to use.

There are two ways to scale with ProScale: manually, using the newly added ProScale tool in the Tool palette, or automatically, using the ProScale dialog box. The dialog box is available from the Gluon menu that appears after installing the plug-in. We found manual scaling to be somewhat non-intuitive. After scaling manually, you see an outline of the scale you performed, but the object doesn’t actually scale until you press the Return key. Seeing the outline prior to committing to the scale command does have its benefits, but we prefer to jump in with both feet and use the Undo command if we’ve made a mistake. The automatic scaling option works like a charm and is every designer’s dream—even if you don’t know it yet. The ProScale dialog box has three tabs that control the scaling: Scale, Options, and Presets. Under the Scale tab, the Fit To option lets you automatically resize your documents to a specific page size (Figure 1).

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InReview: Productivity Enhancers

Figure 3: Check as few or as many options as you wish.

Figure 2: ProScale comes with some page sizes, and you can add your own custom sizes.

To make your work easier, you can choose from a number of preset page sizes, such as half-page, quarterpage, and other fractional page sizes (Figure 2). The presets are useful if you build templates and need to quickly modify pages or page elements for different layouts, or for use on different master pages. You can add your own presets to the drop down list, making it easy to change scaling to a custom size with a single click. You can choose to scale objects from different locations on the object, such as the upper left corner of a selection or the center of a selection. Additionally, you can copy and move (step and repeat) objects to specific locations based on a percentage of the object’s

Figure 4: Make presets—they’re easy, and they’ll increase your efficiency.

size or a specific value. When scaling an entire page, the reference point for the scaling is based on the document margins. We were able to scale from the page edge by temporarily setting the document margins to zero. Using the Options tab (Figure 3), you can choose which items to be scaled by ProScale and customize the settings. As we mentioned, one of the greatest capabilities of ProScale is its ability to scale non-proportionally without distorting text. While this works for most documents, we did find that horizontally reducing a text box with the Constrain option unchecked and the option to scale text enabled did result in squeezed type. To scale objects non-proportionally without scaling text, simply uncheck the Text option before scaling. We were able to scale a graphic box non-proportionally without

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Figure 5: To save a preset, click the Use Settings button.

distortion whether the graphics option was on or off. We quickly found that instead of returning to the Options tab multiple times, it’s much more efficient to save scale settings using ProScale ID’s presets. Presets are easy to create, as you simply choose the settings you want to use under the Scale and Options tab, and then name and save the preset under the Presets tab (Figure 4). Before creating any new presets, we suggest building a default preset so you can easily return to your initial settings. To use a saved preset, click the preset name, then click the Use Settings button on the right side of the dialog box, and finally click the Scale button (Figure 5). With all of the available options, presets are a real time-saver.

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The InDesign Conference

InReview: Productivity Enhancers

PoDCasT!

Figure 6: ProScale ID has no problem scaling a text box with an anchored (inline) object.

The InDesign Conference and InDesign Magazine are proud to present the InDesign Conference Podcast. This bi-weekly video podcast is presented by InDesign expert Sandee Cohen. In each episode we’ll show tips, tricks and cool techniques for InDesign users of all levels. In addition, speakers from the InDesign Conference and Terri Stone, editor in chief of InDesign Magazine, will also bring you the latest InDesign information available. Subscribe to the podcast and join fellow InDesign users in this vibrant community.

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December 2006 | January 2007

4;

Larry Happy is an Adobe Certified Expert and vice president of Training for American Graphics Institute, where he manages the professional development training operations. He has served as the technical editor for several books on Adobe InDesign and Adobe Acrobat. You can reach him at lthappy@agitraining.com.

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:

:

Christopher Smith is an Adobe Certified Expert and president of American Graphics Institute (www.agitraining.com), a consulting and training firm. He is the author of numerous InDesign books, and has served as a lead member of the Adobe Creative Team working as the lead author of the Adobe InDesign Classroom in a Book. You can reach him at cgsmith@agitraining.com.

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Bottom Line. ProScale ID 7.0 is a solid plug-in with many great features. We were amazed at how quickly it performed cumbersome tasks. Scaling a range of pages or an entire, complex document did take some time and processing power, but it was still far faster than making manual adjustments.

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MENU

ProScale ID is also beneficial for anyone who needs to convert from Imperial to Metric sizes.

4;

This version of ProScale ID is much better at scaling rotated objects than the previous version. It had no problem with grouped object or anchored frames, which are sometimes called in-line objects. When we selected a text box that included an anchored group of objects positioned outside of the text frame, ProScale could manipulate both the text and anchored objects with quick efficiency (Figure 6). Text on a path presented one of the few objects where both the text and object were not fully controlled by ProScale ID. In our testing, ProScale ID scaled the path only, not the type. This is consistent with InDesign’s own scaling capabilities. One of the most significant scaling problems faced by many ad agencies and publishers involves the need to scale groups of objects that include text boxes. But when you try to scale such a group in InDesign, its default scaling feature creates a disparity in text sizes. There’ll be two text sizes, with one text size listed in parentheses. ProScale ID eliminates this problem by scaling a group, including text, and listing only a single text size in the Control palette.

www.idusers.com

The InDesign Conference

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InReview: Productivity Enhancers

LinkOptimizer 2.0 Zevrix Solutions www.zevrix.com Price: $79.95 Free 15-day demo version available. Macintosh only. Rating:

By John Cruise InDesign’s ability to play nicely with its Creative Suite siblings is one of the program’s strongest features. LinkOptimizer 2.0, a utility for InDesign CS and CS2 from Zevrix Solutions, tightens the bond between InDesign and Photoshop by automatically reducing the file size of imported pixel-based graphics in Photoshop based on how they’re cropped and scaled in InDesign. Why Bother with Image Optimization? Why would you want to optimize the graphics in an InDesign document? Because size matters and because time is money. Often, you crop and scale graphics within your layouts. The cropped area of the original graphic file is excess baggage; however, every time you package the file—either to send to a printer or to archive the job—the entire graphic file is saved. Similarly, if you scale a graphic so that its effective resolution is higher than the output resolution, the original graphic file becomes unnecessarily large because its resolution is higher than needed. LinkOptimizer can significantly

Figure 7: After you install it, LinkOptimizer appears in your Scripts palette (Window > Automation > Scripts).

reduce the size of many graphic files, which not only saves disk space, but it also speeds up production every time you transfer an InDesign document and its linked graphic files to a client or a service provider. How LinkOptimizer Works. LinkOptimizer is not a plug-in, but a standalone application that interacts with both InDesign and Photoshop. Although it’s possible to launch LinkOptimizer by double-clicking its file icon, it’s easier to use the included InDesign script. After you place the script file (LinkOptimizer. scpt) in InDesign’s Scripts folder (which is within the Presets folder in the InDesign program folder), the script appears in the Scripts palette (Window > Automation > Scripts) (Figure 7). You can open

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Figure 8: The controls in the Processing tab of LinkOptimizer’s Settings dialog box let you specify a Safety Bleed distance, which determines how much of each optimized graphic outside the edge of its graphics frame is retained when the graphic is cropped in Photoshop. You also have the option to convert colors and to perform sharpening in Photoshop.

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LinkOptimizer by double-clicking its name in the Script palette, but if you plan to use it regularly, you’ll probably want to assign it a keyboard shortcut (Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts). (If you’re into mnemonics, Cmd+Option+Shift+L [Mac] and Ctrl+Alt+Shift+L [Windows] work nicely.) Before you use LinkOptimizer to optimize graphics, you should review—and modify, if necessary—the Processing and Backup settings. The Processing panel lets you specify a Safety Bleed area, which controls the amount of the image outside the graphics frame that’s retained for each cropped graphic. You can also choose to perform color conversion and sharpening in Photoshop while images are being optimized (Figure 8).

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InReview: Productivity Enhancers

Figure 9: Before using LinkOptimizer to optimize the graphics in an InDesign document, you should specify Backup settings, which include choosing whether to overwrite the original graphic files or to save new files to a specified folder. You can also rename optimized graphics.

Figure 10: When you click Analyze Links, LinkOptimizer scans the frontmost InDesign document and generates a list of the graphics that can be optimized, either by reducing their resolution, cropping them, or both. You can then choose which to optimize. In this example, 16 of the document’s 86 imported graphics were flagged as candidates for optimization.

The settings you make in the Backup panel determine how LinkOptimizer handles the original graphic files (Figure 9). If you choose to overwrite the original files, you can back them up to a folder. If you opt to leave the originals untouched, you can choose a folder for the optimized files or you can ask to be notified before LinkOptimizer optimizes images and choose a folder at that time. After you’ve specified the desired Processing and Backup Settings, the next step is to analyze the imported graphics in an InDesign document and choose the ones to optimize. (When multiple documents are open, LinkOptimizer works with the

frontmost document.) Before you analyze a document, you must specify a Target Effective Resolution value (the resolution—in dots per inch—of the graphic in final printed piece) that LinkOptimizer uses to determine whether a graphic’s resolution can be optimized. A graphic’s resolution must be at least 10 dpi higher than the specified Target Effective Resolution to be considered for optimizing. When you click the Analyze Links button, LinkOptimizer scans the InDesign document, builds a list of graphics that can be optimized, and provides information about each graphic, including the file format, file size, and effective resolution

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(Figure 10). The Document Info area also tells you how many imported graphics the document contains and how many can be optimized. When you’re ready to optimize the graphics, click Process, then sit back and enjoy the show. LinkOptimizer switches to Photoshop (or opens it if the program isn’t running) and marches through the list of checked graphics while performing scaling, cropping, and—if specified—sharpening. Each optimized graphic file is imported into the InDesign document and replaces the original file. A status bar is displayed while LinkOptimizer is running, but there’s no Cancel button, so you can’t change your mind in midstream.

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InReview: Productivity Enhancers

For example, it won’t optimize the following: ❱ A graphic placed multiple times within a document. (I understand this because a single graphic placed repeatedly and then cropped and scaled differently would require a separate graphic file for each instance.) ❱ Graphics that you’ve rotated and/or sheared. ❱ Monochrome graphics. ❱ Vector-based graphics (e.g., .eps and .ai files). ❱ Scaled graphics with a text wrap that you’ve edited manually. ❱ Graphics that you’ve masked using InDesign’s Detect Edges feature (in the Clipping Path dialog box). Figure 11: After you run LinkOptimizer (by clicking the Process button), the Size Before and Size After columns let you see how much space was saved for each graphic as the result of optimization. In this example, LinkOptimizer reduced the overall size of the optimized graphics by a total of 75%—or about one-fourth of the original size.

In my tests (using a dual 1 GHz G4 Mac), moderatesized documents with 15 to 20 optimized graphics took about two minutes to process (Figure 11). When LinkOptimizer is doing its thing, it’s a sight to behold—Photoshop and InDesign working together in a lively dance—and the file sizes of the optimized images can be significantly smaller than the originals. However… Oddities and Limitations. For all of its power, LinkOptimizer is hobbled by several limitations.

According to Leo Revzin at Zevrix, the last two limitations are the result of internal problems with InDesign. Here’s hoping that they’re fixed by the time InDesign CS3 is released. LinkOptimizer has some other issues: ❱ Because it’s a standalone application, LinkOptimizer behaves differently than a plug-in—and other Mac applications, as well. For example, when LinkOptimizer is running, its window remains open and in front of all other windows, even if you hide or quit InDesign. It’s also a little odd that LinkOptimizer doesn’t display in the Dock when running, nor is the program listed as a running application in the Force Quit Applications dialog box. The Minimize and Close buttons at the top of the LinkOptimizer window are grayed out and unavailable, so the only way to close the window is to click the Done button, which also closes LinkOptimzer. None of this is a knock on LinkOptimizer’s

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performance, but it takes a bit of getting used to. ❱ Frequently, attempting to optimize files in a previously created InDesign document generates an alert saying, “The current front document is a new unsaved document. Please save then analyze.” While benign, this problem forces you to resave and replace the original InDesign file before you can optimize its graphics. It’s worth noting that Zevrix (which is also the developer of BatchOutput for InDesign) was quick to respond to all of my questions and even produced and released an update with a fix for one of the problems I encountered. The Final Word. LinkOptimizer is a useful tool that can save you time and storage space. Its clean, intuitive interface is very easy to use, but its limitations might be a show stopper for InDesign users with documents that contain a significant number of graphics LinkOptimizer can’t optimize. If you want to give it a test run before you make a purchase decision, download the free and fully functional 15-day trial version from Zevrix’s Web site.

John Cruise (cruisejohn@qwest.net) is a Denver-based writer, teacher, trainer, and Adobe-certified InDesign expert. He has co-authored several books about page layout software and writes articles and software reviews for several publications. His most recent book, Adobe InDesign CS2 How-Tos: 100 Essential Techniques, was coauthored by Kelly Kordes Anton and published by Adobe Press.

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InReview: Productivity Enhancers The Creative Suite Conference

MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER FEBRUARY 28–MARCH 3, 2007

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M A G A Z I N E 15

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InBrief

Quick Takes on Helpful Products Without the right tools, dealing with the technical side of layout can take the fun out of design real fast. The following plugins, applications, and gear should make your job easier.

Figure 1: SoftCare’s Overset Manager

By Jeff Gamet

SoftCare Overset Manager SoftCare, $99 www.softcare.de Flowing someone else’s copy into an InDesign document means you don’t have to come up with the words yourself, but if you’re working with a longer document, you need to watch closely for text overflow issues. Softcare Overset Manager saves you from that burden by flagging every place your copy overflows its text frame. This plugin for InDesign and InCopy CS and CS2 can take you to each overset instance, alerts you to overset text before printing, calculates how much text will completely fill a specific thread, and more. FileChute Yellow Mug Software, $14.95 www.yellowmug.com Exchanging large files with clients or colleagues can be a real pain when you hit attachment size limitations in email. With FileChute, however, you can automate the process of uploading large files to .Mac accounts, FTP servers, and WebDAV servers. Once the file is in place, it emails a link that the recipient can click to start the download process. It’s a Mac-only application, but the links it generates are Windows-compatible.

Figure 2: Yellow Mug Software’s FileChute

Recipe Design Wizard Kitchen Wisdom Publishing, $99.95 www.wiskit.com Laying out recipe cards and cookbooks isn’t something I thought about until I stumbled across Recipe Design Wizard. This Adobe InDesign and InCopy plug-in formats recipes for you, complete with brackets to differentiate each step. The plug-in also works well as a layout tool for craft and project instructions that include groups of parts that are assembled in a certain order.

Figure 3: Kitchen Wisdom Publishing’s Recipe Design Wizard

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InBrief

Pluginz.com Pluginz.com, Free www.pluginz.com Tracking down InDesign plug-ins from multiple companies doesn’t have to be an exercise in tedium. Web site Pluginz.com describes and sells a wide range of products to enhance InDesign, along with the rest of the Adobe line up. Plug-ins are grouped in categories so they’re easier to find, and you can add your own product ratings.

for you. This InDesign CS2 plug-in talks to an SQL database that’s loaded with your catalog data to build your document for you. The plugin includes a management module that lets you control projects during development and approval, supports other popular asset-management systems, manages color swatch and graphic substitutions, and takes advantage of Adobe Acrobat annotations when projects are reviewed. Art Director’s Reference Set Galaxy Gauge, $48 www.galaxygauge.com A good layout involves more than just knowing where to place text and graphics on a page. Choosing colors, identifying type styles, measuring item positions on proofs, checking screens... You get the idea. And so did Galaxy Gauge. The Art Director’s Reference Set includes everything a designer or art director needs to check the mechanical aspects of a print job. The set includes the Galaxy Gauge 18 and Galaxy Gauge Elite measurement and conversion tools, Galaxy Pocket Toolbox, Color Map Pro, Press Ranger cards, Font ID 2.0, and color matching cards.

Figure 5: Galaxy Gauge’s Art Director’s Reference Set

builds vertical bar, area, pie, and line charts with labels, 3D effects, and several other formatting options. Spot colors and CMYK are supported, too. This isn’t a casualuse tool, but for workflows that are all about constantly changing chart data, Chartbot can be a life saver.

Figure 6: Soft Horizon’s Art ChartBot

Figure 4: Pluginz.com

RoboCatalog Builder RoboCatalog, contact manufacturer for pricing www.robocatalog.com Building graphics-rich catalogs in Adobe InDesign doesn’t have to be tedious or time-consuming. RoboCatalog Builder takes over the grunt work

Chartbot for InDesign Soft Horizons, $995 www.chartbot.com If you design documents with loaded with charts, Chartbot for InDesign can save you lots of time. This InDesign plug-in takes data from Microsoft Excel files and plots the data into charts that automatically update if the Excel spreadsheet changes. Chartbot

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Menhart Pro Monotype, $71 face /$437 complete family www.fonts.com There’s something special about typefaces designed in the 1930s, and Oldrich Menhart’s Menhart is no exception. Monotype has revived this classic typeface as the OpenType font Menhart Pro. Thanks to Menhart’s Czech background and attention to

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InBrief

detail, this typeface includes amazingly well-designed accents and other diacritics. Although originally used primarily for display purposes, Monotype created this version specifically for text sizes.

Figure 7: Monotype’s Menhart Pro

SoftCare Notes Manager SoftCare, $99 www.softcare.de The Notes palette that InCopy adds to InDesign makes it easy to create in-line notes for other people involved in your projects, but Notes Manager kicks that feature up a notch. This plug-in for InDesign and InCopy lets you filter notes based on several criteria, including user and note creation date, and you can hide non-editable notes. You can also jump to specific points in a document simply by clicking on the corresponding note. AutoPrice Meadows Publishing Solutions, price on request www.meadowsps.com Catalogs, product sheets, and other complex documents with lots of data can be difficult to maintain when pricing information keeps changing. Thanks to AutoPrice, you don’t have to worry about

Figure 7: Meadows Publishing Solutions’ AutoPrice

missing that one critical change. This plug-in grabs information from flat database and ODBC database files and updates product information in your InDesign CS and CS2 documents, complete with formatting. Its unique placeholder approach to tagging data links means that you can flow information into any part of a document, and not just into special data frames.

Jeff Gamet is a consultant, author, and speaker on graphicdesign technologies and Mac OS X. He is a contributing writer for Design Tools Monthly and Layers magazine. For a free issue of Design Tools Monthly, visit www.design-tools.com.

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InPerson

Matt Phillips Senior Computer Scientist Matt PhilLips speaks with David Blatner about transparency, color management, and the realities of software development decisions.

David Blatner: Matt, what’s your background? Matt Phillips: I received my degree in 1993 from the University of Illinois in electrical and computer engineering. And right out of there, I went to Quark in Denver for about five years. It was just before XPress 3.3 shipped and 4.0 was starting to ramp up. Then in 1998, I had the opportunity to come to Adobe to work on this a product, codenamed K2. It had been underway for a few years—essentially large parts of the functionality were already in place—but it was a great opportunity to work on a new code base and really get a fresh start, a fresh perspective on how to solve the problems of the publishing world. DB: What sort of problems did you focus on when you started? MP: I was hired to implement color management. There had been a first pass made at it, and since I had worked on that at Quark, I was asked to come in and work on it at Adobe. It was eyeopening, because the kind of brainpower that they have here is astounding—some of the smartest people in the world in color management work here at Adobe. I felt like I was the new dumb kid at the company learning his way around. So for InDesign 1.0 and 1.5, it was color management, and I was also deeply involved with the printing and PDF export, because they’re all interrelated. The next big release after that was 2.0, and by that point, I was familiar enough with the code base that I took on a somewhat bigger project: implementing the transparency features that shipped with 2.0.

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The Creative Suite Conference InPerson: Matt Phillips

MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER FEBRUARY 28–MARCH 3, 2007

DB: When you say “implementing transparency,” how does that work? MP: It’s a somewhat short-cycle feedback loop with the product management team. They spend a lot of time talking to customers, and engineering brings the expertise to the table of what would it cost to do certain features… DB: What it would cost in actual hours? MP: Right, engineering hours and weeks. So we each bring our expertise to the table, and there’s usually a few iterations of proposals and “Let’s talk about how much it costs,” and then, at some point, we sit down and figure out what can we really do in this release, given the amount of time we have. In the case of transparency, we knew the obvious things, such as assigning an opacity to an object or placing an alpha mask image from Photoshop or TIFF. We also decided that the other things people think of when they think of blending is drop shadows and feathers. And that’s basically what we shipped with, because it was seen as the tightest feature set that covered the bases for a first implementation of transparency. DB: On the one hand, there’s the fun part of transparency: making things look cool on screen. But then you have to print the stuff, and as we know in PostScript and PDF 1.3, you still have to flatten. Were you involved with the flattener side of transparency? MP: The chronology of transparency at Adobe is kind of interesting. Photoshop has had it for a long time, because Photoshop is a per-pixel model. Doing it in

vector space was fairly new. It was introduced first with Illustrator 9 and Acrobat 5. And so each of those applications needed a flattener, and one was designed and built internally by some extremely smart folks. When InDesign came along, we had an existing landscape to look at for how a flattener should work. We were able to give some more input into the flattener’s design to the Core Tech team, and some modifications were made. DB: And then at some point, you left Seattle. I guess you were crazy enough to leave this beautiful weather? MP: That’s right [laughing]. Actually, my wife and I wanted to have our kids grow up around their grandparents. I initially approached my boss saying that I wanted to move and would probably no longer work for Adobe after 2.0 shipped, and my boss came back and said, “Well, why don’t you move there and work for Adobe?” And I said “That sounds great!” So within about six months, we were living in Illinois and I was working out of my house. DB: Does that work well for you, working remotely from the rest of the InDesign team? MP: It does. Adobe is spread across a number of campuses, and so to some extent, you’re working with people remotely all the time anyway. I like it. Not having to commute is a real plus, of course, and probably adds an hour and a half back into my day.  – Editor’s note: This interview took place during The InDesign Conference: Master Class in Seattle, during which there was recordsetting rainfall and flooding nearby.

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InPerson: Matt Phillips

DB: What would you say is your favorite feature in InDesign? MP: My favorite feature in my own daily work is Separations preview, which I use all the time to check things before bothering to go to print or PDF export. But when someone comes up to me and says, “So what is InDesign? Show me what it can do,” I show them the text features. I’m not a text expert by any stretch, but even I can get into some of the OpenType stuff and Optical Margin Alignment. And now I start to notice publications where it’s not used, and I think, “Oh, that doesn’t look so good.” So even I, as a type dummy, know that I can get these really professionallooking results just by flicking a few switches.

terms of how much of this is done automatically for you—how we can bring in domain knowledge about the printing industry and leverage that to set things up for you more intelligently. I don’t think we can ever get to the point where it’s completely automatic, because there are just too many judgment calls that have to be made. But of all the calls that have to be made, judgment calls are a fairly small percentage, so I think we can probably get to the point where once in a while, your application pops up and asks you which of these two alternatives you think is the better one. But all the other ones could be set more or less automatically. It’s wide open for improvement beyond just the basics!

DB: Is there a feature that you wish you could go in and change? MP: Yeah, color management is probably that one for me. You know: You assign your profiles correctly, and then the CMM does all the color conversions, and voilà, you get matched color. But most people in the industry understand that’s not really the case. There are too many switches, too many buttons that have to be set, too many profiles have to be properly chosen or else you don’t actually get the desired results. And they’re scattered in places that not everybody knows to look. So while I think we cover the bases of a colormanaged workflow, and we do have a few extra features to try and preserve CMYK numbers, it’s still very hard to get everything right every time. And so I think that color management as a feature is wide open for complete rethinking, especially in

DB: What’s next? MP: I just was in a meeting where we were talking about what’s on the horizon. Sometimes it’s frustrating because you know what could be done, you know what’s possible. But the realities of software development mean you have to do it one step at a time, and those steps have to be bargained against other steps that other people want to take. There are so many things I think we’ll get to in the coming years—one step at a time, but the sky’s the limit.

David Blatner is the editorial director of InDesign Magazine and co-author of Real World InDesign CS2. You can find him online at InDesignSecrets.com.

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Discover the Adobe Creative Suite 2 Seminar Tour

DAY1

InPerson:® Matt Phillips

Adobe Photoshop ®

Even experienced Photoshop users will gain knowledge beyond their expectations in this session. Discover how to color correct and create complex compositions in no time!

A

ttend the Adobe Creative Suite 2 Seminar Series and increase your productivity and effectiveness with Adobe’s latest creative tools including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. At the seminar you’ll discover tips, tools, and techniques for publishing content for print and the Web faster and more easily than ever. Seminars are led by industry professionals and noted authors, including Jennifer Smith, the author of Creative Suite 2 for Dummies, Mordy Golding, author of Teach Yourself Adobe Creative Suite 2 All in One, David Blatner, author of Real World InDesign, Christopher Smith, author of Moving to InDesign and Larry Happy, technical editor for Adobe’s Classroom in a Book series and Kelly McCathran, service provider evangelist for Adobe Systems.

Discover Tips from the Pros! These Seminars are led by the following industry experts*. Together they’ve written over 20 books on Adobe’s publishing software. Christopher Smith Author, Consultant

Mordy Golding Author, Consultant

DAY2

Adobe Illustrator ®

Jennifer Smith Author, Instructor

Get up to speed quickly on the latest versions of Adobe® Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Presented by the Creative Professionals Association, you will learn proven tips and techniques from industry experts who are also Adobe Certified Experts, leading authors and effective teachers. Attend one day or all three! Register early as space is limited.

Kelly McCathran Instructor

Larry Happy Technical Editor, Instructor

* Speakers vary by location. Not all speakers will appear in all locations.

Denver, CO Miami, FL Harrisburg, PA Pittsburgh, PA San Antonio, TX Dallas, TX Boston, MA Houston, TX Philadelphia, PA New York City, NY

DAY3

Adobe InDesign ®

December 2006 | January 2007

Attend all three days for only

For only

$9900 $279 00

all three days

day

Register today, seating is limited! Call 800-851-9237 or on-line at www.creativeprofessional.org

Peachpit

M A G A Z I N E 15

®

Master InDesign’s capabilities! Spend a day with experts and discover the most effective ways to create documents. You’ll gain valuable tips and tricks from the masters so that you can work more effectively.

Jan 8-10 Jan 8-10 Jan 15-17 Jan 15-17 Jan 22-24 Jan 23-25 Jan 29-31 Jan 30-Feb 1 Feb 6-8 Feb 12-14

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®

See Illustration creation in action! Learn about exciting tools and features that will save you time and enable you to create like never before.

Coming to these cities: David Blatner Author

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In the News

First Public InDesign CS3 Demo

ADC Competition Deadline Looms

Magazine Survey Results

Attendees of November’s InDesign Conference: Master Class were treated to a demonstration of CS3 features that previously only the press had seen. In the short presentation, Chad Siegel, senior product manager for InDesign and InCopy, focused on CS3’s new transparency features. He first showed how a text frame will be able to have different transparency (both opacity and blend mode) for a stroke, a fill, and the content. Next, Chad moved on to an even sexier feature: The ability to apply Photoshop-like effects to objects, such as bevel and emboss, inner glow, and so on. He selected the same text frame and applied a bevel effect, pointing out that the dialog box options were designed specifically to be similar to those we’re already familiar with in Photoshop. When he changed the stroke width and style, the effect updated immediately, of course. (He ended up with a thick dotted stroke in which each “dot” appeared to be a beveled bump.) Chad used a MacTel machine to prove that the beta is, in fact, a Universal Binary application. He emphasized that these features were only a tiny fraction of the cool stuff that would be in CS3, but for various reasons he couldn’t elaborate on or demo other features. Unfortunately, the audience was asked not to take photos, so we can’t visually share the experience with you here.—David Blatner

In the October | November 2006 issue of InDesign Magazine, we showcased a few of the student winners of the Art Directors Club 85th Annual Awards. The deadlines for the 86th awards competition is coming fast: January 19, 2007, for professionals, and January 31 for students. You’ll find all the details on the competition at www.adcawards.org/. Who knows—maybe next year your work will be on these pages!—Terri Stone

In October, I asked magazine subscribers to answer a survey with questions about the magazine and your software upgrade plans. The survey’s purpose was to help guide us in editorial decisions for the next year. I was very pleased when more than a quarter of you responded to the survey—most survey conductors are satisfied with a response rate of 1 or 2%. As a small token of my gratitude, I’d like to share some of the results with you. The two most commonly requested article topics were design practices (67% chose this option) and prepress and printing issues (57%). A few more of you are Mac users (57%) than Windows users (47%). Most of you (90%) use InDesign as part of the Creative Suite bundle, rather than InDesign on a stand-alone basis. We were surprised that 84% of you already have plans to upgrade to CS3. My absolute favorite statistic was the answer to the question, “Do you plan to renew your subscription when it expires?” A staggering 95% of you said yes. Aw, shucks! If you missed out on this survey, or if you’d like to comment on something it didn’t cover, you can write me anytime: tstone@indesignmag.com.—Terri Stone

That Really Is a Big Cube: Winners of the ADC Annual Awards receive the heavyweight ADC Cube.

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Calendar

The INdesign Conference Stockholm January 31–February 1, 2007 www.idconference.com With sessions in English and Swedish and presenters like Sandee Cohen, Richard Rönnbäck, and Karin Söderlund, there’s something for everyone at this two-day InDesign intensive.

The Creative Suite Conference Miami February 28–March 3, 2007 www.csconference.com Some of the biggest names in the training world will lead sessions at this conference. You’ll be able to brush up on fundamentals and delve deep into the intricacies of each Creative Suite app.

Creative profeSsional organization Seminars Denver; Miami; Harrisburg, PA; Pittsburgh, PA; Boston; San Antonio, TX; Dallas-Ft. Worth; Houston January 10, January 17, January 24, January 31, February 1, 2007 www.creativeprofessional.org Spend one day devoted to such InDesign topics as transparency, printing, importing Photoshop files and other images, automated text formatting, and advanced table layout.

Do You have a conference, contest, or event for our calendar? E-mail information to editor@indesignmag.com at least two months prior to event.

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Calendar

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The Creative Suite Conference InDesign User Groups

MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER FEBRUARY 28–MARCH 3, 2007

InDesign User Group Meetings Please see your chapter Web site or contact the chairperson for meeting dates and locations. For more

information about InDesign User Groups, see www.indesignusergroup.com.

Chapter

Members

Meetings held

Chair

Chair contact

Chapter URL

Atlanta

700+

Quarterly

Paul Olmeda

atlanta@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/atlanta

Boston

700

Quarterly

Meg Young

boston@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/boston

Chicago

800+

Quarterly

Jim Maivald

chicago@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chicago

Cleveland

42

Mari Hulick

cleveland@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/cleveland

A.J. Wood

dallas@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/dallas

Brian Cupp

desmoines@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/desmoines

Donna Gniewek

detroit@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/detroit

Dallas Des Moines

18

Detroit

130

Los Angeles

375

Quarterly

John Lopez

losangeles@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/losangeles

Milwaukee

175

Quarterly

Cathy Palmer

milwaukee@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/milwaukee

Minneapolis

250+

Every other month

Keith Gilbert

minneapolis@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/minneapolis

New York City

2,000+

Every other month

Scott Citron

newyorkcity@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/newyorkcity

Orlando

250+

Monthly

Edward Feldman

orlando@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/orlando

Portland

300+

Quarterly

Gabriel Powell

portland@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/portland

Reno

150+

Every other month

Jim Cooper

reno@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/reno

Quarterly

Rebecca Shick

rochester@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/rochester

Quarterly

Rochester San Francisco

867

Every other month

Mark Atchley

sanfrancisco@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/sanfrancisco

Seattle

900+

Every other month

Steve Laskevitch

seattle@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/seattle

Tampa

500

Quarterly

Sarah Schweiger

tampa@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/tampa

Washington, D.C.

1,200+

Every other month

Ken Chaletsky

washingtondc@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/washingtondc

Sydney

60

Every quarter

Eliot Harper

sydney@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/sydney

Melbourne

Tricia Ho

melbourne@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/melbourne

Toronto

Jason Lisi

toronto@indesignusergroup.com

www.indesignusergroup.com/chapters/toronto

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Contributors

David Blatner is the co-host of InDesignSecrets.com, the

software reviews for several publications. His most recent

Bill Lynch is an Irish enthusiast for both InDesign and set

Editorial Director of The InDesign Conference and InDesign

book, Adobe InDesign CS2 How-Tos: 100 Essential Techniques,

dancing. He is the publisher of Set Dancing News. [★]

Magazine, and the co-author of Real World InDesign CS2

was co-authored by Kelly Kordes Anton. [InReview] Claudia McCue incorporates more than 20 years of traditional

and Adobe InDesign CS/CS2 Breakthroughs. [InPerson] Rufus Deuchler is a graphic designer, trainer, and print production

and digital prepress production experience in her current

Pariah Burke is the publisher of the Web sites Quark VS InDesign.

consultant in Florence, Italy. He is also Adobe Certified Expert—Print

incarnation as a consultant and trainer for the graphic arts

com (www.QuarkVSInDesign.com) and Designorati (www.

Specialist and the coordinator of the Italian InDesign User Group. [★]

industry. Claudia’s company, Practicalia LLC, provides custom

Designorati.com), the author of Adobe Illustrator CS2 @work,

onsite training for a national client base of design firms,

and co-author of Special Edition: Using Creative Suite 2. [★]

Erica Gamet is a principal at Digital Dimensions in Boulder, CO. [★]

Scott Citron is an international award-winning graphic designer

Jeff Gamet is a consultant, author, and speaker on graphic-

and principal of Scott Citron Design in New York City, specializing

design technologies and Mac OS X. He is a contributing writer

in fine book design and corporate identity development. He is

for Design Tools Monthly and Layers magazine, and he is the

Christopher Smith is an Adobe Certified Expert and president

also an Adobe Certified Training Provider and Scott is an Adobe

author of Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X Tiger. [InBrief ]

of American Graphics Institute, a consulting and training firm.

publications, printing companies and marketing professionals. She is a frequent speaker at industry conferences, and has

Certified Instructor in InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop CS2. [★]

been fond of InDesign since it was known as “K2.” [★]

He is the author of numerous InDesign books, and has served as Keith Gilbert is an Adobe Certified Instructor and an

a lead member of the Adobe Creative Team working as the lead

Sandee Cohen is the only third-party author to have written

Adobe Print Specialist. One of a select group of individuals

author of the Adobe InDesign Classroom in a Book. [InReview]

educational materials for all five versions of InDesign.

nationwide to be certified for on-site training in InDesign,

Her latest books are the InDesign CS2 Visual QuickStart

InCopy, Illustrator, Photoshop, and Acrobat. Gilbert

Terri Stone is the editor in chief of InDesign Magazine

Guide and Real World Creative Suite 2. [InQuestion]

Consulting has been in business since 1985. [★]

and the Creativepro.com Web site. She lives and works in a cabin in the California redwoods. [InDesigner]

Anne-Marie Concepción owns a busy cross-media design studio

Larry Happy is an Adobe Certified Expert and vice president

in Chicago and is one of the industry’s best-known Adobe trainers

of training for American Graphics Institute, where he

Eda Warren is president of Desktop Publishing Services, a graphic

and consultants. She’s a frequent speaker at industry events and

manages the professional development training operations.

design and training firm in Chicago. She is also an Adobe Certified

a prolific writer for design magazines. She is the co-developer of

He has served as the technical editor for several books

Training Provider and an Adobe Certified Expert on InDesign. [★]

InDesignSecrets.com, and the tips and insights she shares in her

on Adobe InDesign and Adobe Acrobat. [InReview] Brian Wood is vice president and director of training at

free DesignGeek e-zine are enjoyed by thousands of designers, publishers, and prepress professionals around the world. [★]

Ted Locascio is a professional graphic designer and an expert

Seattle’s eVolve Computer Graphics Training. [InStep]

in Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, InDesign, Illustrator, and John Cruise is a Denver-based writer, teacher, trainer, and

QuarkXPress. He is the author of InDesign CS2 at Your Fingertips

Adobe-certified InDesign expert. He has co-authored several

and the author of two lynda.com videos: InDesign CS2 Essential

books about page-layout software and writes articles and

Training, and Creative Suite 2 Integration: Print Project Workflow. [★]

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M A G A Z I N E 15

December 2006 | January 2007

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