Issuu on Google+

Housing Assistance and Student Achievement in  Low­Income Households  Felipe Kast Harvard University May 3, 2009

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy


Abstract

This paper looks at housing social policy and finds that, in the context of low­ income household of Chile, education is constrained by a combination of  precarious housing conditions and income needs

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Overview Question 1 Does public provision of a housing unit affects children´s education? Question 2 What are the channels that may be driving the results? Context Applicants to the housing voucher in Chile between 1998 and 2003 Identification Strategy Regression Discontinuity  using the cutoffs generated in the assignment  process 

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Treatment Treatment 2 Vivienda Básica

Treatment 1 Vivienda Progresiva •

Site of 100 squared meters with  access to water, electricity and sewer  system

Site of 100 squared meters with  access to water, electricity and sewer  system

Expandable construction of 23  squared meters that includes kitchen,  bathroom and one open room

Apartments or coupled houses  with  a construction between 38 and 42  squared meters

Value of the product: 6000 USD

Value of the product= 9900 USD

Size of the Subsidy=60%= 5940  USD

Size of the subsidy= 95%=5700  USD

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Treatment 1: Vivienda Progresiva

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Treatment 2: Vivienda Básica

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Application Process Both programs require submitting an application form  with the  following   •

7.

Valid “Poverty Score Card” made by the local government at the current  house Proof of active savings account with at least • 340 USD for Vivienda Progresiva • 430 USD for Vivienda Basica Name of the wife or husband to check that he or she did not get another  subsidy before

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Assignment Process •

Every year the Minister of Housing offers different packages with a number of subsidies  available

Anyone who is registered with a valid application can choose to participate 

The Minister of Housing compute a total score for each applicant based on the  following elements • • • •

Hosing Needs (by in­site survey) Savings  Waiting time Household size 

Applicants are sorted by total score and subsidies are assigned using this ranking 

The threshold is determined by the stock of subsidies available in an particular offer.

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Data Adding up the two programs an average of 30,000  housing units were provided every year between 1998  and 2001

Follow up data from Ministry of Social Planning

TREATMENT

5 years 2001

1998

2006

2007

Administrative data from Ministry of Housing

The government merged the data for this study using ID numbers. I observe the  same people 5 years after.

The follow up data comes from an special survey developed by the government  during 2006­2007

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Question 1: Graphical Analysis for Years of Education

7.3

7.5

7.8

8

Education

Education

8.3

8.5

8.8

9

Figure 3: Years of Education and Distance to the Cutoff

-60-55-50-45-40-35-30-25-20-15-10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 Distance to the Cutoff

-63-58-53-48-43-38-33-28-23-18-13 -8 -3 2 7 12 17 22 27 32 37 42 47 52 57 62 Distance to the Cutoff

                         Bandwidth=9  

Felipe José Kast

 

 

      Bandwidth=6 

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics

 


Bandwidth Selection Figure 4: Cross Validation Function  Outcome: Years of Education 16.05 16 15.95 15.9 15.85 15.8 15.75 15.7 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Bandwidth

Felipe José Kast

 

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Question 1: Local Linear Regression Analysis TABLE 1: LOCAL LINEAR REGRESSION Bandwidth  Dependent Variable: Years of Educaction  +/­ 18 +/­ 10 Panel A : ITT  (1) (2) Average Years of Education (s.d) Regressors   Intend­to­Treat (T ij )

+/­ 30 (3)

8.37

8.33

8.30

(3.96)

(3.98)

(3.96)

0.211**

0.117

0.206***

(0.097)

(0.125)

(0.079)

­0.002

­0.001

­0.005

(0.007)

(0.016)

(0.004)

­0.005

0.017

0.001

(0.010)

(0.022)

(0.006)

Panel B:  TOT

(1)

(2)

(3)

  Trake up rate

0.77

0.77

0.77

  Treatment­on­Treated  (αTOT )

0.274

0.152

0.268

23,679

13,903

32,224

  Running Variable (X ij ­c j )   Interaction (X ij ­c j )*T ij

Observations

Notes: Regression with fixed effects for each public call where a cutoff is generated. Robust standard errors  clustered at the individual level are shown in parentheses. * Significant at the 10­percent level ** Significant at the  5­percent level *** Significant at the 1­percent level.  TOT in Panel B is estimated by multiplying the Intend­to­ Treat coefficient by the inverse of the take up rate.

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Question 1: Subgroup Analysis (Gender/Age)  TABLE 3: SUBGROUP ANALYSIS Dependent Variable: Years of Educaction  Panel A : ITT  Average Educacion (s.d)

Specification Polynomial LLR    Bandwidth=18 Third Order (1) (2) 8.367

7.915

(3.958)

(3.856)

0.230** (0.104) -0.031 (0.155)

0.198*** (0.0762) -0.111* (0.0629)

0.302** (0.145) -0.138 (0.210)

0.272*** (0.0855) -0.206*** (0.0676)

Panel B:  TOT

(1)

(2)

  Take up rate

0.77

0.77

  Women­Treatment­on­Treated  (α TOT )

0.299

0.257

  Young­Treatment­on­Treated  (α TOT )

0.391

0.353

23,679

61,989

Gender Subgroup Analysis   Intend­to­Treat (T ij )   Differential effect for men (T ij* M ij ) Age Subgroup Analysis   Intend­to­Treat (T ij )   Differential effect for adult population (T ij* A ij )

Observations

Notes: Regression with fixed effects for each public call where a cutoff is generated. adult population is  defined by those with more than 25 years old. Robust standard errors clustered at the individual level are  shown in parentheses. * Significant at the 10­percent level ** Significant at the 5­percent level ***  Significant at the 1­percent level.  TOT in Panel B is estimated by multiplying the Intend­to­Treat  coefficient by the inverse of the take up rate.

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Question 2: Channels that may explain this result  Income Transfer Housing voucher is about 1.5 to 3 times annual household income Neighborhood Effect Looking at poverty rates, delinquency and labor opportunities the evidence shows  that the characteristics of the neighborhood are not affected by the treatment Housing Effect Evidence shows a positive effect on housing conditions. Bedroom density is reduced  by 10%,  there is a 14% increase in the probability of having sewer system,  and there  is a 10% increase in the probability of having in­house drinkable water Homeownership Effect The treatment increases in  27% (14 percentage points) the probability of owning a  housing unit 

  Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


Conclusion o

I estimate the impact of publicly provided housing unit on the level of education  obtained by the population under 25 years old

o

After three to six years I find that the treatment increased by 0.39 years the level of  education for those who used the  housing voucher

Among the mechanisms that could explain this phenomenon o

Neighborhood effects are not activated by the treatment

o

Homeownership channel is affected by probably playing a secondary role, since  we would expect that Homeowensrhip is going to have an impact in the longer  run through its positive externality on social capital, or by reducing residential  mobility. 

o

Thus, it seems that the interaction of an important income transfer with  better housing conditions is producing a positive and significant effect on  education.

Felipe José Kast

Essays on  Poverty Dynamics and Social Policy On the Measurement of Poverty Dynamics


090503_Housing_FK