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region an enduring contradiction that needs to be resolved by passing laws recognizing autonomous (self-employed) sex work done by persons of legal age as work while also regulating it and establishing oversight mechanisms so it can be done according to the law. This study shows how State recognition of WSWs’ labour laws through passing laws legalizing it and regulating its practice is the necessary step to guarantee that WSWs will be able to live fully as citizens, to put an end to the rights violations and forms of violence to which they are exposed at the hands of security forces and other actors in the labour market, and to allow them to develop a sustainable life project in a global scenario of increasingly precarious working conditions and feminization of poverty. The different experiences of exclusion that the women surveyed for this study have on a daily basis, are aggravated by the stigma and violence that result from the lack of social and State recognition of sex work. The recommendations we present below are aimed to contribute to improving the labour and life conditions of WSWs. To guarantee more rights and more rights protection to them is a outstanding debt for States across the region.

RECOMMENDATIONS Based on the analysis of the data collected for this study, we formulate the following recommendations: To national and local States, policy makers and decision makers with regard to public laws and policies:  To become aware of the working conditions for sex workers in the region – that are unequal, precarious, informal and clandestine – with an aim to transform them in favour of WSWs. To establish and/or continue to implement spaces for joint dialogue and work with WSWs’ organizations with an aim to formalize sex work as a legally recognized activity and to draft polices to serve the needs of this sector.  To promote a distinction between sex work and trafficking for sexual exploitation in the law and particularly in drafting and implementing public policies and legal interventions in order to protect WSWs’ rights.  To develop and implement effective mechanisms to prevent, fight and punish discrimination and all forms of violence against WSWs in general and particularly in their work spaces.  To repeal Misdemeanour Codes, Contraventional Codes and all other minor regulations that prohibit offering sexual services and violate WSWs’ rights.  To promote recognition, respect and guarantees for WSWs' rights by establishing regulated, decent and safe conditions for engaging in sex work.  To recognize WSWs’ labour rights through passing laws and drafting public policies to guarantee that those of legal age can engage in sex work and enjoy decent, equitable conditions, free from violence and discrimination.  To grant WSWs’ organizations legal recognition as unions .  To promote actions to make the rights of WSWs known among labour market actors with an aim to guarantee that those rights will be respected, that workplaces will be regulated and that terms will be set for this occupation to be pursued in safety and guaranteeing equality in the enjoyment of rights.  To establish State oversight mechanisms to guarantee that decent and safe conditions, freedom from violence, and guaranteeing equality in the enjoyment of rights will prevail in WSWs’ workplaces so they can effectively engage in their occupation

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Sex work and working conditions: The impact of being clandestine  

Research conducted in 14 Latin American and Caribbean Countries

Sex work and working conditions: The impact of being clandestine  

Research conducted in 14 Latin American and Caribbean Countries

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