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REDOT FINE ART GALLERY in collaboration with Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd. presents

Nanyuma Napangati Solo A Collection of Fine Papunya Tula Indigenous Art

5 October – 12 November 2016

Gallery 1 & 2

For a high resolution, downloadable, PDF version of this catalogue, with pricing, please send us an email to info@redotgallery.com Thank you.

c o n t e m p o r a r y

f i n e

i n d i g e n o u s

a r t


Ningura Napurrula & Nanyuma Napangati Solo The ReDot Fine Art Gallery is honoured to welcome back, after a one-year hiatus, the 12th and 13th exhibitions of stunning Contemporary art from the trail-blazing Indigenously owned art centre, Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd. These joint solo exhibitions firmly cement the position of this corner-stone of the modern Indigenous Art Movement and also represent a poignant look back at the work of one of their recently deceased doyenne and a refreshing and encouraging peek into the future. This stunning collection of over 45 works by two gifted artists from Australia’s vast Western Desert, graphically depicts their strong connection to land, culture and family. Ningura Napurrula was born at Watulka, south of the Kiwirrkurra Community, circa 1938 and was one of the earliest pioneer female painters of the company, completing her first paintings for Papunya Tula Artists in 1996. By 1999 Ningura had already amassed an impressive exhibition profile and was becoming a hugely successful and collectable artist and in 2003 she was chosen, along with four other Papunya Tula Artists, to have one of her paintings represented on an Australia Post international stamp. Arguably her finest moment came in 2004 when Ningura was one of eight Indigenous artists selected to have an example of their work incorporated into the


architecture of the Musée du quai Branly in Paris and her ceiling oeuvre opened to the public in June 2006. Ningura passed away at Kintore in November 2013. Nanyuma was born in the vicinity of Kiwirrkurra, close to Ningura’s birth place in approximately 1944 and despite only being a few years younger than Ningura her painting career has followed a more modest early trajectory, though in 1999 Nanyuma did also contribute to the Kiwirrkurra women’s painting. Whilst their respective styles show close, interconnected, harmonious story-telling that’s central to the Pintupi culture, their styles also offer dramatically different painterly execution. Ningura adopted a more expansive/figurative approach to the songlines of her maternal lineage, the highly spiritual and secretive birth ceremonies of her mother, sometimes rough and seemingly haphazard in its rendering. Nanyuma conversely delivers more controlled dotting, using the stunning techniques mastered by her community colleagues such as Yukultji Napangati and Doreen Reid Nakamarra. The natural usage of positive and negative space to create pulsating lines of “tali”, depict her own important ceremonial stories. This style marries effortlessly with Ningura’s epic renditions of the genesis of life and these painstakingly produced complex paintings all augur a bright future with the masterly old being blended into the refreshingly new. The exhibitions begin on Wednesday 5 October and runs until Saturday 12 November 2016. It will be attended in person by Ben Danks, Assistant Manager of Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd. for the official opening on Friday 7 October 2016 at 6:30pm.

Giorgio Pilla Director ReDot Fine Art Gallery

Left Page: Nanyuma Napangati Digging for Tucker Source: © Photo Courtesy of Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Birth Date Place of Birth Language Skin/Clan

c. 1944 Kiwirrkurra Pintupi / Luritja Napangati

Nanyuma Napangati was born circa 1944 in the Jupiter Well area, west of Kiwirrkurra, WA. She is the sister of highly-respected artists Charlie Tjapangati and Bambatu Napangati. Their father had three wives and was the older brother of the well-known Papunya Tula artist, Pinta Pinta Tjapanangka. She is also closely related to the late Kanya Tjapangati, who passed away in 2006, through the same father but different mothers. She is also mother in-law to George Tjungurrayi. She led a traditional lifestyle before she was taken into Papunya by one of the Jeremy Long’s Welfare branch patrols that were sent out from Darwin in the early 1960’s to round up the remaining nomadic Pintupi people. When Kintore was established in 1982, she chose to move back there to live with other Pintupi people living at Papunya. Nanyuma began painting for Papunya Tula Artists in the early 1990s and was involved in the 1999 Kiwirrkurra women’s painting as part of the Western Desert Dialysis Appeal, a project which was auctioned to raise money for the Renal Unit at Kintore, an Aboriginal Community in the Western Desert. She was one of a dozen women from Kiwirrkurra who travelled to Sydney in 2000 to dance at the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games. As a senior Pintupi law women, her paintings depict designs associated with women’s ceremonies at Marrapinti, a sacred rockhole site west of the Pollock Hills. Her work is characterised by a strong dynamism and rich linear design compositions created with heavy layers of acrylic paint.


Collections Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW), Sydney, NSW, Australia. Artbank Collection, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Peter & Agnes Cooke Collection, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. The Arthur Roe Collection, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2016 Nanyuma Napangati Solo - ReDot Fine Art Gallery, Singapore.

Selected Group Exhibitions 2016 Tjukurrmanu Maru & Tjulkura – Dreaming In Black & White - Paul Johnstone Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. 2015 Kanaputa – Women’s Lore - Paul Johnstone Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. Papunya Tula Artists – Desert Mob Exhibition - Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Annual Pintupi Exhibition - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Community VII - Utopia Art Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2014 Kiwirrkurra Women - Paul Johnstone Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2013 Community V - Utopia Art Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2012 Tjukurrpa Ngaatjanya Maru Kamu Tjulkura (Dreaming in Black and White) ReDot Fine Art Gallery, Singapore. Community IV – Celebrating Forty Years of Papunya Tula Artists - Utopia Art Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2011 Art Karlsruhe 2011, Karlsruhe Trade Fair Centre, Karlsruhe, Germany (Represented by Art Kelch). Revival in Small - Art Kelch, Freiburg, Germany. Papunya Tula Artists: Paintings from the Western Desert - Metropolis Gallery, Geelong, VIC, Australia. Pintupi Art 2011 - A.P. Bond Art Gallery, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin, NT, Australia.


2011 Papunya Tula Artists – Desert Mob Exhibition - Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Australia in Two Colours - ArtKelch, Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. 2010 Small Paintings - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin, NT, Australia. Ngurrakutu – Going Home - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Community - Utopia Art Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Papunya Tula Women’s Art - Maitland Regional Gallery, Maitland, NSW, Australia. 2009 Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, The Chan Building, Darwin, NT, Australia. Community - The Heart of Papunya Tula Artists - Utopia Art Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2007 Gifted: Contemporary Aboriginal Art – The Mollie Gowing Acquisition Fund - Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW), Sydney, NSW, Australia. Papunya Tula Women - Suzanne O’Connell Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2006 Contemporary Aboriginal Art - Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. A Particular Collection - Utopia Art Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Paintings by Papunya Tula Artists - Suzanne O’Connell Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2005 Aboriginal Art of the Australian Desert - Anima Mundi Gallery, Lyons, CO, USA. Pintupi Women - Indigenart, Perth, WA, Australia. 2004 Works from Kintore and Kiwirrkurra - Alison Kelly Gallery, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2003 Pintupi Art 2003 - Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Recent Paintings by the Women Artists of Kintore and Kiwirrkurra - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Papunya Tula Selected Paintings - William Mora Galleries, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Pintupi Art from The Western Desert - Indigenart, Perth, WA, Australia. 2002 Next Generation – Aboriginal Art 2002 - Arthouse Gallery, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Paintings from Our Country - Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, SA, Australia. William Mora Galleries - Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Pintupi Men’s and Women’s Stories - Indigenart, Perth, WA, Australia. Art Born of the Western Desert - Framed Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. Saluting Papunya - Chapman Gallery, Canberra, ACT, Australia. Pintupi Artists - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia.


2001 Arthouse Gallery, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Papunya Tula 30th Anniversary Exhibition - Chapman Gallery, Canberra, ACT, Australia. Indigenart, Perth, WA, Australia. The White Show 2 - William Mora Galleries, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Pintupi Exhibition - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Pintupi Women from Kintore - Fireworks Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Kintore and Kiwirrkurra - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2000 Framed Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Pintupi Women - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 1999 Utopia Art Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 1996 Utopia Art Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.


Road to Marrapinti Source: © Photo Courtesy of Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 153 x 122cm NN1608067


This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 122cm NN1605090

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm NN1512084

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm NN1603072

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The numerous small circles in the painting represent the kampurarrpa.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Ngaru Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 91cm NN1509060

This painting depicts designs associated with the lake site of Ngaru, west of the Kiwirrkurra Community. A group of women camped at this site, performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area. They also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub, Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes grounded into a paste with water and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. The women made damper which they carried with them and ate as they travelled further west.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 61cm NN1501051

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the rows of parallel lines are the tali (sandhills) surrounding the site.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 61cm NN1602054

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 61cm NN1603031

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm NN1505055

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm NN1511032

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm NN1512005

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundel in the painting represents the rockhole at the site while the rows of parallel lines are the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm NN1602073

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm NN1604001

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 107 x 28cm NN1410112

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm NN1506057

This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. The roundel in the painting represents the rockhole at the site. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site, the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east, they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub, Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundel in the painting represents the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Ngaru Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm NN1509083

This painting depicts designs associated with the lake site of Ngaru, west of the Kiwirrkurra Community. A group of women camped at this site, performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area. They also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub, Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes grounded into a paste with water and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. The women made damper which they carried with them and ate as they travelled further west.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm NN1604026

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkurra Community in Western Australia. A group of ancestral women made camp at this site before travelling further east to the site of Wirrulnga, east of the Kiwirrkurra Community. While in the area, the women gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The kampurarrpa are depicted in the painting by the many small circles. The lines in the work represent spun hair which is used to make hairstring skirts, worn during ceremonies, while the larger roundels are the rockholes at the site.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 87 x 28cm NN1501058

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Ngaru Acrylic on Belgian Linen 87 x 28cm NN1503030

This painting depicts designs associated with the lake site of Ngaru, west of the Kiwirrkurra Community. A group of women camped at this site performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area. They also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries, represented in the painting by the numerous small circles, can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes grounded into a paste with water and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. The women made damper which they carried with them and ate as they travelled further west. The large roundels represent the water at Ngaru.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Ngaru Acrylic on Belgian Linen 87 x 28cm NN1505020

This painting depicts designs associated with the lake site of Ngaru, west of the Kiwirrkurra Community in Western Australia. A group of ancestral women camped at this site performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area. They also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes grounded into a paste with water and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. The women made damper which they carried with them and ate as they travelled further west. The large roundels represent the water at Ngaru while the parallel lines are the tali (sandhills) that surround the site.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 87 x 28cm NN1605101

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 31cm NN1410034

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 31cm NN1410078

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The large roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the numerous small circles are the kampurarrpa berries.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 31cm NN1412003

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 31cm NN1510029

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundel in the painting represents the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 31cm NN1603080

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 31cm NN1604008

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 31cm NN1604081

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The rows of parallel lines in the painting represent the tali (sandhills) surrounding Marrapinti.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 46 x 38cm NN1410002

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 46 x 38cm NN1502006

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The kampurarrpa berries are represented in the painting by the numerous small circles.


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 46 x 38cm NN1511090

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundels in the painting represent the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


Nanyuma NAPANGATI Marrapinti Acrylic on Belgian Linen 46 x 38cm NN1602005

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Marrapinti, west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. A large group of ancestral women camped at Marrapinti before continuing their travels further east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkurra and Ngaminya. While at the site the women made nose bones, also known as marrapinti, which are worn through a hole made in the nose web. These nose bones were originally used by both men and women but are now only inserted by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. As the women continued their travels towards the east they gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes grounded into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper. The roundel in the painting represents the rockhole at Marrapinti while the parallel lines are the surrounding tali (sandhills).


In conjunction with

With Special Thanks to the Wonderful Nanyuma

Nanyuma Napangati at Marrapinti Source: Š Photo Courtesy of Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd.


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Nanyuma Napangati Solo  

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