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FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES

EPWORTH VILLAGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

Happy New Year to all of the residents of Epworth /Susanna Wesley!

Feliz Año Nuevo para todos los residents de Epworth/ Susanna Wesley!

The Journey by Ken Fansler

La Travesia por Ken Fansler

To live today with vitality, we must learn to live never knowing if we’ve been successful, but having enjoyed the journey never possessing all the answers, but continuing to ask the questions never full certain of direction, but finding satisfactions in consistency and integrity. This is what I hope we do together in 2009. The meeting with the Residents on the third Monday of the month at 4:00 PM, gives the Board members a time to get to know you and to hear about your life and living in our Village. The Administration is there on a daily basis to hear your concerns and needs and provide you with a living environment that speaks the Mission and Vision of the Board.

“Para vivir hoy con vitalidad, tenemos que aprender a vivir sin la convicción de haber sido exitosos, pero haviendo disfrutado la travesia y jamas en posesión de todas las respuestas, pero siempre preguntando y nunca totalmente seguro de la dirección en la que vamos y encontrando satisfacción en ser consistentes e integros”. Esto es lo que espero hagamos en el 2009. La reunión con los residentes el tercer Lunes del mes a las 4:00p.m., dará la oportunidad de que los miembros de la junta directiva le lleguen a conocer y a escuchar como es su vida en nuestra comunidad.

Please join us at our next meeting and let us get to know you so that as a Board, we can make your life and living the best possible at Epworth / Susanna Wesley.

La Administración esta disponible diariamente para escuchar sus preocupaciones y necesidades y provee un ambiente que habla de la misión y la visión de la junta directiva. Por favor sea parte de nuestra próxima reunión para que podamos conocerle y como junta directiva podamos de su vida en Epworth Village / Susanna Wesley lo mejor possible.

Lyn Farr President of Aldersgate, the Operating Board

Lyn Farr Presidente de Aldersgate, La Junta de Operaciones


EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES ADULT BIBLE STUDY

BULLETIN BOARD: IN THE CHAPEL

Ezekiel, Luke, Acts, Ephesians

SUNDAYS: 10:30-11:30 AM Church Service. March 1--1:00 PM Miami Shores Presbyterian Elders

This spring, ABS explores the creative nature of Christ as it affects human life and the implications of his life for the world in which we live.

EVERY MON. THROUGH FRI.: 9:00 AM - Devotions 1st & 3rd FRIDAY 3:00 PM --- Catholic Mass EVERY WEDNESDAY In Fellowship Hall 3:00-3:45 PM -- Bible Class EVERY TUESDAY In Building 4 (old Dining Room) 1:00 PM Hispanic Bible Class with Rene Sundays---Channel 21 10:AM---Catholic Mass 10:30 AM---Jewish Life

The Promise of New Life This unit looks at five well-known passages from Ezekiel. The first three lessons examine new life as it was promised to Israel in exile. Lessons 4 and 5 look to the future God promised as it would be fulfilled many generations later in Jesus Christ.

The Path to New Life The four lessons in this unit come from three passages in Luke and one from Acts. The first two lessons focus on the suffering and death of Jesus and his triumph over death on the first Easter Sunday. The next lesson continues with the last post-resurrection appearance of Jesus in Luke. The final lesson finds Peter in Lydda and Joppa bringing new life to others in the name and power of Christ.

The Way of New Life This unit of five lessons explores Ephesians through five concepts in that letter: church as family, new life, revelation, home life, and equipping ourselves for Christian living.

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Happy Easter!

Felices Pascuas!

Guest article by Larry Winebrenner

Artículo por Larry Winebrenner

Yes! Happy Easter

Felices Pascuas! Sombreros de Pascua. El desfile de Pascua. Cestas de Pascua. Huevos de Pascua. Conejos de chocolate con deliciosas orejas largas.

Easter bonnets. The Easter Parade. Easter baskets. Easter eggs. Chocolate rabbits with long, delicious ears. We've crammed so much secular into the holiday that it's easy to forget it is a "holy day." The holiest season of the Christian year begins on Ash Wednesday and ends on Easter Day. Easter Day is the holiest day in the Christian year. Although Easter is the be all and end all of the faith, it is not the end. Many treat it that way. Rather than the end, it is really the beginning. Easter is that day when the Resurrection of the Son of God is the dawn of the Sun of Righteousness. All shadows are swept away by this Sun. No matter what is past, it is past. All things are new. Did you ever say to yourself, "If I could just live my life over . . ."? Well, you may not be able to live it over, but you can live it anew. In the truest sense, because of Easter, today is the first day of the rest of your life. Amen!

Hemos sido abarrotado en tal medida por la vida secular que se nos ha hecho fácil olvidarnos que es un día Santo. La temporada más santa de el año Cristiano empieza con el Miercoles de Cenizas y termina el dia de Pascua de Resurreccion. El día de pascua es el dia mas santo del año Cristiano. Aunque Pascua es el todo y termine toda la fe, no es el final. Muchos entienden las pascuas de esa manera. Más que el final en verdad es el comienzo. La Pascua es el día de la Resurrección del Hijo de Dios, es el amanecer del sol del bienestar. Todas las sombras fueron barridas por el sol. No importa el pasado. El pasado paso. Todo es nuevo. Alguna vez se dijo asi mismo, “Si tan solo pudiera volver a vivir …?” Bueno, definitivamente no podra vivirlo todo pero podra vivir de una nueva forma. Podra hacerlo en el verdadero sentido porque gracias a la Pascua, hoy es el primer día del resto de su vida. Amen!

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Greetings from Epworth Dining Services…. By Donald L. Cook, Manager

hot foods. Thelma is our cold food expert, who prepares all salads. When needed, all staff will work together to help each other and to ensure that all assignments are completed in a timely and efficient manner.

We are committed to providing you with the best services when preparing foods [for all occasions] to the residents of Epworth Village and Susanna Wesley. Many of you are familiar with our outstanding “waitstaff”(Felicia, Helen, Ariel, Lilly, Emelia, Maria, Curz, Luis and Diamond) because you see them out front daily. However, most of you may not know our staff who takes care of what we call “the back of the house.” This dynamic staff includes Francisco, Pascula, Jose, Elaine, Rodolfo and Thelma. Francisco and Pascula clean and maintain our dishes, glass ware, cutlery, and pots and pans. In addition, Francisco has an important task of properly storing all of the stock on a biweekly basis.

The Production staff brings a wealth of experience from working in the healthcare and hotel industries. They work long hours! Did you know that their day starts at 5:30 a.m. daily and could end as late as need be when we have to do special events? We value and appreciate both our front of the house “waitstaff”and back of the house “production staff!!!” When you see them, be sure to give them a “thumbs up” for a job well done. Until next time… we hope you continue to enjoy your meals.

In the “back of the house,” we have the Production Team. Jose, Elaine and Rodolfo are skilled cooks/chefs, and they prepare the

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Spring in Lebanon

I sketched the scene and later did an oil painting of it that I gave to my mother.

By Ellen Smith, Apt. 514 When Spring comes in the country of Lebanon the winter rains end. One of the first things my mother liked to do was to go to the pine woods at the edge of the city of Beirut and gather wild flowers such as white and lavender cyclamen. The hills were covered with red and yellow poppies. Jesus called them the lilies of the field. Streams rushed with melting snow from the mountains. One Spring we drove to the Adonis river near the ancient town of Byblos. The river turned red every year with the tinged soil disturbed by the rush of water. Legend said that this was the blood of Adonis who was tusked by a wild boar. We spent some Easters in Sidon visiting friends. All these places are on or near the Mediterranean Sea. There were streams everywhere that we crossed on stepping stones. There we also saw Flea River and the Louse River. These are all English translations from the Arabic. The Dog River was a favorite place to go for picnics near Beirut. There were picnic tables along the river, and caves to explore if you were brave. A Roman aqueduct, looking like a high bridge, crossed the river. One year

I have photos of school friends at a picnic there and of my brother and a friend skipping stones on the water. The cliffs beside the river have inscriptions carved in the rocks recording centuries of conquering armies from Ramses II, Alexander the Great, Napolean to recent times. When I was 15, the students at my father’s Near East School of Theology planned a day long retreat at the Dog River and I went along (no professors). We took the tram to the end of the line in Beirut and walked through the flowered countryside to the river. There was a program of study, singing, and prayer. English was spoken as the students came from many backgrounds. There were always Armenian women studying Religious education. The men became ministers. After a picnic, we walked down the road to a Greek Orthodox seminary. The buildings were white inside and out. A priest gave us a tour and I’ll never forget the brightly colored religious paintings on the walls. I read that there is now a highway along the Dog River through the mountain pass. Cities are built on top of ancient towns, and armies keep coming through Lebanon. Still, in the Spring the shepherds graze their flocks on the hills and find calm pools where the sheep can drink safely.

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girl who was working diligently, she asked what the drawing was.The girl replied, "I'm drawing God."The teacher paused and said, "But no one knows what God looks like"Without missing a beat, or looking up from her drawing, the girl replied, "They will in a minute." * * * * * * *

Don’t Mess With Children… A little girl was talking to her teacher about whales. The teacher said it was physically impossible for a whale to swallow a human because even though it was a very large mammal its throat was very small.The little girl stated that Jonah was swallowed by a whale.Irritated, the teacher reiterated that a whale could not swallow a human; it was physically impossible.The little girl said, "When I get to heaven I will ask Jonah".The teacher asked, "What if Jonah went to hell?" The little girl replied, "Then you ask him.” * * * * * * * A Kindergarten teacher was observing her classroom of children while they were drawing. She would occasionally walk around to see each child's work. As she got to one little

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The children were lined up in the cafeteria of a Catholic elementary school for lunch. At the head of the table was a large pile of apples. The nun made a note, and posted it on the apple tray:"Take only ONE God is watching."Moving further along the lunch line, at the other end of the table was a large pile of chocolate chip cookies.A child had written a note, "Take all you want. God is watching the apples. * * * * * * * A Sunday school teacher was discussing the Ten Commandments with her five and six year olds. After explaining the commandment to "honor" thy Father and thy Mother, she asked, "Is there a commandment that teaches us how to treat our brothers and sisters?"Without missing a beat one little boy answered, "Thou shall not kill."

EPWORTH VILLAGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

Contributed by Ron Waites (an Echoes reader in Miami)


EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

How a Family Party Tradition Began

a flamingo egg hunt party.

By Nathalie Cooner, Apt. 105 When I asked my daughter Martha what kind of party she wanted for her fourth birthday she answered “an Easter egg hunt party!” “Oh,” I said “this is November and we can’t have an Easter egg hunt. We can have a turkey egg hunt party, though.” And we did. I found some wrapped roundish kind of candies and threw them around the back yard for her friends to hunt for them. I gave all the guests party bags for their finds. I even hid some candy bars. You would have thought when they were found that they had found gold! Later in July when my older daughter Mary Ruth had a birthday, she requested “a Turkey egg hunt party.” I said that that kind of party was only for November, but could she think of another kind of bird and we’d have that kind of egg hunt? Her answer was “a flamingo egg hunt party.” At that time we were living in South Carolina. I don’t think in all of that state were there any flamingos around, but she saw them when we visited our families in Florida and she loved them. So, for her birthday we had

After that an egg hunt party became a family tradition, until skating parties, spend the night parties, movie parties and sweet sixteen parties came into being and took over the back yard hunt kind of parties. My daughters were growing up! * * * * * * *

Out of the mouths of kids My family grew up in the Wyoming prairie, and on the long drive from church we would sing hymns to pass the time. Coming home from church one Easter Sunday, my parents asked us what hymns we wanted to sing. “My little sister yelled, ‘Gravy Rose!’ “We all looked at her and my Mom said that she didn’t know that hymn. “‘Yes you do!’ my little sister insisted. ‘You all know it. We sang it this morning.’ “My sister began singing, ‘Up from the gravy rose, with a mighty triumph for his toes…’” Mark E. Honstein, Chaplain Lutheran Good Samaritan Society, Loveland, CO

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An Easter Reflection By Fay Taylor, Apt. 219 Easter is my favorite time of the year. Of course, the real meaning of Easter is Resurrection– the time to celebrate Jesus’ coming back to life after His death on the Cross. In addition to that I like the Spring time, the bright blue sky, the warm breezy atmosphere, the flowers, the pastels, the greens, and whites after the drabness of Winter. And how about the chocolate bunnies, the yellow chicks and the new clothes? I like Easter egg hunts, floppy wide-brimmed hats, and airy sandals. My family tradition was all new outfits– pastel frocks for the girls, suits with long pants and ties for the boys. My preacher daddy always wore a white suit on Easter Sunday. Mama was pretty enough to be in the Easter Parade. One Easter when I was a small girl, Daddy commissioned an artist, who was a member of our church, to paint flowers on my yellow voile dress. On my sister’s dress were painted pink wild roses on her bright green voile.

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When I grew too old to hunt eggs, I made sure my little brother had a hunt. Some of the hiding places were in the living and dining rooms. The sacred music is so special at Easter, sung by the choir or the congregation. “He Arose” or “Low in the Grave He Lay.” What is more beautiful than pots and pots of Easter lilies banked around the altar, or a glistening white lily delivered to your door? In Indonesia, Easter lilies are called “kerk lilies” (church lilies). When I was a missionary in Hong Kong, Mr. Lam Chi Fung sent chocolate bunnies to all the missionary kids and big roasting hens to the adults. Mr. Lam was a big business man with a bigger heart. When I was around twelve we were in Thomasville, Georgia at Easter time, Mama and Aunt Etta took me and cousin Iris Nell downtown to a department store to buy our Easter dresses. They were white voile with soft ruffles, just alike, and very nice. We girls really wanted more sophisticated dresses since we were approaching our teens. But we had to settle for our mothers’ selections, and they were pretty enough to be remembered now in my senior years. (Continued on next page)

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

An Easter Reflection By Fay Taylor, Apt. 219 Although I grew up in South Florida (Florida is Spanish for flower) I never saw more beautiful flowers than when I was in Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. Jonquils, red bud, forsythias, tulips, dogwood. Of course I never saw the change of seasons before going “up North.”

I was invited to attend the Russian Baptist Church in Shanghai on Easter day. When the visitors were still at the gate the church members greeted us all with big bear hugs and cries of “Kristos vos Krios!” I learned that meant “Christ is Risen!” I also learned that the response should be “Christ is Risen Indeed!” It doesn’t matter what language one speaks: English, Russian, Chinese, Spanish. It is the same joyous expression of Easter- “Christ arose!”

Several times in my life my birthday coincided with Easter, two wonderful celebrations on one day. When I was eight years old, I was baptized on Easter Sunday. It was like a personal resurrection, into the life with Christ and into the fellowship of the church.

Out of the mouths of kids A couple of weeks before Easter, a pastor was teaching a Sunday school class of small children about forgiveness and the story of the thief on the cross. Finally, she asked, “And what were Jesus’ last words on the cross?” A little boy raised his hand and in his deepest voice answered, “I’ll be back!”

After the church service, a woman complained to the pastor: “I can’t believe this church knows only one song. Every time I come here, the only song they sing is ‘Christ the Lord Is Risen Today.’”

The Anglican Digest.

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Easter Crossword Puzzle

Solution on Page 23

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I do not hunch my back with yesterday.� Comedian Danny Thomas on the importance of forgiveness.

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Easter By Dr. Alan Beech, Apt. 419 You know the old game; someone says “ham” you say “eggs”; they say “Mickey” you say “Mouse”; they say “Easter” I think “chocolate”. When I was small and fat I loved chocolate (still do) but my Mum and Dad were determined to keep my weight down. So they deprived me of those sweet and delectable calorific things I adored and turned me into an exercise freak. Of course, it was good for me, but don’t you hate it when people make you do things ‘for your own good’? The only exception was Easter Sunday. My parents weren’t very religious. Dad made me go to Sunday School 2 to 5 pm Sunday afternoons and years later I discovered that he and Mum had a cozy loving session in bed the moment my back was turned.

hollow and covered with colored tinfoil. Some were smaller and filled with white or yellow creamy stuff and some were boxes of very small rabbits, made of solid chocolate. If there had been such a thing as Chocoholics Anonymous and I’d been a member, Easter Sunday would have been the day I fell off the wagon each year. They still have chocolate bunnies in stores at Easter time. I’m not sure if it’s a tradition with my English relatives any longer. They are so sensitive about the effects of chocolate on teeth and girth. Even modern Easter egg hunts are usually for plastic or hard-boiled hens eggs. For many years when I was a student I was a member of the Handel Choir of Baltimore and we always sang the “Messiah” at Easter. But my main interest in the choir at that time was a couple of ladies in the soprano section, so that wasn’t a tradition either.

The Easter tradition (pre WWII) to the kids from relatives was gifts of chocolate rabbits, and I couldn’t possibly insult our relatives by not accepting loving gifts. Some were big,

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“Life can be fraught with fear or festive with faith; arid with apprehensions or alive with aspirations.” William Arthur Ward

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Celebrating Easter by Larry Winebrenner Recently I was trying to remember my first Easter when I was a Baptist boy growing up in the little town of Beaufort, South Carolina. Now I have a good memory, so that shouldn't be a problem. I remember, for example, when I was three years old, or, at least, going on three. I know it was then because we were living in Mt. Savage, MD from 1932 until 1934. Since I was born in 1931 [I don't remember that event], I had to be around three years old. Dad was doing some roof work. Before he went up the ladder I distinctly remember him saying, "Don't you dare climb up this ladder." He didn't say anything about the cherry tree next to the house, though. So I climbed the cherry tree, went out on a limb [not the last time I ever went out on a limb!], and dropped down on the porch roof. Dad almost fell off the roof when I walked up and said, "Hey, daddy." So, I can remember waaayy back.

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But I don't remember my first Easter. It may have been when I was about eleven or twelve. Mother took me down to Schein's Clothing Store and bought me a slack suit. The problem is, if that was Easter, I didn't wear the slack suit to church that Sunday. It was a nice weekend and a bunch of us boys went camping over on Goat Island. Boy, was Mother mad. She'd bought that suit for me to wear to church and I didn't even attend. Maybe I don't remember Easter because I never got an Easter basket when I was growing up. I didn't know what an Easter basket was until I had kids of my own. Another reason could be because we didn't pay too much attention to the Christian year in the Baptist church. Don't get me wrong. We knew about Christmas and Easter. It's just that they did not have the religious significance found so often today–even in Baptist churches. For example, probably the smartest girl in school was Gara Black. [I had a crush on her, but that's not why I say she was smart.] One day Gara came to school with a black smudge on her forehead.

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Celebrating Easter by Larry Winebrenner The teacher said, "Gara, you have a bit of dirt on your head." "It's Ash Wednesday," said Gara. "That's no excuse for having a dirty face," the teacher told her. We all agreed with the teacher. We'd never heard of Ash Wednesday. Of course, I now know what Ash Wednesday is. And Lent, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter. Seems I've learned a thing or two since I was a Baptist boy growing up in Beaufort.

An Easter Memory By Gladys Ogg, Apt. 152 Many years ago when my daughter was three and my son was eleven, my husband

and I bought a small farm out in Farmington, Michigan just outside of Detroit. We enjoyed it very much and my daughter always liked to go to the feed store with me. That’s where we would get our baby chicks. Every season we would get 50 baby chicks and raise them. And, of course, we bought the chicken feed there. Well one time we went in there and the feed company, instead of just having plain old sacks, put printing on their bags just like yard goods you would get at the store. Well, one of the bags was extremely pretty and my daughter wanted it, so that’s what I bought that day for my chicken feed. Well when we got home I said to her “what do you want me to do with the chicken bag?” She said “I want you to make me a dress!” So I made her a dress out of the chicken feed bag and it was kind of cute. Well that next Sunday was Easter and my mother was having the whole family over for Easter dinner. Now you have to remember that my mother was a very straight-laced English woman— very proper. When we got there she said to Roberta, “Oh, that’s a pretty new dress you have”. And my daughter said “Yes. Grandma. My mother made it out of a feed bag.” My mother just about died and never got over the fact that her granddaughter was dressed in a feed bag. Happy Easter to everybody and bye bye.

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

The Easter Lily History, mythology, and art are filled with stories and images that speak of the beauty and majesty of the elegant white flowers. One of the most famous Biblical references is in the Sermon on the Mount, when Christ said, "Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they toil not, neither do they spin and yet Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these." Lilies are often called the "White-Robed Apostles of Hope". Lilies were discovered in the Garden of Gethsemane after Christ died on the cross. During the Easter season, churches line their altars and envelop their crosses with a multitude of Easter Lilies, to signify the resurrection of Jesus Christ and the hope of eternal life.

According to the legend, the flowers were formed when Eve cried repentant tears upon leaving Eden, and the tears became lilies. The point of this legend is that true repentance leads to beauty. Established through the centuries as a symbol of purity, grace, and the regal lifestyle, the white lily is a suitable reminder of the greater meaning of Easter. These flowers grace millions of homes and churches every year, embodying joy, hope, and life; whether given as a gift or displayed proudly in one's home, the Easter lily remains a beauteous reminder of how Easter is a time for celebration and rejoicing. So when you purchase Easter baskets for your loved ones, don't hold back with decorated eggs and chocolates, but be certain to include a few Easter lilies as well.

Another concept associated with the pure white lily is that of womanhood. In some early paintings, the Angel Gabriel offers pure white lilies to the Virgin Mary, and this symbolizes that she will be the mother of Jesus. Other paintings show saints bringing vases of white lilies to Mary and the divine child. There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the view is always the same!

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Easter Quiz What does Mardi Gras have to do with Easter? A. Mardi Gras is the first day of Lent. B. Mardi Gras is the last day to indulge before Lent. C. Mardi Gras has nothing to do with Easter. The ashes used on Ash Wednesday are made A. by monks in a monastery in London. B. in Jerusalem and flown over to England. C. by burning palm crosses which have been saved from Palm Sunday last year. How is the date for Easter Sunday calculated? A. The first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox. B. The second Sunday following the harvest moon. C. It is always on the second Sunday in April.

like a tear drop. C. Jesus liked eggs. What does Shrove Tuesday have to do with Easter? A. Shrove Tuesday is the first day of Advent. B. Shrove Tuesday is the end of Lent. C. Shrove Tuesday is the last day to indulge before Lent. Which President inaugurated the White House's annual Easter Egg Roll? A. Calvin Coolidge. B. Andrew Johnson. C. Theodore Roosevelt. Where does the White House Easter Egg Roll take place? A. Capitol Hill. B. The West Wing. C. The South Lawn.

What is the origin of the word "Easter"? A. It was a sky deity associated with rain and agriculture. B. It was the name of a spring goddess. C. It was a mythical beast . Why do we have eggs at Easter? A. They are a symbol of rebirth. B. They are a symbol of sadness as they look

Answers on Page 22

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Snippets from My London

dine at the National Theatre Terrace Café. It has a great view of St. Paul’s across the Thames. Phone ahead though, as it’s popular with Londoners.

By Dr. Alan Beech, Apt. 419 Inexpensive London accommodation is an oxymoron, but we approached it one Easter at a University of London dormitory. They are mainly available in summer. We chose Bankside House, 24 Sumner St., SE 1 on the South bank of the Thames, near the rebuilt replica of Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, across the road from the Tate Modern Gallery and ten minutes walk to the old galleried coaching inn “The George" and Southwark Cathedral. The rooms were small, with single beds, but breakfasts were huge. They also had a student pub. One weekend a group of Italian students came. They stayed up all night partying, otherwise it was quiet. Most of the action in the West End is north of the Thames, but the South Bank also has attractions. A short walk along the riverside promenade from our digs at Bankside we came to The Big Wheel. Its enclosed cars give you a super view of the City and St. Paul’s Cathedral across the Thames. The Royal Festival Hall is nearby and so are the Museum of the Moving Image and the National Theatre. For good French cuisine at a reasonable price

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Many Victorian residences in Central London are built on streets that are open or close-ended squares. Houses line the outside of the road and iron railings on its inside enclose a small park. Some of these have famous names, Grosvenor Square; Berkeley Square, Leicester Square. Many squares have wellkept formal gardens in them. Some are private, only available to residents of the square and the gardener. They all have benches to relax on. On a warm day, this is a grand way to escape the hubbub of city life. Take a book or better yet, a dog on a leash, sit on a bench and prepare to meet local residents. Leicester Square really is a mini-park. As it is in the heart of the West End, its benches are usually full and pigeons flock around to be fed. Pedestrian hordes stream by on its north side, going between Leicester Square tube station and Piccadilly Circus. Just outside the south side of the park is a booth for half-price tickets of the same day’s show at many top theatres. (Continued on next page)

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Snippets from My London By Dr. Alan Beech, Apt. 419 Don’t expect to get into the latest blockbuster, but shows that have been running for some time are usually available. A short walk east from the ticket booth takes you to Trafalgar Square.

People watching and feeding pigeons in Trafalgar Square is great fun if you don’t worry about psittacosis. There are always thousands of both species, some pigeons will land on your hand or head for seeds. The bird-seed sellers are there too. If you look up, you can see Lord Nelson’s statue perched on its column. We often went to free lunchtime concerts at St. Martin in the Fields Church (no fields there) on the east side of the Square.

Florida Keys By Ellen Smith, Apt. 514 I know that I’m in Paradise When I reach the Florida Keys. The island necklace beckons me. I inhale the salty breeze. Key Largo welcomes me On this tropic island trail. It asks if I will snorkel, sun, fish, swim, or sail. Islamorada’s green palms sift the rising sun, Which glistens on the calmness of the ocean blue. It offers feast of snapper, turtle soup, key lime pie too. Treasure islands all around. Big Pine Key has a shallow aqua shore. Travel on through Marathon. On Seven Mile Bridge you’ll soar. Key West— shops and ships and the little Conch train. I’ll turn around, find another isle And come right back again.

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A Muse For Epworth It was two days ‘til Christmas And what did we see? Our letter from Epworth, With news...yes, sir’ee. There were stories of family, some memories of past, Quizzes and p o e m s – Information– What Class! We are folks up in Gainesville, that’s so far away, From our family member, our favorite Aunt Fay. When we read the news of the Epworth Community, We feel a warm spot in our family unity. We know that our loved one is happy and safe, With folks who make sure that she talked with, each day, And smiled at and laughed with when we’re far away. Now, I’ll share a secret about my Aunt Fay, It’s knowledge she shines with...and she really can pray.

No problem at Epworth, the fare is done well, There are friends at the table, and food that is swell. At table they gather and share in their day, And laugh with the wait staff who serve food “your way.” I’m glad it was Epworth where Fay chose to wind down, A place that is friendly and safety is found. There’s a plan for a problem– hurricane comes to mind, There’s a plan for some fun time– food, music– that kind. For all of you who chose this place to dwell, I hope for you too, Epworth rang the bell. Dedicated to the Epworth Community by Jill Rench (a Fay, too)

Fay Taylor’s niece (Editor’s note: Thanks for the poem Jill. We would like more family members to submit material for the Echoes!)

But show her a kitchen, a pan or a pot, And she’ll tell you quite quickly, a cook she is not.

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Echoes From The Past 5 Fingers of Prayer Your thumb is nearest to you, so begin your prayers by praying for those closest to you. To pray for our loved ones is, as C. S. Lewis once said, a “sweet duty.” The next finger is the pointing finger. Pray for those who teach, instruct, and heal. This includes teachers, doctors, and ministers. They need support and wisdom in pointing others in the right direction. Keep them in your prayers. The next finger is the tallest. It reminds us of our leaders. Pray for the president, leaders in business and industry, and administrators. These people shape our nation and guide public opinion. They need God’s guidance.

is the fact that this is our weakest finger, as any piano teacher will testify. It should remind us to pray for those who are weak, in trouble, or in pain. They need your prayers day and night. You can’t pray too much for them. And lastly comes our little finger; the smallest finger of all. Which is where we should place ourselves in relation to God and others. As the Bible says, “The least shall be the greatest among you.” Your pinkie should remind you to pray for yourself. By the time you have prayed for the other four groups, your own needs will be put into proper perspective and you will be able to pray for yourself more effectively. Should you find it hard to get to sleep tonight, just remember the homeless family that has no bed to lie in. Contributed by Jane Cannard, 2003 Echoes

The fourth finger is next. Surprising to many

A small boy approached a white haired gentleman in a store and asked shyly “Are you a grandpa?” “Yes,” replied the elder with a kind smile. “Good,” said the little boy. “My grandpa isn’t here, and I want a candy bar, please.”

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Epworth Village Pets Speak Interviews by Wilma Hoy (Apt. 352), Roving Reporter

The Birds of Susanna Wesley Good morning, pretty birds. What are you doing here? We work here and have for years. The pay’s not great but in today’s world we are just happy to have a job! What do you do? We visit different residents to make them happy— cheer them up a little.

Do you ever get out of your cage? Two of us tried it. One opened the cage door and hopped out only to hear a loud voice saying “GET BACK IN THAT CAGE!” He did, in a big hurry. Another time one of us got out only to find a resident hiding under her sheet and screaming for help at the top of her lungs. The staff came running and cut his vacation short. The rest of us haven’t tried it— yet. I wonder how this work got started. There was a hurricane called Andrew and someone gave George and Gracie to Susanna Wesley because their home got blown away. George and Gracie have since passed away, but the job was established.

How do you do that? Well, if the resident doesn’t see well, the chirpers go in. If someone doesn’t hear well but can see, we send in the beauties. All of you look pretty to me.

& 20

It’s OK to get even—with those who have helped you.

EPWORTH VILLAGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

It seems to me that your work is very important. Keep at it!


EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

My Second Marriage By Elizabeth Snider, Apt. 510 My second marriage was to John Snider May 10, 1980. My first husband, Joe Massaguer, died two and a half years prior. I decided to retire from school teaching after 36 years to marry John, who was already retired from the U.S. Immigration Service. The reason we decided to have a May wedding instead of a June one was because my foster son, Guillermo Parra, had his vacation time in May and he had come from New Jersey to be with us. Both John and I decided we wanted a small wedding and therefore we held it in my back yard. Guilli was a God send; he scrubbed the terrace, set a beautiful ping pong table with linens, a huge cake, flowers, etc. Later he became our chauffeur on our honeymoon trip. He treated us to a night of dancing at a Viscaya night club.

at each congregator. Little 2 year old Danny did not want to be the ring bearer. I offered him cash which he did not want, but his eyes brightened when I mentioned chewing gum and he agreed. The service went smoothly until we came to the exchange of rings. When my preacher brother opened the ring box which Danny held, Danny looked in and yelled “What? No chewing gum?” The wedding was on a Saturday morning, and after the ceremony we enjoyed cake, fellowship, and reminiscing. After we said goodbye to our guests we had a pleasant day and wonderful evening. The next morning we started on our honeymoon with Guilli as our chauffeur taking us to all the Florida parks. Joe and I had 5 wonderful years together until he died. He was 78 and I was 65. We traveled the world. We had fun and I suggest that if you feel bored, marry a second time.

My preacher brother, Rev. David Moe, came down from North Carolina to marry us. He used a tree trunk for his lectern, and wore ecclesiastic robes. John’s grandchildren, Beverly and Danny, took part. Beverly, five years old, was the flower girl. She took a flower each time out of the basket and threw it

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

Know Your Florida State Officials A. Jeff Kottkamp B. Charles H. Bronson C. Eric Smith D. Charlie Crist E. Bill McCollum F. Alex Sink G. Kurt S. Browning Answers: 1-D; 2-E; 3-F; 4-B; 5-C; 6-G; 7-A

Match the names with the State office The Cabinet: 1. Governor 2. Attorney General 3. Chief Financial Officer 4. Commissioner of Agriculture Other Officials: 5. Commissioner of Education 6. Secretary of State 7. Lieutenant Governor

Contributed by Emma Rothblatt, 225B, Susanna Wesley

I wandered lonely as a cloud, That floats on high o’er vale and hill When all at once I saw a crowd, a host of golden daffodil Beside the lake, beneath the trees, fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Fair daffodils, we weep to see you haste away so soon As yet, the early rising sun has not attained its noon. Stay, stay, until the hasting day is done And we will go with you, anon. Contributed by Dr. Alan Beech, Apt. 419

Easter Quiz Answers 1. -B. Mardi Gras is the last day to indulge before Lent. (Mardi Gras means "Fat Tuesday".) 2. -C. by burning palm crosses which have been saved from Palm Sunday last year. 3. -A. The first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox. 4. -B. It was the name of a spring goddess. 5. -A. They are a symbol of rebirth 6. -C. Shrove Tuesday is the last day to indulge before Lent 7. -B. Andrew Johnson 8. -C. The South Lawn

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

We’d like your ‘input’. Contact the appropriate Editor (listed below) with anything you’d like to add to the Newsletter, or any comments you may have concerning the Newsletter. Thank You! Mary McNeill #504- Reminisce Articles from readers about early experiences & remembrances. Wilma Hoy #352– Humor Wilma takes ordinary clichés, events, or just anything & adds a touch of humor to them. Cathy Morris #123- Typist & puzzles Types all the articles & searches out new & interesting quizzes and humor. Vi Ficken #158- Editor in Chief If you’re not sure where to send your article, Vi will get it to the right person.

Easter Crossword Puzzle Answers

Emma Rothblatt 225B Fay Taylor #219 Bea Houldsworth #240 Nancy Levy #317 Ann Shuflin #529 Advisory Staff Adrienne Gay Rev. Rene Ramirez Ceal Diaz ******************** PLEASE NOTE THE DEADLINE FOR THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE ECHOES WILL BE May 8 ****************** NOTE-THIS NEWSLETTER HAS NO PAID EMPLOYEES AND ALL MISKATED (SORRY) HAVE BEEN PLACED IN HERE SPECIFICALLY FOR THE PLEASURE OF THOSE WHO LOOK FORWARD TO FINDING THEM! ****************** We are not copyrighted If there is good here, we want to share it!

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EPWORTH VILLAGE ECHOES FOR -- ABOUT -- AND BY THE RESIDENTS - February / March 2009

EPWORTH VILLAGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 5300 W 16th Avenue • Hialeah, FL 33012

TO:

PRESORTED STANDARD U.S.POSTAGE PAID MIAMI,FL. PERMIT NO. 5573

Epworth Village Echoes  

Epworth Village Echoes, for about and by the residents (Feb - March 2009)

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