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vol. 4, issue 4

Winter 2012 Issue dec • jan • feb Plants for a Winter Landscape Holiday Open House Winter Tours


Editor

Bryn Ramjoué

Proof Reader

Laurie Engel

Gregory Lee, Jason Baker, Rita Reisor, Wendy Yates, Meghan Eames, Morgan Byrne, Marita Tewes Tyrolt Contributing Writers

Contributing Photographers

Amy Pugsley, Pierce McConnell, Jason Baker

Graphic Designers Pierce McConnell, Amy Pugsley

IC Group in Salt Lake City

Printed by

Red Butte Garden, a part of the University of Utah, is a nonprofit organization located in Salt Lake City, Utah. With over 100 acres, including display gardens, walking paths, and natural areas with hiking trails, Red Butte Garden is the largest botanical garden in the Intermountain West that tests, displays, and interprets regional horticulture. 300 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84108 · 801.585.0556 Copyright © 2012 Red Butte Garden. All rights reserved.

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A special attribute of public gardens is that they are ever changing; no two days are quite the same. Each day, each week, brings a new bloom, a chance encounter with our resident pollinators or other wildlife, or a weather event that causes us to see something that we never noticed before. As 2012 slips into the past, we leave the last of our fall blooming flowers and a summer of memories and events, whether it be a friend or loved one’s wedding, a retirement party, an outdoor concert or two, a summer of walking the Garden, taking gardening classes, or a family picnic on one of our waysides or in our secret streamside garden. While our plants are dormant, the Garden itself is not. Winter is a wonderful time for walking the Garden and perceiving it in new ways. It is the most quiet and peaceful of all times to stroll though our landscapes. Deciduous leaves and flowers may be largely gone, but winter presents us with other delights. With thick beds of foliage and eye-catching flowers grabbing our attention during the growing months, it is easy to overlook the abundant wildlife that makes Red Butte Garden their home, feeding directly or indirectly off the cornucopia of fruits and foliage. Overlooking our wildlife is not quite so easy during the winter. A good example is birds that seem to be everywhere once the leaves are off the trees. It would be hard to walk the Garden in winter without seeing quail, often dozens, and yet they go almost unnoticed at other times of the year. They leave their tracks in newly fallen snow and are not an uncommon sight to early morning Garden visitors. We suspect bobcats enjoy our abundant quail in their own way. Other spectacular wildlife making a home in the Garden include fox and a variety of hawk species. Eventually, winter will cede its reign to spring and a new year of growth and abundance will come to Red Butte Garden. Two-thousand-and-thirteen is guaranteed to be different than 2012. New plants will be added, including 40,000 additional bulbs, some plants will be replaced, and others will be one year older and larger. The Garden’s 350,000 bulbs will bloom again, in new and slightly different presentations that represent each bulb’s response to winter and spring temperatures and precipitation. We too will be different–a year older, transformed by time and events, so that we will notice, appreciate, and interact differently with what the Garden will present. Ever changing, but comfortably familiar, Red Butte Garden is yours to enjoy anew again, and again and again.

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Red Butte Garden

Oak Tunnel

- Gregory J. Lee, Executive Director


table of contents

Fragrance Garden Arbor

features

calendar

2 Executive Director's Message

6

Workshops & Class Schedule

14

Garden Fresh Recipe

7 Activities - Free With Admission

10

Volunteer Spotlight

7 11

Holiday Open House 2013 Annual Events Calendar

14 Art Exhibits 17

Garden Adventures Schedule

18

Winter Calendar

Moose Sculpture

articles 4

Winter’s Buds

8 Plants for a Winter Landscape 13

Conservation Spotlight

12

Be a Part of Something Big Frozen Waterfall


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By Jason Baker, Curator of Plant Records

Have you ever looked closely at the buds on a tree or shrub after the leaves have fallen? Often overlooked, they come in many different shapes, sizes, colors, and textures. Buds form during late summer and early fall at the base of the petiole, or leaf stalk, and are the plant’s way of preparing for winter dormancy. Inside the buds are embryonic leaves, stems, and flowers that are waiting to burst open at the first sign of spring. During winter when there are no flowers, fruits, or leaves, botanists use buds when identifying trees and shrubs. They look at their shape, color, and position to narrow down their choices until the plant is identified. Some of the unique qualities that protect buds from the cold weather also make them attractive in a winter garden. One of most recognizable buds is that of the Magnolia (Magnolia sp.). Many Magnolias have very large, fuzzy flower buds proudly displayed on the tips of their branches throughout winter before unfolding with color and fragrance in spring. The layer of fuzz traps a thin layer of air that helps insulate flower buds from the cold and adds a striking sheen when bathed in morning light. Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina), a Utah native, has both hairy buds and fuzzy branch tips. Typhina means “like Typha”, the genus of the 4

Yulan Magnolia

winter’s buds

Red Butte Garden

fuzzy cattail plant that grows along waterways and pond edges. The fuzz layer described for Magnolia is present in Staghorn Sumac as tiny brown hairs that protect the sensitive buds and previous year’s growth from the cold. It also creates a spectacular contrast against a snowy backdrop. Some buds stay small during cold months until they are ready to open as leaves or flowers or both. The Wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox) shrub has small, brown, scaly buds that are among the first to burst into bloom, sometimes as early as January, with a sweet fragrance. Other buds, like those of the Horse Chestnut (Aesculus sp.) and Poplar (Populus sp.) have a sticky coating. This viscous secretion is produced by the plant to protect the buds from insect damage by acting like a sticky trap to small sucking insects such as aphids. Honeybees harvest and use the sticky resin to make propolis, a material similar to beeswax used in the hive to seal open spaces and reinforce its structure. The large, beautiful buds of these two trees make an outstanding statement all winter long. Winter is a great opportunity to explore Red Butte Garden and the unique and interesting world of winter buds.


Winter Wedding in the Orangerie

Carolyn and Adam Jensen Married on January 3, 2012

“

When we were looking at venues, I instantly fell in love with Red Butte Garden and wanted to get married here.

“

-- Carolyn Jensen www.redbuttegarden.org

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SIGN UP for Winter Workshops & Classes WREATH WORKSHOPS SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 4

DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC.

1, 1, 2, 2,

SATURDAY 9AM - NOON SATURDAY 1 - 4PM SUNDAY 9AM - NOON SUNDAY 1 - 4PM

Kick-off your holiday season by creating a festive holiday wreath at our popular wreath-making workshop. Materials include fresh evergreens, pinecones, fruits, assorted decorations, ribbon, and a 16”-18” hoop. Attendees are encouraged to bring unusual greens or favorite ornaments to include in their wreath design. MEMBERS $50/PUBLIC $60 REGISTRATION REQUIRED 801.581.8454 OR ONLINE AT WWW.REDBUTTEGARDEN.ORG

FABULOUS FRUIT TREES (LLHG 554)

FEB. 26 - MAR. 5, TUESDAYS 6:30 - 8:30PM AND MAR. 2, SATURDAY 10AM - 1PM

Apples, cherries, apricots, pears, plums—how do you get the best production from your fruit tree each year? Learn to care for your existing trees and give new ones a healthy start as we cover planting, pruning, thinning, pollination needs, and recommended varieties. NOTE: Saturday, March 2 class will be held at an outdoor location; please bring loppers and pruners to that class. Co-sponsored with Lifelong Learning, University of Utah Continuing Education. MEMBERS $76 (SECTION 002), PUBLIC $84 (SECTION 001) REGISTRATION REQUIRED 801.587.5433 OR WWW.LIFELONG.UTAH.EDU

BOTANY FOR GARDENERS (LLHG 488)

FEB. 21 - MAR. 7, THURSDAYS 6:30 - 8:30PM

Don’t go dormant this winter! Join us to learn basic plant morphology and terminology that will help you better understand plant growth and take some guesswork out of gardening. In this hands-on class you’ll learn why some shrubs are pruned immediately after flowering while others are pruned in late winter/early spring; how to tell a pine from a spruce and why it matters; the reasons behind differing watering practices for turf and trees, and other common gardening techniques. Co-sponsored with Lifelong Learning, University of Utah Continuing Education. MEMBERS $67 (SECTION 002), PUBLIC $74 (SECTION 001) REGISTRATION REQUIRED 801.587.5433 OR WWW.LIFELONG.UTAH.EDU

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Red Butte Garden

Malus transitoria ‘Golden Raindrops’ fruit


MAXIMIZE Your Membership Benefits This

Winter!

These activities are FREE for Garden members and are included with the price of admission for the general public. Registration is required call 801.581.8454 or register online at redbuttegarden.org. GREENHOUSE TOUR

FEB. 7, THURSDAY NOON - 1:30PM

Step out of the cold and into the warmth of Red Butte Garden’s greenhouses. Join us for a behind-the-scenes tour of the state-of-the-art greenhouses where we grow all of the Garden’s annuals, container plants, and Orangerie plants. Get a sneak preview of what will be growing in the Garden this spring. Location: Red Butte Garden Greenhouses

VISITOR CENTER & ORANGERIE TOUR FEB. 21, THURSDAY NOON - 1:30PM

Join us for a guided tour of the Garden’s Orangerie and Visitor Center and get an up-close look at dramatic container combinations, stunning succulents, unique exotics, and our living wall. Location: Red Butte Garden Visitor Center & Orangerie

WINTER TREE TOUR

FEB. 23, SATURDAY 10AM - NOON

Greenhouse

Even though snow may be on the ground, many trees and shrubs with beautiful and interesting colors and textures offer a visual break from the monotony of winter whites. Join us as we walk through the Garden and explore a number of evergreen and deciduous specimens that provide year-round interest and serve as stunning backdrops for perennials and ornamental grasses. Location: Red Butte Garden Visitor Center

2012 HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE & ART FAIR SATURDAY & SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1 & 2, 10AM - 5PM

Free Admission thanks to Zoo, Arts, & Parks (ZAP) Kick-off the holiday season and find unique holiday gifts made by local artists for your friends and family at the 11th Annual Holiday Open House. You’ll find hand-crafted jewelry, pottery, fiber art, glass, photography and more in the Orangerie. Look for fun activities for kids and adults in the craft area. Free hot chocolate and apple cider. In addition, all Red Butte Garden Gift Shop items will be marked down 10%. Garden Members will receive an additional 10% off the sale prices. www.redbuttegarden.org

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Miscanthus

Plants for a Winter Landscape

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By Marita Tewes Tyrolt, Director of Horticulture

Winter can be either a welcome rest for those who love to garden or an ongoing frustration as you anxiously await the opportunity to get your hands in the soil again. Even though plants are resting during this seemingly slow period, the landscape itself doesn’t have to be dull. Many plants have attributes that offer colors or textures in the winter landscape, and some offer food for wildlife. Ornamental grasses continue to look striking in the winter landscape for quite some time. There are many from which to choose, including Miscanthus floridulus (Giant Silver Grass) that grows 10-12’, to less imposing grasses such as Achnatherum calamagrostis (Silver Spike Grass) or Sporobolus heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed). Miscanthus is useful either as a focal point or in a mass and there are many cultivars available in a variety of heights, blade widths, and foliage colors or variegation. For areas with consistent and heavy snowfalls, be sure to select a grass with strong stems, such as Miscanthus cultivars (‘Purpurescens’, ‘Morning Light’, ‘Gracillimus’, or ‘Stardust’), Sesleria species (nitida, caerulea, 8

Red Butte Garden

or autumnalis), or Festuca mairei (Atlas Fescue). Grasses that provide winter seed for birds include Miscanthus (Maiden or Silver Grass), Panicum virgatum (Switch Grass), Schizachyrium scoparium (Little Bluestem), and Sporobolus (Dropseed). Several members of the rose family have persistent fruit, offering both cold season interest and a source of food for wildlife. Newer crabapple cultivars are not the messy trees of yesteryear, and laden with fruit are quite beautiful in the winter. Make sure the cultivar you choose is known to be disease resistant, and consider the plant’s ultimate size and growth habit, as well as flower color and fruit persistence. Some of our favorites include, Malus ‘Centurion’, ‘Zumi Calocarpa’, ‘Golden Raindrops’, and ‘Louisa’, which is a nice weeping selection. Many shrub roses develop showy hips in the fall and winter if their flowers are left to mature into fruits instead of being removed by deadheading. Hips vary in size and shape and are usually red or orangish in color. Some of our favorite roses


Ulmus parvifolia ‘Allee’ bark

Cornus mas Flowers

Iris reticulata flowers

with showy hips include Rosa glauca (Red-leaved Rose), Rosa alba ‘Semi-plena’, Rosa rugosa ‘Jens Munk’, Rosa ‘Pink Meidiland’ (‘MEIpoque’) and Rosa spinosissima (Scotch Rose) which has large blackish-purple hips. Perennials with strong stems add not only interest in the winter landscape, but several genera also offer food for hungry birds, such as Achillea (Yarrow), Aster, Echinacea (Purple Cone Flower), Echinops (Globe Thistle), Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed), Heliopsis (Sunflower), Monarda (Beebalm), Penstemon (Beardtongue), Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susan), Salvia (Sage), and Solidago (Goldenrod). Most people are already familiar with the colorful bark of red or yellow twig dogwoods. Additionally, several trees that have exfoliating or mottled bark are also very beautiful, including Acer griseum (Paperbark Maple), Prunus serrulata (Flowering Cherry), Ulmus parvifolia (Lacebark Elm), and Pinus bungeana (Lacebark Pine). Conifers play a very important role in the

Jasminium nudiflorum flower

winter landscape, being available in a large range of sizes, habits, colors, and textures. The opportunities for using conifers in the landscape are endless and beyond the capacity of this article, but be sure to visit the Garden in winter to truly appreciate our Conifer Collection and get some great ideas. Last but not least, several plants which bloom in late winter are a welcome sight as they herald in spring. Some favorites include Helleborus species (Lenten Rose), Jasminum nudiflorum (Winter Jasmine), Cornus mas (Corneliancherry Dogwood), Corylopsis glabrescens (Fragrant Winterhazel), and Hamamelis vernalis (Vernal Witchhazel), which performs best as an understory shrub. Miniature bulbs are also a great way to enjoy early spring color. While most people are familiar with Crocus, there are many other minis to consider, such as Eranthis (Winter aconite), Galanthus (Snow drops), Scilla (Squill), Chionodoxa (Glory-of-the-Snow), Iris reticulata and danfordiae (Dwarf Iris), to name a few. There’s no time like the present to start planning for next year’s winter landscape! www.redbuttegarden.org

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VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

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By Meghan Eames, Volunteer Coordinator For Red Butte Garden volunteer Dorothy Lamb, volunteering is not about fitting the Garden into her schedule. “It’s on my calendar, like a doctor’s appointment. It’s not about finding time,” says Dorothy, “It’s part of my life.” For 10 years Red Butte Garden has been a significant part of Dorothy’s life. After her second visit to the Garden, a budding interest and encouragement from her husband led her to fill out a volunteer application and join the Red Butte Garden team. She led garden tours for a year and worked in the Garden, but eventually decided to move inside and found her niche working with the greenhouse crew. At first, her job was simple - she took a small hose and watered each plant in the greenhouse for three hours a week. When the new greenhouse was built in 2003, complete with a watering system, she had the opportunity to focus on her true garden passion—planting seeds and maintaining the plants until they are ready to be transplanted to our 18-acres of manicured gardens, the Orangerie, or sold at the annual plant sale. “I’m here for the plants,” she says. “Every week, the first thing I do is check on the progress of my plants from the previous week.” She enjoys seeing the fruits of her labor and takes the knowledge she acquires in the greenhouse and applies it to her beautiful home garden. Gaining plant-growing skills and knowledge are not the only things that keep Dorothy coming back to Red Butte Garden, it’s the people, too. “Everybody 10

Red Butte Garden

at the Garden has passion; they’re cheerful, and if they’re not, we make them happy.” Dorothy definitely plays her part here. Briana Blamires, one of Dorothy’s supervisors in the greenhouse, said, “She is always so full of energy; she livens up the greenhouse with her smiles and playfulness, especially when it comes to keeping Scott in line.” Scott Mower, another greenhouse supervisor says, “She makes us all laugh.” Scott is also incredibly impressed by her dedication. Dorothy should be pleased with the impact she has on the Red Butte Garden community, because for her, giving back to the community is what matters most. “There is good in everybody; everybody knows something. If we all gave back a bit of our talents to the community, we’d be in a really good place. This is what I have to give, so I do.” But Dorothy makes an important distinction here for future volunteers—volunteering at Red Butte Garden isn’t always about starting with the skills involved; it’s about having a passion. “You’ve got to love the soil,” she says, ”We can teach you how to plant it, but we can’t teach you to love it. As long as the passion is there, you can learn the rest.” If you’re interested in sharing or cultivating your passion with the Garden, please call Meghan Eames at 801.585.5688 or email at volunteers@redbuttegarden.org to find out how to get involved.


Annual Calendar: Looking Forward to 2013

May ember

Plant Highlight: Daylily, Rose ............. ZAP Free Day July 24 Camp-outs & Monday Family Nights ............. Art Exhibit: Suzanne Barton Oil Painting Jul 19 - Aug 11

July

Oct- NovPlant Highlight: Ornamental Grass, Toad Lily, Fall Foliage ............. Garden After Dark (10/17-19, 24-26) ............. Art Exhibit: TBA

ober

Plant Highlight: Oak Collection ............. Orchid Show ............. Art Exhibit: Glass Art Guild of Utah Nov 8 - Dec 15 ............. Closed Thanksgiving Day

ember

AugPlant Highlight: Butterfly Bush, Lavender, Rudbeckia ............. Camp-outs & Monday Family Nights ............. Art Exhibit: TBA

ust

Dec-

Plant Highlight: Aster, Autumn Crocus, Fall Anenome ............. ZAP Free Day Sept 9 Bonsai Show Fall Bulb & Native Plant Sale

Plant Highlight: Rose, Serviceberry, Iris,Viburnum ............. Monday Family Nights ............. Art Exhibit: Jeanne Hansen Combined Media Jun 21 - Jul 14

Plant Highlight: 350,000+ Spring Bulbs & Blooms ............. Orchid Show Spring Bulb Show Arbor Day (4/26) is a ZAP Free Day ............. Art Exhibit: Jennifer Worsley Pastel April 26 - May 19

Plant Highlight: Conifer Collection ............. Wreath Making Workshop Winter Solstice Celebration ............. Art Exhibit: Holiday Open House (12/6-7) ZAP Free Days ............. Closed Dec 24 - Jan 1

ember

Sept-

February

March

June

Plant Highlight: Wisteria, Crabapple, Peony, Lilac ............. Camp Registration Annual Plant Sale May 3-4 Bonsai Show ............. Art Exhibit: Yevgeniy Zolotsev Watercolor May 24 - June 16

Plant Highlight: Lenten Rose, Witchhazel, Winter Jasmine ............. Tours: Greenhouse (2/7),Visitor Center & Orangerie (2/21), Winter Tree (2/23)

Plant Highlight: Magnolia, Snowdrop, Crocus, Squill ............. Art Exhibit: Mary Lou Romney Mar 1 - April 24 Art Exhibit: Duke Johnson Photography Mar 29 - April 21

April

January

Plant Highlight: Paperbark Maple, Lacebark Pine ............. Come up to walk & look for birds ............. Art Exhibit: Chase McCleary Jan 4 – Feb 24

The Gift Shop at

Red Butte Garden

Garden inspired gifts

Visit the Gift Shop at Red Butte Garden to find the right gift for the gardener in your life. Located in the Red Butte Garden Visitor Center. Garden members receive 10% off. www.redbuttegarden.org

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Water Conservation Garden drawing

Three months left to be a part of something Red Butte Garden needs to raise $6,000,000 in order to build its long-anticipated, three-acre Water Conservation Garden. Thanks to $5,000,000 in challenge grants from the Alternative Visions Fund and Dumke Family, we are less than $1,000,000 away from that goal! In order for us to receive the $5,000,000 in challenge grants, we must raise that final $1,000,000 by February 1, 2013. You can make a difference by helping us reach that goal. Just think, every dollar you donate will bring six dollars to this project! The Water Conservation Garden may be the most important project Red Butte Garden has ever undertaken. Sixty percent of Salt Lake residential water is now used outside the walls of the home. With the right techniques and plant selections, we can cut that use in half. This gorgeous new three-acre garden will demonstrate that you can have both a beautiful and a water-saving landscape. As the drought this summer once again reminded us, water is a precious and limited resource. In the future people and businesses will locate where they can access adequate water. Water conservation is a necessary investment in the economic and environmental future of our children, grandchildren, and community at large. Unless we in Utah change the ways we currently landscape, Utah’s population growth will increase residential water demand, resulting in unsustainable stress to the environment and its critical ecosystems, diverting water from agricultural and commercial uses that foster economic growth. Please join us in making the Water Conservation Garden a reality. You can donate online at www.redbuttegarden.org/WCG or you can mail your contribution to: Water Conservation Garden Challenge Red Butte Garden 300 Wakara Way Salt Lake City, UT, 84108 To qualify for the 5 to 1 match, gifts and pledges must be received by January 31, 2013. Thank you!

As Westerners, we are facing a future which will demand that we change how we use and value water. The Water Conservation Garden at Red Butte Garden will help us embrace that future by demonstrating that we can continue to enjoy the beauty of our gardens while using less water. -James Redford, Writer, Producer, Director

The University of Utah embraces sustainable growth as a critical part of its mission in the 21st century. The addition of a new Water Conservation Garden demonstrates the commitment of the University and Red Butte Garden to the practices of sustainable landscaping for our growing campus and in our rapidly expanding communities.

By Red Butte Garden Development Department

R

big!

-David Pershing, President of the University of Utah


Conservation Spotlight:

Rare Plant Revegetation Project

Christ’s Indian Paintbrush

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By Rita Reisor, Director of Conservation, and Wendy Yates

The Red Butte Garden Conservation Department has been involved in a large-scale habitat restoration project to benefit the rare and sensitive Christ’s Indian Paintbrush and Greater Sage-Grouse on Mount Harrison in the Albion Range of southern Idaho. The striking yellow-orange flower of Christ’s Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja christii) is unique among paintbrushes, which are more commonly red. In midsummer, these sub-alpine plants blanket the top of Mount Harrison with color. It is the only “sky island” within the entire Sawtooth National Forest where Christ’s Indian Paintbrush can be found. The purpose of a rare plant revegetation project is to re-establish native plants to an area that lost its natural vegetation due to a disturbance, either natural or man-made. When a disturbed area is left un-restored, weedy species can easily occupy the area, leaving few resources for native vegetation. As native habitats become severely degraded by weedy species, wildlife that depend on natives, such as Greater Sage-Grouse, suffer as well. While habitat restoration and revegetation concepts are not new to plant conservation or to Red Butte Garden, this is only the second time the Garden has been involved in a program of this scale. In addition to Christ’s Indian Paintbrush, Mount Harrison is home to an abundance of snow-bed community native forbs and grasses. One of the greatest threats to this snow-bed plant community has been invasion by smooth brome (Bromus inermis), an aggressive, non-native, weedy grass. Over a five-year time period, the U.S. Forest Service removed 90% of this invasive grass. After its removal, revegetation of natural grasses and forbs was needed to prevent reinvasion by the smooth brome.

The revegetation process began with seed collection of Christ’s Indian Paintbrush and four additional native species beneficial to Sage-Grouse and Indian Paintbrush habitat. Propagation of all five species was conducted at Red Butte Garden. In the fall of 2009, a team of over 30 volunteers went to Mount Harrison and planted this young mix of native species. In midSeptember 2012, volunteers planted an additional 1,600 plants, and on September 29, National Public Lands Day, 300 more plants grown from seed at the Garden were planted by local community members. So far, this revegetation of the mountaintop appears to be successful, but continued monitoring is needed to assess the long-term results.

The key to success of this project has been Red Butte Garden’s staff expertise in collecting and propagating native plants, many hours of labor by our dedicated volunteers, and the cooperation of our collaborating partners at the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

www.redbuttegarden.org

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ART EXHIBITS

GLASS ART SHOW November 2 - December 16

MARY LOU ROMNEY ART EXHIBIT March 1 - 24

CHASE McCLEARY ART EXHIBIT January 4 - February 24

DUKE JOHNSON PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT March 29 - APRIL 21

Garden Fresh

Recipe

Butternut Squash & Pear Soup with Dolcelatte Cheese

The Blended Table / Martine Restaurant, Chef Tom Grant

Ingredients:

1 diced butternut squash 1 diced sweet onion ½ t cinnamon ½ t nutmeg 2 t brown sugar 2 c white wine Salt ½ t white pepper 1 c fresh orange juice ½ t turmeric 3 ripe pears 2 c apple juice 2 c vegetable stock 1 c half & half 1 lb dolcelatte cheese (Gorgonzola)

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Red Butte Garden

Directions: In a covered baking dish add squash, onion, spices, brown sugar, & white wine. Braise until very soft (about 1 ½ hrs). When all vegetables are soft add to a food processor with the pears and puree. Put pulp into a medium pot, add remaining ingredients and bring up to a simmer for 15 minutes. Blend dolcelatte into soup slowly with a burr mixer or blender. Adjust seasonings to your taste. If it is too thick, add vegetable stock for the right consistency.


TOP

GIFT

10

MEMBERSH IPS

Reasons to give a Red Butte Garden Gift Membership 10. Because you’re helping support education programs, conservation projects around the state, and maintenance of a world-class botanical garden. 9. It’s the gift that keeps on ... saving your loved ones money on concert tickets, plant sales, classes & more! 8. This gift is guaranteed to last a whole year (unlike the iPod you bought them last year that was thrown in the washing machine). 7. Romantic picnics. Get credit for their happy marriage! 6. Re-gifted reindeer socks get old pretty quick, but the Garden looks fresh and different every day. 5. We have squirrels, birds, and bugs. And a garden gnome named Chauncey! 4. First-hand experiences with nature. 3. No assembly or batteries required. 2. Gift-wrapping a tree has never been easy. Trust us, we’ve tried. 1. Because friends don’t let friends spend all their time indoors.

Get your holiday shopping done early–go online to www.redbuttegarden.org, call 801.585.7172, or stop by the Visitor Center to purchase a Gift Membership (or two) today!

Japanese Maple

· $35 Individual: one adult · $45 Duo: two adults · $65 Circle of Friends: one adult + 3 guests · $65 Family: two adults + 6 kids · $120 Contributor: two adults + 6 guests · $250 Forget-Me-Not: two adults + 8 guests · $500 Blazing Star: two adults + 8 guests · $1000 Avant Gardeners: two adults + 10 guests · $2500 Director’s Club: two adults + 10 guests

Membership Options*

* Prices valid through December 31, 2012. Subject to change thereafter.

www.redbuttegarden.org

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Get set for Summer! To find out about concert club and sponsorship packages for the 2013 Red Butte Garden Outdoor Concert Series. Visit www.redbuttegarden.org/sponsors or call 801.585.3813 to reserve your package today!

2012 Advisory Board:

Garden Information

Carter Livingston, Chair David Gee, Vice Chair

Hours:

Admission:**

Olivia Agraz Cathy Foote Angstman Pete Ashdown Jane Barker Rebecca Duberow Fred Esplin Gayle Everest Kelly Fisher Kathie Horman Gregory Lee Vickie Long Nancy Martin Michele Mattsson Rob McFarland Judy Moreton Michael Perez Tom Ramsey Robert Rose Chris Satovick Ann Scott Sonnie Swindle Joyce P. Valdez Henry Wurts

October 1 - December 23* Daily 9:00AM - 5:00PM

Adults (18-64) $8 Children (3-17) $6 Children under 3 Free Seniors (65+) & Military $6 University of Utah Faculty & Staff with ID $6 University of Utah Students with ID Free

Emeritus members E.R. Dumke, Jr Cleone Eccles Warren McOmber

January 2 - February 29 Daily 9:00AM - 5:00PM * Closed Thanksgiving Day and December 24 through January 1 ** Admission prices valid through December 31, 2012. Subject to change thereafter.

Location:

Groups of 12 or more receive $1 off regular admission price for each person. Full group payment is due at time of Garden entry.

Visitor Center, Gift Shop, & Mailing Address: 300 Wakara Way - Salt Lake City, UT 84108 Phone: 801.585.0556 Fax: 801.587.5887 Web site: www.redbuttegarden.org Comments: 801.581.4938 or e-mail bryn.ramjoue@redbutte.utah.edu

Product group from well-managed forests and other controlled sources

www.fsc.org Cert no. SCS-COC-001216 1996 Forest Stewardship Council


Children’s Garden

Just for Kids FEB JAN

Garden Adventures

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Snowflake Clings 10-11:30am

9

Animal Families

10-11:30am

When there’s a nip in the air, snowflakes are sure to follow! Join us at the Garden to learn about these winter wonders and then create your own snowflake window clings.You’ll love being able to bring the beauty of a snowflake into your home without inviting in the winter weather. Valentine’s Day is right around the corner, and we’re excited to share stories of the many loving animal families that live right here in the Garden. Test your knowledge of how animal families show love and kindness for one another, and then create a holiday keepsake to share with your own loved ones.

Garden Adventures are kids’ classes held semi-monthly on Saturdays. Classes start promptly at 10AM in Em’s Sprout House and registration is required. Ages 4-12 are welcome with a caregiver. Limit one caregiver per participant (registration not required for caregiver). No infants please. MEMBERS: $5 PUBLIC: $7 PLEASE REGISTER ON OUR WEBSITE WWW.REDBUTTEGARDEN.ORG OR BY CALLING 801.581.8454.

Winter Solstice Celebration December 22, Saturday 10AM - 1PM

Join us in the Children’s Garden to celebrate the return of the light! As you wander through the Garden, warm your hands at our fire barrels, enjoy a hot drink, and make a wish at our Yule log. Participants can also create wonderful winter candles and their very own solstice head wreath. Free with garden admission

www.redbuttegarden.org

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Winter 2012-2013

Events at Red Butte Garden Want more information?

Classes & Workshops, page 6 Activities that are Free for Garden Members, page 7 General Garden information (hours), page 16 Kids Activities, page 17

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M

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W

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Have your holiday event or reception at Red Butte Garden

DECEMBER 2 HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE FREE ADMISSION WREATH WORKSHOPS 9-NOON & 1-4 pm

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winter solstice celebration 10 am - 1 pm

END glass art show nov 2 - dec 16

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garden 24

closed to public dec 24 - jan 1

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Red Butte Garden

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JANUARY

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See us at The CHASE McCLEARY Original Bridal ART EXHIBIT Showcase BEGINS JAN 4-5

New Years day

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Garden Adventure Snowflake clings 10 am

See us at the KUED Super Reader Party

Martin Luther King JR. Day

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Full moon

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Come up for snowshoeing or a walk in the wintry Garden

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groundhog Day

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greenhouse tour noon - 1:30pm

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BOTANY FOR 21 GARDeNERS (1/3) 22

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valentines Day

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6:30-8:30pm

presidents Day

24 end CHASE McCLEARY ART EXHIBIt

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26 fabulous fruit trees (1/3) 6:30-8:30pm

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Winter Tree tour 10am - noon

Visitor center & orangerie tour noon - 1:30pm

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BOTANY FOR GARDeNERS (2/3) 6:30-8:30pm

March 1 Mary Lou Romney art exhibit begins

www.redbuttegarden.org

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Non Profit org. US Postage PAID Salt Lake City Permit #1529

300 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108

Spellbound The night is darkening round me, The wild winds coldly blow; But a tyrant spell has bound me And I cannot, cannot go. The giant trees are bending Their bare boughs weighed with snow. And the storm is fast descending, And yet I cannot go. Clouds beyond clouds above me, Wastes beyond wastes below; But nothing dear can move me; I will not, cannot go. -Emily BrontĂŤ

Red Butte Creek


Red Butte Garden Winter 2012 Newsletter