Page 1

UK EDITION JUNE 2018, £3.50

BEYOND THE ORDINARY

POWER TRIP

WELLEN, HOCH WIE HÄUSER

ONE MAN’S MISSION TO CONQUER THE BIGGEST WAVE IN THE WORLD

UND EIN DEUTSCHER REITET SIE: SEBASTIAN STEUDTNER

NOEL GALLAGHER SO BESIEGST DU

“ROCKSMARTPHONE-SUCHT KILLED ROCK ’N’ ROLL” DEINE

HEATHER SO BESIEGST DUKNIGHT DEN BESTEN ENGLAND CRICKET’SDER LEADING FUSSBALLER WELT LIGHT

LAWNMOWER RACING SO SIEGST DU IN

24 100 HOURS OF MUD AND MAYHEM BREAK-DANCE-BATTLES


EDITOR’S LETTER

Passion is something everyone wants in their life, but the focus of this intense emotion can vary wildly – as we discover in this month’s issue. For big-wave surfer Sebastian Steudtner Steudtner, there’s nothing that gets his pulse racing like a giant wall of water. It’s why the 33-year-old German ventured to Nazaré on the Portuguese coast, determined to tame the world’s biggest waves. For an account of his incredible adventure, see our feature (page 34).

“It’s a fine line between a perfect attempt and a wipeout,” says Viennabased lensman Konstantin Reyer of shooting at Portugal’s iconic bigwave spot Nazaré with surfer Sebastian Steudtner. Page 34

We go in search of the unsung heroes of the UK festival scene (page 56), who make our summers truly memorable with their unusual fervour for everything from gong baths to marriage ceremonies in an inflatable church. And further afield, in rural France, we spend 24 hours in the company of motorsport enthusiasts with an unconventional desire: to race lawnmowers (page 76).

CONTRIBUTORS THIS ISSUE

TAZ DARLING

Whether she’s shooting stories or making books, the UK photographer and publisher is as happy standing in a muddy field as she is at the printing press. Which is lucky: conditions in France, where she shot a 24-hour lawnmower race for this issue, were testing. “I thought staying awake would be the hardest thing, but it was staying upright in the mud,” she says. “But what beats making mud angels at dawn after 16 hours of racing?” Page 76

RICHIE HOPSON

The London-based photographer’s keen eye for creating images that are stylish but true to life has led him to shoot everyone from freerunners in Kuwait to BMX riders in Tokyo. But he stayed relatively local to shoot England women’s cricket captain Heather Knight at Lord’s – an experience he says is right up there with the best of them. “It was an absolute pleasure,” Hopson says. “Heather was a total professional.” Page 70

We hope you enjoy the issue.

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THE RED BULLETIN

KONSTANTIN REYER (COVER)

LABOURS OF LOVE


Passionate about pure mechanics & extreme style Tommy G. rides with a shockproofed Formex on his wrist

www.formexwatch.com


CONTENTS June

FEATURES 34

Nazaré

50

Noel Gallagher

56

Festival heroes

70

Heather Knight

74

Calum Hudson

76

Lawnmower racing

86

Craig Mitchell

88

Woody Harrelson

Big waves don’t come any bigger – or more seductive to surfers Fame, fans and freedom: the former Oasis man mouths off Meet the unsung individuals who make summer unforgettable Leading the England women’s cricket team to world domination The wild swimmer braving the world’s most perilous waters Le Mans it isn’t. But this grassroots motorsport is gaining ground The judge helping LA’s marginalised residents through running Valuable life lessons from the Solo and Three Billboards actor

94 Rammellzee

Inside the mind-bending universe of the hip-hop art maverick

88

56 FIELD OF DREAMS

Staging a festival for thousands of revellers isn’t easy. The Red Bulletin talks to some of those who make the magic happen

WOODY’S GUIDE TO LIFE

Sometimes it’s OK to play the fool, says Oscar nominee Woody Harrelson

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THE RED BULLETIN


BULLEVARD Life and Style Beyond the Ordinary

11 Drop star: Australian cliff

diver Rhiannan Iffland

14 The phone that loves the wild 16 Wasabi gets real 18 Actor Rosamund Pike talks

radioactivity and rebellion

20 Go diving with manta rays 22 Old camera tech, new tricks 24 Winning formula: the watch

that’s ahead of the field

26 B-boy RoxRite’s road to glory 28 Capsized in the sea? Try this 30 Indie songwriter Courtney

Barnett shares her playlist 32 Become a cave dweller

GUIDE

Get it. Do it. See it 106 Control freaks: inside

Red Bull Gaming Sphere

110 Get fit like champion cable

wakeboarder Dominik Gührs

112 Highlights on Red Bull TV 114 The Ducati Scrambler redux 116 Dates for your calendar 120 The Red Bulletin worldwide

SCOTT SALT, AUSTIN HARGRAVE/AUGUST, KONSTANTIN REYER

122 Ride and shine in Pamplona

34 BREAKING THE WAVE

Sebastian Steudtner lives to surf. But not just any wave – only the monster lurking in Nazaré will do

THE RED BULLETIN

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BULLEVARD LIFE

&

STYLE

BEYOND

THE

ORDINARY

Iffland takes the plunge in Lago Ranco, Chile, at the 2017 Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series

FALLING WITH STYLE DEAN TREML/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

RHIANNAN IFFLAND is scaling new heights. And when the cliffdiving champ gets to the top she’s leaping straight off

THE RED BULLETIN

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“I USE FEAR AND EMOTION AS ENERGY ON THE PLATFORM”

Rhiannan Iffland: “I’m a bit of an adrenalin junkie, I’m not going to lie”

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t the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series a few years ago, a watermelon was dropped from the 28mhigh diving platform. Seconds later, it hit the water at 85kph, exploding into a red mush. The divers would meet a similar fate if they didn’t enter the water precisely, feet first. “The feet are not the worst thing; it’s the knees and groin I have to focus on squeezing together,” says Rhiannan Iffland. “Also, the conditions: whether it’s wavy or flat. If the water’s warm, it’s a bit softer; if it’s cold, it will really hurt.” Iffland knows a thing or two about falling from a great height. Having trampolined competitively as a child, she dived at a national level for Australia. “Putting those skills together for high diving made it an easy transition,” says the 26-year-old from Newcastle, New South Wales. It was while show diving on cruise ships and at water parks that Iffland found her true calling. She entered the opening round of the 2016 Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series at Hell’s Gate in Texas as a wildcard… and won, finishing 10 points ahead of her nearest rival. By the end of the series, she was world champion. A year later, she took the title again.

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Despite her success, Iffland will still feel trepidation on her return to Hell’s Gate on June 2 for this year’s opener: “I’m scared every time I walk to the end of the platform. But fear can keep you safe. I channel it into my performance. “It can all go perfectly, you can hit vertically and still feel it,” she says of impacting the water at three times the force of gravity. “I’ve chipped my tooth from landing short. You’d be surprised how many people bite their tongue.” For Iffland, though, the post-landing moment is what it’s all about: “That feeling when you pop up after hitting the water and you’ve overcome your fears.” It’s an experience divers have enjoyed for at least 250 years. In 1770, western explorers witnessed the king of Maui leaping off cliffs in a tradition called lele kawa – “to jump feet first into the water from a great height without making a splash”. The Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series debuted just nine years ago, followed in 2014 by the Women’s Series. Popularity in the latter is rapidly growing. “We’re seeing a lot of younger girls take to the stage,” says Iffland, herself the youngest female Red Bull Cliff Diving winner on record. “And the women who’ve been here since the start are increasing the difficulty with more twists and somersaults.” Iffland is also ready to push her limits. “I want to challenge myself at 25 metres,” she says. (The height of the men’s dive is 28m, but the women’s is only 22m.) “At that height, you can feel the difference of each metre on impact. So, 25 metres… then I’ll tell you whether I want to go any higher after that.” Instagram: @rhiannan_iffland THE RED BULLETIN


PREDRAG VUCKOVIC/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, STEPHEN BACCON/RED BULL CONTENT POOL KATIE CAMPBELL SPYRKA

BULLEVARD

Iffland leaps in São Miguel, Azores, during the third stage of her wildcard entry to the 2016 World Series. She won the round

THE RED BULLETIN

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BULLEVARD

Explore

WHEN NATURE CALLS

A smartphone you won’t have to worry about in the wild. This one takes care of you

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Explore’s design is inspired by the Land Rover Discovery’s front grille and dashboard dials

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Also available: a case with a universal bike mount that attaches to either the stem or the handlebars THE RED BULLETIN

NICK MUZIK PHOTOGRAPHY

TOM GUISE

hey say that staring at our phones prevents us from enjoying the world around us. The Land Rover Explore begs to differ. As you’d expect from the maker of some of the most rugged off-road vehicles, this device is made for adventuring. For a start, it’s not easy to smash – the factory-fitted screen protector is capable of withstanding a 1.8m drop. It’s impervious to dust and submersion in salt water; can endure humidity, temperature extremes and thermal shock, and you can still operate the screen with wet fingers. Clipping on the included case – the Adventure Pack – doubles its battery life and, thanks to an extra aerial, its GPS signal. It also gives access to AR topographic mapping, so if you must stare at the screen all day, you’ll still see the world in a whole new way. landroverexplore.com


ULTRA-LIGHT, WICKING STRETCH FABRIC BEST WET & DRY GRIP

4 WAY STRETCH FABRIC

DBX BIKE GEAR LEATT.COM Distributed in the UK by

Leatt’s pursuit of rider safety starts at layer one. With gear that’s tougher, more durable, featuring stitched-in tech that takes all the knocks and bounces back every time. New level ventilation. Improved absorption. Leatt gear is First Line Protection that redefines the aesthetics of the Thrill. leatt.com/bicycle2018/ www.hotlines-uk.com

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Email: sales@hotlines-uk.com

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Tel: 0131 319 1444


BULLEVARD The rhizome is ground into a paste at the table. The Japanese do this by rubbing it on shark skin

C

YOU’RE EATING SUSHI WRONG

First, you need some wasabi. No, not that green paste – the real deal. Turns out you’ve most likely never eaten it 16

Jon Old began growing wasabi outside Japan eight years ago: “Getting it wasn’t easy”

THE RED BULLETIN

TOM GUISE

Real wasabi

There’s a reason why this is essential: “The chemical reaction lasts just 20 minutes. You have to break down the cell walls so the enzyme makes contact with the glucose, which produces the heat. Your eyes sting, which peaks after five minutes, then you’ve got maximum flavour. After 30 minutes, it’s over – it’ll taste sweet, but with no heat left.” Before you flip out at the Japanese for perpetrating a global fraud, take note that most of them also don’t eat it. “The majority of households, even most restaurants, don’t buy fresh wasabi,” says Old. It’s too expensive – “Our retail price is more than £200 a kilo” – and that’s because it’s hard to grow. “We use a double-shade net, because it doesn’t like a lot of sunlight. Lose a crop six months in and it’s 18 months before you can harvest again.” But is it worth the effort? “Some of the fake pastes use mustard and horseradish to mimic the taste, but you don’t get the floral essence, fresh flavour and pungent aroma. Fresh wasabi is more complex, and the natural sweetness makes you crave another hit.” That’ll be a yes, then. thewasabicompany.co.uk

ALAMY, J CHERRY

heck the side of a tube of wasabi paste and you’ll find a handful of ingredients listed: water, salt, horseradish, xanthan gum, colouring… but no wasabi. You’ve been eating a lie. So, what is real wasabi? You’re looking at it. “It’s a perennial brassica, like broccoli,” says Jon Old of UKbased The Wasabi Company, the only farm outside Japan that grows it in flowing spring water. “Imagine a palm tree and how the leaves drop off, leaving the trunk behind. That’s how wasabi grows, and the crown forms the rhizome [stem].” That’s where the flavour comes from. “You grind the wasabi at the table,” says Old. “If you don’t see this done, it’s not real wasabi.”


A gifted cellist, Pike has music in her DNA – her father sings opera and her mother is a violinist

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THE RED BULLETIN


BULLEVARD

the only good thing about working on Doom: I went to medical school in Prague and learnt about human dissection. I thought, “If I’m going to be chopping up monsters, I want to be good with a scalpel.” That’s what I’m proud of with that movie – I look like I know how to dissect something.

F

the red bulletin: What has your latest role taught you? rosamund pike: With a film like Entebbe, it’s important to get comfortable with your props. It’s not about how you pick up a rifle, but how you carry it for 12 hours a day. So I talked to soldiers. That was

BOO GEORGE/TRUNK ARCHIVE

RÜDIGER STURM

or her role in 2014’s Gone Girl, Rosamund Pike was nominated for an Academy Award, a Golden Globe and a BAFTA. The film opened up a world of opportunities for the English actress, who plays Nobel laureate Marie Curie in the forthcoming biopic Radioactive and this month appears as West German militant Brigitte Kuhlmann in crime thriller Entebbe. But the 39-year-old is not without regrets. “I’ve made mistakes,” Pike admits. “I made a film based on the video game Doom. I thought it funny that I was in Pride & Prejudice in a bonnet, and at the same time someone wanted me to do a movie with The Rock, killing monsters. It was terrible and I should never have done it. I’ve survived things I probably shouldn’t have.”

THE RED BULLETIN

And for Entebbe you studied German history, too… There’s always a chance to learn. Your character can’t exist in a vacuum – it informs, even if there’s no mention of it in the script. I watched lots of documentaries from the time. Any time [Red Army Faction co-founder] Ulrike Meinhof appeared on TV, she exuded this sense of righteousness. You really feel it when you see [the group] talk in interviews. Ever felt the need to rebel? Not particularly, because my parents were similar to me. Both were singers struggling for the art they believed in. We have to work at it when you’re an entertainer, and the movie-star thing doesn’t sit comfortably with me. But I embrace fans. Having a fanbase is the best thing, because your films get seen, and hopefully it’s a relationship you’ll have throughout a lifetime. What has your own life taught you so far? I used to struggle with adversity, but now I know it’s useful to have felt these things. I was going to get married in… I can’t even remember now. But the man I was meant to marry cancelled the wedding, which was devastating at the time. There is a colossal change in my work that comes from that experience – to have loved and lost and felt a profound emotion, and to be able to tap into that for work. I lost my grandmother and was at her bedside for four days. Then I had my children,

Rosamund Pike

“THERE’S ALWAYS A CHANCE TO LEARN”

ROSAMUND PIKE is at the top of her game, but, says the Entebbe star, there’s plenty of room for improvement

so in one year I experienced birth and death in a real, visceral way. It’s a privilege to be with someone when they die; awful, but an honour. It changed my understanding of the in-between bits. And the learning doesn’t stop – next, you play scientist Marie Curie… I wanted to capture her true brilliance, as well as all the complexities of her character, especially in the context of the times she lived in. She was unbelievably modern and clever. I’ve been learning chemistry – I got a teacher to come to my house to get me thinking in that way. I’m going back to school, which is great.

Entebbe is in cinemas from May 11; entebbefilm.co.uk

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BULLEVARD Hawaii

Kailua-Kona Manta Ray Dives of Hawaii runs a manta ray night dive and snorkel excursion every evening for US$120 [£85] per diver, which includes one tank. Gear rental extra. Divers must be open-water certified.

LIZBETH SCORDO

Adventure

SARAH LEE

TWILIGHT ZONE

Take a plunge into another dimension for a close encounter of an altogether different kind 20

THE RED BULLETIN


S

eth Conae has never had an actual extraterrestrial encounter, but he ends most nights feeling like he has. Every evening, his business – Manta Ray Dives of Hawaii – zips groups by boat along the Big Island’s rocky Kona Coast, and moors in Makako Bay. Then, at dusk, divers plunge into the dark Pacific to commune with massive manta rays. “It’s like watching an alien ballet: graceful, surreal, peaceful,” says owner/operator and lead diving instructor Conae. “You’re just in awe.” What brings these close relatives of sharks to virtually the same spot night after night, year after year, is the rays’ own version of dinner by candlelight. Crew members place crates of underwater dive lights on the ocean floor 11m below, allowing divers to sit around ‘the campfire’. The divers shine their lights up towards the surface, while the snorkellers above direct theirs downwards. This light zone attracts the plankton that the rays feed on, and thus the giant flat-bodied fish themselves – four a night on average. “The manta rays come to show off,” says Conae of these large-brained animals that each weigh more than half a ton and have a wingspan of up to 7m. “They’ll swoop in with open mouths and start circlefeeding and doing back flips, which we think is the most energy-efficient way to accumulate their plankton in one area, instead of having to keep passing back and forth.” Since each has a unique underbelly spot pattern, like a fingerprint, almost all the rays are recognisable and have been officially catalogued and named – like Darth Rayder, X-Ray, or the gregarious Grayer Ray, who’s happy to mingle up close with visitors. “People are just so blown away by the whole experience,” says Conae. “It’s a once-in-alifetime kind of thing.” mantaraydiveshawaii.com

THE RED BULLETIN

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BULLEVARD

SHUTTER SHOCK

Photographer Giles Clement shot BMX pro Mike ‘Hucker’ Clark at high speed, using 170-year-old camera technology. Here’s how... 22

T

he world of action photography appears to be driven by the latest tech – which makes Giles Clement an exception. To take the above shot – a Red Bull Photography project – the US snapper used a process that predates the American Civil War. Ambrotype is shot onto glass soaked in an emulsion called collodion and dipped in silver nitrate. “I only have five minutes from the collodion being poured until the shutter clicks. It’s probably why they abandoned this process in the 1890s,” he says. Insensitivity

to light (as gauged by the ISO scale) may have been a factor, too. Ambrotype is ISO1 (most modern cameras are 100 to 800) and requires a massive camera to house Clement’s 500mm lens – made in 1918 – and a 40cm x 50cm glass plate. But, as Clark launched his BMX off the ramp, Clement captured the jump as cleanly as if firing off the latest DSLR. Having produced a negative on the glass, he then washed off the silver particles not hit by light, creating the vintage action print you see here. gilesclement.com

Clement can also lay claim to the first drone photo shot onto tintype (a metal plate)

GILES CLEMENT

Ambrotype

TOM GUISE

It looks like evidence of a time-travelling BMXer from a century ago, but this glass print was shot in 2018

THE RED BULLETIN


BULLEVARD

THIS WATCH WON AN F1 GRAND PRIX On May 27, the 2018 Monaco GP takes place. Two years ago, parts of this timepiece steered one driver to victory

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t’s May 29, 2016, and as the weather clears at a rain-drenched Monaco Grand Prix, Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton employs a risky strategy. As the other drivers pull into the pits to switch to intermediate tyres, he sticks to his extreme wets until it’s dry enough to swap to slicks. It’s a ploy that works: with one fewer stop than the rest of the field, Hamilton gains track position over pole-starter Daniel Ricciardo and wins the GP. And he was wearing this watch, right? Kind of.

THE RED BULLETIN

ROGER DUBUIS

Spider Pirelli

With only eight made, the 2017 Excalibur Spider Pirelli Double Flying Tourbillon is too precious to wear for racing, but Hamilton was carrying a piece of it... on his wheels. The strap is made from the rubber inlays of his winning Pirelli tyres. Which ones? Who knows? But the blue motifs match the sidewall colour of Pirelli’s Cinturato wets. For 2018, Roger Dubuis has released new Excalibur Spider Pirelli watches, this time using winning tyres from the 2017 championship. The identity of the driver and race are a secret, but each strap sports a an ID code specific to the tyres – a certificate of authenticity, and a clue for those who know what they’re looking at. rogerdubuis.com

TOM GUISE

F1 tyres cost around £1,300 a set. With just a fraction of one tyre, this watch retails for more than £200,000


Turning 30 has clearly not dimmed Atherton’s lust for life. A five-time UCI Downhill World Champion, five times the overall winner of the UCI Downhill World Cup, and a recent winner of BT Sport’s Action Woman award, the youngest Atherton is the family’s biggest star. Bigger and stronger, the elite men of downhill mountain biking will always be faster than their female counterparts, but, like the men, the elite women are already training to ride at the limit of their ability, and would leave a male rider from outside of the World Cup circuit for dead. “It’s always strange when people say, ‘You inspired me to start riding’. But I’m inspired by other sports people, so I guess there is some truth in it. But there’s still a lot to do; still a long way to go on the women’s side.” “Because it’s an extreme sport, perhaps people think it’s more about the skill, or how gnarly you are, or how crazy. But that’s why downhill is great: it’s about the whole package. Like a dance or a meditation. Your body is so aware of everything. You’re aware of your breathing and every bit of your skin. You’re even aware when you blink on the track, and you don’t want to be blinking in the middle of a rock garden. You’re so aware of the crowd. Sometimes, you can smell beer, or hear the music.” “I always think that the losing feels worse than the winning feels good. Winning feels really good, it’s what everyone aims towards, but losing definitely feels worse. When you don’t win, that feels ten times worse, and it doesn’t ever leave you. Losing is hard to explain, but that’s what makes you keep going.” Rachel rides in Endura. #AllTribesAllWoman

RENEGADE PROGRESS

stories.endurasport.com/rachel-atherton

endurasport.com


BULLEVARD

A MENTOR 1 GET

“I didn’t know that breaking existed outside of Sonoma County! The year I started out, I imitated what I saw others doing. I learnt balance, tried head-spinning, and I was able to do that pretty fast. I copied what I saw in movies like Beat Street and Breakin’ [both 1984], and read books at the library. Everybody says, ‘Don’t bite,’ but I was just trying to pick up whatever I could.”

Victory at b-boy event Circle Industry 2018 in Salzburg, Austria, in March earned RoxRite his record-breaking century of wins

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THE RED BULLETIN

MARKUS BERGER/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

NORA 0’DONNELL

“At a friend’s birthday in 1995, I battled one of the best b-boys in my area – and he beat me. Then I battled him again at school, in front of Ground Level [veteran b-boy Mike Cisneros], who recruited me for his crew. Breaking wasn’t super crazy like it is now; it was back spins, flares, head spins, halos… the foundation of power moves. Ground Level taught me to use them as steps, not moves.”

THEN CREATE 2 COPY,


RoxRite

SIX STEPS TO B-BOY SUPERSTARDOM In March, RoxRite became the first breakdancer to hit 100 career battle wins. Here’s how he got there…

A STYLE 3 DEVELOP

“I got recognised at a young age by the pioneers, because I reminded them of breaking in the past. I’m a traditionalist, but I evolve the foundation, the original moves. I don’t take a step and repeat it, I change it up. That’s what moulded my style and helped me stand out: delivery of the foundation mixed with styles coming out of the West Coast. Not many guys were doing it back then.”

THE RED BULLETIN

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ike all superheroes, RoxRite has an alter ego – Omar Delgado Macias, a Mexicanborn American who, 24 years ago, began breaking in Sonoma County, California. “I was 12,” he says. “Back then, it was rare you’d find anything with breaking in it. I didn’t hear the term ‘b-boy’ that whole first year.” Thanks to artists like RoxRite, it’s a different case today. “I want to be remembered for pushing the envelope of competitive breaking. Because I don’t do the flashiest moves, I’ve beaten people I wasn’t supposed to, doing my style on the world’s biggest stages. Maximise what you do best and you can win anything and beat anybody.” roxriterepresents.com

UNUSUAL LIKE SOURCES A BOXER 4 USE 5 TRAIN “I like dances with plenty of steps, like tap and popping. In breaking, you use your feet a lot, so you can find influences for your toprocks [standing footwork]. I remember watching [1978 Jackie Chan kung fu film] Drunken Master and seeing all the acrobatics, like back kick-ups and flips. It made me see things differently and inspired me to do things that stood out.”

“When I’m breaking, I spar like a boxer who goes rounds and rounds with different fighters. The idea is to not do the same stuff every round, and your 18th round has to look as good as your first, if not better. If you’re not taking care of that, it all becomes too robotic and you’re forcing everything to look the same every time you step out on the floor.”

YOUR OPPONENT 6 FINISH

“Sometimes in competition I think a lot about what I’m going to do; other days I don’t. I’m just connecting everything and letting it all flow naturally. The idea is to defeat your opponent, so I think, ‘OK, he did three good moves. I have to do at least four.’ I’ve got to shake him up and make him think twice about what he’s going to do next. It’s a battle. You have to prove yourself.”

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BULLEVARD

Portugal

Atlantic Venezuela

Team Essence – Oliver Bailey, Jason Fox, Mathew Bennett, Ross Johnson and Aldo Kane – became the first crew to row nonstop and unsupported across the Atlantic from mainland Europe to South America

How to…

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Former Royal Marines sniper Aldo Kane provides support to film and TV crews in extreme environments

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hen Aldo Kane and his four rowing mates made port in Venezuela on March 29, 2016, it was the successful end to a challenge that had begun 50 days earlier in Portugal. Team Essence had known it would be tough, but hadn’t expected to be fighting for their lives in a storm off Cape Verde. “It’s dark, but you hear this freight train of a rogue wave,” says Kane. “It comes from nowhere – you feel it suck you up its huge 10-metre face, then it smashes you, and the boat is upside down in the maelstrom. It’s dark, you can’t see, it’s bitterly cold – you’re already starting to go hypothermic…”

2 Save yourself first

“Your first instinct must always be self-preservation. You’re looking out for others with the ‘buddy system’, but first you must ensure you are not in danger. When the wave hit, the three of us on deck went overboard. We were attached by lanyards and were under the boat for 40 seconds, pulling in on them. We didn’t have our life jackets, and one of us wasn’t attached – if he’d let go, he would have died.”

3 Make decisions

“What helped us survive was making lots of decisions: close the hatches, pump out water, get on some warm kit, get a hot drink, make sure the electrics are clean, send SOS messages. Put a time barrier between you and what you’re

about to do – just a second is enough to process it with your instincts – then act. Even if your decisions turn out wrong, at least you’re still in control.”

4 Don’t dwell

“After 10 hours of dealing with the capsize, your mind replays the tapes: ‘What if Ollie had been washed out to sea?’ When reflecting, you can either freeze and let it ruin you, or use it to make decisions like, ‘All but one of our poo buckets was washed overboard. If we lose this one, having a shit will be difficult, so let’s tie it down!’”

5 Condense chores

“Use the buddy system. We still had seven weeks to go, and the daily routine was two hours’ rowing, two hours’ rest, repeat non-stop. In your break time, you’ve got to sleep, eat, and sort out the sores on your arse, legs and hands. So I’ll finish rowing with you, then I’ll sort out your food; you’ll be drying my clothes and sorting out navigation. Chores get condensed right down and, before you know it, you’ve rowed 3,308 nautical miles and set a new world record.” THE RED BULLETIN

MATT RAY

Adventurer Aldo Kane and his team set a new record for rowing the Atlantic east to west, but not before their world was turned upside down

“Decide on the three things you need to do in the next 30 seconds to stay alive. When something like that happens, you have to be very, very calm. Take a step back and let the music play. It happens in split seconds, but you’re removing yourself from the situation.”

ALDO KANE

ENDURE CAPSIZING IN THE OCEAN

1 Light a cigar


Wyn Masters by Sven Martin

15-17 JUNE

Insert witty ad waffle here banging on about suspension travel, progressive/aggressive geometry, World Cup wins, gnarly super rad athletes, and don’t forget to include trendy catchphrase terms such as long & low & slack... cheers*

*Too busy riding new bikes in the mountains to work on ads. Apologies. We take fun serisously. Do you?Show us at funisseriousbusiness.com #SRSLYFUN


BULLEVARD

Courtney Barnett

Barnett has her own label, Milk! Records, which she started in her bedroom

“I LISTEN TO JANELLE MONÁE EVERY DAY”

The Australian slacker-rocker shares her current musical obsessions

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CAMP COPE THE FACE OF GOD (2018)

ALDOUS HARDING HORIZON (2017)

JANELLE MONÁE MAKE ME FEEL (2018)

“I‘ve been listening to the new album [All Nerve] a lot, and this is my favourite track. The Breeders make music that sounds so different and a bit strange, and I love that – it never really goes where you think it will. Also, I love the way Kim Deal sings. It was a huge honour to get her to play on two songs on my new album. She’s so warm and enthusiastic, just a really thoughtful person.”

“This young Melbourne band just released their second album, How To Socialise & Make Friends, and I can’t get over how good it is. They touch on really important stuff in their lyrics, like sexual abuse, which makes their music so powerful. You can hear the emotion and vulnerability in the vocals of this. I’m a sucker for strong lyrics; something different and thoughtful I can connect with.”

“I saw this New Zealand songwriter perform at a music festival and was mesmerised. Her on-stage presence – she’d stare at people in the crowd and then off into the distance – creates this weird tension. It makes you feel a bit awkward – in a good way. I love that this song sounds simple, but there are crazy technical things going on underneath – that speaks for her outstanding songwriting skills.”

“At first, this song sounds a bit like Prince’s Kiss, which makes sense as he worked on her new album [Dirty Computer] before his death. It’s so good that I’ve been listening to it every day. She’s an amazing actor, too – I highly recommend both of her 2016 films, Moonlight and Hidden Figures. Also, check out her empowering [2018] Grammys speech [on the #MeToo movement] if you haven’t seen it. It’s so cool!”

THE RED BULLETIN

POONEH GHANA

THE BREEDERS HOWL AT THE SUMMIT (2018)

FLORIAN OBKIRCHER

arely does a debut album create as huge a splash as Courtney Barnett’s Sometimes I Sit And Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit. The 2015 release won four ARIAs – the Australian equivalent of the Grammys – made numerous best-of-the-year lists, and prompted Rolling Stone to name the indie wunderkind “one of rock’s finest young songwriters”. The follow-up, Tell Me How You Really Feel – out this month – sees Barnett, now 30, refine her craft and cement her reputation for funny and poignant wordplay. Here, she reveals what’s on her playlist right now. courtneybarnett.com.au


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the still-forming limestone cave was first opened to the public in 1967. To mark the 50th anniversary last year, local ironworker Arnaud Morgan and visual artist Cédric Lochu created a habitable space within La Grotte de la Cocalière. The 25m² pyramid of perspex and steel has a comfortable climate of 2025°C, while outside in the cave the temperature peaks at 14°C with 100 per cent humidity. For €690 (around £600), two people can enjoy a night in the structure, deprived of any natural indicators of time

or the outside world, and without the regular influx of onlookers – the only company is a colony of eyeless invertebrate crustaceans known as Niphargus. The package includes a VIP visit and breakfast. Originally intended only to remain for the duration of the anniversary celebrations, the installation has proved so popular that its stay has been extended. That’s pyramid power for you… grotte-cocaliere.com

CHRISTINE VITEL

woken by the deafening absence of sound, you lie in pitch darkness. Then you flick on a bedside lamp. Suddenly, the room is bathed in myriad magical colours reflected off stalactites, cave pearls, calcite crystals and sparkling concretions. Not for nothing is La Grotte de la Cocalière – a 50m-deep subterranean chamber at the eastern edge of Cévennes National Park in southern France – nicknamed ‘the Diamond Cave’. Created 35 million years ago during the Eocene Epoch,

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THE BIGGEST WAVES IN THE WORLD…

...break off the coast at the Portuguese fishing village of Nazaré every winter. Only a small number of BIG-WAVE SURFERS can ride them. Sebastian Steudtner is in this select group. The 33-year-old German’s whole life revolves around the rolling giants, and his experiences have taught him important lessons on motivation

Words DAVID MAYER Photography KONSTANTIN REYER

34  


30M TALL WITH A WEIGHT OF 500,000 TONNES

The record-breaking waves at Nazaré come crashing in at the coast right next to the village’s cliff-top lighthouse. This is where visitors head to get the best view of the waves


DEEP BREATHS BEFORE THE OFF

Professional surfer Sebastian Steudtner lives in Nazaré from October to February for the bigwave season. He interprets the colour of the wave before riding it. “The darker it is, the more power it’s packing,” says Steudtner

“You can’t tame the wave. All you can do is become part of it” Sebastian Steudtner, big-wave surfer

36


THE ASSISTANTS TAKE UP POSITION

Big-wave surfers are towed out to the waves by jet-skis, and for good reason: not even the fittest among them would attempt to brave the huge currents and paddle out alone


In NazarĂŠ, 300hp jet-skis take surfers out to the immense waves Here, two jet-ski operators do battle with a beast in January this year. Storm Friederike made for particularly testing conditions

  39


AND WE’RE OFF

Find the perfect line, then go hell for leather. Big-wave surfers go hurtling down the face of a wave at up to 80kph. Here, Steudtner rides Nazaré’s wall of water


Steudtner says being carried by such a huge wave feels like a mountain range is pushing him along   41


“If you come off the board, pull your legs up to your chest. All you can do then is sit and wait. The challenge is not to panic” Sebastian Steudtner

THE WAVE BREAKS

Frenchman Benjamin Sanchis is pursued by whitewash. The Nazaré wave can reach such an incredible height because the current is sped up by an underwater canyon some 4,300m deep, which ends right off the coast 42


GOT IT!

Surfer Steudtner recounts his big-wave experiences through public speaking. He says riding waves (opposite page, top: NazarĂŠ; bottom: Coxos) has taught him about responsibility


“The only thing I’ve wanted to do ever since I was a child is surf. For me, there’s a deeper meaning embedded within it” Big-Wave-Surfer Steudtner

Sebastian Steudtner

  45


“The wave is always with me” Big waves teach even bigger life lessons: world-class surfer and keynote speaker Sebastian Steudtner talks grand goals, high expectations, and wiping out on Nazaré’s wall of water Dedication

Sebastian Steudtner is sitting on the back of a jet-ski, getting splashed by 14°C water. Both he and the driver stare out to sea. In the distance, waves roll towards them like grey steel giants, but the big-wave surfer remains still. Steudtner’s lips are blue. His hands are numb with cold and his eyes are stinging from the salt. Sometimes it’s not the surfing that Steudtner sees as the real challenge; it’s this hanging around. He’s waiting for the perfect wave. Which is why he’s here in Nazaré, the Portuguese village where the world’s biggest waves break each winter. It’s why Steudtner – one of the few Europeans among the world’s big-wave elite – has moved here from Nuremberg, Germany. His aim is to ride a 25m wave and set a new world record. But the battle starts long before he meets his foe. Steudtner can sometimes find himself hanging around in the water all day before a wave comes along that meets his exacting requirements. When it finally appears, though, all it takes is a quick nod to the driver and Sebastian is up onto his surfboard and the jet-ski engine is at full power to get him out to the wave. Finally, the waiting is over. the red bulletin: How do you decide whether to ride a wave or not? sebastian steudtner: Besides the height of the wave, I’ll look at the colour, 46

for example. The darker it looks, the greater its mass, which means it’s packing more power and speed. It can therefore grow even bigger before it breaks. How do you learn to interpret a wave like that? The conditions for big-wave surfing only come together a few days a year… You gain experience over the years, obviously. But never does a day go by when the wave isn’t with me. Whenever I allow my mind to wander – if I’m driving, or I’m on the rowing machine, or I’m out running – I’ll be picturing the wave. And I don’t just see it in front of me: I can feel it beneath my feet and smell the salty air. Don’t you ever switch to imagining something else? No, never! The only thing I’ve wanted to do, ever since I was a child, is ride big waves and experience that elemental force. I find a deep meaning in it to this day. Does surfing have a deeper meaning? It does for me, at least. By which I don’t mean a moral meaning, but a personal one; nothing gives me the same satisfaction that surfing does. It’s what I get up for in the morning, and why I don’t mind undergoing weeks of endurance training at a time, for example. To be honest, I think a lot of people lack this sense of meaning.

What do you mean? I meet a lot of successful managers at my seminars and talks, but they’re not driven to go into the office. Perhaps it’s because they’d secretly rather be at home, spending more time with their families. And yet they don’t change their lifestyle because they’re successful? Exactly. They earn a lot of money, so it doesn’t even occur to them to reduce their hours or look for another job altogether. They may have to give up their wholly capitalist way of thinking and pursue what really gives them fulfilment – like more time with their family.

Responsibility

When Steudtner lets go of the rope and the jet-ski driver has turned around, there’s a moment when everything is quiet. It’s at this very moment the surfer feels the 500,000-tonne wave launch him forward. It feels like a mountain range is pushing him along. Steudtner comes

Steudtner on the beach in Nazaré: “Sometimes you look down from the crest of a wave and think, ‘Oh God!’”

barrelling down the face of the wave at 80kph. The uneven water surface slaps his feet, thighs and hips hard. But he hardly notices the blows thanks to all the adrenalin racing around his body. Surprisingly, you suffer from vertigo. Do you get a sense of height when you’re on the wave? Sometimes there really is a moment when I stare briefly into the abyss and think, “Oh God!” And what happens next? I decide on the perfect trajectory to take and then go hell for leather. As soon as I have the situation in hand, the moment of fear passes. You’ll have often spent weeks training for a single ride, plus there are usually spectators and camera crews hanging around on the coast. How do you deal with that heightened level of expectation? I only feel pressure from my own need to perform. I’m


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lucky that way. I was a bigwave surfer before anyone in Europe knew what the sport was, and I financed myself by working on building sites and as a bouncer. When you take responsibility for your goals, other people’s expectations no longer matter.

What you’ll need for big-wave surfing

1 A jet-ski

Paddling won’t get you anywhere out here. The professionals stand on their surfboard and get towed out to the waves by jet-ski. Ideally, the jet-ski should be at least 250hp. Steudtner’s model, which generates more than 300hp, is even better.

Control

When Steudtner comes crashing off his board, the wave first bounces him around like a tennis ball and then swallows him whole. He’s now engulfed by a deafening thunder. Wild currents tug and tear at him. Water gushes into all the openings on his wetsuit. Sometimes it suddenly goes quiet and he’s alone in the pitch black. This means Steudtner has been washed out at the base of the wave and now has to swim back to the surface as quickly as possible – before the next monster comes crashing down on him.

Can you describe that? When I’m freediving, I can hold my breath until I lose consciousness. So I know that even if I faint in a wave, my team can still rescue me. To stave off impending panic, it’s worth letting go a little and remembering that you can’t tame the wave. All you can do is become part of it.

Follow Sebastian on Instagram: @sebastiansurfs. For info on surfing trips to Portugal, go to: magicquiver.com 48

3 A flotation device

If a big-wave surfer comes off their board, it’s essential for them to get back up to the surface as quickly as possible. Surfers wear a wetsuit or an additional vest with a built-in flotation device to aid their return to the surface. Just pull the ripcord to inflate.

The big five breaks where you can be sure of monster waves

1. JAWS, HAWAII Winter storms can create waves more than 20m high at this legendary break off the north shore of Maui. This was where Steudtner first encountered monster waves – it was love at first sight

2. CORTES BANK, CALIFORNIA

4. NAZARÉ, PORTUGAL

3. MAVERICKS, CALIFORNIA

The mother of all European monster waves. Here, the walls of water can climb to more than 25m in height. This is made possible by an underwater canyon that descends as far as 4,300m below the surface

The home of surf culture has two hotspots to offer: Cortes Bank – 160km offshore, best reached by speedboat – and Mavericks, south of San Francisco

5. TEAHUPO’O, TAHITI This break off the southeast coast of Tahiti exists thanks to a coral reef that’s just half a metre below the surface in places. This makes for hollow waves, but also a high risk of injury

CARLOS A.FURUTI, WWW.PROGONOS.COM/FURUTI

How do you manage that? Visualisation is a help in those instances. When I’m underwater, I force myself to think of something positive – like a good friend, for example. Once I’m calm, a primal instinct takes control.

lessons

The best way to prepare for long stretches underwater is to take freediving lessons without the use of oxygen cylinders. The lessons focus on giving you a better understanding of your breathing reflex and on testing your personal limits, while increasing your lung capacity, too. Specific swimming techniques will also help conserve oxygen. The record for the longest freedive is 11 minutes, 35 seconds.

GETTY IMAGES, YAMAHA, QUIKSILVER

What happens when you wipe out? I immediately pull my legs up to my chest to protect my knees. After I’ve done that, all I can really do is wait. In that situation, it’s crucial not to panic.

2 Freediving

THE RED BULLETIN


EXPERIENCED DRIVER DEPICTED

WHAT AR E YO U BU I L D I N G F O R ?

B U I LT T H R O U G H E X P E R I E N C E … E AR N E D O N T H E T R AI L

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NOEL GALLAGHER‘s High Flying Birds hit the summer festival circuit this month, armed with material from their latest album, Who Built The Moon? Here, the former Oasis mastermind tells us how he keeps the fire burning after a quarter of a century in music, why there are no real rock stars left, and what you must never ever do at a festival Words MARCEL ANDERS 50  

LAWRENCE WATSON

“NOBODY F*CKING OWNS ME”


Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds is essentially a solo project plus touring members and guests


“ROCK STARS TODAY? THERE ARE NO ROCK STARS LEFT”

It’s almost nine years since Gallagher called time on Oasis

52

So what did you do? I started working with David [Holmes, British musician and producer]. He said to me, “You’ve conquered that fucking thing – Britpop or whatever it was. You’ve done it. It’s time to start again.”

LAWRENCE WATSON

the red bulletin: You’ve been releasing music for 25 years. How do you keep things exciting? noel gallagher: When I got back from the Chasing Yesterday tour [with his band High Flying Birds, in September 2016] and I’d written and produced and recorded and performed and funded and fucking designed the merchandise, I felt like, “You’re done. You’ve done it.” I started this thing in 1993 and now it was like, “I can’t do this sound any more.”

Did you take a different approach when you went into the recording studio with him? I’d start playing, and every time it began to sound THE RED BULLETIN


like Oasis, he’d stop me and say, “No, that’s Oasis. Do something else.” And then there would be a moment of inspiration. I would play and he’d jump on that and say, “Right, this is going to be the song.” And then we’d take it from there. That sounds very congenial considering it was reported that you strangled him… David? Only twice. I wrote the chorus of The Man Who Built The Moon [from Who Built The Moon?, the third album by Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, released last November] and I thought it was great. But he said, “No.” So I did another one and thought it was even better. He turned it down again. The third one was even better, and I thought, “This is fucking one of the best songs I’ve ever written…” “No!” The chorus you hear on the album was the eighth. The eighth! And annoyingly he was right. Because he kept saying, “No, no, you can do better.” I got to the eighth one, and I was actually about to say to him, “I’m not writing any more choruses. This is fucking it.” But as I played it to him, he said, “That’s it.” And he was right. Why does Who Built The Moon? have such an optimistic sound? There was no masterplan. But when it’s finished and you take a step back, you listen to it and there’s just an overriding feeling of joy and optimism. That’s quite a revolutionary thing to do these days in rock music, rock ’n’ roll, whatever you want to call it. It’s very easy nowadays to pick up a guitar and just sing about what’s in the news, because rock critics think that’s what we all want to hear: thoughtful, thought-inducing music. Well, I say that’s fucking boring. If I want to know what’s going on in the world, I can watch the news. I want to hear beauty and truth in music. I don’t want to hear the news. The news is boring. What should good rock music be about, then? It used to be about girls and trying to get girls and then trying to have sex with girls and then taking drugs with girls and then marrying girls and then dancing with girls while taking drugs with them. That’s what music used to be. It used to be more exotic. Now it’s fucking boring. You know, when I think of rock music now, I think of Dave Grohl and it’s like, “Can you stop shouting, please?” And I think of Green Day and it’s like, “Can you stop moaning, please?” All dressed the same, all with tattoos, fucking earrings and dyed hair. That’s not where I’m coming from. I’ve never been like that.

“MUSIC USED TO BE ABOUT GIRLS AND TAKING DRUGS. IT USED TO BE MORE EXOTIC. NOW IT’S F*CKING BORING” THE RED BULLETIN

“I DIDN’T WANT TO BE FAMOUS. I WANTED TO BE RICH. FAME? MEH” What, in your opinion, has rock ’n’ roll lost along the way? Rock has killed rock ’n’ roll. Rock ’n’ roll used to be about the clothes and the swagger and the sex and the girls. Now it’s about fucking groaning, you know, like, “Whoa!” There is no rock ’n’ roll any more. To me, rock ’n’ roll was freedom: freedom of thought, freedom of expression. And I got into this to do whatever the fuck I want. Can you remember the last time you saw one of your musical peers and thought, “Wow! Now that’s rock ’n’ roll!” Charlotte [Marionneau, French-born songwriter who records as Le Volume Courbe]! She plays in my band. When she pulled out a pair of scissors in rehearsals, I genuinely thought it was the most rock ’n’ roll thing I’d ever seen in my fucking life. That’s not a joke. You have a band member who plays scissors? Well, she’s doing backing vocals in the band. I said to her, “Can you play the tambourine?” And she says, in that dismissive way that French women do, “I cannot play the tambourine.” So I’m like, “Well, can you do something else?” And she says, “I can play the scissors.” I’m like, “The what?” And she says, in a stern kind of way, “The scissors.” So I say, “Can you bring them to rehearsals tomorrow?” So she brought them, and I was like [laughs], “She’s wearing a cape and playing the scissors. It’s fucking out there, man.” So that moment of strangeness and surprise is what’s lacking in rock music right now? Definitely. Bands are owned by their fans because they’re in touch with them on social media, and their fans dictate to them what they want, and their record company dictates to them what they should be doing. I’m sorry, but nobody fucking owns me. They don’t own my thoughts, or what I wear, or who I want to be in my band. And anyway, people don’t know what they want until they get it, you know what I mean? Think anybody wanted Oasis before it came along? No! But what’s wrong with rock stars today being more in touch to their fans? Rock stars today? There are no rock stars left. Really? Rock stars now in England? They’re either really fucking naff or the wrong side of 40. Or they don’t write their own music and they have nothing to say. Or they have bad hair and even worse shoes. 53


There are great bands, though. Kasabian are great. That band Jungle are great, too. But actual rock stars? Nah, I don’t see it. Why is that? There’s a very simple reason. At the back end of the ’90s, the record companies stopped working for the bands, and the bands started working for the record companies. And now people are so fucking happy to get a record deal that they’ll do anything. I run a label, and my management runs one, too. And I can tell you from experience that record labels, they see bands in clubs, sign them and say, “This is great! But can you work with these songwriters, so they can write you a hit?” The bands are so pleased with their new deal, they go, “Yeah, OK.” That’s it. That’s all you need to know about the music industry. When [Oasis] started out, it was like, “We’re doing you a fucking favour signing to your record label, not the other way round.” That’s the difference. But back then people would still buy albums. It’s much harder for young bands to make money nowadays, isn’t it? That’s true. The record labels own Spotify. Music is now for hire. Bands don’t get paid for being on Spotify. The only saving grace is that as long as you can stand upright and play live, you’ll be OK. But now, when you sign a record deal, they’ll take that from you, too. It’s a filthy business, but people are desperate for fame. Weren’t you, too, when you started out? When I started, I didn’t want to be famous. I wanted to be rich. Fame? Meh. I’m good at fame. Fame doesn’t bother me. But it wasn’t the driving force. That’s easy to say when you’re a rock star… I’ve never considered myself a rock star. Technically speaking I am, sure, but I don’t walk like a rock star. I can talk like one.

“I’VE GOT NO REGRETS. I DON’T HAVE THAT GENE. YOU HAVE TO LIVE IN THE MOMENT”

On the subject of rock-star talk, is there anything you regret having said in the past? Why? What did I say? [Laughs.] No, there are a few personal things I’ve said about people that were a little bit over the top, but I’ve got no regrets about any artistic choices I’ve made. I don’t have that gene. That part of my brain is yet to be unlocked. I just don’t get it. You live in the moment, right? If you’re building a rocket, would you rather it go up in flames or just go [makes a fart sound] on the landing pad and fall over? I’d rather go up in flames. It would be a bit of a spectacle. At least you could say, “Wow! Look at that fucking thing!” noelgallagher.com 54

NOEL GALLAGHER’S FESTIVAL DOS AND DON’TS Drawing on years of serious experience, the rocker reveals all you need to survive in style Later this month, you’ll be hitting the summer festival circuit, playing shows all across Europe. Were you an avid festival-goer during your youth? When I was young, I could hardly afford the big festivals. But of course I went to Spike Island [The Stone Roses’ legendary concert in May 1990]. That’s the one gig everybody went to. If you were from Greater Manchester, you had to be there. It was The Stone Roses playing on a man-made island of toxic waste [the Cheshire site was formerly home to numerous chemical factories]. Thank God I didn’t eat or drink much that day. I just took ecstasy, like the 30,000 idiots around me. It was fucking nuts – and good fun. I’ve been toxic ever since. [Laughs.] What are your golden rules for surviving a festival? Most important: drink enough water. Try to get some shade wherever possible. Don’t get into fights, even if people are rude, loud and full of shit. Check out some of the smaller stages, because the bands playing there deserve it; the main-stage acts aren’t always the better ones. Wander around the grounds to enjoy the vibe, don’t stay in the mosh pit all day, do take enough breaks, and just chill. Take it

easy and save up some energy for the way home. What are your essential festival items? Well, unfortunately you can’t bring your own drinks, which is a shame because it means you’ve got to buy the expensive crap – and wait in line for ever to get it, which is terrible. I hate that. Another must-have is sun lotion – never go without. Don’t forget your sunglasses and an iconic band T-shirt, too, otherwise you’re not cool. And make sure you have enough cigarettes and a full lighter, and that your weed, your pills or whatever you’re into are in their place. You want to get into that zone where you really lock into the music, where you sing and dance and whatever. I don’t dance – and I never will – but I get into the groove. What’s the one thing you should avoid at all costs? The wrong shoes. Don’t wear sandals when it’s muddy and dirty. Also, never dress too light or too heavy – that’s a big one. Don’t just wear a T-shirt when they’ve announced rain, and don’t show up in your winter jacket when it’s a summer weekender under blue skies. Be reasonable. Listen to your brains before you shut them off. And don’t eat anything that looks like garbage, because it probably is. You should try to eat light and fresh, not that sausage or pizza that’s been in the sun way too long. And only drink bottled liquids – nothing open without a seal. You don’t want to spend the entire festival lining up for those Dixi loos. Those are disgusting. What would be your dream festival line-up? I would say U2, Neil Young, Coldplay, Sex Pistols and myself. That would be a cool line-up. I’d really enjoy that. Would I be top or bottom of the bill? I don’t know, and I wouldn’t mind. It would just be a fun day with old pals, decent catering and cold drinks. That’s all good with me. THE RED BULLETIN


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Secret rave, Boomtown Fair Festival-goers gather for the Tribe of Frog forest party at Boomtown. The revellers know the name of the DJ, but who installed the hundreds of butterflies and garlands above their heads?

WILD AT HEART


THE HIDDEN HEROES OF THE UK FESTIVAL SCENE

Words FLORIAN OBKIRCHER  Photography JASPER CLARKE, JANE STOCKDALE



  57


W

e usually buy festival tickets because of the line-up. And it’s the performers on stage we passionately applaud in rainsoaked fields. But it’s the unsung heroes offstage who really create the festival experience – and last summer we set out to find them. The Red Bulletin spoke to site managers, pyrotechnicians, icecream vendors and recycling stewards at four of the UK’s bestloved music festivals – Green Man in south Wales, Bestival in Dorset, Boomtown Fair in Hampshire, and Sunfall in London – to shine a spotlight on them for a change…

Sunfall at Sunfall Lovers of electronic music congregate in south London’s Brockwell Park


“People let go of all their worries” OLIVE GONG

Gong Bath practitioners, Green Man COLIN AND OLIVE GONG (ages not supplied – “But I’m no spring chicken!” says Colin) have been bringing their gong bath operation to music festivals since 2004. “Back then, we’d hear a hundred times a day, ‘Gong bath? What’s that?’” Colin recalls. But these days their service is in high demand: they provide 35 half-hour sessions throughout the Green Man weekend, only pausing when the main stage is pumping noisily. “First, we lie them down and give them a moment to settle,” says Colin. Then one of them starts playing the gong, quietly at first, then slowly building up. For some people it has a relaxing effect, much like a massage, while others find it energising. “A word people often use at the end of our sessions is ‘cocoon’,” Colin says. “They feel like they’ve left the festival.” According to Olive, many of their customers love to start their weekend with a gong bath. “It allows them to let go of the worries they arrive with, and helps them to fully land in the moment.”

Visualist, Bestival DAVID NAJARIAN (35) arrived at Bestival on the last leg of DJ Shadow’s 18-month world tour. As the person in charge of the iconic US turntablist’s onstage visuals – a wildly colourful spectacle projected onto 6m-high LED walls – his work day started at 7am, just three hours after their motorhome arrived on site. There’s a lot to do: loading all the gear onto the stage, setting up DJ Shadow’s turntables, four big projectors and Najarian’s control panel, and doing a full check. Then he removes everything and sets it all up again before the DJ’s headline slot. It’s a tough job – “Nobody enters the touring business for sleep,” he laughs – but a rewarding one. “You’re literally bathing people in light. You’re adding another layer to the show.” THE RED BULLETIN

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“The other day, a man married his tent” GEMMA TREW

Wedding planner, Bestival GEMMA TREW (38, right) takes care of the newlyweds at Bestival’s Inflatable Church. Equipped with vicars, DJs, and bridesmaids such as Mariella (left), the 100-capacity venue enables the more spontaneous among us to marry their loved ones. Or, indeed, inanimate objects. “The other day, a man married his tent,” says Trew. The flamboyant ceremony lasts for 45 minutes, and the couple gets costumes, rings, a certificate – and the opportunity to celebrate the union at the wedding disco, conveniently located right next door to the church.

Ice-cream vendor, Green Man In the ’80s, JULIET NOBLE (64) and her husband Martin Orbach had a genius idea for their sheep’s milk: instead of supplying local cheese-makers, they’d make ice cream and sell it directly to the public. Since the mid’90s, they’ve also taken their ice cream to around 25 music festivals each summer. At Green Man, they use roughly 30 boxes of cones and about half a tonne of sheep’s milk ice-cream – sold in 10 different flavours. “People love it because it’s quite light but it tastes creamy,” Juliet says. The most popular flavour at Green Man? Toffee and honeycomb.

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Owner and director, Green Man When FIONA STEWART (56) arrives at the festival site, three weeks before the fun begins, she sees acres of fields containing nothing but sheep. Green Man was founded in 2003, and with its grassroots approach – no VIP areas, no corporate sponsorship – it has become a favourite among UK music lovers. “A festival is like a jigsaw puzzle where all the pieces have been designed over the year to fit together so the event can happen,” says Stewart. Her job is to ensure the pieces fit: “There are 47 managers responsible for the delivery of their different areas. Most never need to contact me, but I’m always available if they do.” Here, she’s pictured with her dog Walter inside the Green Man, a statue made from natural materials collected by local farmers over the year. It’s traditionally burned on the last night of the festival.

“A festival is like a jigsaw puzzle” FIONA STEWART


Pyrotechnician, Boomtown Fair Since 2015, GEORGE DAVIES-COWARD (26) and his company Aardvark FX have been providing Boomtown with effects that not only look spectacular but give you a tingling sensation when the heat hits the skin. “People feel the warmth,” Davies-Coward says. “There’s nothing else effect-wise that does that at a festival.” He and his team arrived on site with a full-size truck loaded with 100 flamers, two additional trucks carrying 10 tonnes of propane gas and thousands of litres of Isopar (a fuel similar to diesel) in order to stage nine pyro shows throughout the weekend. His highlight of the festival is the grand finale at midnight on Sunday, where all the visual-effect crews – laser, video and pyrotechnics – work together on a choreographed show to music. “It’s the moment where everyone gets their phone out,” says Davies-Coward, who, unsurprisingly, loved to play with firecrackers in his youth – and now considers himself very lucky to be paid to do it.

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“You feel the warmth of the show on your skin”

SCOTT SALT

GEORGE DAVIES-COWARD


Director of theatre, Boomtown Fair

“We create a festival within the festival” MARTIN COAT

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Even though MARTIN COAT (36) swore to himself he’d never turn Boomtown into work (“It was my favourite festival as a visitor!”), when he was offered the job as its theatrical director six years ago he couldn’t resist. Throughout the year, he develops an overarching story narrative for Boomtown’s immersive theatre, which plays out – unnoticed by many attendees – alongside the musical programme. “It’s a festival within the festival,” he says. “It’s a game that, as an audience member, you can play for four days and become a character yourself. The story unfolds and you can actively partake and change the story.” Coordinating up to a thousand actors throughout the site – who give punters clues and lead them to hidden backrooms – Coat usually works at least 12-hour days during the festival. This year, more than 5,000 people showed up for the theatre’s grand finale performance, which involved a fictional underground hacker group planting a virus into the giant communications tower owned by evil corporation Bang Hai Industries. “It’s a theatre-meets-computer game narrative that rolls out from year to year,” he says. “For a lot of people, it’s their first experience of that level of theatre. That’s great.” THE RED BULLETIN


“You’re a character in our story” MARTIN COAT

Bang Hai Towers, one of Boomtown’s main stages, was taken over by Martin Coat’s immersive theatre

Volunteer, Bestival ALEX TOMPKINS (24) is one of the very few people at a festival who hands out money to visitors. Besides his stewarding and wristbanding duties, the volunteer is part of the Bestival Eco-Bond team, who give £10 to every festival-goer who brings them a full bin bag of rubbish on leaving the site. “Some people claim they haven’t generated enough rubbish. That’s fair enough, but we’re not supposed to accept a bag that’s a third full,”says the biomedical science student from Liverpool, who donates his festival pay to a homeless charity. “But most of the feedback has been very positive. Some people don’t even know what is recyclable, so it feels good to create more awareness.”

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STOUT HARDTAIL SIMPLICITY

• MODERN AGGRO HARDTAIL GEOMETRY • CREATED WITH INPUT FROM MATT JONES • THREE DIFFERENT BUILD LEVELS • ROBUST COMPONENTS


“The step counter on my phone went off the scale” CHLOE MUNTS

Co-founders, Sunfall Two years ago, NOAH BALL (37, left) – also co-founder of the Dimensions and Soundwave festivals in Croatia – and ANDY PEYTON (right) decided to organise a thoughtfully curated event in south London’s Brockwell Park for lovers of underground music, with additional DJ sets at nearby clubs. On the day of the festival, programme director Ball arrives on site at 7am to meet with all the parties involved – from the local council to the police and the festival operations manager. “Usually I’m on the phone all day, checking in with all the stages and the artists about to go on stage, just making sure everyone’s happy and everything is running as best it can from our side,” he says. Due to security and stewarding issues at the main gate, Noah’s day was even more hectic than usual. “I didn’t chill out much during the day. But the anxiety died down a little bit by the end of it and I could eventually enjoy one of the sets.”

PR team, Bestival CHLOE MUNTS (34) and her team (left to right: AIDAN, CHLOE, CERYS, MOLLY) ensure that you’re able to relive some of your favourite Bestival moments via videos and reviews once you’re back home. Taking care of the media on site includes everything from setting up interviews with artists to ensuring photographers leave the pit in front of the stage after three songs of each set. Munts says the biggest challenge of her job is trying to be in 10 places at once, especially last year when the rain stopped them using motorised transport. “The step counter on my phone went off the scale,” she says. “I did an average of 50,000 steps a day! You certainly don’t have to go to the gym for a few weeks after.”

Bestival (Aug 2-5), bestival.net; Boomtown Fair (Aug 9-12), boomtownfair.co.uk; Green Man (Aug 16-19), greenman.net; Sunfall is on hiatus this year – instead, check out Dimensions in Croatia (Aug 29-Sep 2), dimensionsfestival.com

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ON THE BALL

HEATHER KNIGHT faced injury, ridicule and self-doubt en route to last year’s World Cup victory with the England women’s cricket team. But, she says, the real challenge is dealing with success Words RUTH MORGAN Photography RICHIE HOPSON

Heather Knight, who became captain of the England women’s cricket team in June 2016, is no stranger to victory. The 27-year-old battled her way to the top in a male-dominated sport, and led her team to an historic World Cup win on home soil last year, for which she’ll collect an OBE later this month. the red bulletin: When did you last get injured by a cricket ball? heather knight: I got one right in the face during training about a month ago. It’s not pleasant, but it’s part of the game. How did you get into playing cricket? My older brother Steve played. I was the annoying little seven-year-old tomboy copying everything. When he joined our local cricket club in Plymouth – 70

Plymstock – I followed him. I was the only girl at the club. I played my first hardball game when I was nine, against 12-year-old boys. Were you conscious of being different? I stuck out like a sore thumb! The guys I played with were great; it was more the bemused looks on the faces of opponents. I got the odd comment like, “Ah, there’s a maid playing,” and, “Does she do our ironing after we’ve finished?” There was a time I got called ‘sweetheart’ a few times by an opposition team, so my team, in jest, called me sweetheart for a while – that allowed me to laugh at it. Did it hold you back? Quite the opposite – I think it spurred me on. I always had the pressure of being THE RED BULLETIN


Knight led England to a ninerun victory against India in the 2017 Women‘s World Cup


“I LOVE PROVING PEOPLE WRONG – IT PUSHES ME TO BE BETTER”

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judged harshly if I played badly: “Oh, she’s a girl, she’s not good enough.” At the time, I wasn’t consciously representing all women or anything like that, but now, when I look back, I kind of was. Every time I didn’t perform well, people questioned whether I was good enough to play men’s cricket. But I love proving people wrong, so that’s always pushed me to be better. That’s still true of my cricket to this day. Captaining a winning women’s cricket side at a World Cup must have been unimaginable at the time… Totally. The women’s game today is unrecognisable from how it was back then. Four years ago, we became professional, as are almost all women’s teams around the world now. When I was growing up, women’s cricket wasn’t on the telly very often, if at all, and you couldn’t earn a living from it. But at the last World Cup you sensed it was a different tournament. To sell out at Lord’s… that’s something I never thought could happen. It was crazy. And 180 million people around the world were watching it. Has becoming captain of the team changed you? I was excited, but daunted at the same time. I was stepping into the shoes of Charlotte Edwards – a legend in the game – and it was the year before the World Cup. But having that faith put in me by Mark [Robinson, the England women’s team coach] was reassuring. My role has changed a lot: I’m a lot more involved in decisions, and there’s a lot more responsibility and pressure. But as I’ve grown into the role, I’ve learned to listen to my gut and not doubt my decisions. How have you found the public side of the role? After every game, there are the captains’ interviews, and emotions can still be raw – especially when you’ve just lost. You have to gauge whether you want to find positives from the match, or give the team a bit of a rod up the jacksie!

Knight gave up a place at Cambridge University to pursue a career in cricket

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“I MAKE BETTER DECISIONS WHEN UNDER PRESSURE”

Which comes more naturally? Generally I’m a positive, optimistic person. But you can’t always go into a press conference after losing and say everything is brilliant. There’s a place for emotion, too. Sport is emotional – passions are high, the adrenalin is high – and the press and public appreciate that. You can’t be a robot. Is losing the toughest challenge for you? No. In fact, I get a weird pleasure out of having done badly and having to rethink things. I’ve always found being successful and winning a challenge harder in terms of getting to that next level. When we lose and our backs are against the wall, that’s when my true character comes out. So you’re much more comfortable being the underdog? Yeah, a sport psychologist would have a field day with me! I weirdly enjoy that rawness, the need to prove people wrong and push back to the top. When you lose, you have to find a way to work harder and get better. I make better decisions as a captain when I’m under pressure. Make-or-break situations keep you sharp. Winning the World Cup must have taken you outside your comfort zone… Well, you should never think you’ve made it, even after a big win; there’s always more to do. But after it had all sunk in, I did think, “It’s never going to get better than this.” Being world number one, being favourites, is a different prospect. You need a different team psychology to maintain your success. So, how do winners keep winning? One of the toughest things in sport is to keep winning! Mark, our coach, has been brilliant at not focusing on particular games, but keeping up a general culture of trying to be the best we can. Now we’ve had that success, we want more: we want to break records, too. We want to be remembered as the England team that dominated cricket in our time. Next up is the Women’s World T20 in November, and we’re going for the win. Follow Heather Knight on Twitter: @Heatherknight55 73


TAKE FIVE

Regular guy Calum Hudson on…

BEING A WILD SWIMMER

On weekdays, he’s a mild-mannered office worker. But, in his spare time, the 28-year-old swims the world’s most savage waters with his siblings, Jack and Robbie

2 There’s untapped potential

Of the world’s top 30 largest rivers, only five have been swum – by a 63year-old Slovenian named Martin Strel. We want to swim the seven biggest maelstroms – huge, dangerous whirlpools. With a seasoned ship’s captain and local knowledge, routes can be plotted at certain times of the year. We’ve done the top three: Moskstraumen and Saltstraumen in Norway, and Corryvreckan in Scotland.

3 The main risk is being eaten

Where we swam in the Arctic Circle, killer whales roam; in Venezuela, bull sharks swim up rivers, and there are great whites around Alcatraz. A production company wanted to film a river-swimming expedition up the Congo, and we almost had it approved, but then we read five instances of crocodiles taking people from kayaks. I’ve bottled swims in Venezuela because of the [5.5m] Orinoco crocodiles.

4 It can get a bit brisk

The Arctic Circle is about seven degrees [Celsius] – the Gulf Stream warms it a bit. Red Bull Neptune Steps in Glasgow in March was colder, like three degrees. In the Arctic, we had to stop every 30 minutes for hypothermia checks: you give your first name, last name, date of birth, do multiplication… Get anything wrong and you’re out of the water. I was panicking I’d forgotten my multiplication.

Wild bunch: (left to right) Robbie, Calum and Jack Hudson

1 A lake or river shouldn’t just be something you drive over on your way to work” CALUM HUDSON

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It’s about reconnecting with nature

We grew up in the Lake District, doing outdoorsy stuff. But then we went to uni where it was all boozing and partying, and that was followed by life in the city, commuting and being trapped in an office. After two years in London, we sold the old family home, so I approached Jack and Robbie about swimming all 90 miles [145km] of our childhood river [the River Eden], which flows past the bottom of the house, as a goodbye to where we grew up. It all started from there.

5 It sets us free

Wild swimming is the most accessible outdoor sport – you need pretty much zero kit. A lot is just knowledge of where to go; Scotland has the right to roam, whereas England is more strictly managed. A lake or river shouldn’t just be something you drive over on your way to work; it could be where you do your daily exercise or go on an adventure with your mates.

thewildswimmingbrothers.com Interview TOM GUISE Photography JODY DAUNTON THE RED BULLETIN


AT THE CUTTING EDGE One day a year in a muddy field in France, the hum of singlecylinder engines is all that can be heard. Welcome to the world of LAWNMOWER RACING, where Europe’s finest lock wheels in a battle of attrition where the only prize is glory – and a chicken Words TONY THOMAS  Photography TAZ DARLING   77


DOWN ’N’ DIRTY IT MAY BE, BUT THIS IS STILL AN OUT-AND-OUT MOTOR RACE Conditions at Yvernaumont this year were so wet that at times it seemed the only colour visible was brown

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arely an hour into the start of a 24-hour lawnmower race in the French Ardennes over Easter weekend, and – wham! – a mechanical failure sends double world champion Bob Koedinger flying through the air, then back to earth with a thud. The right front wheel of his mower has broken, and the Luxemburger is winded, with a neck injury, hors de combat amid straw bales in a nondescript farmer’s field. In major-league motorsport, this would be an event of seismic import, as was evident when Fernando Alonso – also a two-time world champion, though in F1 rather than lawnmower racing – rolled his McLaren into a ball in a huge accident at the 2016 Australian Grand Prix. News of the incident and Alonso’s subsequent condition (he was largely unscathed) instantly made headlines worldwide. Here, though, at the 24h Tracteurs Tondeuses de France, the champ is helped to his feet, dusted off and encouraged to go for a lie-down in the back of a van. “He probably won’t race again,” says teammate Les Pantry, “but we’ll see how he feels after a few hours.” This matter-of-fact assessment is typical of the lo-fi nature of the sporting event being played out before our eyes. For most, mention of ‘24-hour motorracing in France’ conjures exotic visions of

Ferraris and Porsches racing through the night at Le Mans in pursuit of huge prize money. But not here. With its handful of cattle sheds and its single-track country lane – the nearest town, CharlevilleMézières, is 12km away – Yvernaumont is a place the nearby A34 dual-carriageway passes through, not a destination. Except, that is, for the 200-or-so lawnmowerracing diehards who have travelled from as far afield as Finland, Germany, England and Luxembourg to indulge their passion for competing on little motorised vehicles designed to do no more than cut grass. While there will be a winner, there is neither trophy nor cash prize: a turkey and a duck (both live) have been awarded in the past, as has a full round of local cheese; this year, there’s a chicken. But, for the riders, this is what it’s all about: bargain-basement motorsport blessed with enough cut-and-thrust to make it stimulating for all those involved. "It’s a mini-F1 race, really,” says Carl Dimmock, one sixth of Team Best Western from the UK. “There’s a lot of motorsport strategy.” It seems that once you try this littleknown sport, it’s hard to forget. Like many, Daniel Bouquet – a co-organiser of today’s event – came to the sport after a glass or two of rouge with a long Sunday lunch. “I had a tractor [mower] in my garden that

Sometimes during a 24-hour lawnmower race, taking a break is the only option

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“YOU HAVE TO TREAT THE MOWER WITH RESPECT” A pull-cord engine start for the French MVYC Racing Team, who finished fourth


ONCE YOU TRY THIS SPORT, IT’S HARD TO FORGET

Le Mans it is not, but this is night racing during a 24-hour motorsport event in France…

Many of those racers are here today, wearing ‘Lavia 2018’ T-shirts and caps as badges of honour. And soon many will come to reconsider claims that ‘Lavia 12’ is the ‘toughest’ test in their sport… Before the off, however, spirits are high. No fewer than 37 teams have assembled, and there’s a mood of excited bonhomie as they anticipate maybe 1,000 laps of racing on the 1.2km loop that has been scraped into the topsoil.

T Lighting is courtesy of cheap, bike-spec LED strap-ons

I wasn’t really using very much,” says the Frenchman, his nephew Alexandre acting as translator. “And I just decided to take it to a race and have a go. That was it.” Alexandre, a 27-year-old doctor, and his cousin Boris were urged to join uncle Dan’s adventure, and before they knew it they were racing on a frozen lake in Finland. “Our tractor broke during the race,” Alexandre says, “and I remember THE RED BULLETIN

sitting there, colder than I had ever been, thinking, ‘What am I doing here?’” That event, the self-proclaimed ‘toughest lawnmower race on earth’, was held in February, over 12 hours, and for many of the more committed teams it marked the start of an unofficial ‘season’ – not that lawnmower racing is bound by anything so formal as a calendar or immutable, year-long entry commitments.

hose who care about these things note that the shape of the course resembles that of the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, where the Spanish F1 Grand Prix has been held since 1991. But that’s where the similarities end, for there’s not even the faintest whiff of glamour here: the only smells are distinctly… rural. The toilet facilities are of the portable plastic variety, while a makeshift bar and barbecue have been hammered together in a cowshed – with the cattle still in residence. Woe betide any spectator or competitor who arrives without wellies… The down ’n’ dirty spirit of the event should not, however, detract from its essence as an out-and-out motor race. This much is evident from time spent watching ‘trackside’ during practice. There’s real skill in the way the top drivers 81


“IT’S SUCH A LONG RACE, ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN”

By the morning of day two, overnight rain has left the course rutted and treacherous

pilot their machines; the very fastest use the ‘Scandinavian flick’ technique made popular by rallying greats including Stig Blomqvist and Markku Alen. The tricky but effective manoeuvre requires a driver to attack a corner too sharply, steering the mower into it more acutely than would appear necessary. This aggressive approach destabilises the rear wheels, pivoting them away from the corner, whereupon the driver can apply power and drift the mower through and out of the corner by steering into the slide. “This sport teaches you so much about car control,” says Richard Hawksbee of Team Best Western. “I think I would have made a pretty good racer, but when you have a day job you can’t have time off if you have an accident. And you’ve got to have money behind you to get to the next level. Not here – it’s fun motorsport, and it puts the fun back into motorsport."

momentum must be maintained through the twists and turns if competitive lap times are to be achieved. ‘Competitive’ is the watchword for crack outfits Team Best Western, Les Lux (Luxembourg) and Team B1 (Germany). All three rely on modified Wheel Horse mowers, which date from the late ’60s and are now much sought-after among the racing fraternity, despite their being

outdated by the standards of modern tractor mowers. They’re coveted because they’re light (around 118kg), cheap (a fully built ‘race’ mower should cost no more than £1,300) and their robust, easily repaired steel frames are capable of taking hours of off-road pounding despite lacking any suspension. Tweaks such as fixed rear axles from go-karts, fitted with a single disc brake,

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eeing this cornering technique being applied to such an unlikely vehicle is indeed comical. For the fastest teams, though, finesse is required from drivers to maximise the potential of machines that offer only 13hp from 390cc single-cylinder engines. While that’s enough to urge them to a maximum speed of almost 90kph, every scrap of 82

Running repairs are essential: even re-welding a broken chassis if required THE RED BULLETIN


There’s no glamour in lawnmower racing, but honour – and poultry – is at stake

are permissible, as is fine-tuning of the angle at which the wheels meet the ground, to improve the mowers’ handling. But engine modifications are banned, as is any upgrade that runs counter to the ‘cheap as chips’ promise of mower racing.

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his guiding principle was enshrined in 1973 when the British Lawnmower Racing Association was founded by now president Jim Gavin and friends in a West Sussex country pub. The Cricketers Arms in Wisborough Green remains the spiritual home of lawnmower racing and the ‘Wisborough 12’ its blue-riband event. Les Pantry, an aircraft engineer by day, is these days the driving force behind the British race, as well as a larger-than-life presence on the world tour. This weekend he’s a guest driver for Les Lux and is philosophical when the injury to star driver Bob Koedinger scuppers the Luxembourg team’s hopes of victory, despite Koedinger having started from pole position. “It’s such a long race,” says Pantry, “that pretty much anything can happen. And it’s not unusual for one of us to come away with a bit of an injury. I had a big one myself last year: I broke eight ribs, and two vertebrae in my neck. Spent most of the week in hospital. That’s the thing 84

with mowers – you have to treat them with respect because they’re not designed to go fast. They were built to cut grass.” Today, though, they’re doing a grand job as muck-rakers, having churned up the once firmly packed course surface into a sea of mud. Overnight rain renders conditions at times almost impossible, leaving less able mowers spinning their wheels helplessly as they try to ascend the gently climbing back straight. As in any motor race, however, the strongest overcome adversity, and by daybreak on Sunday, with only 17 mowers still running, it’s clear Best Western will take some stopping. The team of six – Carl Dimmock (kitchen fitter); Jordan Bell (steel fabricator); Matt Cable (mower owner and kitchen fitter); Wayne Stevens (window cleaner “and entrepreneur”); Phil Jennings (development engineer for Jaguar Land Rover) and Richard Hawksbee (machine tool sales manager) – are all swift drivers, and their red machine has run almost

“IT PUTS THE FUN BACK INTO MOTOSPORT”

flawlessly. The most worrying moment came during the dark small hours when a fuel refill fumble caused a momentary fireball – fortunately with no more serious consequence than the light singeing of an engine cover. By hour 23, the team have built an unassailable lead, winning before the finish, but they still want to take the chequered flag and allow master mower maker Matt Cable to drive the final laps and a victory tour. Their final tally of 981 laps (ahead of Les Lux on 939 and Team B1 on 912) is agonisingly short of the 1,000 that would have been easily within reach in dry conditions, but the total race distance still comfortably cracks 1,000km. This is no small feat for a humble and unlovely machine originally designed with only the tending of lawns in mind, and as the mower finally comes to rest – muddied but unbowed – after 24 gruelling hours of mud, wet and gears, it’s hard not to feel some smidgen of respect for its doughty mechanical soul, and the pluck of those who’ve raced it. Dimmock catches our admiring gaze: “Wanna have a go?” If you want to have a go, head to lawnmower racing event Red Bull Cut It in Cheddar, Somerset on June 9. For more information, visit redbull.co.uk/cutit THE RED BULLETIN


Bridgestone launches the brand new Battlax Adventure A41 bike tyre this month in MOROCCO! Read next month’s press to find out what the journalists thought of the tyre. Already available at your local dealer.

Bridgestone UK For your nearest Bridgestone Authorised Dealer, visit our website www.bridgestone.co.uk/motorcycle-tyres

@bridgestonemoto www.grippingstories.com


TAKE FIVE

Lawman CRAIG MITCHELL on…

RUNNING WITH THE WRONG CROWD In 2012, the Los Angeles criminal court judge began a marathon running club for the homeless on Skid Row. Six years later, it shows no sign of flagging…

2 I believe in a second chance

We marginalise and write off these folks. Society views a person as an addict, an alcoholic, a criminal, but alter their environment, give them other choices, love, nurturing, and they can be a very different human being. Few of us are irredeemable. Of my hundreds of murder cases, there are only two where I think it’s doubtful they’ll regain their humanity.

3 It gives a sense of purpose

If you’re an alcoholic or drug addict, the goal is sobriety; if you’re uneducated and in a low-wage job, it’s to acquire the skills for secure, meaningful employment. That’s why the international aspect of the club is important. We just got back from the Jerusalem marathon and they’re like, “Where are we going next year?” Goals are central – they keep you coming back.

4 I’m invested in these people

Funding the trips is problematic because ethics prohibit a judge from asking for money. For our first marathons overseas, it was me and some friends writing the big cheques. The international part of my programme is important, but is it essential? Maybe not. But if you’re willing, as I am, to donate three mornings a week plus extra time at weekends, that makes a huge difference in others’ lives.

Justice of the pace: judge Craig Mitchell leads by example

5 It’s also saving me 1 I wanted to go the extra mile We marginalise and write off these folks as addicts, alcoholics, criminals… but few of us are irredeemable” CRAIG MITCHELL

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The running club was started when Roderick Brown, a man I’d sentenced to prison, contacted me. He was paroled to [homeless shelter] the Midnight Mission and he liked the way I’d treated him, so he asked me to come to Skid Row to meet the people he was working with. The president of the mission asked if I could contribute to the programme, which wasn’t something I was looking for, but then I always try to reach out in a way that’s more beneficial than sentencing someone to incarceration. And I run. That was the genesis of the idea.

Twelve years ago, I ruptured discs in my cervical spine and had titanium rods implanted to prop up my neck. With that type of surgery, you’re advised not to run, but I ignored it; there’d be a gaping hole in my life if I couldn’t take part in the club. If I have a difficult sentencing or legal issue to deal with, I’ll often tell the lawyers, “I think you’ll get a better decision out of me if you let me run on it and get back to you.”

The film Skid Row Marathon is in selected cinemas on May 9; skidrowmarathon.com Interview EDDY LAWRENCE Photography MARK HAYES THE RED BULLETIN


Woody Harrelson, Hollywood’s great philosopher, puts on his thinking hat


WOODY’S WORDS OF WISDOM

“Cynicism is for losers”

In the new Star Wars spin-off movie, Solo, WOODY HARRELSON plays the jaded mentor to a young Han Solo. But off-screen he’s even better at dishing out advice. The 56-year-old actor teaches us how to banish sharks, enjoy losing, and make Charles Dickens our personal therapist Words RÜDIGER STURM

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Photography AUSTIN HARGRAVE/AUGUST

sk someone to share some true words of wisdom and you’ll often end up disappointed by empty platitudes. Not so with Woody Harrelson. The Hollywood actor may not express himself as eloquently as history’s most celebrated philosophers, but there’s no doubt he’s a great thinker. Harrelson is a driven man. The son of a convicted murderer, he possesses a sense of justice that brings him into conflict with the police. He has chained himself to the Golden Gate Bridge to protest the destruction of ancient redwood trees, for

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example, and has openly cultivated hemp to start a conversation about the difference between drugs and industrial raw materials. Whatever Harrelson does, he does it with passion, whether it’s drinking cognac, kitesurfing, or therapeutic fasting. The triple Oscar nominee, whose career took off thanks to the US sitcom Cheers in the ’80s, now reaches a cross-generational audience with movies such as Natural Born Killers, The Hunger Games and, most recently, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. But what really makes Harrelson a good mentor is the fact that he

likes people. The father of three daughters embraces the world with an openness that’s rare to see. He might unexpectedly end up sitting with a bunch of locals at a bar and challenging them to a game of chess. He’ll shoot the breeze about God and the world with homeless people. He might share his lunch with road workers. This is not purely altruism and curiosity on his part, though; Harrelson knows that anyone who wants to find out the meaning of life needs to dive in headfirst and regularly knock themselves off their own pedestal with some good, 89


critical self-reflection. Here, he imparts some valuable life lessons he’s picked up along the way.

MARVEL AT STUFF: DON’T BECOME A ROBOT

“There’s this quote by Gerry Spence, the legendary American trial lawyer who almost never lost a case. In one of his books, he writes, ‘I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief.’ The latter applies to a lot of people. You see how people lose their lust for life and slowly turn into robots.”

MAKE A FOOL OF YOURSELF: IT MIGHT CHANGE YOUR LIFE

“I’ve been a big Elvis Presley fan ever since I was a child. It got to the point where one day, egged on by friends, I gave a spontaneous rendition of a song by ‘The King’ in the school library. I jumped up on a table and everyone started clapping. When I was done, this girl, Robin Rodgers, came up to me and said, ‘Drop in on our theatre group.’ I thought Robin was quite a catch, so I went along. That’s how I first discovered acting – and I also dated Robin for a while.”

LOOK DEATH IN THE FACE: IT’LL KEEP YOU GROUNDED

“I could write a book on all the neardeath experiences I’ve had. A friend and I once climbed onto the roof of a bus going about 90kph. There was a hatch in the roof that you could use to get back inside the bus. My buddy jumped in and called after me, ‘Come on, man, get in!’ Just as I jumped in, I heard this whooshing noise right by my head. It was a bridge we’d just gone under. I swear, another second and I would have been done for. But it clearly wasn’t my time to die.

“I believe we’re all born with an expiry date on our forehead. If I get in any danger, I think, ‘Hey, it’s not my time to die’” 90

“I actually believe that we all come into this world with an expiry date stamped on our forehead. So if ever I find myself doing something dangerous, I say to myself, ‘Hey, it’s not my time.’ I once tried to calm down a woman who was sitting next to me on a plane and freaking out because she was so scared. ‘Don’t worry,’ I said. ‘You’re safe. It’s not my time to die.’”

GO DIVING, BUT ALWAYS DO IT METHODICALLY

“I love diving off cliffs into the water. The highest dive I did was from almost 30 metres up. It can end up hurting, but it doesn’t have to. It all depends on technique. Don’t splay your arms or anything else when you land. You shouldn’t dive-bomb, either. When your body enters the water, you need to be stretched out straight to the tips of your toes.”

BE LIKE WATER: GO WITH THE FLOW

“I don’t care where someone comes from, what their job is, or how much money they’ve got. I get on well with everyone and find it easy to approach people. Once, I drove past a couple of road workers and they told me I should spend their lunch break with them, so I parked up my car and we had a great time. In situations like that, I feel like water. Water always flows the same way the conversation does.”

FASTING HELPS UNBLOCK YOUR EMOTIONS

“As soon as someone starts acting aggressively around me, I want to stand my ground. That’s just the kind of guy I am. Once, a couple of guys in Croatia were making fun of the way I laughed. So I picked up two rocks – I was ready to fight. It was one of the hairiest situations I’ve ever experienced. Luckily, one of them recognised me from Natural Born Killers and it didn’t go too far. Now, I’ve got a better handle on my anger thanks to yoga and meditation. I’ve also fasted when I’ve felt blocked spiritually and emotionally.”

ANGER CAN BE A LIFESAVER

“There are times when I’m kitesurfing that I want to curse the sport altogether, like when the wind

drops or the kite gets tangled up in the line. Then you’ve got to swim back and drag the kit along behind you in the water. Once, it happened to me two kilometres out in the ocean, in an area teeming with sharks. On top of that, it was dusk – exactly the time predators like to hunt. I was so focused on my anger that the thought of panicking didn’t even enter my head. I was so angry I screamed my lungs out. I must have scared off a couple of sharks with all my cursing. I didn’t even notice that I’d been stung by a jellyfish – it was only when I got back to shore that my wife pointed out my skin was covered in red patches.”

LISTEN TO YOUNG PEOPLE: THEY MIGHT SAVE YOU FROM YOURSELF

“Matthew McConaughey [his co-star in the first season of TV crime drama True Detective] is one of the sharpest guys I know. He recently said to me, ‘Cynicism is the worst disease of old age.’ I concur 100 per cent. After I directed Lost In London [Harrelson’s audacious 2017 directorial debut, which he filmed in a single take and broadcast live to cinemas] I screened it in five American colleges and the students reacted extremely positively. They didn’t yet have that cynicism that creeps into you as the years go by and you’ve had one disappointment after the other. You almost develop as a self-defence mechanism. I make a conscious effort to surround myself with people who are neither cynical nor sarcastic.”

LOSE LIKE A WINNER

“I love poker, but I usually get fleeced mercilessly by the other players. When I’ve lost big-time again, I love to start preaching: ‘You don’t know what you’re missing – the true, deep euphoria that comes from losing.’ I don’t mean it, of course, but I can’t let them know that.”

CONSUME BOOKS, NOT MEDS

“One of the darkest periods of my life was in my twenties in New York. I was an unemployed actor, eking out a living doing odd jobs that barely covered my rent. I eventually got really depressed for the first time in my life. At some point, I got a temp THE RED BULLETIN


08.15 – 6 June An impressive conquest along the Alps

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WOODY HARRELSON: A BRIEF PROFILE No need to Google – here’s the actor’s life in anecdotes…

Age: 56 Harrelson has lived in a matriarchy for as long as he can remember. He was brought up by his mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. He and his wife Laura Louie live in Maui, Hawaii, with their three daughters. Even the family’s dog and cats are female. He doesn’t like to speak about his father, a convicted murderer who died in prison in 2007. At one point, Harrelson wanted to study theology. He likes kitesurfing, playing the guitar, philosophy, cognac and beer. Those last two in that list have been known to lead him astray, most notably back in 2002 when he ended up on tabloid front pages thanks to his part in a foursome. His wife forgave him. He smoked pot for 30 years, but gave up two years ago. He regularly loses money in poker games against country music legend Willie Nelson. He has been a strict vegan since his mid-twenties after a stranger on a bus diagnosed him as lactose intolerant. The change of diet also helped cure his acne and his clogged-up airways. Harrelson runs a firm that produces ‘tree-free’ paper. And he co-owns the world’s first organic vegan beer-garden, Sage in California.

Harrelson’s infectious laugh almost got him into a fight with two strangers in Croatia

“I was two kilometres out in the ocean at dusk, in an area teeming with sharks. But I was too angry to panic about it” 92

job with publishers Random House. I was allowed to choose any book and take it home. There were things like Charles Dickens and the great literary classics. I filled a whole box with books – it was so heavy I could barely carry it. Then I started working my way through all those great works. That helped me get over my depression better than anything else.”

JUST FORGET IT

“If I’m in a bad mood now, I latch onto someone else’s life instead of brooding over my problems. Binge-

watching TV shows always helps – four episodes in and you’ve forgotten all about whatever it was. Matthew McConaughey recently said to me, ‘What do you do when something’s really bugging the hell out of you?’ I said, ‘I just forget whatever it was that made me furious.’ Because ultimately all you can do is stay positive. There’s absolutely nothing you can do that beats an optimistic outlook on life.”

Solo: A Star Wars Story is in cinemas from May 24; starwars.com/films/solo THE RED BULLETIN


THE ART

OF DISRUPTION You’ve probably felt the effects of RAMMELLZEE’s work even if the name’s not familiar. The late New York artist, rapper and medieval monk-inspired revolutionary has influenced hip-hop heavyweights from the Beastie Boys to Cypress Hill. All while dressed as an array of intergalactic warriors Words BRAD WIENERS


ANGELA BOATWRIGHT, PIERRE GUILLIEN

Opposite: Rammellzee as one of his alter egos, Chimer; this page: his 2008 work Atomic Note Tag Minus 12%

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“There wasn’t, and won’t be, another like Rammellzee” When gallery owner Joe La Placa first met the hip-hop maverick and artist – pictured here in typical Rammellzee attire – his mind was blown

1999. He’s 38 at the time, wears a black polyester doo-rag, has alert, if tired eyes, and flashes an easy, knowing smile.


O PETER GRAMBERG, GETTY IMAGES

pen any English dictionary, according to hip hop pioneer and pop artist Rammellzee, and it’s there in front of your face: the story of a centuries-old battle for the truth. Can’t see it? “Read it backwards,” he insists. Then, perhaps you’ll see what he’s getting at: the IndoGermanic language tree is a technology of war. The medieval monks knew this, as did graffiti writers in 1970s New York. The letters of the Western alphabet are soldiers. Each can be destroyed, but is also armed to defend itself. Welcome to Rammellzee’s world. It’s one that many struggle to enter. Seated, headphones on, Rammellzee drops his particular insights on alphabetic truth during a radio interview in 1999. The 38-year-old wears a black polyester doo-rag, has alert – if tired – eyes, and flashes an easy, knowing smile. Beneath this exterior, though, one senses the frustration of the outsider artist. The radio host is a bit baffled, like many others before her. The alphabet is at war? Is this guy for real?

Rammellzee first set down his theory of typographical conflict in a manifesto as a teenage graffiti writer in 1979. He described the arrows in the spiky letters he sprayed on subway trains as a defence against exploitation, and the carriages carrying these letters as tanks in battle. He named his treatise ‘Ikonoklast Panzerism’, and while he would manage to make his living as an artist soon after, the struggle to subvert and liberate language remained literal for him. This was his craft, and he called it ‘Gothic Futurism’. “I’m an arms dealer,” he tells the radio host. She thinks he means this figuratively, the ‘arms’ being the rhetoric in his raps as an MC. “No,” he insists. “My weapons is real… I’ll make you one.” Graffiti writer, recording artist, verbal prankster – Rammellzee was all of these, but the self-taught artist deployed many ‘weapons’, including paint, epoxy, plaster, plastic, marble and, more often than not, other people’s rubbish. He fashioned the latter into elaborate costumes, masks and toys, which he frequently wore, each with a role to play in sagas he could recite long into the night. Rammellzee was many things to people from many different worlds: a model who once dated Madonna; an imposing, costumed character from outer space; a shy, mysterious figure who inhabited a universe of his own creation. Though he never gained the renown of his one-time collaborator, American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, Rammellzee was something of a muse to the more celebrated painter and sold plenty of his

own creations after making the leap from subway trains to downtown galleries. His effect was felt in the hip-hop world, too. In 1983, Basquiat produced the 12-inch test pressing titled Beat Bop, which featured Rammellzee in a duet with rapper K-Rob. His nasal delivery – a style Rammellzee dubbed ‘Gangsta Duck’ – would later be cited as an influence by Cypress Hill and the Beastie Boys. The track became a collectable touchstone, and the theme for iconic graffiti documentary Style Wars. That same year, Rammellzee took the stage in the climactic scene of hip-hop movie Wild Style and made a memorable cameo in director Jim Jarmusch’s 1984 cult movie Stranger Than Paradise. Rammellzee’s own home/studio in New York, which he dubbed the Battle Station, was becoming a pilgrimage site for other musicians, graffiti artists and eccentrics. “Rammellzee is a special piece of magic galaxy dust – the Magic Scriptulator,” bassist Bootsy Collins reportedly said when he and George Clinton, the leader of the P-Funk collective, visited in 1987. So is Rammellzee best understood as a performance artist who dabbled in the visual arts, a serious artist who also rhymed, or a scene maker? A retrospective of his work, RAMM∑LLZ∑∑: Racing For Thunder, at Red Bull Arts New York City until August 26, gives audiences a chance to answer this for themselves. The show, which features everything from his early’80s post-graffiti work to the Garbage Gods that populated the Battle Station,

Rammellzee’s 2009 work Atomic Note Maestro Atmosferic – ‘K1.77’ refers to his status as a graffiti artist (‘King1’) after spraying the most train carriages in 1977 THE RED BULLETIN

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reveals how busy Rammellzee kept himself in the 49 years up till his death in 2010. “There wasn’t, and won’t be, another like him,” says Joe La Placa, co-founder of New York’s Gallozzi-La Placa Gallery, and a dealer who sold Rammellzee’s work for years. “I remember the first time we met, we talked about letter forms, which I was interested in from an art history perspective and he got into via the [graffiti] writers. We talked about how literacy was power in the Middle Ages, and he told me a story about the monks hiding a letter from God in hell… Then he said letters didn’t just carry symbolic meaning, but contained energy that can be released, like a split atom. That blew my head off.”

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orn in late 1960, Rammellzee – his birth name isn’t known for sure – was raised in the projects in the New York neighbourhood of Far Rockaway, Queens. Raised by a police officer, he was, by 14, one of the very punks his father figure was

Rammellzee’s greatest work of art, arguably, was his own myth assigned to catch. The young Rammellzee and his crew created improvised markers using empty cigarette lighters, filling them with purple supermarket ink and stuffing shredded erasers into the top to act as a form of applicator. “It would leak all over your pockets, but you could hit a train,” Rammellzee told culture critic Greg Tate. “’Course, when you got home you got your [butt] beat because your pants were all fucked up.” Standing at 6ft 3in [190cm] tall, and with a slender build in his youth, Rammellzee cut a rather lanky-looking figure – an impression accentuated by the overcoats he favoured, which hung loose

Rammellzee’s 1989 work Knotted Minds was created with spray paint, strips of film, and printed paper collage

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ANGELA BOATWRIGHT, RAMMELZEE KNOTTED MINDS 1989

The Red Bull exhibition examines the evolution of his diverse body of work

from his frame. He often wore ski caps and googles, or could be seen sporting three sets of shades in a stack on his forehead, including those wraparounds with the narrow slit that look like they were made for viewing nuclear tests. What American-Mexican author Jennifer Clement first noted about Rammellzee was his distinctive gait. “He walks or rather glides in big steps leaning backward with a bop in his walk,” she writes in her 2000 book Widow Basquiat, an intimate portrait of Basquait’s lover and muse, Suzanne Mallouk. Rammellzee, Clement writes, loves slang, “calls girls ‘freaks’ and boys ‘crimees’, for criminals.” When he sleeps at Mallouk and Basquait’s loft, she says, “He never takes off his shoes or hat. He says he does this in case he needs to make a quick getaway.” Once he had reached working age, Rammellzee held the usual array of random jobs that seem, in retrospect, crucial to an artist’s development. He signed up to a modelling agency. He attended classes at the Clara Barton School for Health Professions in Brooklyn, where he worked on mouth guards and dentures – the kind of precise handiwork that he would later employ for his assemblage projects. Rammellzee worked as a diver for his uncle on an oil rig, where, the music historian Dave Tompkins writes, he “learnt to punish his diaphragm like a monk”. This prepares him for the interesting sounds he would later generate on the vocoder – the electronic, voice-altering device Tompkins profiles in his excellent 2010 book How To Wreck A Nice Beach: The Vocoder From World War II To Hip-Hop. During his employment as a diver, Tompkins notes, Rammellzee “ingested his fair share” of less dense air and gas, a mixture that enabled him to play around with the pitch of his voice. “Yet he learned the ‘Gangster Duck’ style not from frogman helium but Jamal, a rapper he’d met at a Far Rockaway Police Athletic League centre, where they would change voices and get-ups to trick the cops.” As Rammellzee told Tompkins, “I owe my life on the mic to that dude.” Though he was never estranged from his family, Rammellzee said they didn’t know what to make of him and his burgeoning skill set. “Nobody in my family likes what I do,” he revealed to Tompkins. “They damn sure don’t understand how I got to New York and how I got to stay.” But in the wider world his fan base was growing. Rammellzee’s


Rammellzee as ‘Vain The Insane’ – other alter egos included ‘Rip-cord Rex’ and ‘Chaser The Eraser’

of the hip-hop and art worlds, as The Village Voice once put it. However, music historian Jeff Mao cautions against this. Mao is collecting oral histories from Rammellzee’s friends and collaborators for the Red Bull exhibition. “He was an intensely charismatic presence who made an indelible impression on everyone who encountered him,” Mao says. “But he was too singular and uncompromising to be defined or confined by any scene. Ultimately, a force of nature like that separates itself from the crowd.”

He could pull on one of his ersatz costumes and all but disappear early paintings and work in resin sold well, and to prominent collectors such as Dia Art Foundation co-founder Heiner Friedrich. Hell The Finance Field Wars, which Wild Style director Charlie Ahearn considers to be one of Rammellzee’s finest paintings, hung in the Tokyo store of streetwear brand Supreme on its opening night. Often overlooked, too, are the months he spent living and working on marble sculptures in Martina Franca, southern Italy. In 1987, Rome’s Galleria Lidia Carrieri held an exhibition of his work titled The Equation. The following year, he and the MCs Shock Dell and Delta II collaborated as Gettovetts on Missionaries Moving, an album for Island Records, but it sold poorly. When he returned to the Battle Station, Rammellzee began to work in earnest on his bricolage – work that culture critic Mark Dery later seized upon as an example of ‘Afrofuturism’ in the 1994 essay that introduced the term. A hot topic today in the wake of the film Black Panther’s monster success, Afrofuturism is a movement that combines elements of black history and culture with science fiction and tech. A prime example of this, said Dery, is Rammellzee’s Gasholeer, a suit of Samurai-like armour that the artist spent four years building from materials 100

plucked from New Yorkers’ trash. The Gasholeer is, to use Dery’s phrase, “a 148-pound [67kg], gadgetry-encrusted exoskeleton” that shoots flames from its heels and throat. “Much of what Rammellzee did qualifies as Afrofuturism,” says Reynaldo Anderson, the chair of the Humanities department at Harris-Stowe State University in St Louis, Missouri, and co-editor of the 2015 book Afrofuturism 2.0: The Rise of Astro-Blackness. But, he points out, Rammellzee had his own term for his work, too: Gothic Futurism. As Anderson observes, “[Rammellzee] is right at the intersection of the black experience and these European forms, the Gothic letters he wants to wrest out of the ancient empires.” Given the various groups and scenes he moved between, it’s tempting to see Rammellzee as an amalgamation of external influences – the Forrest Gump

His Gulf War sculpture (1991)

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MARI HORIUCHI, GRONINGER MUSEUM GULF WAR 1991

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ammellzee’s Tribeca residence, the Battle Station, might well have been his magnum opus. He filled this loft – situated on the fourth storey of a building on Laight Street in Lower Manhattan – floor to ceiling with his creations. It got to the point where Rammellzee could pull on one of his ersatz costumes and all but disappear, camouflaged in his own cabinet of wonders, two eyes blinking out from a world assembled from dumpster trash. “He crammed it all in, but it wasn’t just chaos,” Ahearn says. “He was meticulous.” Visitors to the Battle Station never knew what might unfold. Pilgrims might be given a lengthy tour, with Rammellzee sharing the particular origins, traits and destinies of each of his characters. The first time Tompkins entered, he recalls in How To Wreck A Nice Beach, Rammellzee introduced him to the Mettroposttersizer, an “electro-magnetic planet smasher that causes ‘The Wizard’s Game Of Pool’, leaving the solar system in a ‘molten state’. Also referred to as ‘another reason to drink beer’”. On a subsequent visit to the Battle Station, Tompkins found himself on the back seat of a minivan, gazing up at “a fleet of skateboards and souped-up Tonka chassis… Each is an armoured letter from Rammel’s transuniversal alphabet, aeronautic structures of disfigured angles and points, encrypted and long estranged from the word itself, now helmed by plastic dragons, doll heads and Dimetrodons, sprayed in gold”. Oh, my weapons is real… I’ll make you one. Each of Rammellzee’s costume characters had a part to play in his Gothic Futurism universe, as he explained to Greg Tate when the critic crossed the threshold. Tate reports, “Some of them are from different time periods. The Purple People Eater over there is China, the Cosmic Bookie… He places his bets with the Horrors, and the Horrors


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Gamble galaxies. The Wieder is dealing with Chronologies. He spins around and deals with Ovulisation. He has to deal with the bet called ‘Womb Versus Man’.” Tate would later write that while listening to Rammellzee it’s hard to know what’s cosmology and what’s a child’s make-believe, but, “you be the judge. Ramm don’t care, ’cause Ramm don’t stop”. Rammellzee continued to record music, collaborating at times with famed bass player and producer Bill Laswell, who has worked with everyone from Sly & Robbie and Yoko Ono to Motörhead and writer/visual artist William S Burroughs. (Laswell once arranged for Rammellzee to meet Burroughs while both were in Amsterdam, and the two of them hit it off. At a subsequent encounter in New York, Rammellzee’s wife Carmela Zagari told The New York Times, Burroughs greeted him as “Father”. “Son!” Rammellzee replied, opening his arms.) In 2003, under the slightly expanded moniker The Rammellzee, he released This Is What You Made Me, a double 12-inch set produced in Japan; a year later, he worked with German record label Gomma on his debut album proper, Bi-Conicals Of The Rammellzee, which featured other artists and producers including Ferris Wheel, Munk, Jaws, Stuart Argabright, Taketo, Death Comet Crew, Naughty and Kaos. “As impenetrable as it is wildly entertaining, this record will fuel Rammellzee’s reputation for

The artist in warrior mode

at least another two decades,” one music critic predicted at the time.

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hortly after the September 11 attacks, the owner of the building where Rammellzee and Zagari resided sold up. It was, Dave Tompkins later wrote, the only time he saw Rammellzee looking sombre: it meant he had to move the Battle Station. The couple relocated to a more conventional apartment in nearby Battery Park City, forcing much of the Battle Station into storage. Money, too, became more of an issue: Rammellzee hadn’t had to pay rent on the Battle Station for years; it had been a squat. Rammellzee remained productive, performing with the guitarist Buckethead at gig venue the Knitting Factory, and providing work for a solo exhibition in Zurich. But, in

Rammellzee’s 1985 creation Atomic Note Blue Based Nightmare has echoes of Wassily Kandinsky’s betterknown 1923 painting Composition 8

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his final years, friends saw less and less of him, and they could tell he wasn’t well. According to The New York Times, heart disease was the reported cause of Rammellzee’s death, but friends suspect the epoxies he used (working without a respirator) and drinking had taken their toll, too. He’d been in noticeable decline since a seizure in 2008. While Rammellzee was still alive, art curator Jeffrey Deitch approached him about mounting a new show in New York, but he became fixated on an impractical idea: to fill the gallery’s entire volume with resin. After his death, gallerist Suzanne Geiss assisted Deitch in recreating a portion of the Battle Station for Art In The Streets, an exhibition at LA’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Geiss also negotiated with his estate to assess what Rammellzee had in storage. “I can’t imagine what others might have thought when opening the storage unit – like, ‘What is this pile of junk?’” Geiss recalls. “He’d had a deep fat fryer at the Battle Station, so everything was coated in this residue of grease. We moved it all to a warehouse, and spent seven months cleaning and cataloguing it. It was like taking part in an archaeological excavation.” From this wreckage, Geiss rescued almost three sets of Rammellzee’s Letter Racers – spacecraft sculptures representing the alphabet, created from junk – that Tompkins once sat beneath, and built an inaugural show for Geiss’ own gallery. Several of these pieces will be included in the current show in New York. “Rammellzee is a fascinating person, because he embodied each of the personae he created,” Geiss says. “And his work came from a deeply held belief that he’d unlocked the key to the universe.” Throughout it all, Rammellzee remained obsessed with letters and letter forms, and his theories about his work – some of it clever, some of it doped-up nonsense – challenge you to question any information you trust. Even the name he took is not a name, he said, but an equation, and is properly written with sigmas, not epsilons (RAMM∑LLZ∑∑). Rammellzee may have had a key to the universe, but it wasn’t made up of simple answers. On the mic or on canvas, with marble or trash, and in his own person, he was a provocateur; his greatest work of art, arguably, was his own myth. “He was the art,” says Ahearn.

RAMM∑LLZ∑∑: Racing For Thunder is at Red Bull Arts New York City until August 26; nyc.redbullmusicfestival.com THE RED BULLETIN

BRIAN WILLIAMS, RAMMELZEE 1985

He had his own term for his work: ‘Gothic Futurism’


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guide Get it. Do it. See it.

28 May

SOUTH TO SIAN

XTREME VIDEO/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, @ANTHONYDODDS

What started for Zye Norris (pictured) and Harrison Roach as a three-month trip to surf remote breaks became a two-year journey across Indonesia by board, bike, boat and 4WD. Watch the premiere of the film about their voyage on redbull.tv

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GUIDE

Do it

“I faced some of the best players in the world and beat them all”

Playing for kicks: FIFA hotshot Ryan Pessoa at Red Bull Gaming Sphere

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Gaming

READY PLAYER ONE A new virtual world has just been unlocked in east London. Drop in and power up… Words TOM GUISE Photography JAMES PEARSON-HOWES

Descend an unassuming stairwell in Shoreditch, east London, and you’ll face the world’s deadliest street fighters, the most skilful footballers, and racing drivers who can execute the perfect drift before launching a green shell with precision. They may be video-game characters, but the players controlling them are very real and extremely good. Welcome to the new Red Bull Gaming Sphere. A cross between a digital sports bar and a technological dojo, the Red Bull Gaming Sphere is the UK’s largest eSports studio – a hangout where pro and casual players can interact, spar and just plain show off. Since opening in March, it has hosted Dota workshops, deathmatches with Quake champions, and, each week, the Friday Night Brawl – a chance to team battle on the likes of Overwatch and Rocket League. It’s also the place where The Red Bulletin met two players whose lives have been levelled up by their video-game talent…

THE RED BULLETIN

THE SIM RACER Sinem Temur has a driving simulator that costs more than your car

In the summer of 2016, Temur was working in a theatre in Belgium when her boyfriend brought home a second-hand driving-game set-up. “It had real pedals and a steering wheel, and I wanted a go, but a friend said, ‘No, it’s not a girl thing,’” she recalls. “I wanted to prove him wrong. So I practised. By the end of the week, I could beat his time on Project CARS’ Monza track.” Temur, now 30, began posting videos of her laps to YouTube under the moniker @SimRacingGirl. “I had 300 followers when Vesaro contacted me,” she says. “They make high-end [racing simulator] chassis in the UK and they sent me one.” By the end of the year, she was being inundated with equipment to test, and invitations to gaming events. “Then I got invited to the Red Bull Racing Factory.” The Formula One team were offering her the opportunity to try out

Need for speed: Sinem Temur, aka YouTube’s @SimRacingGirl

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GUIDE

Do it

their rig. “It’s a raised motion platform with stairs,” she says of perhaps the world’s most realistic racing simulator. “I wore a helmet to communicate with the engineer. When motion feels bad, there’s latency. Here, I didn’t even notice the platform was moving until I saw footage. That’s realism.” Piloting a simulation of the team’s F1 car – “on the Red Bull Ring, of course” – Temur pitted her mettle against Max Verstappen’s own record. “I was eight seconds off, but it was his qualifying set-up and I was on default,” she says. Today, Temur’s YouTube channel has more than 35,000 subscribers and she makes tutorials for Fanatec, one of the world’s leading sim-racing manufacturers. As for her home driving rig, she estimates it’s worth more than many a real car: “18,000 Euros,” she says. “Not including the PC.” As for what’s next, a career as an eSports athlete isn’t yet on the cards – “I don’t think I’m good enough yet, but I’m doing coaching sessions” – but Temur is keen to get behind the wheel of a real-life racing car: “I did a taxi lap at Modena and I knew every bump – I realised it’s something I want to try on my own.” Two years into her career, Temur now finds herself influencing a new generation of sim-racing girls. “I get messages saying, ‘You’re so inspiring, you got me into sim racing.’ And there are real female race drivers who got into it because of what I’ve done.” While she admits her audience is male-dominated, Temur is confident she’s helping change the scene: “There will definitely be more female sim racers because of me,” she says. youtube.com/simracinggirl

108

“A friend said, ‘Racing isn’t a girl thing.’ I had to prove him wrong” Temur races on the Gaming Sphere’s rig with a McLaren GT3 wheel

THE RED BULLETIN


Gaming

PESSOA’S FIFA 18 TIPS

TEMUR’S RACING TIPS

Want to become the Messi or Ronaldo of gaming? Here’s how…

1

Five ways to improve your driving skills and take pole position

WORK THE WEEKEND “Take part in the weekend league. It’s crucial when getting coins to improve your team, and you’re up against people competing to achieve the highest ranking possible to qualify for a tournament.”

1

PICK A GOOD GAME “Project CARS 2 is a fun way to start, because it’s arcade-ish – or ‘simcade’, as we call it. I played it for five months before transferring to Assetto Corsa. I also love DiRT Rally – I made a video in Finland and got 975,000 views. I earned €1,000 with that video.”

2

BE STRATEGIC “If I had known the path to being a competitive player was spreading out your games on the weekend league, I would have played differently when qualifying for the FIFA Interactive World Cup. But I rushed all my games. If I had taken more care, I would have won more games.”

2

FIND YOURSELF A DRIVING COACH “The best way to learn is with only two people racing: the coach and me. He drives in front and I can see his lines, then he drives behind so he can see how I pick up his feedback. He can immediately tell me to brake later or earlier.”

3

ONLY RACE IN VR “With one screen, it’s hard to see the other cars; three screens are better. I only race in VR, because you can look behind you. Sometimes I’m in VR for hours. If you’re in the zone and really focused, it’s weird when you take off the headset. I’m like, ‘Where the fuck am I?’”

4

BUILD YOUR OWN RIG… “For my set-up at home I have the Vesaro chassis and, because I work for Fanatec, I have their steering wheel base and pedals. Their ecosystem can mix different wheels and bases. There are more high-end brands like Heusinkveld, but it’s a big price difference.”

5

…OR JUST DRIVE SOMEONE ELSE’S “The Gaming Sphere’s rig is great for starting with. The wheel base is the [Fanatec] ClubSport V2.5, which I race at home. The pedals are the ClubSport V3 – inverted so they hang down. It feels different, especially the throttle. Some like them, some don’t. Personally, I like them.”

THE RED BULLETIN

Pessoa: unbeatable (almost)

THE FOOTBALL PRODIGY

Just a year ago, Ryan Pessoa was a bedroom FIFA player. Now he’s in the big league Ryan Pessoa was 10 when he first began playing FIFA on the PS2. Last June, aged 19 and studying at Exeter University, he received an email. “I’d qualified for a tournament without even realising,” he says. “It said I had to fill out some form or my position would go to someone else. I thought it was spam, so I ignored it. Turns out I’d finished fifth in the world.” And so began the legend of Ryan Pessoa. After finally submitting the form, Pessoa was flown to Munich to compete in the FIFA Interactive World Cup qualifier. “Nobody knew who I was. I had a really tough group of the best players in the world and beat them all.” By the end of the year, everybody knew who Pessoa was – the world’s number one Xbox One FIFA 18 player, now rebranded Hashtag Ryan. That moniker came from one of the biggest names in

YouTube football: Hashtag United, who play real-world matches in a league set-up similar to that in the FIFA videogame series. “[Owner] Spencer Owen approached me, saying he wanted to sign me to their eSports team.” These days, Pessoa juggles his time between business studies at uni and training at Hashtag’s London HQ. “On the weekends I have to play 40 games, so that’s 10-15 hours. I still practise during the week, but not as much as I used to – as soon as my lectures were done, I’d never stop.” Pessoa may be able to indulge his passion further in the near future, however. “I love eSports: I’m learning new things every day, and when I’m done with university I’m taking up gaming full-time,” he reveals. But he’ll still find time for friendlies against his old FIFA buddies. “We play every day,” he says. “But they haven’t beaten me in five years. Wait, I think someone beat me on penalties once…” youtube.com/hashtagryan

3

STUDY THE REAL SPORT “You can learn to play FIFA from real-life football: how to save, how to be structured, making those runs, and the attacking side. I’m not sure FIFA can help you learn how to play football in real life, though.”

4

SLOW DOWN AND RETAIN POSSESSION “I used to think pace was everything, but what I’ve learnt is to not always sprint when attacking. Walk and wait for your opponent to move a defender out of place, then do a one-two. Also, I used to play so direct: one-nil up in the 85th minute, I’d go for the goal; I scored the most goals in the Munich tournament. Now I score less, but keep possession. I learnt from the world champions – it’s the way to get results.”

5

LEARN FROM PROS “The Gaming Sphere is fantastic for competitive gaming. You can go down and play pro gamers like me, or other casual players. It’s a massive step forward for the UK gaming scene.” Red Bull Gaming Sphere is at 2 Chance St, London E1 6JT. The minimum age for entry is 16. You must register online at redbull. com to attend most events

109


GUIDE

Do it GET FIT LIKE A WORLD CHAMPION

“FIND YOUR INNER BEAST!”

What two-time cable wakeboarding World Champion DOMINIK GÜHRS doesn’t know about sporting success isn’t worth knowing. Here, the 28-year-old Munich native reveals his top training tips – which will have you reaching for the rolling pin…

Dominik Gührs

Fit to compete: Gührs in action in Croatia

KONSTANTIN REYER (2), MARJAN RADOVIC/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, PICTUREDESK.COM (2) DAVID MEYER TOM MACKINGER

was just 12 when he went shopping for a skateboard and, taking the salesman’s advice, returned home with a wakeboard instead. The tip paid off: the German has twice been crowned World Champion and takes his third shot at the title later this year.

Rope-master: the cable wakeboarding World Champion in ‘beast mode’

110

THE RED BULLETIN


Fitness

M OVE M E NT

“If you want to improve, push your limits”

M I N DS ET

“If you’re not focused, you’ve lost before you’ve even started”

“If I want my muscles to grow, I have to put them under the right stresses and strains, which is why, every now and then, I like to get into a state I call ‘beast mode’.”

“Wakeboarding races often last less than a minute, so you must have complete focus right from the very start – otherwise the race is already lost.”

“Every fitness fanatic knows that moment during the last set of barbell squats when your legs start to shake and you think you can’t go on. If I can force myself at that very moment to do one more, I get a sort of superpower and I can do another three, four or five reps.”

“To achieve maximum mental concentration, I juggle three balls before competing. It focuses all my attention on my hand-eye coordination and leaves no room for distracting thoughts.”

“Of course, you shouldn’t overdo beast mode. You need to develop a good sense of what your body can do. Beginners should aim to get there gradually.”

R EC OVE RY

“I recover from training by doing more training“ “When I’ve done a really tough strength session, I tack on another 20 to 30 minutes of fascia training. That involves moving the foam roller really hard over the spots that hurt the most, until the pain eases off. I literally roll the pain away.” “Relaxation is important, too. In addition to the fascia training, getting enough sleep is vital for recovery. I need a minimum of eight or nine hours.” hours

ROLL LIKE AN EXPERT

“At some point while juggling, my body takes over, my hands seem to throw the balls by themselves, and I get into a sort of ‘mental flow’ – that’s the perfect state when you’re going into battle.”

JUGGLE TO AID CONCENTRATION “Hold two balls in your right hand, one in your left. Throw as shown above: from the right hand, then the left, then the right, catching the balls. You now have two balls in your left hand, one in your right. Throw the balls as before, starting with your left hand, and so on.”

N UTR ITI O N

“I don’t bother with calorie counting, gluten-free diets or strict meal plans” “If I want to give my best performance, I have to feel comfortable, and part of that comes from eating what I want, even if that sometimes means it’s dripping with fat. But I’m specific about what I eat right before and after training to give my body the best possible fuel.” “About an hour and a half before each session, I’ll eat pasta or potatoes with vegetables to give me the power I need. Then, just before I start, I’ll eat a banana or drink a protein shake; both are easy on the stomach, yet still provide energy. I need something light after training, too, or I’ll slip into a coma.”

REWARD YOUR HARD WORK “Mix 250g of low-fat curd cheese with a little protein powder, then add chopped fruit, nuts, and a teaspoon of honey. It’s the perfect reward after an intense workout.”

“I swap the foam roller for a rolling pin for use on my inner thighs and calves. It’s much easier to hold.”

THE RED BULLETIN

111


GUIDE

See it

An epic surf odyssey, a rally classic, and one tough cross-country mountain-biking challenge. See all this – and more – on Red Bull TV this month

Hear hand-picked music and interviews with influential artists. This month’s pick is…

28

Roach: “Indonesia is the best country to score waves”

May

SÓNAR ÓNAR DÔME

PREMIERE

SOUTH TO SIAN

Follow surfers Harrison Roach and Zye Norris on their two-year, 4,000km odyssey across Indonesia, from Bali to Sumatra's Lagundri Bay. Travelling by board, bike, boat and four-wheel drive, the pair discover whether, in these days of GPS and Wi-Fi, the dream of a true surf adventure is still alive.

18

to 20 May

LIVE

WRC PORTUGAL

WATCH RED BULL TV ANYWHERE

Red Bull TV is a global digital entertainment destination featuring programming that is beyond the ordinary and is available any time, anywhere. Go online at redbull.tv, download the app, or connect via your Smart TV. To find out more, visit redbull.tv

112

Part of the Championship since its inaugural year – 1973 – the Rally de Portugal is back for the 2018 season. Can world champion Sébastien Ogier win it for an incredible sixth time?

20 May

LIVE

MTB WORLD CUP 2018, GERMANY

Albstadt is one of the XCO World Cup’s most physically demanding courses. See this year’s riders tackle its long, steep climbs and technical descents.

14 June ON AIR

For the past 13 years, Red Bull Music Academy has hosted a stage at renowned electronic music festival Sónar in Barcelona. To mark the Academy’s 20th anniversary, this year’s live stream – across three days, from June 14 – features artists such as genre-bending Madonna collaborator SOPHIE (pictured), and team-ups including electro legend DJ Stingray and British bass heavyweight Mumdance, and Afrobeat drummer Tony Allen and Detroit funkster Amp Fiddler. LISTEN AT REDBULLRADIO.COM

THE RED BULLETIN

WOODY GOOCH @WOODYGPHOTO, XTREME VIDEO/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, @WORLD/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, BARTEK WOLINSKI/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, KOURY ANGELO/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

MAKING A CLEAN BREAK

May / June


GUIDE

Get it

THE SCRAMBLER REMIXED A bike concept so good they invented it twice Words TOM GUISE

1962

The original Ducati 250 Scrambler is launched

114

Filthy beast: the Scrambler 1100 Sport – almost too beautiful to mess up

DUCATI

The origin of the scramble bike is as pitted as the trails it was built to tackle. The name comes from the ‘hare scrambles’ popularised in the early 20th century – races across the UK countryside on modified street bikes stripped of unnecessary weight and sporting a higher seat, knobbly tyres, and a raised exhaust for better ground clearance. Lighter and quicker, with an emphasis on torque rather than top speed, these machines served up raw necessity as aesthetic. Their growing popularity caught the eye of Joseph Berliner, owner of the Berliner Motor Corporation, the largest importer of European bikes to the US. Wielding his powerful influence – and displaying not insignificant instinct – Berliner demanded from Ducati a purpose-built machine that could satisfy a US market hungry for bikes capable of on- and off-road discipline. In 1962, the Ducati 250 Scrambler was born. For nine years, iterations of this machine with increasing grunt tackled highways, unsealed tracks and natural terrain, from the Midlands to the Mojave Desert. But, as scramble tracks evolved into motocross circuits with epic jumps, the demands became too much for a bike born with street DNA. Dedicated dirt bikes with lighter frames and longer suspension emerged. By 1976, the Ducati Scrambler was no more.

1968

The Ducati Scrambler, as advertised in its home country of Italy

THE RED BULLETIN


Motorbikes REVIVAL OF THE FITTEST

DUCATI SCRAMBLER 1100 SERIES It wasn’t out of nowhere that Ducati revived the Scrambler in 2015. For years, riders had been stripping down their modern bikes and adding chunky tyres, engine bash plates and high bars – only this time it was rugged retro appeal, not function, that was the driver. This is the essence of Ducati’s modern Scramblers:  although sporting a 1970s offroad aesthetic, they’re more street machine. Some are more filth-friendly than others. The Café Racer is clearly for the city, while the Desert Sled is a homage to the outback racing Steve McQueen enjoyed. For pure pose, the Mach 2.0 has livery by Californian bike customiser Roland Sands. But the new models for 2018 – the 1100 series – eschew the lightweight ethos for brute 1079cc muscle. These beefy rides are stripped down like The Rock without his shirt on. It’s a marriage of retro styling and cuttingedge tech: the rim of the round headlamp recalls the sticky tape popularly applied to the edges of ’70s off-road bike lights – only this time the lamp is LED-powered. The dials are digital, but with an RPM scale reminiscent of the old speedometers. The desmodromic valve system that controls the engine intake and exhaust valves, though, is anything but new tech –  developed by Ducati engineer Fabio Taglioni in 1956, it was part of the Desmo R/T 450, the last original Scrambler to launch in 1970. Today’s Scrambler may not assuredly tackle a modern MX circuit, but it has evolved into something else. It has the raised pipe, knobbly tyres and stripped-down aesthetic, but is very much a machine about town. scramblerducati.com

1969

The 450 Scrambler debuts. The last of these is produced in 1976

THE RED BULLETIN

1969

A full range of Scrambler models are aimed at the 'hippy' market

115


GUIDE

Do it

10

May /June May OVO Energy Tour Series Britain’s leading team cycle race series is pedalling across the UK this month with stages in eight locations, starting in Redditch on May 10, before heading up to Scotland and freewheeling down to Wembley Park for the penultimate competition on May 29. All events are unticketed and free to all spectators. Various locations; tourseries.co.uk

23

to 24 June

TOTAL WARRIOR

There was a time when only army rookies would have to endure punishing obstacle courses, but now they’re a summer pastime. This one is billed as the pinnacle of obstacle racing, with 25 killer challenges spread across 10km, including monkey bars, Tarzan ropes, a 30m pool filled with tractor inner tubes, a tank full of ice, a leap over fire, and a run through a forest of electric cables. Makes the training in Full Metal Jacket look like a stroll in the park… Bramham Park, Leeds; totalwarrior.co.uk

116

Fulham Palace was once the residence of bishops, but this bank holiday weekend it’ll host open-air screenings of films including Jaws, The Godfather and Titanic. Because watching movies is always more enjoyable in the grounds of a stately home, especially when accompanied by a choir and orchestra. And even more so when the latter is performing the La La Land soundtrack along to the film, conducted by its actual composer. Fulham Palace, London; fulhampalace.org

27

May/11-14 June Game Of Thrones: Live Already done the location tour? Perhaps the Live Concert Experience will sate your Westeros cravings until next year’s final season. Show composer Ramin Djawadi and an 80-piece orchestra serve up highlights of the musical score, with 3D setpieces, LED effects and a 4m-tall Horn of Winter. Various locations; gameofthronesconcert.com

26

to 27 May Love Saves The Day The dance festival born from Bristol’s underground music scene steps out for its seventh year, this time rescuing a whole weekend with its good vibes. Fat Boy Slim and Sampha headline their respective days, but there are beats and bleeps for everyone, including Bicep, Four Tet, the Black Madonna and Shy FX. Eastville Park, Bristol; lovesavestheday.org

THE RED BULLETIN

SWPIX, IAN JACOBS/PRESSPIX.BIZ

25

to 27 May Live At The Palace


FOTO: MICK FANNING/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

BEYOND THE ORDINARY

SUBSCRIBE NOW TO THE ACTIVE-LIFESTYLE-MAGAZINE Distributed free every second Tuesday of the month with the London Evening Standard. Also available across the UK at airports, gyms, hotels, universities and selected retail stores. Read more at theredbulletin.com

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GUIDE

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May /June

6

to 16 June On The Run II Tour When Beyoncé and Jay-Z hit the road for the original On The Run Tour in 2014, they didn't escape the US further than two nights in Paris. This time, the Bonnie and Clyde of R&B/rap are scooting around Europe, kicking off on our shores with Cardiff on June 6, before heading to Glasgow, Manchester and finishing in London on June 16. Various locations; beyonce.com

Think the world is lurching toward the end of days? Consider this training: a 23,000m2 abandoned shopping mall filled with postapocalyptic crazies, and you trapped in there with a full-recoil infra-red-firing M6 rifle with only 30 shots in the clip. From the creators of the Zombie Survival Experience, with creature designs from Oscar winners, this is a fully immersive – and terrifying – two hours of fun.

GETTY IMAGES, ZED EVENTS

8

May onwards The Wasteland Experience

Wasteland Shopping Mall, Reading; zedevents.co.uk

118

THE RED BULLETIN


THE RED BULLETIN PROMOTION Joe Barnes and Fergus Lamb of Scottish trio the Dudes of Hazzard at home in the Highlands, atop the Canyon Spectral

W

hat the British Isles lack in high mountain ranges or chairlift access to vast bike park networks, they make up for in a riding scene as rich as clotted cream. British mountain bikers are notorious for making the best of whatever’s on their doorstep – and judging by the number of riders competing at the top of the sport who hail from these shores, that approach works. Of course, it’s a stretch to guarantee that a bike can change how you live, but it sure can help when you’re searching for that excuse to leave work early and ride. The Canyon Spectral was created by riders, for riders, to have the most fun riding. With Fort William’s finest, The Dudes of Hazzard on board throughout the development process, the Spectral is a bike that begs to be thrown through corners and fly down singletrack; a bike to set, forget and then pedal off for a big day out on the hill or an evening in the woods. In short, it’s a bike that was built for the British scene. Say no to your routine and yes to the trails. Find out more at canyon.com/noroutine

NO ROUTINE It’s a stretch to guarantee that a bike can change how you live, but it can help. Say no to your routine and yes to the trails The new Canyon Spectral


GUIDE

Check it

THE RED BULLETIN WORLDWIDE Festival stories from the fields of England and the Mexican jungle, how to trounce a football superstar, and a hip-hop art maverick who waged war with words – just some of the highlights from our issues around the globe this month

USA RAMMELLZEE A celebration of the graffiti visionary who blew minds on the hip-hop scene – and in the art world

Secret rave, Boomtown Fair Festival-goers gather for the Tribe of Frog forest party at Boomtown. The revellers know the name of the DJ, but who installed the hundreds of butterflies and garlands above their heads?

THE HIDDEN HEROES OF THE UK FESTIVAL SCENE

Words FLORIAN OBKIRCHER Photography JASPER CLARKE, JANE STOCKDALE

WILD AT HEART

57

UNITED KINGDOM FESTIVAL HEROES Stage manager, pyrotechnician, recycling steward… meet the unsung individuals behind four of the UK’s best-loved festivals

“I’D LIKE MY SCREEN LOCK TO LAST THREE HOURS”

UNIQUE PAR NATURE Les artistes aseptisés et sans saveur vous lassent ? Le Français KIDDY SMILE est tout l’opposé, et ne fait pas exprès. C’est au naturel qu’il s’exprime dans la danse et la musique. Un naturel peu commun. Texte PH CAMY

Photos CHRIS SAUNDERS

Styling GUY TAHI

Déterminé : Kiddy Smile, 30 ans, un artiste complet qui s’est révélé en autodidacte dans la création musicale.

43

FRANCE KIDDY SMILE Breaking convention: the ballroom DJ, singer and LGBTQ icon who has France under his spell

120

GERMANY MATTHIAS SCHWEIGHÖFER The star of cyber-crime TV thriller You Are Wanted shares his thoughts on the pros and cons of technology

THE RED BULLETIN


June

GLOBAL TEAM EL ANTIFESTIVAL EN TULUM Cómo un grupo de DJ organizaron una SERIE DE FIESTAS en un lugar paradisiaco, con sabor a festival, pero ecológico. ¿Es posible? Sí, ellos lo demostraron Texto MARCO PAYÁN

Fotografía GERARDO ARTEAGA

La Riviera Maya volvió a brillar, este año fue con el Sound Tulum.

62

MEXICO SOUND TULUM Rumble in the jungle: the party organisers putting the Mayan community and the environment at the heart of their plans

AUSTRIA NEYMAR JR Want to know what it takes to beat one of the world’s best footballers at five-a-side? The reigning champions of Neymar Jr’s Five have some pointers for you

DANCE SPECIAL

WECK DEN B-BOY IN DIR

Am 29. September ist Zürich Breakdance-Welthauptstadt. Red Bull BC One-Judge BENNY KIMOTO verrät, welche Powermoves die besten B-Boys zeigen werden. Text ALEX LISETZ

Halo

Rotieren auf der Kopfaußenseite

LITTLE SHAO/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

„Probier diesen Move nur, wenn du so gut trainiert bist wie mein Kumpel Lil Zoo am Bild – die Kräfte, die auf dein Genick wirken, sind enorm. Bei der sauberen Ausführung hilft ein PsychoTrick: Stell dir vor, du trägst ein Stirnband und drehst dich genau entlang dieser Linie um die eigene Achse.“ Schwierigkeitsstufe 7/10 54

SWITZERLAND B-BOY SPECIAL As we count down to September’s Red Bull BC One World Final in Zürich, judge Benny Kimoto profiles the power moves that win battles

THE RED BULLETIN

Der Marokkaner Lil Zoo performt kopfüber beim Red Bull BC One World Final 2017 in Amsterdam.

UNITED KINGDOM The Red Bulletin United Kingdom, ISSN 2308-5894 Editor Ruth Morgan Associate Editor Tom Guise Music Editor Florian Obkircher Chief Sub-Editor Davydd Chong Publishing Manager Ollie Stretton Advertisement Sales Mark Bishop, mark.bishop@redbull.com Printed by Prinovis GmbH & Co KG, Printing Company Nuremberg, 90471 Nuremberg, Germany UK Office 155-171 Tooley Street, London SE1 2JP Tel: +44 (0) 20 3117 2000 Subscribe getredbulletin.com Enquiries or orders to: subs@uk.redbulletin.com Back issues available to purchase at: getredbulletin.com Basic subscription rate is £20.00 per year. International rates are available The Red Bulletin is published 10 times a year. Please allow four to six weeks for delivery of the first issue Customer Service +44 (0)1227 277248 subs@uk.redbulletin.com

Editor-in-Chief Alexander Macheck Deputy Editors-in-Chief Waltraud Hable, Andreas Rottenschlager Creative Director Erik Turek Art Directors Kasimir Reimann (Stv. CD), Miles English Head of Photo Fritz Schuster Deputy Head of Photography Marion Batty Photo Director Rudi Übelhör Production Editor Marion Lukas-Wildmann Managing Editor Ulrich Corazza Editors Stefan Wagner (Chief Copy Editor), Christian Eberle-Abasolo, Arek Piatek Design Marco Arcangeli, Marion Bernert-Thomann, Martina de Carvalho-Hutter, Kevin Goll, Carita Najewitz Photo Editors Susie Forman, Ellen Haas, Eva Kerschbaum, Tahira Mirza Commercial Director Franz Renkin Advertising Placement Andrea Tamás-Loprais Creative Solutions Eva Locker (manager), Verena Schörkhuber, Edith Zöchling-Marchart Country Management and Marketing Sara Varming (Ltg.), Magdalena Bonecker, Julia Gerber, Kristina Hummel, Melissa Stutz Commercial Design Peter Knehtl (manager), Sasha Bunch, Simone Fischer, Martina Maier Head of Commercial & International Publishing Birgit Gasser Production Wolfgang Stecher (manager), Walter O. Sádaba, Friedrich Indich, Michael Menitz (digital) Repro Clemens Ragotzky (manager), Claudia Heis, Nenad Isailovi c,̀ Maximilian Kment, Josef Mühlbacher Office Management Kristina Krizmanic, Yvonne Tremmel IT Systems Engineer Michael Thaler Subscriptions and Distribution Peter Schiffer (manager), Klaus Pleninger (distribution), Nicole Glaser (distribution), Yoldaş Yarar (subscriptions) Global Editorial Office Heinrich-Collin-Straße 1, A-1140 Vienna Phone +43 1 90221-28800, Fax +43 1 90221-28809 Web www.redbulletin.com Red Bull Media House GmbH Oberst-Lepperdinger-Straße 11–15, A-5071 Wals bei Salzburg, FN 297115i, Landesgericht Salzburg, ATU63611700 General Manager and Publisher Andreas Kornhofer Directors Dietrich Mateschitz, Gerrit Meier, Dietmar Otti, Christopher Reindl

121


GUIDE

Action highlight

Makes you fly

Pro rider Courage Adams performs a triple take-off at the world’s first mirrored BMX park – the result of two-and-a-half years’ work by track designers in his adopted hometown of Pamplona, Spain

The next issue of THE RED BULLETIN is out on June 12 122

THE RED BULLETIN

SEBAS ROMERO/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

Time to reflect


LO N G E ST C U T F O R M A X I M U M COV E R AG E W H I L E M A N O E U V R I N G T H R O U G H T H E M O ST T E C H N I CA L T E R R A I N R E D E S I G N E D N E C K L I N E W I T H F R E S H ST Y L I N G A N D R E L A X E D F I T F O R I N C R E A S E D F R E E D O M O F M OV E M E N T T W O E A SY- ACC E S S R E A R Z I P P E R P O C K E T S ST R AT E G I CA L LY P L AC E D TO P R E V E N T S WAY I N G W H E N LOA D E D

SOLD AT FINER DEALERS WORLDWIDE | WWW.TROYLEEDESIGNS.COM


THE ULTIMATE

The new Stumpjumper is the most versatile trail bike we’ve ever made. Seriously,

TRAIL BIKE

proprietary headaches, focused on your needs, and made the new benchmark in

the damn thing rides like it’s on rails. And yeah, we’re stoked about that, but we’re even more excited about how well it’s tuned to you. We’ve said goodbye to trail bikes. It’s the Stumpjumper we always wanted it to be.

specialized.com/stumpjumper

The Red Bulletin June 2018 - UK  
The Red Bulletin June 2018 - UK