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Thursday, April 3, 2014 Vol. 121, No. 28 | Athens, Georgia redandblack.com

AREAS INVESTIGATED BY THE RED & BLACK FOR CRASH RATES

Uphill battle TRAFFIC SAFETY

Visibility, speed common concerns on campus roads BY NICK WATSON @nsawatson12 One of the most dangerous miles in Georgia for cyclists is nestled in the center of its flagship institution. With the beginning of spring and the Twilight Criterium around the corner, more people are out and about as cyclists and pedestrians. Bikers and walkers, however, saw more collisions with vehicles during the last decade in Athens on Broad Street and Lumpkin Street. Lumpkin Street, from Pinecrest Drive to Baxter Street, was ranked No. 1 in terms of bike crashes, according to a 2013 analysis by the University of Georgia Traffic Safety Research and Evaluation Group. On the downhill from Cedar Street to Baxter Street, the number of Lumpkin Street crashes climbs to 14 crashes in the last decade, half of the total crashes in that mile-long corridor. And the way BikeAthens Executive Director Tyler Dewey sees it, getting rid of that ranking will mean getting rid of certain bike lanes. “The longer term solution is actually removing the bike lane from the downhill section of the hill and putting up signage to remind cyclists to ride in the middle of the lane,” Dewey said. “As you go downhill on a bike, you are traveling about very close to the posted automobile speed limit, so you wouldn’t be impeding traffic to ride closer to the middle of the lane. That also makes cyclists more visible to cars.”

In the interim, Dewey has been working with interns in the UGA Grounds Department and the Office of Sustainability on a short-term solution to propose to the county government. Sumner Gann, the bike infrastructure intern in the Office of Sustainability and a master’s student of environmental planning and design, said some options include placing a mirror on the corner of the Tate Parking Deck or highlighting the bike lane. “We’re intending to meet with the county at some point in time to put in a formal request, because we know this is a problem area and we’d liked to see it fixed,” she said. “But we haven’t officially finalized yet what we think the solution might be for that area.” When the group narrows down the options, Dewey said the Grounds Department will begin discussions with county government on how to change the road and at what cost. “Right now we have it very conceptual, and the next step would be getting some more official, formal documentation done including a cost analysis,” Gann said. Pedestrians don’t fare much better on Lumpkin Street. In all of Athens-Clarke County, Lumpkin Street is second in terms of pedestrian crashes(26), with the most collisions on Broad Street(45). For both cyclists and pedestrians, Lumpkin Street, Broad Street, Baxter Street and Prince Avenue rank in the top five for the most crashes.

Cyclists and pedestrians in the Athens area face greatest danger of collisions on downtown streets, intersections and crosswalks. SOURCE: UGA Traffic Research Group GRAPHIC BY CAITLIN LEMOINE/Staff

See TRAFFIC, Page A11

OBESITY INITIATIVE

Need for health education still high

INSIDE

BY NICHOLAS FOURIEZOS @nick4iezos WAYNESBORO ­ — Tara Egan watched proudly as her fourthgrade daughter, Kyleigh, became an avid runner after signing up for a youth fitness program in Burke County last year. What Tara didn’t expect though was for her son, Christopher, and husband, Eddie, to suddenly get the exercise bug as well. Now the entire family runs and walks together regularly, sometimes training for 5K races outside the same office where Kyleigh first laced up her running shoes. “I’m not a runner, but I did run with her,” Tara said, “The whole thing has spilled off into our household.” The Egan family is the type of success story that the county is striving for. Burke County ranks among the state’s most-obese counties and county commissioners are worried about the health care costs associated with the condition. Girls on the Run, a 12-week fitness program for young girls, was brought in by the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service in Burke County to face some of the county’s concerns. The extension office works with the county to provide university-led research and health education to residents. It organized free medical screenings, health fairs and public employee nutritional training. The UGA Obesity Initiative, a multi-million dollar research and outreach program, was started two years ago to reduce obesity in the state. While the initiative is working on valuable obesity-related research, the information is often bottlenecked from reaching counties like Burke. Initiative leaders

B1 BREAKING THE ICE

Tara Egan (left) and her daughter Kyleigh are participants in the Girls on the Run program, which promotes exercise in families. NICHOLAS FOURIEZOS/Staff say they encourage extension agents to point people with obesity-related questions to the website. But low literacy rates, poverty and a lack of health awareness in many rural counties hobbles the effectiveness of solely promoting the website. Debbie Murray, the initiative’s outreach director, said its contributions, such as winning grant money and lobbying county commissioners to spend more on healthcare, are sometimes understated. “The really interesting thing about the Obesity Initiative is you don’t go out and say, “We’re the obesity initiative and we’re doing all of these things,’” said Murray, the associate dean for extension and outreach. “At the community level, we don’t necessarily label everything as the Obesity

Initiative.” Terri Black, a Burke County extension agent, said she hasn’t received funding from the initiative for local health programs that have been successful. The initiative has made no difference, Black said, in the obesity-related programs she’s had in place since as early as 2007. “I can’t say that I’ve seen anything tangible,” Black said. “It hasn’t really changed anything for me.” The rest of the 39 counties in the Southeast District’s extension offices didn’t receive information or funding from the initiative for county-specific projects, according to District Extension Director Joann Milam, despite including many of the state’s most obese counties.

B6 JUNKMAN’S CLOSING

A2 EVOLUTION OF COP CARS

See OBESITY, Page A10

NEWS, A2 • VIEWS, A4 • SPORTS, B1 • VARIETY, B4 • SHOWCASE, B7 • PUZZLES, B9 An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia and Athens Communities

Established 1893, Independent 1980


A2 News

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

Changing needs of police contribute to evolution of cop cars BY MICHELLE BARUCHMAN @mlbaruchman Innovative technology, changing expectations of police officers and maintenance concerns contribute the evolution of police cars in Athens. “When we sit down and look at cars [to buy], we’re looking at use, comfort to the officer and other people that we provide rides to, and maintenance cost that we have experienced with vehicles for similar type designs and that’s how we start making our choices,” said University of Georgia Police Chief Jimmy Williamson. Williamson said the UGA Police Department has roughly 20 cars for about 88 people. The police car is the officer’s office and the car is running almost continuously. Because he said officers put around 30,000 miles on a car each year, the cars have to be sustainable. “When the Ford Expedition first became available on state contract, we bought some,” Williamson said. “We ran the Expedition two years longer than we ran the Ford Crown Victorias. We normally got three to three-and-a-half years from the Crown Victorias and we were able to get about four-and-a-half to five years out of the [Ford] Expeditions.” Initial price and cost in the long run also affect decisions police make about which cars to buy. “We’re probably never going to explore buying all-wheel-drive cars because of the maintenance issues,” Williamson said. “Some cars we can get for probably about $2,500 less than a Chevrolet Tahoe, but what we found is we spend probably close to two to three times that money on repairs on the front end because they don’t hold up well, whereas in Athens-Clarke County, they might hold up better because they have a bigger geographical area they cover, so there is not as much turning.” He said the SUVs the department buys cost about $25,000 on the state contract and they last longer than small sedan cars. “If you look far back University of Georgia police used to drive station wagons, so to me it’s kind of funny that we have kind of made a circle because the two-wheel drive SUVs that we drive are basically a station wagon in my mind,” Williamson said. Carter Greene, assistant chief of ACC police, said he has been in law

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Ford Crown Victorias, (top), were discontinued and replaced with other cars including the Chevrolet Impala (bottom). Cars used by police have evolved over time based on cost and durability among other factors. ILLUSTRATION BY LYDIA DAVIS/Staff enforcement since 1984 and he uses very different cars now then he used to use when he began working. “We’ve come from large sedans that were made specifically for police to front wheel drive smaller four door sedans, as well as hybrid vehicles,” Green said. Greene said cars are also more gas efficient and safer due to technology than 30 years ago. “They have air bags, locking brake systems and sensors,” Greene said. “We added blue lights and a siren. We installed cameras, computers and mobile data terminals that officers use to write reports, get calls and run tags.” While ACC experiments with the most efficient cop cars, Greene said in the future, they will continue using

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Chevrolet Impalas and Toyota Priuses. Dan Silk, a part time instructor in the criminal justice department, said the police cars that are used have been standardized until recently. “Over the last 20 years, there has been some pretty consistent staples of American police cars until about the last five or six years,” Silk said. “For a long time, the only two options that anybody really had or really pursued were the Chevrolet Caprices, which was a rear wheel drive V8 car and the Ford Crown Victoria police interceptor, which is also a rear wheel drive V8 car, but neither of those are made anymore so eventually they are going to be extinct.” Silk said Ford discontinued production on the Crown Victorias for financial reasons.

“To you and me, it looks like they are everywhere, but as far as market share, for Ford, it was a small share for overall global market so it wasn’t financially sustainable for them to build it anymore when the only people that drove them were cops and taxi cab drivers,” Silk said. Silk said police cars have also changed because of shifting expectations for police officers. “Police overall now compared to 20 years ago, day in and day out, are expected to bring so much more equipment with them, whether that’s tactical equipment or life saving equipment or communications equipment,” Silk said. “It’s a different environment so as a profession, police generally use more space than they used to.”

SHE BLINDED ME WITH SCIENCE

Q: Can I use fireplace ashes as a fertilizer?

A: That would make sense, right? Controlled burns are generally considered beneficial for forest growth, so why wouldn’t the ash you’ve built up in your fireplace over the winter be good for your garden? Well, the answer from Julia Gaskin, sustainable agriculture coordinator for the crop and soil sciences department at the University of Georgia, was a cautious yes. “Wood ash is typically, historically, used as a source of potassium or potash,” she said. “But it also has a good bit of calcium and some other things in it. So if you aren’t careful you will run your soil pH up into a very alkaline state which isn’t the best for growing vegetable crops.” Gaskin said the best time of year to use fireplace ash was generally in the autumn season, when you might usually lime in your garden. She said the optimal pH level for a vegetable garden was between 6 and 6.5, and gardeners can get their soil tested. “It’s $8 for a routine soil test that will tell them the soil pH," Gaskin said. "It will tell them how much phosphorous is in there and

Julia Gaskin, sustainable agriculture coordinator for the crop and soil sciences department, said typically the best time to use ash is autumn. RAINEY GREGG/Staff potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, some other things. If they turn it in and check ‘vegetable garden, home vegetable garden,’ it will come back with some fertilizer recommendations.” Once you know what the pH of the soil is, Gaskin said it is OK to apply wood ash sparingly. If you can see a consistent layer of ash, Gaskin said you’ve probably used too much. It’s better to use a light dusting, get the

Jeanette Kazmierczak @sciencekaz

soil tested again and then add more ash if deemed necessary. “The problem is your wood ashes can vary in their potassium amounts,” Gaskin said. “It’s not like you’re getting a known quantity out there. You’re just trying to kind of nurse it along. But you defi-

nitely don’t want to over apply and, if your pH is already in the 6.0 to 6.5 range, probably you want to look for another potassium source. I speak from experience. I’ve done this in my own garden and run my pH up to like 7.8, which is pretty alkaline.”

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

News A3

SGA questions student representation Student representation at the University of Georgia has long been the priority of the Student Government Association. But lately, representatives and executive candidates alike have clashed over the importance of a number of seats in the senate. Student Life seats are made up of representatives in SGA that, unlike standard senators, do not run on behalf of a specific college. Instead, they are appointed to serve as additional representation for areas of campus that are often marginalized, such as the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community, and university organizations such as the Resident Hall Association. Senators stand divided SGA has been divided on the importance of these seats, particularly when it comes to accountability. SGA President Austin Laufersweiler authored Amendment 36-01, a proposed revision of the SGA constitution that would remove Student Life seats from the organization. In his address to the senate in its March 18 meeting, he cited the ambiguity of seats as a key issue. Most contentious was his assertion that, since Student Life seats are appointed, they might be held less accountable to come to meetings and follow through with legislation than senators. When questioned about his stance on Student Life seats, Laufersweiler said he could see how the seats could be useful for additional student representation, yet thinks

Austin Laufersweiler, president of SGA, speaks to a crowd at a senate meeting Sept. 3. JOHN ROARK/Staff senate would be better served by getting rid of them in order to reassess their importance. “I think that it is possible that supplementary seats could be valuable. I think that the current Student Life seat system takes away from senate more than it contributes,” he said. “Ultimately, I think the system needs major overhaul if it should continue to exist at all.” Laufersweiler said if Amendment 36-01 had passed, SGA would “be in a better place than it currently is." Without the amendment, he said senate will be restricted. But Tripp Calloway, director of external relations for SGA, said Student Life seats are imperative for legitimate student representation. “These Student Life senators actually want to be there for their organization because they feel like their voice needs to be heard,” he said. Calloway said the seats are effective at representing students in their state, yet there is some room for improvement. “I think ultimately, in their current state,

they serve the students well. We need to make them better; [SGA should] not even put it on the table to remove them,” he said. Amendment 36-01 failed in SGA’s last senate meeting March 25 in a 24-20 vote, lacking the two-thirds majority needed for passage. However, in the same meeting, senators passed Resolution 36-34, which will create a committee to reassess Student Life seats next year. That means next year’s executive representatives will have to make a decision about the seats’ future. Executive tickets propose solutions Jim Thompson, a candidate for SGA vice president running on the DJB executive ticket, said, if elected, he would work to reevaluate specific Student Life seats, particularly those pertaining to Greek life. “We are going to have to reassess how we fill [Student Life seats] because this past year the InterFraternity Council told the IFC Student Life representative that he was not allowed to vote on issues because they

didn’t want him representing their voice,” he said. Thompson said the DJB ticket would work to incorporate representation beyond senators elected based on their colleges, and that inefficiency and ineffectiveness with the seats would be addressed through the use of the task force set forth in Resolution 36-34. One of the possible solutions cited by Thompson included the creation of a House of Representatives conBecome a Plasma Donor Today sisting of representaMust be 18 years or older, have Please help us help those tives from student valid I.D. along with proof of SS# coping with rare, chronic, and local residency. genetic diseases. organizations on camWalk-ins Welcome. New donors can receive $30 pus. today and $70 this week! Book your appointment online New Donors will receive a $10 today. Megan Ernst, a bonus on their 2 donation candidate for SGA vice with this ad. Biotest Plasma Center Ask about our Specialty president running on 233 West Hancock Ave. Programs! Athens, GA 30601 the Bridge executive 706-354-3898 ticket, said, if elected, www.biotestplasma.com @BPCAthens www.facebook.com/BiotestPlasmaCenterAthens she would primarily work to reform Student Life seats by making085RedandBlack3.22x1.5.indd 1 1/9/14 11:39 PM them more representaAND MARGARITAS tive of their respective constituencies. Ernst said Bridge would initiate a nomination process by which each group represented by a Student Life seat would select someone to be in SGA on their behalf. She said getting rid of the seats in order to reassess them, as was proposed in Amendment 36-01, would effectively • limit one per customer disenfranchise an entire • must present coupon group of students for a year. 320 E. 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SAE makes changes to initiation, bans pledging BY MARIANA VIERA @mariana_viera1 Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Supreme Council ruled to ban pledging from the fraternity’s initiation process in an attempt to amend its violent past and save the fraternity from extinction. Brad Cohen, SAE’s eminent supreme archon, said in a video for the fraternity’s Founders Day that the ban on pledging was put in place due to the fraternity’s history of hazing and the consequences of those events, such as suspended and shutdown chapters and the loss of student lives. Nine students have died in events related to SAE since 2006 — more than any other fraternity. The Beta chapter of SAE could not be reached for comment. The University of Georgia has had a chapter of SAE since 1865. It was the first fraternity to be founded at the UGA. It has also initiated more members than any chapter in the nation. Walter Kimbrough, president of Dillard University in New Orleans, has done research on fraternities and on hazing. He said he does not think the SAE’s pledge ban will be successful in stopping hazing. “Based on history, everybody who’s gotten rid of [pledging] has still had hazing,” he said. “Does it limit it? The answer is no.” Lambda Chi Alpha banned pledging in 1969. The fraternity has been accused of hazing since then, such as the suspension of UGA’s chapter of Lambda Chi in 1999. Zeta Beta Tau and Historical

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The changes made to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s pledging process are a part of the fraternity's True Gentleman Experience. JOHN ROARK/Staff Black Colleges and Universities have also banned pledging, said Kimbrough, but hazing is still a problem these organizations face. Kimbrough said it would be naïve to think a pledge ban would work. The SAE chapter at Cornell University had an allegedly hazing-related death in its fraternity house in 2011. David Skorton, Cornell’s president, banned pledging on campus as a result. The ban on pledging was also put in place in order to eliminate class structure between new members and active members. Chapters of SAE have been treating its pledges as secondclass citizens, Cohen said. “We’re going to make this change as a team, as a brotherhood, because it’s the right thing to do and if we don’t, we may simply just not exist in five years,” Cohen said.

Starting March 9, pledge programming was eliminated from the fraternity’s operations and the classification of pledge no longer exists. All SAE chapters are required to implement the change immediately. SAE is one of the largest fraternities in the nation with chapters or colonies in more than 240 college campuses and about 14,000 undergraduate members. According to the changes to the initiation process, also known as the True Gentleman Experience, any student who accepts his invitation to join the organization has four days to complete the requirements for membership. There can be no activity or events in which a new member must pledge their commitment to the fraternity within that four-day time frame. Members who are guilty of such activity will be held accountable.

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A4 Views

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

Views

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OUR TAKE

Biking in Athens a precarious pastime

M

y first weeks at the University of Georgia, I thought I would never need a car in Athens. I was excited to be in a town where I could ride my bike everywhere and not have to worry about paying for parking, driving after a night out or filling up my gas tank. But I soon found out a car was going to be very necessary for me. After the first week of classes, I left my bike locked to the rack outside of Creswell Hall because I never wanted to ride it anywhere ever again. Putting aside the fact that I was embarrassingly slow at getting up Athens’ notorious hills, I never felt safe biking on the streets. I thought I was going to die every time I rode down Lumpkin Street next to SUVs and pick-up trucks that barely any had space to give me and wanted to go about 20 miles faster than my measly little mountain bike could. Not to mention how frustrating it is to struggle up Baxter Street in the August heat with cars going every which way. I know many people who are braver than I who ride their bikes everywhere every day, and some have had nothing but positive experiences. Others paint a different picture of the bike lanes in Athens. I saw my fair share of bike accidents on campus throughout my first year and have stayed safely in my car ever since. According to analytics by the UGA Traffic Safety Research and Evaluation Group conducted in 2013, Lumpkin leads the Classic City in terms of bicycle accidents. With 44 crashes on Lumpkin, 24 crashes on Milledge Avenue and 22 crashes on Prince Avenue (one fatal) all in the past decade, it seems Athens is not as bike-friendly as the prevalence of bike lanes might suggest. Bikes provide a cheap, healthy, environmentallyfriendly way of getting around town and campus, and that transportation option shouldn’t be compromised by unsafe road conditions. As a community, we should work together to make Athens’ roads safer for those who want to enjoy all of the benefits of biking, especially now that the weather is getting warmer. — Jana French for the editorial board

COURTNEY WILLETT/Staff

SGA

MEDICINAL MARIJUANA

Student Life seats needed to increase representation in SGA

L

ast week, Student Government Association President Austin Laufersweiler presented an amendment to strip SGA of Student Life Senate seats. He argued that the Greek councils did not want to be represented by somebody they did not select. The vote wound up falling short of the two-thirds majority required to pass constitutional amendments, but several members who are running for seats next year have voiced their support for the removal of the Student Life seats. Each organization that fits under a category represented by a Student Life Seat can have the opportunity to submit a recommended candidate to SGA; three years ago, when I walked into a small room in Tate to interview for the Residence Life seat, I had such a recommendation. For most Student Life seats, their respective organizations should be able to come together to nominate candidates for their Student Life seat. A group as organized as the Greek community should be able to select three representatives to be their voice on student government. Student Life seats are selected by the Rules Committee, which is comprised of some of the most trusted senators. Members are hand-picked by the president pro tempore, and approved by the Senate. Senators who run for election need only submit a certain number of signatures and attend a meeting to learn the rules of campaigning. In many ways, the Rules Committee’s vetting process can produce better representation for students than elections with such poor participation. In the argument to remove Student Life Senate seats, many noted that they simply wanted to remove these seats so that they can

Sam Woo

Guest Columnist

Death of medicinal marijuana bill leaves many Georgians suffering Pranay Udutha Guest Columnist

be reformatted. But this would require the seats to be removed via approval of the student body, and then the reinstated almost a year later by the student body. Constitutionally, 10 percent of the student body must vote in referenda to make the results valid. So will these seats actually be reinstated? Maybe eventually. Will removal of these seats for any amount of time reduce the number of voices represented in SGA? Absolutely. If the real intention is to increase student representation, then these voices should not be removed. They should be tasked with coordinating dialogue between the organizations they represent in order to establish a selection process that gives more power and responsibility to the organizations themselves. SGA elections attract only a small percentage of the student population to the polls. Perhaps a few more will participate once we can vote using Athena, but complaints from marginalized students remain. With no simple fix to the issue of campus apathy, perhaps we will not see every student represented in SGA anytime soon. But until we can get every UGA student invested in student government, we should make a conscientious effort to give representation to voices which might not otherwise be heard. —Pranay Udutha is a senior from Acworth majoring in international affairs and biology

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n March 20, sick children, desperate parents and passionate advocates left the state Capitol disappointed. They received the unfortunate news that House Bill 885, more commonly known as the medicinal marijuana bill, failed to pass in the Senate because of a lack of compromise between the House and the Senate. HB 885 would have allowed patients suffering from glaucoma, cancer and seizures to have access to potentially life-saving forms of medicinal marijuana. If passed, the bill could have provided thousands with the medication that they need in order to live a life free of seizures, free of pain and free of suffering. Unfortunately for these individuals, Sen. Renee Unterman destined HB 885 for failure because of her own political agenda. By attaching Senate Bill 397 to the medicinal marijuana bill in a last ditch effort to push both through, Unterman crushed any hope of providing medical attention to children suffering from life-threatening seizures. “She had an agenda important to her, but it needed to stand alone. She didn’t need to hijack another bill to push her piece of legislation,” said Rep. Allen Peake, the primary sponsor of HB 885. “I understand there is value in that piece of legislation, but the bottom line is that they didn’t need to be attached. If 885 stayed by itself, it would’ve passed.” HB 885 passed through the House with overwhelming support, but once SB 397 was attached, its former supporters had serious reservations. Lawmakers adjourned at midnight without ever reaching a compromise about the fate of HB 885. “[The legislative process] gets very political, and it is an election year unfortunately,” Rep. Margaret Kaiser said. “We fully thought HB 885 would pass, but it looks like it did not because politics were in play.” It is important to point out that the issues addressed in SB 397 are equally as important as those addressed in HB 885. SB 397 would have reformed medical treatment for autistic children in Georgia, but attaching the bill to the medical marijuana bill only ensured the failure of both bills. Now that both bills failed to be passed, it seems that precious time and money were wasted during this year’s General Assembly. The 2013-2014 session was a complete failure for autism and medicinal marijuana reform. No one, including Unterman, gained from the political gridlock that got in the way of important reform. For the families that fought so hard to support autism and medical marijuana reform, there is nothing we can do. It seems like the government failed to listen to its constituents and provide the necessary reform to ensure that all of its citizens can enjoy the high quality of life that they deserve. For these individuals, justice was not served. —Sam Woo is a freshman from Marietta majoring in business administration and international affairs

OPINION METER: The week that was

CARELESS CAMPAIGNING

SGA executive elections have come and gone, but instead of wondering which platform was more deserving of implementation, consider a more elusive question: How few students actually voted this year?

FINAL FOUR Your bracket is well beyond ruined. Your alma mater has said a sorrowful farewell to basketball season. Yet somehow, you’ll still be glued to your couch this weekend to watch Florida take on UConn and Wisconsin face Kentucky in the Final Four.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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Editor In Chief: Hilary Butschek Managing Editor: Cy Brown News Editor: Kendall Trammell Associate News Editor: Taylor West Sports Editor: Tanya Sichynsky Associate Sports Editor: Connor Smolensky Variety Editor: Ben Dell’Orto Associate Variety Editor: Courtney Willett Opinions Editor: Laura Thompson Photo Editor: Taylor Sutton Chief Photographer: Randy Schafer Multimedia Editor: Gabe Ram Design Editor: Caitlin LeMoine Social Media Editor: Jana French Editorial Adviser: Erin France Editorial Assistant: Jennifer Pointer Staff Writers: Shannon Adams, James Anhut, Michelle

GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER

UGA agricultural researchers are known for revolutionizing their field, but now they are taking on the soccer field. One of their strains of Bermuda grass hybrids has been chosen for use in the World Cup this summer.

POLITICS Gov. Nathan Deal will be visiting campus on April 7. Deal is scheduled to give the keynote address at UGA’s Public Service and Outreach Annual Meeting, as well as speak at a meeting organized by UGA's College Republicans.

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

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GEOPOLITICS

Ukraine’s balance between East and West still in contention

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he most recent development in Ukraine’s revolution was the peaceful, pseudo-annexation of the Crimea by unmarked (read: Russian) troops. Like the rest of the conflict, this act is complex and mired in the shared histories of Russia and Ukraine. To address the act itself, after several weeks of peaceful, albeit illegal, occupation by Russian troops, an unauthorized referendum was conducted on March 16 among the populous of Crimea. The result showed an overwhelming majority of Crimeans favored becoming a part of Russia, a decision quickly cemented in law by Moscow. The United Nations and western leaders, stunned by the audacity of Russian President Vladimir Putin, said that they did not recognize the referendum as legal (which it isn’t, by Ukrainian or international law). Crimea contains more ethnic Russians and Russian speakers than any other part of the country. It has been fought over for millennia because of its strategic importance, most recently in the Crimean War of 1853-56. It is so important to Russia because it contains their only warmwater port, and is therefore critical to maintaining naval power. In the 1950s, Nikita Khrushchev gave Crimea, then a part of Russia, to Ukraine because the area is physically connected to Ukraine (getting all its water and electricity from the country) and is therefore more easily ruled by Ukrainians. Because all three were part of the Soviet Union at the time, borders were more of a formality than a concern.

Ian Woods

Guest Columnist

Even though Crimea is important to Russia, that isn’t enough to warrant a risky political move like invasion. The rest of the story involves the peculiar way most Russian citizens view the region. After the break-up of the Soviet Union, Ukraine along with many formerly Soviet states gained independence. Many of these states attained it with extensive help from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and western powers intent on killing the USSR entirely. Because of this foreign intervention, most Russians felt that something had been unrightfully taken from their country. This seems odd because most Western narratives of those events focus on how evil the Soviets were. Now, those old feelings have pushed Putin to the brink of war. The best way to understand those nebulous post-Soviet feelings is with an analogy: Say the United States isn’t so united any more. Our economy is tanked, states are fighting and, suddenly, Florida decides to secede. Most people that still consider themselves U.S. citizens don’t like this because they like Florida. If it secedes, where will we vacation or retire? What will become of the infamous Georgia/Florida rivalry? Also consider that North Koreans have supported the secessionist forces in Florida that the

crumbling U.S. government has no time or money to combat. If you can fully comprehend the magnitude of such a situation, you may realize why Putin thinks he is in the right. As for the morality of what Russia has done, no one outside of Moscow’s influence doubts that it was wrong. The real question is what will become of Ukraine and its transient government? I think the key to that lies in the meaning of the word Ukraine: borderland. The country has functioned as the border between Russia and Europe for centuries. Ukrainians deserve independence and ought to be allowed to maintain ties with the European Union if they want. However, its connections to Russia cannot just be thrown to the wind. The Kievan Rus, who founded Kiev, were the forefathers of both Ukraine and the entity that would become known as Russia. Geographically, Ukraine exists a stones throw away from one of the most powerful land armies in the world. So Ukraine is related to both Russia and Europe, yet the rest of the world seems to want to see it choose the favorite sibling. The key to the success of whatever government follows this temporary one will be how it navigates the nature of Ukraine’s unique position between East and West. They can either exploit it to the country’s benefit, or drown in it like past governments have all inevitably done. — Ian Woods is a freshman from Suwanee majoring in psychology and economics

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Smoking ban welcomed by nonsmoking student

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for one, am really glad there is a ban on smoking. Many of my friends and I always complain about getting stuck behind the trail of a non-caring smoker. One thing I had to say was a negative of coming to college was the inconsiderate nature of some of the people who smoke. Of course, it is not everyone who should be penalized, but one person suffering from secondhand smoke is one too many. Not many people realize that secondhand smoke contains more toxins than directly smoking. Why should I have to suffer for a habit that I have not chosen? There have been too many instances of other people having to be victims of the bad habits of others. Thanks to everyone who fought for this rule, I plan to live a happy secondhand smoke-free life. —Aniya Hamilton is a freshman from Tucker majoring in environmental health science

ZERO-TOLERANCE

Strict punishment policies ignore important ‘gray area’

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wo weeks ago, a Virginia sixth grader was suspended and threatened with expulsion for having a razor blade at school. But administrators were so swift to react that they were late to consider context: she took it from a student who was attempting to cut himself and she threw it away. The school’s clear overreaction toward the girl’s seemingly righteous actions caused public backlash against the school, and her record was cleared as a result. But why did the school punish her instead of commending her? The answer lies in a concept known as the “zerotolerance policy.” Zero-tolerance policies, while having great intentions, warrant little area for jurisdiction. Many schools and universities are adopting these policies for safety precautions, but could this be a double-edged sword? While these policies protect both the students and the faculty, they offer no understanding for extenuating circumstances. And this is not a problem unique to grade school. The University of Georgia even has some zero-tolerance policies to be aware of — particularly for those involved in Greek life. UGA maintains a zero-tolerance stance in regard to hazing within campus organizations. Just a month ago, eleven members of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. were arrested for hazing allegations, and now face a plethora of repercussions if found guilty. In 2010, a student wrote an angry letter to Parking Services, unhappy with the limited scooter parking near Aderhold. He was immediately turned over to the Student Judiciary for sending a “threatening” message. He faced the intimidation of severe punish-

Are you a

Zach Hawkins Guest Columnist

ACADEMICS

Organic chemistry proves success requires hard work Savanna Sturkie Guest Columnist

ment for about a month before the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education wrote to then-President Michael F. Adams, explaining that the student’s actions were protected under the First Amendment and his charges were dropped. The zero-tolerance policy the University withholds against hazing should be recognized, as it is clearly implemented to keep students safe. However, I think the term “hazing” can mean a whole lot of different things. While the arrests for Kappa Alpha Psi were with good reason (there was alleged physical abuse), most fraternities and sororities maintain a system of pledging in which “hazing” could be considered harmless acts of bonding. While zero-tolerance policies have very clear advantages, the inflexibility can be almost inhumane and unjust. In the overall spectrum of what is good and bad, there is always a gray area. If everything were black and white, there would be no arguments and there would be no mistakes — but there would also be no mercy or second chances. It is these things that make us human, and they are to be appreciated and respected. Safety for students and faculty should come first, but an understanding of their circumstances is also essential. —Savanna Sturkie is a freshman from Columbus majoring in art history and pre-journalism

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W

e have almost all heard of the infamous O-chem, or officially known as organic chemistry. Whether you are a science major or not, you probably know multiple people who have given up a good bit of their lives to take on this horrific, evil course. Students devote hours upon hours each day to study incomprehensible amounts of information with, more often than not, little success. While this class is a monstrosity at universities and colleges all around the world, I feel like it maintains a special level of disdain at the University of Georgia. It is no mystery that O-chem is one of the worst weed-out courses at UGA, and has been so for quite a while. I find it extremely discomforting and unfair that a single course has caused many people I know to alter their entire life plan due to the fact they could not construct mechanisms or synthesize reactions. “It seems as if The University of Georgia chemistry department is more concerned with challenging students to the point where test averages are not even passing grades,” sophomore Jayesh Patel said. This point is frightening. The averages on many tests in both Organic Chemistry I and II are failing grades. I’ve heard some say that getting 50 percent correct is their goal. Even worse, for many a score 50 percent is shooting for the stars. Certainly medical school or any other professional school is a place where only the best of the best should be accepted, but should we really be judging a student based off one class? Premed prerequisites specifically have been carved in stone for a while, but there is a hope that like many law schools, medical schools will begin to phase out course requirements and start to rely on entrance examinations. If this were to happen, prospective students still must demonstrate mastery of core science courses, but actual class grades would carry less weight. However, the difficulty of the course is also a way of measuring one’s will to push their academic, mental and physical limits, to see if they are worthy of entering the elite ranks of science professionals. “I think O-chem can be fun if you make your mind think that way,” said sophomore Sam Kennedy. “Learning it can be a huge pain, and it is very hard, but once you get it, it’s extremely rewarding to accomplish something so challenging.” Certainly working hard at anything will lead to success down the road. I imagine I would suffer a complete mental breakdown at the very sight of an O-chem exam, so I have serious respect for those brave enough to take the final exam. I definitely think that O-chem has major flaws, but I also think that it is a way of determining dedication and perseverance. Nothing comes easy in life, especially not O-chem. —Zach Hawkins is a sophomore from Peachtree City majoring in international affairs

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A6 News

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

Booze prices alter drinking pros, cons BY HELENA JOSEPH @helena_josep University of Georgia students may not be consciously calculating the cost-benefits of consuming alcohol, but their brains could already being doing this for them. Associate professor of psychology James MacKillop is studying how the brain makes decisions about drinking alcohol, as well as how it weighs the pros and cons of drinking. The study was tested through a bar laboratory alcohol procedure in order to assess how the cost of alcohol affected the amount people consumed. MacKillop said his lab is focused on understanding drinking and alcohol misuse by studying it live in the lab or using a combination of brain imagining. “In our study we measure the perceived pros of drinking by how much a person chooses to drink,” MacKillop said. “We measured the cons by how much the cost of drinking suppressed their drinking.” For the experiment, MacKillop said he focused on 24 heavy male drinkers between the ages of 21 and 31. “We were able to identify regions in the brain that are using more oxygen during different kinds of choices,” he said. “By identifying these regions, we were able to infer that they required more activity.” MacKillop said the result showed a variety of different brain activity. “When people were no longer willing to drink because the price was too high, we saw they had high activity in the anterior insula,” MacKillop said. “So it seemed like the insula was very important for characterizing how much person felt like the cost outweighed the benefits.” According to PubMed, the anterior insula plays a role in decision making and sudden insight.

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James MacKillop, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Georgia, used a laboratory set up like a bar for his research on decision-making in the brain regarding purchasing alcohol. DIONDRA POWERS/Staff “Finding that the anterior insula was high in activity when cost of drinking outweighed the benefits could mean that this region of the brain is the intersection where our rational and irrational systems work together,” MacKillop said. But MacKillop said when people were not affected by cost, there were different patterns in the brain. “There was selectively greater activity in an area in the brain called the cuneus, which has been associated with the value of possessions,” he said. “And there was high activity in the posterior cingulate.” UGA Police Chief Jimmy Williamson said he encounters a number of students at UGA who have consumed alcohol daily. “Most students are in a position aren’t aware of some of the risk of consuming since most people aren’t talking about whether you should or you shouldn’t drink,” Williamson said. “There are no

really good examples of responsible consumption which cause many students to go down the path of heavy drinking.” According to UGAPD’s crime statistics 406 people were arrested for alcohol-related instances in 2012. And in 2013, 339 people were arrested for alcohol-related instances. “It may be DUI or underage drinking or public drunkeness," Williamson said. "Many of our students are capable of purchasing alcohol easily at the current pricing in the area.” MacKillop said people think about alcohol use disorders as a disorder of decision making. “In the future, we are hoping that we can use this experiment and methodology to understand what types of neural activity is different with individuals with alcohol-use disorders relative to healthy drinkers,” he said.

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BY MICHELLE BARUCHMAN @mlbaruchman The arrival of spring marks the beginning of growing season for farms and gardens, and Mary Schulz, volunteer coordinator at UGArden, said the University of Georgia, established with agriculture as part of the land grant, places an emphasis on food. “I think it makes UGA unique in the amount of land they have to work with for agriculture and the relationship between UGA and Georgia as a state and Athens as a city,” Schulz said. “They have a relationship of charity and giving back to the city of Athens because we were granted so much land in the first place.” The UGArden uses volunteers to harvest produce, including vegetables, fruits, shiitake mushrooms and herbs. “We have about 4 acres in rotation every season using organic practices,” Schulz said. “We concentrate on having good soil to grow our vegetables in.” UGArden also works with academic departments on campus. “We use greenhouses here at the UGArden that are shared by the horticulture department, so we have a good amount of successive sowing,” Schulz said. “We have crops that has just been seeded, crops that are in the middle and crops that are in the field. We always have a good rotation of plants going out of the field and plants going into the field.” Schulz said the season affects the types

University of Georgia trucks haul in vegetables from UGArden, which grows herbs, fruits and vegetables for the local Athens community. PJ. TURRENTINE/Staff of foods grown. “We grow a lot of greens during the springtime, and right now we have lots of vegetables, we have some onions and we have most of the regular summer crops, lots of tomatoes and squashes,” Schulz said. She said the UGArden, like any other garden, works in seasoned rotation. “Once its ready for harvest, it takes a lot of people,” Schulz said. “Usually our biggest harvest is in the summer, when all of our spring work pays off. In the fall we are doing cleanup preparing for winter. In the spring we are switching from lower fall beds to upper summer beds.” Because the garden is run through student labor, volunteers are allowed to take home some of the produce they cultivate. The majority of the food is donated out into the Athens community, to organizations such

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as Campus Kitchen at UGA and the Athens Community Council on Aging. “We’re focused on getting healthy meals out into the Athens community and our main goal is to get meals out there to people who need a little extra assistance during the month,” said Katie Faulkner, coordinator for events and fundraising for Campus Kitchen. Faulkner said the meals Campus Kitchen makes are not possible without UGArden. “They are how we get most of our fresh vegetables that we use to cook healthy meals,” Faulker said. “We use the spinach and other different greens they give us to cook our meals and deliver them later that week.” Campus Kitchen, Faulkner said, is responsible for cooking, planning and delivering the meals. She estimates there are more than 100 meals served

per week. The meals, she said, are planned around what UGArden has available, but other components of the meal come from places, such as Earth Fare. Brooks Oliver, UGA’s food services materials manager, said he mostly gets food from other local companies for dining halls because the quantity produced by UGArden is not large enough to feed the amount of students that eat in dining halls every day. Oliver said he strives to buy as much local produce as possible. Local food, he said, is food from any state that touches the state of Georgia. “Right now we’re getting sweet potatoes from North Carolina, we’re getting locally grown mushrooms and greens from regional areas, strawberries out of Florida, and Georgia is one of the highest chicken producing states,” Oliver said.


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A8 News

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

UGA law offers new graduate program BY STEPHEN MAYS @stephen_mays Conceptualized around a year ago, the University of Georgia School of Law will house a new graduate-level program starting in the fall. The Master in the Study of Law program is a 30-hour, nonthesis degree that will give students access to nearly all of the School of Law’s available courses. “The point of this is to let people gain an understanding of areas of law that would help them in their careers without the input of time and money to get a law degree, because their goal is not to become attorneys,” said Paul Rollins, associate dean for administration in the School of Law. It’s possible to complete the program in one year as a full-time student. Rollins said the degree would serve best as a complement to existing fields of knowledge obtained as an undergraduate or as a companion to another graduate-level degree. “I think this degree would give [students] an advantage in the employment marketplace for particular areas related to their existing academic attainments,” Rollins said. The only required class for students in this program is an introductory course. From there, students are able to pick and choose from virtually any of the School of Law’s courses. There are some, Rollins said, with specific requirements that they might not be able to take. “I think that’s one of the huge advantages of it,” he said. “You get access to almost the entire curriculum, so you can

Paul Rollins, associate dean for administration, said the program is an enhancement. JOHN ROARK/Staff select your coursework based on your interests and professional goals.” For Signe Hanson, a sophomore international affairs and Latin American and Caribbean studies major from Duluth, Minn., the potential for the degree only taking one year is appealing. “I would focus on international policy with international organizations,” Hanson said. “I think it’s good, since it’s only one year, to sort of see if law is something I’d be more interested in in the future.” She said the program would “obviously” be beneficial to almost anyone since it allows him or her to focus on whichever area relates to his or her field. Though the program gives students access to a wide range

of law, it will not qualify them to take the bar or become an attorney. “My advice, to people who want to go to law school, would not be to go into this program if they know they want to go to law school,” Rollins said. The program is designed to be small, Rollins said. This allows the three administrators overseeing the program to work closely with the students. “We certainly expect to have a class that will enroll this fall,” he said. “This will be a small program, probably starting out in the single digits, with a maximum of about 15 students per year.” Although housed in the School of Law, students in this program are admitted to the graduate school. Due to that, students can use more than just the Law School Admission Test for admittance. The LSAT, Graduate Management Admission Test, Medical College Admission Test and Graduate Record Examinations are all acceptable entry tests for this program, Rollins said. Rollins also said there is possibility to waive the test requirements on a case-by-case basis, depending on prior experience. “It’s definitely what I would call a complementary or enhancing degree,” Rollins said. Students will have to have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution prior to enrollment. The deadline for fall 2014 admission is July 1. The School of Law also offers a Juris Doctor or J.D. degree and a Master of Laws or LL.M. degree as well as the M.S.L. program.

Donna Pittenger gives out a treat at the Oconee County Animal Control facility DIONDRA POWERS/Staff

Local animal shelter begins foster program BY HELENA JOSEPH @helena_josep Oconee County Animal Control facility, an animal shelter, launched its first foster program, allowing students and community members to temporarily house animals. The shelter holds both dogs and cats, and is the only organization in the area that allows students to foster animals. Ashton Keegan, a volunteer at the Oconee Animal Shelter and the person in charge of the new foster program, said not having a foster program at the shelter made it harder to save all the animals.

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“Now that we have this program, when an animal reaches its time limit at the shelter it can go into a foster home and go onto a family,” said the senior communication studies major from Colorado Springs, Colo. Keegan also said the foster program is a popular concept across the nation. “The process of fostering an animal is really simple,” she said. “You fill out an application online and then we establish a home visit to make sure the home is safe for an animal. Then you can tell us what kind of animal we are willing to foster and then you can get that foster animal of your choice.” Alice Schuermann, a sophomore communication sciences and disorders major from Chicago, said she knows that animal shelters are overflowing with animals. “I rather these animals be away with a family, instead of being in a shelter where they won’t get as much attention,” she said. Schuermann also said she has five cats at home. “I love cats so I would foster a cat if I could and add him or her to my family,” she said. Keegan said that the length of fostering an animal varies. “An animal could have a medical situation and need to be fostered for only a certain amount of time,” she said. “Or if you foster a dog or cat that just needs a home until it finds it family, then you will have that animal until it finds what we call its ‘forever home.’” Gloria Lee, a freshman nutrition science major from Duluth, said she is looking for a dog. “The only bad thing I can see happening with the foster program is that you would have to be really careful with choosing owners for the pets because some people aren’t capable of taking care of pets,” she said. The program also provides volunteer hours for students who would like to help out at the shelter. Keegan said that the great thing about it is saving the animals. “Being a government run organization, if an animal reaches its time limit then we have to follow the rules and put it to sleep,” Keegan said. “But this program has made it where we can find a way around that.” Those interested in the new foster program can find a foster application form on the organization’s Facebook page “Foster Friends of Oconee County Animal Shelter.”

S. M


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

News A9

Professor said UGA respects females BY LAUREN MCDONALD @laurenmcdonald2 When Mehrsa Baradaran began her career as a professor at Brigham Young University Law, she struggled to gain respect in her classroom. “I’m not sure if it was the school itself or the particular class,” Baradran said. “There’s a lot of reasons that that could’ve happened. It could’ve been that it was my first year teaching. It could’ve been the culture of the school or it could’ve been those particular classes. I did have a rough go at it in the beginning, and there were some problems with controlling the class.” Baradaran posted on PrawfsBlawg that in her first few semesters teaching at BYU, she faced loud talkers and eye rolling as well as a student who refused to take a lollipop out of his mouth to answer her questions. She wrote that this made her feel as though she could not establish herself as an authority figure in her classroom. A survey conducted in 2010 by the University of Redlands found 16 percent of professors have not experienced student incivility. It also found that students are more likely to be disrespectful to professors who are women, young or inexperienced. Baradaran said the idea students have of the typical professor could play a role in whether or not students view a professor as an authority figure. “When all you know is sort of old men, and you see a young woman teaching, you sort of don’t equate that with a professor,” Baradaran

Neknomination and other drinking games create greater risk of alcohol poisoning. HANNAH PAP ROCKI/Staff

Drinking challenges dangerous to collegians BY MICHELLE BARUCHMAN @mlbaruchman

Mehrsa Baradaran, assistant professor of law, teaches contracts and banking law, and has been at the University of Georgia for two years. ORLANDO PIMENTEL/Staff said. “At my other school, they didn’t have a critical mass of young, female professors and so I think that stood out a little bit, whereas here there are plenty of us, in the law school at least.” After coming to the University of Georgia two years later, Baradaran, an assistant professor in the School of Law, has had a different experience. “My teaching experience here has been actually excellent,” Baradaran said. “I’ve had really great classes. I’ve had small and large [classes]. I’ve really enjoyed the students. My classes have just been really respectful and very engaged and prepared.” Baradaran said she can not attribute one reason as to why her students at UGA have not been disrespected here. “It’s possible it’s because I’ve gained more experience as a teacher, it’s also possible that your student

body is more diverse,” Baradaran said. “I have not had the problems here that I did have at the other school. I walked into this classroom and was given a lot of respect and deference. Here, there are also a lot more female professors and female professors of color.” Like Baradaran, Margaret Christ, an assistant professor in the accounting program of the Terry College of Business, has had a good teaching experience at UGA. In the six years she has taught at UGA, Christ said she has been impressed with the deference her students have shown her. “[My experience at UGA] has been very positive,” Christ said. “With respect to the students in particular, I think we have very good, strong and motivated students. I’ve said from the beginning they’ve all been very polite and respectful.” Christ said she attributes this to the

Students pushing for major in neuroscience BY LAUREN MCDONALD @laurenmcdonald2 The University of Georgia may soon offer a major in neuroscience, a degree program that would aid students who are double majoring in biology and psychology to achieve the same end. “When I talked with most of these students who were doing the double major in both disciplines, they said the reason they were doing so is because they have an interest in neuroscience," said Mark Farmer, chair of the Division of Biological Sciences. Farmer said a problem for double majors is the coursework doesn’t overlap. “It in many cases took more than the normal four years, simply because of the specific core requirements in both disciplines,” he said. It was for this reason Farmer, with the help of Keith Campbell, the head of the psychology department, began investigating the possibility of creating a degree program in neuroscience. Farmer thought this could be done with a minimal amount of resources from UGA, which he said is always a concern when starting a new program. “I felt that the University of Georgia... did in fact have the necessary faculty to teach a quality program,” Farmer said. He said the student interest was already in place. “With [200] or 300 students who would then move from either biology or psychology into this new major, it

would instantly be one of the largest majors at the University of Georgia,” Farmer said. At the time Farmer was considering making this proposal three years ago, however, he said the University System of Georgia Board of Regents was pushing for consolidation in UGA programs, rather than expansions. So instead, a neuroscience concentration within the biology major and subsequently within the psychology major was created. Farmer said it offered restricted courses, compared to the broad amount of courses offered for a typical biology major. Only two neuroscience degree programs exist in Georgia, at Emory University and Georgia State College. Brittany Truitt, president of the Undergraduate Neuroscience Organization, said student members of UNO and the Nu Rho Psi Organizing Committee started a petition to show student support for a neuroscience degree program. “Students did [a petition] a couple a years ago as well, and they were able to get the concentration put in place, which is what we have now,” said the senior psychology and biology major from Griffin. “This past year, a few students started the petition again and it’s currently being circulated.” Last time she checked, Truitt said the petition had 175 to 200 signatures. Farmer said the proposal is in the process of being reformulated and it could be offered to incoming freshman next fall.

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values instilled in students by their parents before they come to college and to the efforts students have to put in just to attend UGA. “It suggests that they’ve been raised well, probably by parents who focused on manners and respecting adults,” Christ said. “It’s hard to get into UGA, and I think they recognize that they are somewhere special.” Sara Beth Cockerham, a junior political science major from Blairsville, said she thinks a culture of respect exists at UGA. She said the reason this atmosphere is present is the importance students place on getting their degree. “I think the students at UGA value their education and really do want the most out of the degree they’re getting,” she said. “So I think that they’re more apt to listen to their professors and more apt to take their advice.”

Completing a drinking challenge after being tagged in a social media post with #neknomination could lead to more than just social acceptance — five people have already been reported dead after participating in the dare. Neknomination is a social media trend where a friend nominates others to post a video drinking large amounts of alcohol an absurd way within 24 hours and challenge more friends. “Too much alcohol, as is in this challenge, is detrimental and can cause nerve and brain damage,” said Lou Kudon, program manager at the Northeast Health District. Adriane Strong, director of health education at the Northeast Health District, said though she isn’t very familiar with this drinking game, it doesn’t take long for things such as this to catch on. “It’s not just fun, it’s not just a party,” Strong said. “It really could have some lasting consequences.” David Wyatt, director of communications of Aware Awake Alive, said there is a certain peer pressure associated with drinking games that leads them to extreme drinking. “Young people and inexperienced drinkers don’t realize that that amount of alcohol can kill them,” he said. According to a study by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, a college student, aged 18 to 24, dies every 44 hours from alcohol poisoning in the United States. “Sometimes people see people posting pictures of them partying and doing crazy stuff, the things that get more attention of social media, and think that is normal and what is expected,” Wyatt said. Wyatt said there are peak times throughout the year when social drinking is highest including the beginning of the school year, St. Patrick’s Day, Halloween and spring break for college students. Wyatt said though drinking games are nothing new, Neknomination takes drinking to a new level as irrationality takes over and can lead to death.


A10 News

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

OBESITY: With limited funding, UGA initiative must continue fight ➤ From Page A1 ‘Chipping away at an iceberg’ The median annual household income in Burke County is just more than $32,000, far below the state’s average of about $47,000. More than half of its residents identified as either African-American or Hispanic and the majority of its land is considered rural. Obesity is disproportionately high among minorities and in rural, poor communities, according to the American Psychological Association. “We have a very high rate of unemployment,” Black said. “We know when people have lower incomes, they purchase cheaper, less nutritious food.” Along with these community traits, half of Burke County’s children live in single-parent homes. A study in The Journal of Applied Research on Children found that single-mother families, in particular, had higher rates of child obesity. Black said it’s sometimes hard for single mothers to carve out time for cooking healthy meals while also working full-time. Kids aren’t always able to play outside during the day, especially if their caregiver is still at work when they return from school. “Mom might be working two or three jobs,” Black said. “Stress levels are much higher.” Burke County’s obesity rate went from 37 percent to 36 percent from 2009 to 2010, the most recent data available. The percentage of obese adults dropped for the first time since 2005, according to the U.S. County Health Rankings & Roadmaps released last week. While Burke County held steady, many counties leapfrogged it as their rates rose. The most obese counties were Hancock and Terrell, which increased to 39 percent. Burke County is tied for No. 8, an improvement from No. 2 in last year’s rankings. Black said her programs couldn’t be solely responsible for the drop. She works with too small a portion of the county to expect that. However, she did see the ranking as a positive step. “We do feel like we make an impact, but on the grand scale it might be a very small impact,” Black said. “It’s kind of like chipping away at an iceberg with a spoon.” Burke County residents often do not have a college education and have grown up with the traditional Southern diet, both challenges that will take years to reverse. Those problems are consistent with the issues facing many rural counties dotting the Southeast District’s extension offices. “It really comes down to making choices and being educated,” Milam said. “Poverty plays a huge part in just not being educated about nutrition.

Walk Georgia, a program run by the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, received funding through a grant from the Coca-Cola Company, which was lobbied for by the UGA Obesity Initiative. NICHOLAS FOURIEZOS/Staff ‘We can tackle these issues’ In addition to Girls on the Run, Burke County offers its employees nutrition and behavior awareness training and the county is already benefiting. “A couple of years ago, our health insurance rates went down. This year, it went up just a small amount,” said Merv Waldrop, the Burke County administrator. “Given what most counties are facing, we’re really pleased that we’re getting a handle on our health insurance costs.” Waldrop said the model could be adopted by the state’s other poor, rural communities. “I think other counties can run with it,” Waldrop said. “If we have healthy employees, we’ll have a lot less sick time, we can be much more efficient with taxpayer’s money.” Working with small groups to develop effective health programs is a strategy the initiative employs. The initiative has limited programs in workplaces, schools and hospitals, that leaders hope to expand once it has the financial means to. “We want to leverage the expertise and resources we have on campus,” Murray said. “It’s a process and unfortunately, even if we had several million dollars, we wouldn’t be able to make a big dent on it.” The initiative won a grant from the Coca-Cola Company to help fund Walk Georgia, an online fitness program and annual single-day event conducted by the extension offices. Initiative leaders lobby the Association County Commissioners of Georgia for increased obesity-prevention funding in its communities. The plan is to expand programs to other counties once the initiative receives more funding and

Income and high rates of single-parent homes contribute to Burke County’s obesity. NICHOLAS FOURIEZOS/Staff discovers which strategies work best. “What we’re hoping will happen is that, as we get things on the ground that are successful, those things will diffuse across the state,” Murray said. Sometimes the biggest obstacle is simply distance. Taking advantage of the extension offices will be especially vital once the initiative is able to reach deeper into the state. “The further you get away from Atlanta and Athens, the more challenging it becomes and the more important it is that we rely on those extension offices,” Murray said. “Working together, in partnership, we can tackle these issues.”

Bridge presidential candidate Zek Osibanjo (left) debates concerns about party platforms against DJB presidential candidate Drew Jacoby (right). JOHN ROARK/Staff

Sanctions filed during SGA elections BY DANIEL FUNKE @dpfunke Two complaints dealing with possible violations of the University of Georgia Student Government Association Elections Code by executive tickets Bridge and DJB were addressed in an Elections Committee sanctions hearing Tuesday night. Shreyas Vangala, the SGA attorney general and chair of the committee, said the meeting was called because DJB requested a financial audit of Bridge’s campaign expenses. After being presented with the evidence, the committee found nothing wrong with Bridge’s expense report. “The numbers added up. There were no discrepancies, no violations of the Elections Code that we found based on our deliberations,” he said. “It seemed like there were a lot of issues, a misunderstanding with how financial contributions were being perceived.” After the decision, Vangala said Bridge then brought forth charges against DJB for hanging a handpainted banner in the Tate Student Center Plaza. Elijah Staggers, the Elections Committee liaison for Bridge, said DJB’s hand-painted banner violated the Elections Code since Campus Reservations does not allow handpainted banners to be hung in the Tate breezeway and all candidates must abide by UGA rules. Vangala said the committee ruled against Bridge’s claim. “I think they were suggesting that the other campaign was blocking the view of [their banner] and we found that it not actually doing that,” he said. Vangala said there were no official sanctions filed and that there

were no problems he could perceive in the meeting. But Staggers said he felt the decision was unfounded due to DJB’s lack of evidence in its defense. “I feel like there was a miscarriage of justice,” he said. “I provided documentation, pictures, screenshots of the regulations. I came in with a foolproof argument and the opposing ticket actually did not come prepared with any evidence. The only thing they were able to say in their defense is that it was a mistake.” Staggers said DJB was not able to provide documentation of the banner’s approval by UGA administration, which is required for signage in Tate Plaza, yet the Elections Committee ruled in DJB’s favor. He said the committee did not explain their decision. “With the outstanding lack of evidence on the side of the other ticket, the Elections Committee still ruled in their favor, saying that it was not a violation of the Elections Committee,” he said. Brittany Arnold, the treasurer candidate for DJB, said the whole encounter was a big misunderstanding. “We had all thought one thing going [into the hearing] and they thought we were coming to attack them. They thought we were kind of being malicious in doing that,” she said. “Really it was just a miscommunication between the two different parties.” Arnold said upon getting to the hearing, both parties discovered each other’s preconceptions did not align with reality. “There are no grievances. I feel really good about the Bridge party and I’m just glad the misunderstandings are cleared up,” she said.


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

News A11

Fraternity’s anniversary kicks off week-long celebration at UGA BY MARIANA VIERA @mariana_viera1 The Zeta Pi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. will be celebrating its 45th anniversary with a weekend of brotherhood and networking. “We have a whole weekend lined up,” said Dervin Cunningham, a senior biological sciences major from Albany. “It’s a lot of different events going on. I think roughly 130 brothers will be in attendance and our chapter is made up of almost 300 [brothers].” The anniversary weekend will run from April 4-April 6. Cunningham said they will host a golf tournament on April 4, they will open the Zeta Pi Chapter Archives in the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Library on April 5 and there will be a post-reunion concert by Branford Marsalis at the UGA Performing Arts Center on April 6. Andre Sutton, a senior marketing major from Decatur and the president of the chapter, said six out of the seven local founders will be at the anniversary weekend. Alpha Phi Alpha was nationally founded in 1906 at Cornell University in Ithica, N.Y. It was the first black Greek letter organization. The Zeta Pi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha was founded in 1969 and was also the first black fraternity at UGA. The chapter won multiple awards at the 58th annual Georgia District Conference in Savannah. Some of the awards won included Chapter of the Year and Outstanding Brother of the Year, which was individually awarded to Cunningham. Zeta Pi alumni include Walter Kimbrough, the president of Dillard University in New Orleans and one of

(From left to right): Elijah Staggers, Jamal Releford, Jeremiah Lemons, Dervin Cunningham and Andre Sutton are Alpha Phi Alpha members. HANNAH PAP ROCKI/Staff the youngest college presidents in the nation, Hamilton Holmes, one of UGA’s first black students and his son Hamilton Holmes, Jr. Kimbrough attended UGA from 1985 to 1989. His father was in the fraternity at Morehouse College in Atlanta, and Kimbrough said he thought Alpha Phi Alpha was the perfect fit for him when we came to UGA. He said that was a time when there was a lot of push from students to have a more inclusive community. “It was a period where black students were trying to establish a more firm place,” Kimbrough said. “That was the time we first started having conversations about having some kind

of cultural center. It was an interesting time. Georgia was really going through some growing pains.” Kimbrough said he continues to be an active member in the graduate chapter of the fraternity in New Orleans. Following the anniversary this weekend, the Zeta Pi chapter will host Alpha Phi Alpha Week, Sutton said. “It will be a week of events and the events will be catered to different people on campus,” Sutton said. The week will include Women’s Appreciation Day on April 7, where the Alphas will pass out flowers and cookies by Tate Student Center to the women on campus. Later that day

they will have Barbershop Talk, where the men on campus can get a free haircut and talk to the Alphas. On April 8 there will be a forum at the Zell B. Miller Learning Center. April 9 is Stroll like an Alpha, a team competition for the women on campus. April 10 is the NPHC Art Show. April 11 the Alphas will do community service. April 12 the Alphas will have a cook-out in the morning and the 29th annual Pajama Jam at night. Pajama Jam is a party hosted that brings an attendance of more than 3,000 people. A portion of the ticket sales from the event goes toward its national philanthropy, which is the March of Dimes. “Alpha Week is basically a celebration of the people,” Sutton said. “School is stressful. Our week is basically a time to relieve the people. We’ll give flowers to the girls to let you know you’re appreciated. We’ll give haircuts to the guys so they don’t have to spend any more money. Stroll like an Alpha is so we can have a little fun. The art show is the same thing about fun. Community service is just to give back to the people. The cookout is to feed the people and Pajama Jam is just to have more fun. So basically, we like to use Alpha Week as a stress reliever for the campus.” Sutton said the Zeta Pi chapter is a group of men who want to do good for the campus, the community and themselves. “It’s a group of men who push each other through accomplishments, through striving to be better than normal,” Sutton said. “It’s a group of men who fuel and use each other as resources so that we can help the campus and help our community. That’s basically what it’s like to be a Zeta Pi.”

TRAFFIC: Downtown intersections pose most dangers to pedestrians, cyclists ➤ From Page A1 Zack Carlton just needs some space — 3 feet to be exact. As a cyclist, he often feels that cars are passing too closely. The perpetrators he sees a fair amount of the time are those around his age. “Sometimes cars just don’t see bikes or drivers — maybe younger, college drivers — don’t use their turn signals, which is a real problem if you’re on a bike,” said Carlton, a freshman exercise and sports science major from Watkinsville. Having experienced several close calls, Carlton’s only collision with a car was last month riding on Milledge, the thirdworst street with 24 crashes and 18 injuries. “I was crossing Milledge from the west side of Baxter to the east over on campus, and a car was going and they didn’t signal their right turn, and turned right into me,” Carlton said. “I didn’t get hurt very badly. That’s lucky. We were both going only about 10 miles per hour.” After a check to make sure everyone was all right, Carlton and the other driver drove their separate ways. For Carlton, the street that shares his name has been one of the worst sections of campus in his experience at UGA. “Carlton Street is not great, especially coming from the east side back west because it’s uphill that way,” he said. “You’re going slower and, in one spot across from the Coliseum Training Facility, the road’s narrower and there’s that crosswalk. Cars try to pass too close there to try and pass you before that crosswalk.” ••• Near the Arch, 25 of the 45 crashes on Broad Street in the last decade start from the intersection at Lumpkin Street and end at the intersection with Jackson Street. Statistically, Broad at Jackson Street is the most dangerous intersection for pedestrians in the last decade. Marc Tremblay, a doorman at Magnolia’s, at that intersection, has seen his fair share of near misses but never an actual accident. “With drunk kids, there’s always close calls. It’s just a matter of how slow the driver is

going,” said Tremblay, who has worked at Magnolia’s since August. According to the UGA traffic research group, 38 percent of pedestrian-vehicle crashes in Athens occur during the months of September, October and November, and 43 percent of crashes occur between 3-9 p.m. The commonality between both statistics is football season, where big nights can draw large crowds to the downtown area. Although no particular time of year struck Tremblay as a more dangerous season for pedestrians, bigger occasions, he said, bring more people to downtown with a stronger thirst. “You always have those drunk kids that will walk across the street even though they know its red, and they’ll give cars the bird or walk at their own pace,” he said. It’s a lack of understanding and obedience to the laws of the road that lead to a higher exposure to risk, said Carol Cotton, director of the UGA Traffic

Safety Research and Evaluation Group and lecturer of health promotion and behavior. “It’s that interface that’s so dangerous,” she said. “When you have pedestrians who are not knowing what the law is — or they do and disobey it purposely — and you have cars that are not obeying their laws correctly, that’s where the danger comes in.” ••• In February, Tobias Smith, 19, a mechanic at Sunshine Cycles, was killed riding his bike on Winterville Road. Despite having the necessary stickers and lights, the narrow roads in that area, Dewey said, allowed for little room for Smith without a bike lane. “Tobias’ death really shook us all, but it sort of reinforces the messages that we’ve been speaking about,” he said. While Smith’s death called into question the safety of many Athens roads for cyclists, Prince Avenue is one that citizens are pushing local government to remedy

The University of Georgia's traffic research shows that 38 percent of local pedestrian-vehicle crashes occur between September and November. FILE/Staff immediately. In the last decade, one pedestrian and one cyclist have been killed on Prince Avenue, ranking fourth-worst for pedestrians (15 crashes) and second-worst for cyclists (22 crashes). Complete Streets: Prince Avenue, a grassroots Athens group advocating traffic calming planning, is hoping to change that. The plan entails reducing the four-lane road to three lanes while installing temporary pedestrian islands at crosswalks. In addition to better accessibility for pedestrians, Cotton said that reduc-

ing the speed of the avenue will greatly help in preventing pedestrian fatalities. “If you’re hit by a car going 20 miles per hour, then the likelihood is that you’re going to survive,” Cotton said. “Anything over 20 miles per hour — certainly 30 miles per hour — is catastrophic.” Visibility of these crosswalks and pedestrians is a problem Cotton sees with the road, as she drives down Prince every day to get to and from work. “That’s one of the problems with the crosswalk right now that’s at The Grit,” she

said. “People are using it, but drivers aren’t seeing it. It’s in a very unusual place, midblock, that doesn’t have residences. You’re not thinking about pedestrians there.” With a growing medical corridor around the former Navy Supply Corps School and other Normaltown businesses, Cotton said the expansion further down Prince is something to keep an eye on. “We’re going to have to watch that particular corridor,” she said. “It hasn’t been a problem yet, but the potential is certainly there.”


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© 2014 Ernst & Young LLP. All Rights Reserved. ED None.

On my project team, I work with people from around the world. Thursday is our international cooking night, when we share our favorite dishes and a bit about our ancestries. We’re a team in the office, a team in the kitchen.”


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Sports

Sports B1

➤ OUR WEEKLY PODCAST: SUSS-PACE JAM Check out this week's podcast featuring "The Jammies," our end-ofseason basketball awards just in time for the Final Four. GO TO REDANDBLACK.COM

HOCKEY

Health scare doesn't freeze Ice Dog BY SAMMY O’BRIEN @sobrien92 Six months ago, Georgia ice hockey goalie Kevin Smith underwent surgery to remove his appendix, was diagnosed with an enlarged spleen and battled mononucleosis. He was in rough shape. Fast forward to the end of March, just a few weeks before the Ice Dogs’ home opener at the Classic Center against rival Georgia Tech, and Smith has beaten out three other goalies for the starting position. “Kevin missed the first half of the season and came out in January in fantastic shape,” head coach John Hoos said. “His play was outstanding, his movement and reflexes were great. He played a couple of great games and earned the spot. He continues to work hard for it every day.” Smith has played in seven games so far and has posted a 4-3 record between the pipes. His save percentage ranks second on the team (89 percent) although freshman teammate Grant Schwartz has started in four more games than Smith. The junior goalie wasn’t always in the spotlight. Junior captain Stephen Bray remembers a time when hockey life was not as smooth for Smith. “I’m really proud of Kevin because last year he didn’t get to play as much,” Bray said. “It’s awesome that he never gave up and I think he earned the starting spot.” Smith remembers tougher times as well, but took rehab head on when returning from surgery. “It was pretty tough not being able to play in the first half and improve,” Smith said. “But over the winter, I was playing in other leagues to get back in shape. I think that helped shake off rust as well as the December practices coach held.” Because Smith missed half of the season, three goalies were left in a battle for the starting spot. Schwartz, sophomore Brandon DeRosa and sophomore Erik Nilsson all split playing time throughout the season. Schwartz played in 11 games (1-6-1), DeRosa in six (1-2) and Nilsson in four (1-1). Hoos said each goalie brought specialised skills to the table and played well when they earned their chance to start. He understands rotating between four goalies may seem excessive, but once Smith returned Hoos couldn’t let a man go. The Ice Dogs’ goalies took the opportunity as a chance to make each other better hockey players. “It’s the competitive aspect and we have to fight for ice time,” Nilsson said. “Sometimes we go for each other’s throats, but it helps the team because whoever is in net was the goalie on fire that week.” Though the season ended over a month ago, the competition held strong in preparation for the first real home match in Athens. That was until a few days ago when Hoos named Smith the starter. “Kevin has a calmness to him,” Hoos said. “He certainly doesn’t show that much affection and

that’s a great quality to have. He doesn’t get rattled easily and our defense likes that. He plays with a lot of energy, but stays emotionally level.” The Classic Center reported that the home opener on Wednesday, April 9, has sold out. A crowd of more than 2,000 people will attend as Smith steps between the pipes, just seven months after surgery. “This might be the most pumped up I’ve been for a game,” Smith said. “It’s Georgia Tech, which is always fun, and the place should be loud, too. I feel like we could throw any goalie in the net and get a victory, but I’m just lucky.”

Junior Ice Dogs goalie Kevin Smith beat out three of his teammates for the start in the Athens opener. RANDY SCHAFER/Staff

FOOTBALL

Redshirt season can benefit football players on, off the field BY NICK SUSS @NickSuss Some football players redshirt. Some football players don’t. But the value of a redshirt season isn’t black and white. Most players who take a redshirt season their freshman year live to not regret it. Likewise, freshmen who decide to compete for playing time in their first college seasons rarely regret their decisions either. “I don’t see a downside ever to redshirting,” redshirt sophomore quarterback Faton Bauta said. “Ever. But I definitely think redshirting for coming in early [is good], especially for [quarterbacks] because there’s so much we need to know and there’s so much we need to learn and grow with.” The experiences of the quarterbacks on roster accurately reflect Bauta’s assertion about the value of a redshirt for those under center. Of Georgia’s four quarterbacks, three have taken redshirt seasons, while the other hasn’t been on the team long enough to do so. Of those three quarterbacks — Bauta, redshirt senior Hutson Mason and redshirt freshman Brice Ramsey — Mason was the only to sit out a year outside of his freshman season. For the others, and most redshirt players for that matter, the value of redshirting isn’t in growing physically. The value of a redshirt season comes in improving the mental aspect of the game. “When you play in this league, everything in your head needs to fire faster and you need to know

Gym Dogs Mary Beth Box (left) and Chelsea Davis (right) will compete at regionals for spots at this year's NCAAs. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON /Staff

GYMNASTICS

Breaking down Gym Dogs’ upcoming regional competition BY ELIZABETH GRIMSLEY @AllFlippedOut

Redshirt sophomore quarterback Faton Bauta (10) took his year off to study Georgia's playbook. FILE/Staff where to go and a lot of things,” Bauta said. “[So] I think mentally for sure. It’s that thick playbook that you need to memorize.” Bauta wasn’t the

only Bulldog who valued his redshirt season because of its off-the-field advantages. See REDSHIRT, Page B3

The NCAA regional championship could potentially be interpreted as more important than nationals. It’s the qualifying meet for the big show. If a team underperforms and doesn’t make it out of regionals, its season is over. Just four years ago, the Georgia gymnastics team was coming off of five consecutive national titles. But at the Columbia regional at Missouri, the team tied for second, lost the tiebreaker and failed to make it to nationals. The result shocked the gymnastics community. Take a step back. How does a team qualify in the first place? Once teams are seeded into the six regional locations, the criteria of making it to nationals is simple. The top two teams advance from each regional as well as the top two all-around competitors not on a qualifying team. Finally, any event winners also not on a qualifying team

make the trip as well. Unlike previous years, when a team’s regional qualifying score and regional score were used to determine seeding for NCAAs, there is more of a bracket style competition in effect. The top two teams from the Athens, Minneapolis and Baton Rouge regionals will compete in one NCAA preliminary session while qualifiers from the University Park, Seattle and Fayetteville regionals will compete in the other. So technically, the score a team gets at regionals doesn’t matter for nationals at all. Instead, regional competition is simply a chance to qualify to Birmingham, Ala., and fine-tune routines. Although there is little doubt of the Gym Dogs not making it back to Birmingham for NCAAs this year, anything can happen. The Athens regional, where the team will be competing, has many good teams and individuals. See GYMNASTICS, Page B2


B2 Sports

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

GYMNASTICS: No. 7 Michigan among regional competitors ➤ From Page B1 Georgia

Junior second baseman Anna Swafford (25) chose “Gangsta's Paradise” by Coolio as her at-bat walk-up song. RANDY SCHAFER/Staff

Walk-up music sets tone for players BY TYLER SERRITT @TSerritt11 There are a lot of sounds during a Georgia softball game. There is the soft music played between innings, the narration by the PA announcer and the peaceful ding of bats and snaps of gloves. And then there is the loud clip of Coolio’s “Gangsta’s Paradise” that rings out of the speakers when second baseman Anna Swafford approaches the plate. Walk-up songs are becoming a tradition for softball batters in recent years. Players chose songs that help them maintain focus but still exude excitement. Some players choose bassheavy rap songs to get motivated. Some opt for up-tempo rock songs to get relaxed while others pick songs that describe more about themselves. UGA outfielder Niaja Griffin decided to go with a song that might surprise fans, a variation of the theme song for the early ’90s cartoon “Rugrats.” “Growing up, ‘Rugrats’ was my favorite show,” Griffin said. “I just wanted to think of something that I really enjoyed ... It also has a great beat. I love that beat.” Griffin likes to use the opportunity of picking a song to show off her personality. “I think it helps people know more about me and how I am,” Griffin said. “I think people really get a good taste of that. The song definitely is me.”

Outfielder and first baseman Kaylee Puailoa chose a song that instead of pumping her up, helps her collect her thoughts before hitting. That song would be Fiji’s tranquil “Chant of the Islands.” “That song really helps me take a breath and relax when I am headed up to the plate,” Puailoa said. “I prefer to play something soothing that helps me stay calm and collected.” The song also hits close to home for the California native, who has family heritage rooted in the islands of Tonga. “I think that’s one of the reasons I chose it,” Puailoa said, “was because it helps show my people my background and where I am from.” Shortstop Paige Wilson, who moved to Athens from Chicago, understands picking a song based on hometowns. One of the songs that Wilson chose to play is Young Jeezy’s rap hit “Put On,” which features proud, cityrepping lyrics. “I really love it in Athens, but I’m not from here,” Wilson said. “I wanted to pick music that reminded me who I am playing for back home.” It also doesn’t hurt that the song is also pretty loud and motivating. “It definitely gets me excited to go and bat,” Wilson said. “When the bass comes in, I am just ready to get up there and get after it.”

SEE A COMPLETE PLAYLIST ONLINE

Regional seed: No. 1 Notable: The Gym Dogs are the No. 1 team in the country on bars and set the highest mark on the event at the recent Southeastern Conference championship with a 49.7. It will be a tough matchup between Georgia and No. 2 seed Michigan. Average performances on beam and floor at SECs proved to be the downfall for the Gym Dogs and kept them out of a higher finish. The team has the home crowd and familiar surroundings on its side, which it should benefit from as it has done well in Stegeman throughout the 2014 season. To qualify first, the Gym Dogs will have to match their season-highs on beam (49.425) and floor (49.450) all while continuing their success on the remaining two events. Starting its competition on bars and ending on vault should be advantageous for Georgia as it will be able to begin on its best event and close out on a high note.

lower-seed team after the Kent State Cinderella story of 2001 when the Flash qualified to NCAAs after entering regionals as the No. 4 seed. The Chippewa will have the Olympic order (vault, bars, beam, floor) on their side, but a more realistic expectation will be qualifying individuals to Birmingham. Ohio State Regional seed: No. 4 Notable: The Buckeyes are frequently a top-20 team in the NCAA, but have dropped off slightly this season. They made nationals for the first time in 23 years in 2012 after finishing second to Florida in their regional. Ohio State, more known for its men’s gymnastics program than its women’s, has a handful of individuals that have a shot at making NCAAs this year. Senior Melanie Shaffer is ranked No. 21T in the all-around and No. 29T on floor and will be vying for one of the two all-around spots. Ending on a bye will force the Buckeyes to sit and wait as their fate is handed to them by the other teams left on the competition floor.

Michigan

N.C. State

Regional seed: No. 2 Notable: The Wolverines are coming off of its season-high road score at the Big Ten championship, including a perfect 10 from senior Joanna Sampson on floor. The Wolverine’s strongest event is undoubtedly floor, in which its season average is only one-tenth lower than Georgia’s season-high. Sampson, freshman Nicole Artz and senior Natalie Beilstein are all ranked in the top 25 on the event and the lineup is a force to be reckoned with. The team is also strong on vault, but lost sophomore Austin Sheppard to a broken ankle last week. Sheppard is No. 2T in the event and scored 9.95 or higher on five of 11 vaults this season. On the flip side, Michigan has struggled a lot on beam this season, sitting at only No. 17T in the country. If the Wolverine’s want to win the Athens regional, they must hit beam and maybe even go above their season-high (49.275). But the Wolverines end the competition on beam, and with Georgia on vault and loud cheers sure to be a distracting factor, the team could let up.

Regional seed: No. 5 Notable: The Wolfpack is ranked in the top 25 on vault and beam and sits just outside the rankings on floor at No. 27. Although there is no real chance of making nationals as a team for N.C. State, sophomore Brittni Watkins has a great shot of qualifying as an individual allarounder. Watkins is No. 16 in the country in the all-around and has an impressive season-high of 39.425. She is also No. 30T on vault and No. 33T on floor.

Central Michigan Regional seed: No. 3 Notable: The Chippewas recently won their fifth-straight Mid-Atlantic Conference championship and are coming into regionals with their highest ranking since 2005 when they were No. 14. Central Michigan has little chance of making nationals, but never count out a

Rutgers Regional seed: No. 6 Notable: After not making regionals last year, the Scarlet Knights have bounced back tremendously and have had some record-breaking moments in 2014, including an all-time high RQS of 195.340. Realistically, the Scarlet Knights could challenge for fourth or fifth if they don’t make too many mistakes. After starting the season strong, the team dropped off a bit, likely due to the loss of freshman April Baker to injury. However, freshman Claire Jones stepped up to the plate with seasonhighs of 9.9 on vault and floor and 9.875 on beam. Redshirt junior Luisa Leal also hit 9.9 or higher on her routines multiple times this season. Senior Alexis Gunzelman is also an important part of the Rutgers team, sitting as the top–ranked Scarlet Knight on all four events and the allaround. On a good day, all three gymnasts have a chance of qualifying to nationals.

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Sports B3

REDSHIRT: Football players have mixed opinions on sitting out ➤ From Page 1 “I grew a lot in the playbook,” redshirt sophomore wide receiver Kenneth Towns said. “Not playing, but you get to watch film and watch the other guys. You get to learn from their mistakes and you just get to learn and grow off the field.” Learning the game isn’t the only off-thefield benefit of a redshirt season. As redshirt sophomore wide receiver Blake Tibbs said, acclimating one’s self to new surroundings is just as vital since college is such a different experience than high school. Senior wide receiver Chris Conley, a player who never redshirted, said Towns and Tibbs are two players the team expects to produce in the upcoming season. “Kenny Towns is a guy we’re going to count on a lot to play because he’s gotten a lot better,” Conley said. “And also Blake Tibbs. Those are some guys who you can look to get some time this year and make some plays because they’ve gotten to the point that they will be counted on.” Now two years removed from their respective redshirts, Towns and Tibbs both said they feel as if they are ready to contribute. As competitive offensive players, they are not alone in looking to be contributors after taking a redshirt season. However, their defensive counterparts cannot say the same. Of the 11 players expected to get starting time on defense come fall, none have taken redshirt seasons. In fact, many players forwent the option in favor of competing in some fashion as freshmen. Because of this, players like senior cornerback Damian Swann have no regrets

about jumping into the action early. “I feel like if I would have taken that redshirt year, I wouldn’t have learned as much as I learned my freshman year,” Swann said. “Once they decide to redshirt you, you’re on the scout team the rest of the year. It’s kind of hard to get ahead of everybody else when you’re down playing with the scouts. I don’t regret not being redshirted at all.” Although many of the most productive defensive players never took a redshirt season, 11 defensive players on the active roster have taken a redshirt season, be it for injury or for acclimation. Of those 11, one player that teammates are quick to point to is redshirt freshman defensive back Reggie Wilkerson. Coming off of a season-ending knee injury sustained om 2013. Wilkerson has recovered and is practicing with the team, albeit with a green, limited contact jersey on. “He’s got a lot bigger and he’s got a lot confident,” sophomore safety Quincy Mauger said of Wilkerson. “It takes a lot of toll on your body when you hurt your knee before you go in. He’s held it strong and he’s been doing a great job of being a teammate and even a brother sticking with us through thick and thin. So I predict that he’s going to be out there as well, rotating in.”​ With only one early-enrollee this spring — quarterback Jacob Park — it is easy to predict that many more players will earn redshirts come fall when freshmen report to practice. Though some are expected to make immediate contributions like Mauger and Swann did, many will sit out a year to get better mentally and physically.

Track and field athlete Liz Tepe served in the Marine Corps before joining UGA track. She enrolled at UGA under her own volition before trying out for and making the track and field team. DIONDRA POWERS/Staff

Marine finds youth on UGA track team BY MARIYA LEWTER @MariyaCLewter Most college track and field athletes have been competing for the majority of their lives. They have spent years perfecting their craft and went to school with every intention of competing. However, for one member of the Georgia track and field team, this was not the case. Pure spontaneity and curiosity, rather than years of competing and preparation, led to a collegiate track and field career for 26-year-old senior Elizabeth Tepe. Tepe is originally from Parker, Colo. where she attended Ponderosa High School. For personal betterment, she decided to enlist in the Marine Corps following her high school graduation. “I hadn’t really set myself up for success in high school, and I knew I needed to make a change, and I knew I needed something big, something drastic,” Tepe said. “The military always appealed to me, and I figured the Marines were ‘Go big or go home,’ so that was what I wanted.” Tepe spent four years in the Marines from 20062010 working as an ammunition technician stationed at Camp Pendleton in California. After, she went back to school, enrolling in Saddleback Junior College. Tepe had no prior plans to compete in track and field after serving, but when her husband Jarrod Tepe was deployed, she decided to go out for the school’s track team to keep herself occupied. “It was a complete surprise,” she said. “My husband was on deployment, and I was bored so I decided to go out for the team.” Coaches saw that Tepe was not a great sprinter but encouraged her to try throwing. She thrived in this, finishing third in the hammer throw at the 2012 California State Championships with a personal-best mark of 186-9 and also serving as the junior college national record holder. When it came time to transfer, Tepe chose to come to Georgia, where she could focus on a strong academic career as well as compete under the leadership of throws coach Don Babbitt.

“I knew Coach Babbitt was the best, and I knew Georgia had a really good academic and biology program,” Tepe said. “I registered myself and got in on my own academics, and then went out for the team. Babbitt was nice enough to accept me on the team.” During the 2013 outdoor season, she opened her outdoor career by winning the Georgia Relays with a mark of 191-5. She reached a career-long mark of 200-5 to win the War Eagle Invite, and she won the hammer throw title at her first Southeastern Conference Outdoor Championships after posting a personal-best toss of 203-4. During the 2013 indoor season, she took fifth in the weight (54-6.75) in the VT Elite Meet, and reached a personal-best distance of 59-6.75 for sixth place in the weight at the Akron Invite. This year, Tepe was one of the 297 UGA studentathletes named to the J. Reid Parker Director of Athletics Honor Roll for the 2013 fall semester. “[I love] being a part of Coach Babbitt’s program,” she said. “It’s a legacy within track and field, and if you say his name anywhere that knows track and field, they know who Coach Babbitt is. Learning from him and being with athletes of the same caliber challenges you, and it’s the best part of throwing for Georgia.” Babbitt also raved about Tepe and the degree of maturity she has brought to the UGA team. “One of the many things that she brings is a very strong degree of leadership, not just for the throwers, but for the entire track team as well,” he said. “She serves as a good example of somebody who has been through a lot in life so far and can lead by example and show the kids what to expect and how to go through tough times. It’s good to have on the team.” One thing that she also loves about Georgia is the relationship she has with her teammates. “They keep me younger,” she said. “I’m a little older than they are, and they keep me hip and in with the know. I have a Twitter now, and I learned all kinds of things from my teammates. They keep me young.”

Gym Dogs remedy small mistakes ahead of NCAA regional championship BY ELIZABETH GRIMSLEY @AllFlippedOut The small things. That’s what the No. 6 Georgia gymnastics team is working to improve on heading into the NCAA regional championship this Saturday. “Where can we get one tenth back comparing to SECs or prior training practices,” sophomore Brittany Rogers said. “When it comes down to post-season, it’s about little things and not so much about making your routine, but how can you make your routine as best as it can be.” For every member of the team, the focus is something different.

“My one percent is finding my landings,” freshman Kiera Brown said. “[As a team]… just putting it al together and hitting all 24 routines.” Limiting deductions is particularly important with four judges on each event as opposed to the typical two at regular season meets. “It adds a little bit more pressure,” Rogers said. “But it’s all the more reason to show off and show four sets of eyes instead of two sets of eyes that there are no deductions.” While the gymnasts are doing everything in their power to prepare their routines for the competition, Georgia head coach Danna Durante is making sure the team enters the coli-

seum prepared as well. “Our practices have been a little longer, so it helps keep their focus, which is important,” Durante said. “They’ve got to be able to sustain that energy through and then stand and wait and cheer your team on and then go.” Although it is technically a postseason competition, the regional meet is hosted by Georgia, so the atmosphere will be similar to that of a home meet. “It’s our equipment,” Durante said. “We’ve been in there already five times. It’s a definite benefit.” All of these factors will play to the Gym Dogs’ advantage. However, the

team will be without Rogers on two of her normal events due to an ankle injury suffered during warm ups at the SEC Championships two weeks ago. “It’s competable,” Rogers said. “As a precaution, they don’t want to make it worse by putting me on floor and vault. ” Saturday’s regional serves as the qualifier to the national championships. The top two teams continue on to Birmingham, Ala., two weeks later. The Gym Dogs will face off against Michigan, Central Michigan, Ohio State, N.C. State and Rutgers Saturday at 4 p.m. in Stegeman Coliseum.​


B4 Variety

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

Town & Gown Players resurrects ‘Oklahoma!’ BY COURTNEY WILLETT @courtney_say The Athens Town & Gown Players are putting on the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic ‘Oklahoma!’ which debuts April 4. This classic work of musical theater will be performed by local professional actors with live music and no electric modification. The cast and crew are determined to stay true to the show’s roots, through the groups’ attempt to use instrumentation similar to that of the original ‘Oklahoma!’ productions. “I love the music,” said Derek Adams, director and University of Georgia alumnus. “This is one of those shows were I feel that as long as human culture exists, we will be doing ‘Oklahoma!’ It’s a show that is exactly what it is. It’s not trying to mimic anything, and it’s not trying to copy anything, because it is the first modern musical. It created that form. It’s almost like doing Shakespeare.” “Oklahoma!” premiered in 1943 and marked a groundbreaking turn in musical drama. Rodgers and Hammerstein were the first to fully utilize song and dance as a form of exposition rather than a diversion from the story. The creators additionally were the first to introduce the condradiction of dark villains in a happy cartoonish environment. “The more I learned about how ground-

breaking “Oklahoma!” was, the more I got into it,” said Dustin Ah Kuoi, playing Ali Hakim. “The more we do rehearsals, the more I love the show … The dialogue is really smart and funny and fast-paced. It’ll be a fun show for anyone that comes.” “Oklahoma!” has an overarching theme of the pursuit of “the American dream” all while telling the story of two people too stubborn to admit their affections for each other. Set in 1906 American Indian territory, the musical delves into the power struggle and class conflict between cowboys, farmers and peddlers. In spite of its poignant political message, “Oklahoma!” retains a cheery persona with its quick wit and the upbeat numbers. “‘Oklahoma!’ is just always a show I had loved and always wanted to do,” said Mackenzie Marr, a second-year majoring in piano performance and music education from Augusta playing Ado Annie. “We're working on making [the characters] realistic but kind of like cartoons. The world they live in is realistic but not real.” The cast and crew are eager to do the classic musical justice. It’s an interesting work, with strange plot components and complex characters. Although the play is somewhat cartoonish, characters remain multi-dimensional and dynamic. The production is

“OKLAHOMA!” WHEN: April 4-13 WHERE: Town & Gown Players, 115 Grady Avenue PRICE: $18 for adults, $15 for seniors, $10 for students true to itself and conveys a distinct message without any confusing subtext or hidden meaning. “My whole goal is to have a very cohesive and really solid production of this show. To make it come together, you have to make it fun, make it fast and have really good performers and singers and dancers. We just do the show,” Adams said. Rodgers and Hammerstein debuted with “Oklahoma!” and proceeded to create famous pieces such as “The Sound of Music,” “Cinderella,” and “The King and I.” Song, dance and lyrics come together to move the story forward and convey mature themes. The show will be fit for an audience of all ages, with drama for the adults, and fun musical numbers for the children. “It’s a great show to just turn your brain off and watch people singing and dancing and having fun,” Adams said.

Radiolucent make its homecoming at Georgia Theatre on Friday when it joins The Whiskey Gentry and supporting act The Defibulators. Courtesy Radiolucent

Radiolucent and The Whiskey Gentry team up in Athens BY ANDREW PLASKOWSKY @aplaskowsky Seven years ago, the five Georgia boys who make up Radiolucent couldn’t have imagined the success they’ve seen recently. Over the past few years, Radiolucent’s combination of ’60s rock, country and a little bit of gospel have helped it become a name that’s on everyone’s lips when it returns for a homecoming show. Athens is home to lead vocalist Michael Mann, drummer Zach Neal, guitarist Clint Poe, keyboardist Michael Cowen and bassist Dylan Andrews. For Mann, there’s no extra stress when coming back home to perform. Instead, he’s more at ease because he knows the audience better. “You can come home at any point and there’s more people there at the show who sing along,” Mann said. “It’s relaxing when you don’t have to convince people in other cities that you’re good.” The group is fresh off this year’s Rock Boat, the “World’s Greatest Floating Music Festival,” where the band played alongside Sister Hazel and Reel Big Fish. Following upcoming show at Georgia Theatre on Friday, Radiolucent hopes to get back into the recording studio to record its sophomore album, the follow-up to its 2012 debut “Turn Me On & Turn Me Loose.” “We want it to push a lot of boundaries. We do the Southern-rock thing, but we like gospel and psychedelic music too,” Mann said. “We want to be genuine to ourselves and take risks, so that’s something we’re extremely excited about.” Sharing the stage with Radiolucent on Friday will be a friend to the group, Atlanta band The Whiskey Gentry, which it has performed with multiple times previously. “We’ve become good friends and they’re great people,” Mann said.

RADIOLUCENT AND THE WHISKEY GENTRY WHEN: Friday, April 4, 9 p.m. WHERE: Georgia Theatre PRICE: $10 “It’s a no-brainer for us to play with people we like. Of course we try to do it as much as possible.” Formed in 2009 by husband and wife Lauren Staley and Jason Morrow before adding Chesley Lowe on banjo, bassist Sammy Griffin, drummer Price Cannon, Rurik Nunan on fiddle and Michael Smith on mandolin, the band is using the upcoming show as an album release party of sorts. “Live in Georgia” is the band’s first live album, and it was recorded over a period of two nights, one in Athens and one in Atlanta, around the release of its second studio album “Holly Grove.” “We tried recording live before, but we weren’t in love with the way it turned out the first time, so we tried again to see what would happen,” Staley said. “We were really excited even just listening to the raw recordings.” Friday night marks the tail end of The Whiskey Gentry’s most recent tour, before several big performances at festivals over the summer to be followed by a long break. “It’s been a real whirlwind,” Staley said. “It’s going to be nice to come home and do these next two shows. We will probably hit the road again sometime in the fall, but we’ll be thinking about when we can hit the studio again.” Rest assured that when the two bands are reunited that the atmosphere will be joyous, and both couldn’t be happier to be returning to one of their favorite cities.​

Music Notes: April 3-5 THURSDAY, APRIL 3 The xx Breaking from its residency at the Park Avenue Armory in New York City, indie-pop band The xx is arriving in Athens for a soldout set at the Georgia Theatre on Thursday at 9 p.m. Although the band hasn’t released anything in two years since its sophomore album “Coexist,” demand for the show was so incredibly high that tickets were being resold for around $500. The Atlanta band Mood Rings will be the opening act.

FRIDAY, APRIL 4 Boomfox Athens’ own Boomfox returns home to the Green Room for one of its last shows on its tour to promote

its second EP “Beech Valley” this Friday. Boomfox is one of very few Athens bands that has a lead female vocalist and it ultimately works in its favor. The raw visceral energy in Hannah Zale’s voice breathes life into the songs giving them unparalleled emotion. Tickets are $4 and the show begins at 10 p.m. Burns Like Fire Athens punk-rock band Burns Like Fire is coming back to Athens for its first hometown show of 2014 this Friday night at the Caledonia Lounge. In January, it released its latest EP “To The Ground” through the label Autumn + Colour before setting out on tour. Angry vocals combine with revved up guitars and pounding drums to make even the most relaxed of concertgo-

ers ready to dance. The show begins at 9 p.m. and tickets are $5 for 21+ and $7 for 18-20.

SATURDAY, APRIL 5 Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors Drew Holcomb and his touring band the Neighbors will be returning to Athens for a show at Georgia Theatre on Saturday. After gaining notoriety throughout the South with a relentless touring schedule, Holcomb has opened for various artists including Ryan Adams and The Avett Brothers. With a voice as warm as Marcus Mumford’s and a full band, the show will showcase the talents of all involved. Tickets are $15 and the show begins early at 7:30 p.m. — compiled by Andrew Plaskowsky

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Variety B5

Fashion designers collaborate for museum of art BY COURTNEY WILLETT @courtney_say The Athens Fashion Collective will be featured at the Georgia Museum of Art’s Museum Mix on Thursday night and will feature a spring collection collaboration between Paper-Cut-Projects and Megan Huntz. “It’s been great,” Huntz said. “I’ve known Amy [Flurry] and Nikki [Nye] of Paper-Cut-Projects for some time, and we became friends through our mutual interest in fashion. I’ve always wanted to collaborate with them and when they told me about the Athens Fashion Collective I knew I had to do it. I’m really excited.” Huntz has a background in industrial design and studied fashion in Milan. Following graduation, she worked with denim design in Italy. After working with washing and treating denim fabric, Huntz expanded her horizons and began experimenting with silk washing and dying. “I decided to design my own brand,” Huntz said. “It was new, fresh and never seen before. I worked with the enrichment of textiles through washing and dying, and then I started adding digital prints.” One of Huntz’s iconic spring works features photographic images printed on silk. Huntz visited the Georgia mountains with a photographer. She placed silk just under the surface of water and then printed that image on the fabric. “It’s a meta concept. I like to incorporate a strong artistic concept. There is so much stuff out there in the world and I always like to have a strong link to some-

thing artsy,” Huntz said. Paper-Cut-Projects founders Flurry and Nye also coined their own brand by creating paper accessories with only glue and an X-Acto knife. Their works have been featured in the Lincoln Center for New York Fashion Week alongside world-renowned clothing designers including Cartier and Valentino. “We make a lot of paper wigs,” Flurry said. “They’re very sculptural. It’s not origami; they’re engineered pieces created by precision cutting. This collection will have bold creations. There’s a collar of feathers, over-sized arm cuffs and some hair pieces as well.” Paper-Cut-Projects is largely an abstract brand, featured in runway shows and magazines. Much like Huntz’s work, the pieces are fantastical and artistic but retain and organic feel. Both Nye and Flurry are heavily involved in the creative process to create cohesion throughout their collections. “Our lead designer has worked in paper for over 10 years. I was coming out of magazines, producing and styling fashion, which leaves you in this fantasy. Fantasy is fashion. These are the things stylists create for a page or runway show,” Flurry said. The collection featured this Thursday will present Huntz’s fabrics alongside Paper-Cut-Project’s elaborate accessories. Huntz created a line of monochromatic hand-dyed blue silk to compliment the woodlands-inspired paper accessory line. “It’s really amazing. The blue has such depth and it contrasts with the white,” Huntz said. “I was interested in how all of the

Hacking is not just for computers any more. At The Hatch, a new makerspace in downtown Athens that hopes to incite creativity with a bevy of shared resources, hacking can mean the creation of anything from a website to a table to automated curtains. “A makerspace is essentially a shared studio of sorts,” said Erica Parson, an Athens native and the executive director of The Hatch. At its location in the FourAthens building on East Dougherty Street, members of The Hatch bring objects such as wood-working tools, 3D printers, Google Glass and Raspberry Pis — miniature computers used to program appliances — to share among members of the space. “We have all the toys everybody wants to play with but can’t necessarily afford or have lying around their house,” Parson said. “The goal is to provide the space and the resources for people of many different disciplines to come together and teach each other, to let them collaborate and come up with cool new art and tech innovations.” The Hatch was created as a collaboration in December of 2013 between Jim Flannery, the co-founder of FourAthens, a technology start-up facilitator located in downtown Athens, Parson and lead developer Tommy McDonald. The Hatch’s regular events include a “How to Make” series, in which community members teach each other everything from how to build a microwave to glass sculpture, as well as a monthly “First Friday Hackathon.” In conjunction with similar events in Augusta, Colombus and Rome, The Hatch invites community members to spend four hours creating any project

WHEN: Saturday April 5, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. WHERE: Ciné PRICE: $10

Found Footage Festival highlights forgotten comedy BY JOE YOUORSKI @jyouorski

A model walks the runway as a part of the Friends of Advantage adDress a Need fashion show. FILE/Staff pieces would aesthetically go together. It’s like two sides of the same coin, but not an exact copy of that coin.” Museum Mix is free and open to the public. All of the Georgia Museum of Art galleries will be open and refreshments will be provided. DJ Winston Parker will be providing additional musical entertainment.

ATHENS FASHION COLLECTIVE WHAT: Thursday, April 3, 8:45 p.m. WHERE: Georgia Museum of Art PRICE: Free

Inventors compete with time constraints in ‘Hackathon’ BY CHELSEY ABERCROMBIE @comma_freak

FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL

they desire on the first Friday of every month. Any amount of pre-planning and personally provided materials are allowed, as long as participants finish their projects in the allotted four hours. Since The Hatch’s first Hackathon on Feb. 7, projects have ranged from websites to stained glass windows to programmable appliances. “The coolest [project] so far I think is a group that came in and made automated curtains,” Parson said. “They wrote the code at the Hackathon, they built the curtain rod, and it worked off a light sensor. When the sun came up, it automatically opened your curtains for you and when it got dark it closed them.” Antoinette Stevens, a third-year computer science major from Stone Mountain, attended one of The Hatch’s First Friday Hackathons with a group of fellow students. “We made a website that was kind of like people teaching people how to do different things,” said Stevens, a member of UGA’s Society of Entrepreneurs and vice president of the University’s Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers student branch. “If you knew how to bake a certain cake, you could make a video and put it on there. It was kind of a how-to site.” According to Stevens, it’s not just the Hackathon’s four hour limit that can be attractive to creative minds looking to attempt a dream project. “The community is important too, because there’ll be people to show you how to use the stuff,” Stevens said. “The connections you make, you might go in there and meet your future business partner and build something amazing.” Athens-based UGA graduates Cali and Robert Brutt were drawn to the artisanal side of the First Friday Hackathon. Cali, an entrepreneur, and

Robert, a middle school teacher and woodworker, learned about the event through FourAthens. “I made a table out of a pallet,” Robert said. “I thought, ‘I’ve never done this before, I’ve got four hours, I think I could probably do this in four hours,’ and I think I did it in three.” Even if a contestant doesn’t have a traditional project in mind, the atmosphere itself can be inspirational. “I am definitely a little bit more out of my element, because I’m not so much a traditional maker,” said Cali, an entrepreneur who runs two businesses. “I’m not always making things with my hands. The last time I made a cutesy little string art thing, which was awesome, but I really like the spirit of the whole thing. I love to be in a place where people are actively making things. I’ve already made awesome connections through that.” Stevens, Parson and the Brutts look forward to The Hatch having its own space outside of the FourAthens building, as it will allow for more interaction between participants. “Last time, I was anti-socially chopping wood outside the space. It was great,” Robert said. The Hatch, which recently filed for 501(c)(3) non-profit status, will soon launch a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for a space more conducive to the growing organization’s needs. The makerspace also has a sponsor in Allgood Lounge, where many of the regular makers meet and discuss their projects on a habitual basis. The Hatch plans to charge a $75 monthly membership fee, which Stevens said is preferable to the thousands of dollars an individual would have to pay for its innovative equipment. “There’s also things I don’t have that maybe I might try to use for the first time or want to use for the first time,” Robert said.

Joe Pickett and Nick Prueher of Found Footage Festival have been traveling around the world to show their ever growing collection of bizarre and entertaining VHS tapes for 10 years now, but at its core, the show is still rooted in the duo’s favorite high school pastime. “The show is essentially the same as what we were doing in our parents’ living rooms in high school,” Prueher said. “Having friends over, watching videos, making jokes.” Featuring everything from cheesy ’80s workout videos to peculiar training programming for corporations, the Found Footage Festival will be coming to Ciné on April 5, part of a national tour Pickett and Prueher are taking the show on. “Each year we’ve toured more and more places,” Prueher said. “Last year, we toured all 50 states and Sweden for the first time, along with the U.K. and Europe.” The two founders grew up in Wisconsin and met during the sixth grade, and over the years began cultivating what would eventually become the basis of the Found Footage Festival. “We really bonded over a love of things that were so bad they were good,” Prueher said. “We would dig around in thrift stores for things that would entertain ourselves and our friends, and one of the things we’d find would be VHS tapes.” Over the years, the two continued to collect these sorts of forgotten VHS tapes. Both founders wound up working in the television and film industries, giving them a wealth of experience for an event such as this. Finally, in 2004, they put on their first showing to a positive reception, giving them a platform to turn their hobby into something larger. “It’s expanded a lot since that first show in the back of a bar in Manhattan,” Prueher said. The two introduce the videos and provide humorous commentary, often riffing on the more ridiculous aspects of the videos. The two also try to find the subjects of the videos to get an insight into what they’re showing. “We’ll fly to wherever they live and interview them,” Prueher said. “It’s almost like ‘Inside the Actor’s Studio.’ We just give a really indepth focus to these videos that most would people would just forget about, so that’s one of the cool parts of the show.” Throughout the event’s tours, the two have found Athens to be a good location for the show. They have established a healthy relationship with Ciné , and tend to draw highly receptive crowds to the event. “Athens is like our home away from home,” Prueher said. In each town the show stops in, Prueher and Pickett make sure to check the local thrift stores for new material, and encourage fans to bring in any tapes that they find on their own. By sorting through a largely dead medium, the two hosts have found a cache of content that has never been shown to the public before, giving them a niche that most other shows can not replicate. “We’re always looking for stuff that you can’t see anywhere else,” Prueher said. “It’s all things that you can’t find on the Internet, so the only place you can see it is at this show.”

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B6 Variety

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

Nashville singer debuts in Athens BY ANDREW PLASKOWSKY @aplaskowsky When Cole Taylor, originally from Cuthbert, left Valdosta to go to Nashville and chase his dreams at the start of 2013, nothing could have prepared him for what came next. Following in the footsteps of other country contemporaries such as Luke Bryan, Thomas Rhett and his close friend Cole Swindell, Taylor met his goal of signing a publishing deal with Universal after being in Nashville for only nine months. “It’s so great that I get to work hard and still do shows for the fans that have been around since I was still down in Valdosta,” Taylor said. “I get to write every day and get my brand out there as an artist.” Taylor’s 2011 debut “Cab of My Chevy” was released independently while he was studying at Valdosta State University and provided a base for his future endeavors. As most artists often look back on their debut with disdain, Taylor couldn’t be more proud of his start, citing the experience and preparation it gave him when he arrived in Nashville. “I was young when I did that record and it was great to get the experience of gaining fans; to see them come out to shows to see me and sing my songs. The record is important to tracking my growth as an artist and songwriter,” Taylor said. After signing his publishing deal, a number of top name country artists began taking an interest in him as a songwriter like FloridaGeorgia Line and Lady Antebellum. He wrote a

song on Chase Rice’s newest EP “Ready Set Roll,” but he teased that bigger things are to come within the next year. “We have a lot of things working for other artists right now, but I can’t disclose any of that. There’s some cool stuff happening in the next year so watch out,” Taylor said. While other publications focus on what makes Taylor so similar to his contemporaries, he wants them to know it’s OK to draw comparisons while he remains different in certain respects. Taylor’s greatest musical influence is country legend Garth Brooks for his writing and stage presence. “I’m a big fan of storytelling in songs. With my music, I like to have a more in-depth narrative and there’s a few ways to do that,” Taylor said. “Garth Brooks is one of the first who could take the stage and really just own it instead of standing there with a guitar the entire time.” The possibilities are limitless for the future of Taylor and his brand, while he balances work on his next studio album and writing for others. “Since I’m signed now I have more people to answer to so I can’t just throw it out on iTunes independently. What we’re working on now is trying to be different musically and see where it goes,” Taylor said. When he hits the stage of the 40 Watt Club, Taylor will pledge allegiance to the Bulldog Nation — just don’t tell Valdosta State. “I haven’t played there with my band yet, but I’m a huge Bulldog fan,” Taylor said.

Junkman’s Daughter’s Brother, a beloved local salvage store, will not renew its lease in August, ending its nearly 30 year run as part of downtown Athens, when its owner Mark Gavron retires. CHRISTIAN CANNON/Staff

Junkman’s to close up in August BY ALEX EVERHART @alexbeverhart After 28 years in the surplus and salvage business, Junkman’s Daughter’s Brother is closing its’ doors. Mark Gavron, the store’s owner, announced the store’s closing on Monday. He said his lease is up at the end of August, and he is ready to retire. “It’s been great,” Gavron said. “Most people don’t get to have as much fun as I have running a business.” Junkman’s Daughter’s Brother opened in October of 1986, a few short years after Gavron’s sister opened Junkman’s Daughter in Atlanta. Junkman’s carries a multitude of items including life-size cutout posters, Halloween costumes, trinkets and fun gifts. Gavron’s father owned several salvage stores in Atlanta while he was growing up, and he decided to keep up the family business. Gavron graduated from the University of Georgia in 1978 with a degree in geology. He worked in Boulder, Colo., for eight years before moving back to Athens to open his own store. The original store was located on Broad Street, but soon moved to 160 East Clayton St. Now, Junkman’s is located a few blocks down on the same street, which has been its home for the last 20 years. Although the Junkman’s in Athens is set to close at the end of summer, Gavron said he would continue doing what he loves part-time. He has no

plans to leave town anytime soon. “I am planning on doing a Christmas store that will be open pretty much November and December,” Gavron said. He has not found a location for the seasonal store, but he is already looking into gifts and merchandise. Gavron said he would use at least 100 different companies in his new store. As of now, the seasonal store will stay under the same name. In the meantime, Junkman’s will remain fully stocked until the end of August. He plans on selling everything in the store including the eclectic supply of posters, tapestries and fixtures. “The merchandise is fun and I have good employees,” Gavron said, “I kind of hate to see that part of it go.” Junkman’s has seen great success over the years in the Athens area. Gavron said his store has been well received in Athens and feels the store has been a good part of the community. Many celebrities have visited, including Amy Adams, Courtney Love, Kurt Cobain and Leon Russell. With a son entering high school within the next year, Gavron hopes to maintain the seasonal store for a few years. With his newfound free time, he also hopes to complete a few adventures on his bucket list, which include hiking in New Zealand and Patagonia, trekking in the Himalayas and visiting Machu Picchu. “Everyone will be sad to see us go,” Gavron said.

UGA alumnus returns as performer BY JONNY WILLIAMS @itsjonnyw Known to many people for its rich music scene, Athens is equally known for its excessive party culture. For Nashville-based singer and songwriter Bobby Cool, Athens is personally remembered for both. Like many students who first enter the University of Georgia, handling the city’s over-the-top nature was difficult for Cool. “When I first got to college, I was just immersed in the party scene and got in trouble, got arrested a couple of times and really was kind of spiraling downhill,” Cool said. During his time at UGA, Cool encountered both music performance and religion at around the same time. This was the beginnings of laying out an influence for his future career as a singer and songwriter. “For the first couple years of college, I just played [guitar] in the dorm room or apartment and just started learning songs, but being immersed in the Athens music scene … I caught the bug and wanted to do it. So junior year I played my first show,” Cool said. “About the same time I started playing music live, God was just doing a lot of things, putting a lot of people in my life.” Cool continued to perform around Athens for the rest of his UGA career, but his real entrance into the music scene didn’t happen until he moved to Tennessee for unrelated reasons. “I graduated in December 2008 and moved to Nashville in January 2009 and really then began my education in the music industry,” Cool said. “I was working for an insurance company at the time, but was playing

Bobby Cool will make an appearance in Athens to promote his upcoming album release. Courtesy Bobby Cool and writing and meeting a lot of people.” The musical style that Cool developed in his new home isn’t much of a surprise — country. Cool’s style, however, isn’t necessarily what people generally think of when the word “country” is used as a musical adjective. Cool takes influence from both the Nashville scene and other Southern genres. “The way that I’ve been describing it is ‘rootsy-country,’” Cool said. “But, there are totally influences of singer songwriter, some rock ‘n’ roll influences.” Cool’s upcoming debut album, “Light In The Dark,” is titled after what he feels represents his change in lifestyle. Though it lyrically features a religious aura, Cool’s upcoming release wouldn't fit among gospel and other Christian recordings, being a secular album with religious influences “Specifically, no — it definitely is not a religious album,” Cool said. “But, if you’re looking for it, there are gospel undertones.” More than simply an artist on stage singing to a crowd, Cool’s live shows are a constant intercommunication between himself and the audience — and that’s exactly how Cool likes it. “I would say its very high energy — a lot of interaction, a lot

BOBBY COOL WHEN: Thursday April 3, 11 p.m. WHERE: General Beauregard’s PRICE: Free

of back and forth, give and take with the crowd,” Cool said. “Thats what I enjoy most is playing and interacting with the crowd. That’s where I kind of get my kick.” Though Cool developed himself musically in Nashville, he hasn’t forgotten where his roots lie in the field and his beginnings in his style of music began. Cool is looking forward to his upcoming return to Athens, but his final goal regarding his venue of choice has yet to be met, as he has his eyes set on one of Athens' premier venues. “Athens is where I learned to play music, it’s where I fell in love with the idea of pursuing music as a career and its home. Every time I go back it’s just like a breath of fresh air,” Cool said. “I’m dreaming about the day when I get to play the Georgia Theatre.” He hasn't reached his dream venue yet, but he’s taking the first steps.


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Showcase B7

Showcase

RANDY SCHAFER/Staff

Bulldog Balloons: Inflatable zoo For part two of a weekly photo essay about business management student Johnny Torres, The Red & Black shadowed Torres while he performed balloon artistry at two events featuring his company Bulldog Balloons. On March 23, Torres was hired to

perform at a Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt on Barnett Shoals Road during a “Kids Day” event. The following weekend, Torres worked a similar event for a Belk department store inside Georgia Square Mall, during a “Kidsfest” event on March 29. Aside

from private parties, much of Torres’ income as a balloon artist comes from local businesses hosting kidoriented days. Coincidentally, and sometimes strategically, Torres meets additional contacts and customers while performing in public.

1. Torres begins making a third rose balloon for a group of girls waiting for him to complete four roses at Belk during “Kidsfest.” Scheduled to work from noon until 3 p.m., the popularity of his balloons kept him an hour late, and he nearly ran out of balloons. 2. During “Kidsfest,” Torres (from right) smiles while making plane noises, handing his finished airplane balloon to 7-year-old Carson Smith, as his grandfather, Keith, grins looking at Carson's reaction. Torres’ most frequently requested balloons are monkeys or dogs on motorcycles, horses, airplanes, flowers and superheroes.

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3. Shortly before the line for Torres’ balloons moves to the back room, 8-year-old Anna Claire Childers, (from top) holds her 2-year-old sister Amelia, who's smiling, as her 5-yearold sister Alyssa Kate eagerly waits for Torres to finish making balloon horse at Menchie’s.

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4.During "Kids Day" at Menchie’s, Torres finishes making a dog on a blue motorcycle balloon requested by a child, as other children eat frozen yogurt. Because of the populari-

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ty of his act, Torres eventually moved to a back room, so customers could reach the frozen yogurt dispensers.

5. While in the back room, 2-yearold customer Asher Thrift smiles while looking at his yellow horse balloon made by Torres at Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt during "Kids Day." The most common age range Torres performs for are children ages 2-9, or an occasional adult accompanying their child.


B8 Variety

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

Events THURSDAY APRIL 3 LOCAL

FRIDAY APRIL 4 UGA

Nature Ramblers When: 8:30-10 a.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Price: Free Contact: www.botgarden.uga.edu A Night of the Arts When: 5:30-7:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: Free ($10 tour) Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com

MUSIC

The xx When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: Sold out Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

Leaving Countries When: 10 p.m. Where: Boar’s Head Lounge Price: Free Contact: 706-369-3040 Sehrmann, Rogue Band of Youth, Freak in the Fire When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com

29th Annual Insect Zoo Open House When: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Where: UGA Miller Plant Sciences Price: Free Contact: entomolo@ uga.edu

UGA Relay for Life When: 7 p.m. Where: UGA Intramural Fields Price: $10 Contact: www. ugarelay.org

Entertainment Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Dirty Birds Price: Free Contact: www.facebook. com/dirtybirdsath

Family and Friends, Tedo Stone, New Wives When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 (adv), $8 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

SATURDAY APRIL 5 LOCAL

LOCAL

Oklahoma! When: 8 p.m. Where: Town & Gown Players Price: $10-18 Contact: www. townandgownplayers.org

First Friday Hackathon When: 6 - 10 p.m. Where: Four Athens Price: Free Contact: www.hatchathens.com

MUSIC

TRIVIA

Cole Taylor, Jon Langston When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: www.40watt.com

DJ Mob Knarly, Dead Nation Heroes, Flashbomb When: 10 p.m. Where: Cutters Pub Price: Free Contact: 706-353-9800

The Classic City International Film Festival When: 10:30 a.m. Where: Morton Theatre Price: $10/film, $25/festival pass Contact: www.theclassiccityfilmfest.com Athens Hole-A-Thon When: 5 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Donations encouraged Contact: www.georgiajan.org

MUSIC Parrothead, Live Transmission, Los Meesfits, Hearts on Fire When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors, Judah & The Lion When: 7 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre

The xx will be making a sold-out appearance at Georgia Theatre on Thursday April 3, with support from Atlanta act Mood Rings. Courtesy Tuomas Vitikainen Price: $15 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

MUSIC

Craig Waters & The Flood When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: 706-5464742

ART Opening Reception When: 6-9 p.m. Where: Mini Gallery Price: Free Contact: www.facebook. com/minigallery

FILM The Classic City International Film Festival When: 10:30 a.m. - 8:50 p.m. Where: Morton Theatre Price: $10/film, $25/festival pass Contact: www.theclassiccityfilmfest.com

SUNDAY APRIL 6 TRIVIA Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: The Capital Room Price: Free Contact: www.thecapitalroom.com

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Drew Davis, Walden, Rebecca Rego and the Trainmen When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com The Segar Jazz Affair When: 6 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $8 (adv.), $10 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

LOCAL

APR 3 ...... The XX w/ Mood Rings- SOLD OUT APR 4 ..... The Whiskey Gentry & Radiolucent w/ The Defribulators APR 4 .................. Have Gun, Will Travel after Radiolucent- ROOFTOP, FREE APR 5 ............... Early: Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors w/ Judah and the Lion APR 5 ............................ Late: Conspirator w/ Modern Measure

MONDAY APRIL 7

Agro Cycle Tour When: 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Where: Multiple Locations Price: $68 Contact: georgiafoodtours@gmail.com

B.E. Godfrey When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com

LOCAL Meet the Author: Jim Miles When: 7 p.m. Where: Oconee County Library Price: Free Contact: www.athenslibrary.org/oconee Visiting Artist: Cassie Meador When: 4 p.m. Where: Miller Learning Center, Room 214 Price: Free Contact: 706-542-7270 “Athens Gateways: Unsafe? Unprofitable?” When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Cine Barcafe Price: Free Contact: www.accneighborhoods.org

KARAOKE & OPEN MIC Open Mic Night When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot's Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com gOPEN Mic Night When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: 706-546-5609

TUESDAY APRIL 8

Where: Georgia Theatre Price: Soldout Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

LOCAL University Woman’s Club Spring Fashion Show When: 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Where: Athens Country Club Price: $25 Contact: www.womansclub.uga.edu Be Green Fest When: 5-7 p.m. Where: Barrow Elementary School Price: Free Contact: www.smore. com/dphy

WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 TRIVIA Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Mellow Mushroom Price: Free Contact: 706-613-0892

ART Tour at Two When: 2 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

MUSIC William Tyler When: 9 p.m. Where: Green Room Price: $6 (adv.), $8 (door) Contact: www.greenroomathens.com Jive Mother Mary When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: 706-546-4742

TRIVIA Locos Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Locos Grill & Pub Price: Free Contact: www.locosgrill. com Trivia at the Rail When: 10:30 p.m. Where: The Rail Price: Free Contact: 706-354-7289

Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, Consider the Source When: 9 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $10 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

MUSIC Lazy Locomotive When: 11:30 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Rooftop Price: Free Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com Higher Learning When: 11 p.m. Where: Green Room Price: $5 Contact: www.greenroomathens.com Umphrey's McGee When: 8 p.m.

LOCAL Athens Farmers Market When: 4-7 p.m. Where: Athens City Hall Price: Free Contact: www.athensfarmersmarket.org Silent Auction When: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Where: Taylor-Grady House Price: $5-8 Contact: www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com


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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Puzzles B9

DRINK AND DINING GUIDE FRIDAY

THURSDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Your weekly guide to Athens’ daily deals.

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY

MONDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Where: 256 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 549-0166 Website: www.allgoodlounge.com

******************** $2.25 22oz NATURAL LIGHT EVERY DAY! ********************

Where: 1860 Barnett Shoals Rd.

Phone: (706) 850-1916 Website:

Wing Night 4pm-close! .49 cent Boneless/ .69 cent traditional

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$2 off beer flights $3.25 Red Stag

FINAL 4 TONIGHT Buy 20 Boneless Wings get 5 free $2.50 PBR Tallboys

Wrestlemania 30 7pm $5 cover 10% off w/ Church Bulletin or Kids Eat Free

Pad Thai

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NCAA championship!!! General Knowledge Trivia 8:30 pm w/ the Good Guys Nate and Jeff $2.25 22oz Natty drafts

Burger Tuesday!! $4.99 Fresh Angus Burger w/ Fries all day!! (dine-in or takeout)

Closed

Panang

Drunken Noodle

Happy Hour 4-7pm $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells

Happy Hour 4-7pm $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells Oyster Lovers 3-6pm Buy a dozen get a dozen half off

Happy Hour 4-7pm $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life

HAPPY HOUR $1 Pints of High Life all day

8pm - Trivia $7 Domestic pitchers, $1 High Life pints

Sports Trivia 8:30pm w/ The Good Guys Nate and Jeff $5.50 House Pitchers

www.beefobradys.com

COZY YUM YUM Where: 489 E Clayton St Phone: (706) 543-8898

MARKER SEVEN COASTAL GRILL

Where: 1195 S. Milledge Ave.

Phone: (706) 850-3451 Website:

Happy Hour 4-7pm $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells

Oyster Lovers 3-6pm Buy a dozen get a dozen half off.

Oyster Lovers 3-6pm Buy a dozen get a dozen half off

Late Bird Drink Specials 2-6pm $3 Mimosas, $4 Bloodys $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells

$6 Frozen drinks, $13 House wine bottles

$3 Well drinks & shots

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

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Where: 320 E. Clayton Suite 201 Phone: (706) 613-0892 Website: mellowmushroom.com

(restrictions apply)

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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puzzles

B10 Puzzles

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Red & Black

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 3 ACROSS 1 Make gentle 5 Actor Stacy __ 10 Pepper grinder 14 Mountain goat 15 Bird of prey 16 Length times width 17 Be obliged to 18 Raise AKC dogs 19 Puts on clothes 20 Moral; honest 22 Opposed to 24 Capture 25 __ out; makes smooth 26 Royal decree 29 Afternoon hour 30 Piers 34 Gave for a time 35 __-Man; early video game 36 In __; refusing to face reality 37 First letters 38 Eight-armed sea creature 40 Uninteresting 41 Mischievous no-show

43 Curved bone 44 Make well 45 Deserves 46 Quilting party 47 Soiled 48 Takes out text, for short 50 Cry 51 Not as tall 54 Remembers 58 Scoop holder 59 Burr or Spelling 61 Like sweater weather 62 Once more 63 Punctures 64 Luau dance 65 State of clutter 66 Cone-shaped home 67 In a lazy way

DOWN 1 On __; prompt 2 Border on 3 Fit together, as machine gears 4 Like dodoes and dinosaurs

5 Shish __; bites on a skewer 6 British noble 7 Grow older 8 Chop in two with a big knife 9 Row of shrubs 10 4th U.S. president 11 Common metal 12 Part of the eye 13 Final 21 Tiger or tabby 23 Mountains of South America 25 Repeat performances, upon request 26 Thrill 27 Actress Winger 28 Bring upon oneself 29 Bit of cereal 31 Apple drink 32 24 __ gold 33 In a crafty way 35 %: abbr. 36 Give a nickname to 38 Start

39 Dessert choice 42 Actress Julie 44 Small barbecue 46 Bawl out 47 One of the Seven Dwarfs 49 Minimum 50 Good judgment 51 Fraud 52 Sharpen 53 Individuals 54 Caftan, for one 55 Noisy 56 Lounge about 57 Kill 60 Eminem’s style

DOWN 1 As blind __ bat 2 Cozy after-bath garment 3 Shopping area 4 Agreement 5 Wed 6 Zone 7 Thin flat board 8 No one in particular 9 Work too hard 10 Headfirst plunge 11 Dollar bills 12 Torn in two 14 Ron and Nancy 21 Bundle of hay 25 Rage 26 In the __ of; used to doing 27 Upper crust 28 Pot __; cut of beef 29 Cornered 30 Attila’s men 31 Seize power

32 Waterbirds 33 Despised 35 Relinquish 38 Boring 39 Making airtight 41 Pelosi’s title: abbr. 42 Small duck 44 Coif 45 Give in 47 Hombre’s title 48 “Ashes to ashes, __...” 49 Notice 50 Leak out 52 High point 53 Scrabble piece 54 Bears or Cubs 55 Consequently 59 Small amount

706.410.2003

FRIDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 4 ACROSS 1 Provide with weapons 4 Pile up 9 Smell 13 Fly high 15 Monte __; casino resort 16 Grape-bearing plant 17 Capable 18 Whipped __; sundae topper 19 On an __ keel; stable 20 Detailed; fancy 22 Take a nap 23 Actor Sinise 24 Auction offer 26 “Hark the __ Angels Sing” 29 Exhaustive 34 Without companions 35 In poor taste 36 Yellow, Red, Black or Dead 37 Unfair slant 38 Very small

39 Hard cooking fat 40 “__ Now or Never”; Elvis song 41 Carnival attractions 42 Curt 43 Tied up 45 Gathered crops 46 Be a copycat 47 Sea World performer 48 Ricky Ricardo’s portrayer 51 __ dish; TV signal receiver 56 Drug addict 57 Express one’s views 58 Bookish fellow 60 Drove too fast 61 Cantaloupe or honeydew 62 Very excited 63 Keyboard error 64 Put forth effort 65 Mass of people

P U Z Z L E

A clever person leans toward cynicism but a wise one is clever enough not to.

S P O N S O R

SATURDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 5 ACROSS 1 Arrive 5 Bush 10 Comic actress Imogene __ 14 Give __; lose all confidence in 15 Landlord-tenant agreement 16 Pitcher 17 Be flexible 18 Betrothal 20 White __; termite 21 Walking stick 22 Jokes around 23 Public square 25 Berry or Olin 26 TV’s “The Big Bang __” 28 Physician 31 Shouts 32 Birdbrain 34 Mover’s truck 36 Hammer’s target

10% OFF

STUDENT DISCOUNT

37 Walk on both sides of 38 Casino game 39 Night before 40 Pooh’s creator 41 Zodiac sign 42 Mistakes 44 Be attentive 45 Tavern drink 46 Dog walker’s strap 47 Seacoast 50 Lunch or dinner 51 Steal from 54 Extensive 57 Garment of old Rome 58 Finds a sum 59 Bisect 60 Haywire 61 Finest 62 Bury 63 __ up; spends

wwDOWN 1 Havana’s nation 2 __ up; reveal one’s feelings 3 Vermont’s capital 4 At the __ of the day; ultimately 5 Disreputable; slimy 6 Reddish dye 7 Hit the ceiling 8 Neighbor of Canada: abbr. 9 Plead 10 Concrete 11 Has debts 12 Penny 13 __ and crafts 19 Kick out 21 Cadillacs and Camrys 24 Lounge about 25 Nutcase 26 Tim Daly’s sis 27 Lift and throw with effort

28 Eat 29 Removes from power 30 Spectrum 32 Troubles 33 VP __ Quayle 35 Midday 37 Blaze 38 Foil-wrapped bit of Hershey’s chocolate 40 Internal spies 41 Small bottle 43 Most unusual 44 Follow the __; kids’ game 46 Depart 47 Q-tip, for one 48 Animal pelt 49 Chances 50 Dissolve 52 Villain 53 Sea inlets 55 Fraternity letter 56 __ away; fled 57 Plato’s “T”

address 3 Sitting on 4 Miami baseball player 5 Happy 6 See eye to eye 7 Courts 8 Consume 9 Tired 10 Walks unsteadily 11 __ vaccine; Salk’s interest 12 Representative 13 Woodwinds, for short 21 Take as the rightful owner 23 Egypt’s river 25 __ up for; defend 26 Refer to 27 Microwave, e.g. 28 Torn in two 29 Slow crawler 32 Eagle’s nest 34 Remove from power 35 Barking marine mammal

36 Catch sight of 38 States openly 40 Mexican mister 43 Early Oldsmobiles 45 Motives 48 Fold mark 50 Critter 51 Singer Bobby 52 Piece of music 53 Strips 54 __ at; derides 56 Sink stopper 57 Rescue 58 “My Country, ‘Tis of __” 59 __ and pepper 62 Marsh

W/COLLEGE ID

TRIVIA EVERY SUNDAY 7-9 MONDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 7 ACROSS 1 Little rascal 6 Fills with wonder 10 Hot tubs 14 Sum 15 Hockey score 16 Garment of old Rome 17 Worship 18 Learn by __; memorize 19 Emcee Trebek 20 Finds a substitute for 22 Locomotive 24 __ of Wight 25 Faucets 26 Part of the eye 29 In __; fashionable 30 “__ Been Working on the Railroad” 31 Prince Harry’s late mum 33 Uneven 37 Take care of 39 Signifies 41 Takes to court

Terry believes business is part of the community.

Major in FINANCE It’s more than stock trading…

42 Go into 44 Passenger 46 Gullible one 47 __ B. DeMille 49 In a tidy way 51 Consider horrible 54 Baez or Rivers 55 Relaxed 56 Goes on in spite of opposition 60 Regretful one 61 Up to the task 63 Nebraska city 64 Not working 65 Bitter 66 Belly button 67 Loch __; monster’s lake 68 Omelet maker’s needs 69 Frozen rain

DOWN 1 Night twinkler 2 Zip __; part of an


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Puzzles B11

TUESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 8 ACROSS 1 Derogatory remark 5 __ out; get rid of gradually 10 Swiss skier’s slopes 14 Grow weary 15 Equestrian 16 Canoe or tug 17 Jillian & others 18 More peculiar 19 Cartoon bear 20 Leftover ashes 22 Member of a criminal gang 24 Depressed 25 Watery part of the blood 26 “E” on the gas gauge 29 Obsolete 30 Pleasure boat 34 Reclines 35 Emerson’s monogram 36 Cowardly 37 Letters before an alias

38 Place to keep ice cream 40 “You __ My Sunshine” 41 Extreme fear 43 Daddies 44 Laundry soap 45 School writing assignment 46 Congressman’s title: abbr. 47 Two-__; was unfaithful 48 “Lovely Rita, __ maid...” 50 Whale group 51 Hit musical for Liza Minnelli 54 Restricted 58 In the sack 59 Burr or Spelling 61 Thus 62 Tearful request 63 Lasting attack 64 Omen 65 Actress Harper 66 Concluded 67 Throw

DOWN 1 Asterisk 2 Queue 3 Fancy vases 4 Puts up a fight 5 Haughty 6 Conceal 7 Tally up 8 Appeared 9 Boo-boo 10 Extremely bad 11 Money, slangily 12 Book leaf 13 Commotion 21 24 hours 23 Customer 25 Pullman car 26 Fill with joy 27 Farrell & Tyson 28 Juicy fruits 29 Be in the red 31 Take as the rightful owner 32 Crowd

33 Rough woolen fabric 35 Elementary school subjs. 36 Affirmative 38 Entrance hall 39 Use a stun gun 42 Hotels that are part of a chain 44 Most orderly 46 Keep 47 Selleck or Petty 49 Rib 50 Yearned 51 Senior officer on a ship: abbr. 52 Qualified 53 Buzzing insects 54 Theater box 55 Threesome 56 Breakfast order 57 Puts on 60 __ as a beet

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WEDNESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 9 Pearl Our Freshwater ACROSS Set includes pearl 1 Fellow earrings, a pearl bracelet necklace 4 Run __; chase and a pearl 9 Bulk; weight for $99

13 Perched upon 15 Vow taker 16 Haywire 17 Contact with a beeper 18 To become stuck 19 Look for 20 Last day of October 22 Acacia or alder 23 “King of the Jungle” 24 Foot digit 26 Respect highly 29 Ajax or Comet 34 Small flies 35 Large dangerous fish 36 Greek “T” 37 Cravings 38 Cowboy shoes 39 Gemini or Leo

AthensLivingUGA presents •

Tri v a

5 QUESTIONS EVERY WEEK

*Questions (Hint check out Red & Black publications)

3. Who is the Ice Dawgs starting goalie?

~ 3 points 1. What new program did the Oconee County Animal Shelter 4. Name one person whose clothing will be in the Georgia and Rescue just launch? ~ 3 points Museum of Arts Fashion Show. ~ 7 points 2. What new drinking game has killed at least 5 people since February 1st? ~ 5 points 5. What local downtown store is closing? ~ 3 points

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DOWN 1 Space 2 Ogden’s state 3 Meditative exercise 4 Like a flowering bush, poetically 5 Sad expression 6 Movement of the waves 7 Border 8 Goes in again 9 Go quickly 10 Water jug 11 Unrestrained 12 Small child 14 Air rifle ammo 21 Tells a fib 25 Furniture wood 26 Cairo’s nation 27 Contemptuous look 28 “It takes two to __” 29 Selected 30 Overdue

40 Nickname for Margaret 41 Baggy 42 __ closet; place for sheets, towels, etc. 43 Large brass instrument 45 Longfellow’s specialty 46 Inquire 47 Keep __ on; watch closely 48 Air pollution 51 Smoker’s item 56 Agony 57 Lessen 58 Fine __; music, painting, etc. 60 Not working 61 Very early bedtime 62 Paper bag 63 Home of twigs 64 Put forth effort 65 __ Beta Kappa

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31 Period spent in the military, e.g. 32 Very willing 33 __ nose; cold symptom 35 Before long 38 Piece of furniture in a home library 39 Naps 41 Pounds: abbr. 42 Part of the ear 44 Substance that attracts metals 45 Mom or dad 47 Spud 48 Whirl around 49 Manufactured 50 Lubricates 52 Mountain goat 53 __ in; conceded 54 Pitfall 55 Engrave 59 Zoom down snowy slopes

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WIN COOL PRIZES!

Grand Prize

$100 check for a student organization or $100 gift card for a student team Go online and register your student team or organization!

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Need a roommate or a job? Got something to sell, rent, or trade? Place your ad ANYTIME at: redandblack.com/classifieds EMPLOYMENT

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Moving Help Part-Time Work Full-Time Pay. Now in Athens! Be your own boss! Set your own rates! Set your own schedule! Apply Now! Go to: Movinghelper.com

Do you have a Bachelor's degree? Would you like to teach English in Japan? Hello!s Associates in recruiting teachers for the 2015 school year. What: Information session for Hello!s Associates English teaching position When: Sunday, April 27th, 2014 Where: UGA Campus, Aderhold Hall room 114 Contact: Kyle Lovinggood (kylelovinggood@ hellos-english.com) Lifeguards Needed: Gwinnett, Fulton, Walton and Dekalb county pools. For information: visit www. positivelypools.com or call 770972-3111 Earn up to $11/hour at a neighborhood pool! Certification and training provided Blue Whale Pool Management is now hiring 2014 summer season lifeguards and Pool Operators (pool maintenance) in the North Atlanta area (Gwinnett, Alpharetta, Roswell, Norcross, Marietta, and Kennesaw). Certification classes (lifeguarding & CPO) are available. Compensation: $7:25 to $10.00 based on experience To apply, please visit our website at www.bluewhalepools.com or call 770-893-9017. Central Presbyterian Church seeks creative, energetic persons for our youth program for part time positions to help plan, lead and coordinate all youth activities for one year. Send resume/ references to office@athenscentralpres.org. Visit our website at http://athenscentralpres.org to view the complete job description.

FOR SALE Need more Energy but don't like the taste of Energy Drinks? Try our new Energy Chews! Only $14.95. 10 chews per pack. www. idlife.com/buddy

HOUSING 2&3&4 Bedroom Awesome Houses Pre-Leasing for Fall! Walk and Bike to UGA and downtown! Historic, charming, renovated, modern amenities. W/D. $500$1500/month. luckydawg96@ yahoo.com http://athensrentalhouses.co.nr/ $100.00 off 1st month's rent, pre-lease for Fall before May 15th! 1 bedrooms in 5pts. Furnished and Unfurnished. On UGA/City busline. Onsite Laundry, pool. No Pets. $505-$605. Carousel Village Apartments. 706-548-1132, www.carouselvillage.net 4&5 Br Houses still available for Fall '14. UP TO $1000 OFF FIRST MONTH'S RENT for qualified properties! Call Carriage House Realty,Inc at 706.353.1750 for current specials! 3 bedroom 2 bath condo in gated community features include: hardwood flooring, covered patio, pool, lake, crown molding, stainless steel appliances, and granite countertops in kitchen. $129,000 Contact Pat Hallow Coldwell Banker Upchurch Realty 706-424-2182 or 706-543-4000 ext. 287 Room for rent in a 2 bed, 2 bath condo $600.00/mo everything included. Female & graduate/law student preferred. Granite counter tops, walk in closet, 12 ft. ceilings. VERY nice living. Kmathis@ sports.uga.edu $1,175 per month 3 bedroom/3 bath cottage The Woodlands. Privately owned, great amenities, W/D, no pets. Available 8/5/14. Anita@TAU-USA.com

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! Walk to campus or downtown. Just a couple of blocks from UGA busline. 2BD/2BA flats. $800 with some utilities included. Call Athens Best Rentals at 770-725-2018 or 706540-6540 (cell). Live Downtown across from the UGA Arch! Spacious floor plans with hardwood floors & stainless steel appliances! Now Leasing for Fall! 706-613-2742 Visit www.Fredshp.com for more information! Woodlands Townhome, 3BR/3BA available Aug 1, only a few units away from clubhouse, washer/dryer, gated, pool, workout facility, on campus bus route, only a few miles from campus $1050 per month, utilities not included 404-964-9281. Over 1200 affordable rental units to choose from, close to UGA with professional 24/7 management. Visit www.RentAthens. com for a complete list with pictures and addresses. Or call 706389-1700 to discuss your housing needs. 2 BR/ 2 1/2 BATH COTTAGES FOR RENT IN THE GATED WOODLANDS COMMUNITY. 12 MONTH LEASE, BUT ONE IS AVAILABLE FOR 15 MONTHS STARTING JUNE. $900./ MONTH. CALL ELLEN @ 404-2109437 OR STEVE @ 404-788-6905. House for Rent. 218 Colima Avenue 2 bedroom, 2 bath, kitchen, living room, fenced backyard, large deck. Dogs welcome. Available August 1st. $825/month. 706-461-1302

SUBLEASES Subleasing a room in 5 bedroom house. $550/month for 3 months. Utilities negotiable. Close to downtown. Most roomates gone for summer. 404-229-9212

Indicates images available at: redandblack.com/classifieds

Subleasing a room in a 3 bedroom 3.5 bathroom townhouse at The Ikon for $504 plus utilities. The home is furnished therefore you don't need to bring your own furniture. briannaj@uga.edu 4 bedroom apartment of girls at The Connection at Athens. The furniture is all upgraded. Your bedroom will have its own SEPARATE BATHROOM and closet. Please email me at erintoms@ uga.edu Awesome suite for sublease during the summer months. Independent bathroom, independent walk-in closet, independent office, independent corridor and coat closet. 404-944-6619 $340 a month, not including utilities, June/July sublease. 2 bedroom/1 bath in Dearing Garden Apartments off Church Street. It only takes 15min to walk downtown or to the MLC! 678684-9071 Sublease in Athens, $375/ month!!! Time: May 5- July 31st Where: Apt. 106, 101 International Drive, Athens, GA, 30605 What: 1 bed & bathroom in a 4/4 apartment 770-402-9329 Townhouse Wooden livingroom floor 4bed / 4 bath (subleasing 1 bedroom) Now til July Super nice 5 mins from school Bus 14 $375 per month, but negotiable!!! 404-723-2606 Subleasing a bedroom in a 4/2 (furnished) at the U for summer. Rent 299/month including all util. (Cable/internet, electricity, water) Very close to campus. 229-4445200 Room in 4 bed/4 bath apartment in River Club. Furnished, inunit laundry, cable, internet, pool, volleyball court, basketball court, tennis court. $350/month, not including electricity. 912-508-3510 FIND the perfect place to live! redandblack. com/classifieds

Subleasing apartment MayJuly 2014. One room in a 4 bedroom apartment at The U Apartments on Riverbend Pkwy. Rent is $435/month, includes utilities. Email me at jesshok@yahoo.com/ ted2016@uga.edu for more information. Sublease apartment AVAILABLE Now-July2014 & can RELEASE for fall. $285/month. 1BED/ PRIVATEBATH in townhouse. Amenities: pool, dishwasher, washer/dryer, large closet, free parking, UGA & Athens Transit Buses outside door. (404-3452693) or cherhung@uga.edu I'm relocating to the Athens area and I'm looking for a room in The Club or The U to sublet starting around June 1st. Dates are flexible. I am female and I prefer to live with other females. 919221-5046. Thanks! Summer Sublease. $300 per month, plus utilities. 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath townhouse on Eastside. Very spacious. Contact Hannah at hannahm@uga.edu if interested. Looking to sublease my room in 4 bedroom townhouse in Towne Club (off Milledge) Summer 2014. Rent 445/month plus utilities. Call 404-542-4952 I am in need of a girl ages 1828. I would be willing to pay for the utility bill so that the rate would be a solid $375/month. 404-729-4229 Sublease on 2160 S.Milledge Ave. for girls available. $385 a month without utilities. Private bathroom, spacious kitchen, washer/dryer, previously paid pet fee. Two minutes away from campus. Contact weebee@uga.edu. I have a studio apartment for sublease for summer. On UGA bus line. Near 5 points. It will be available from May-August. E-mail for details. dennis12@uga.edu The Red & Black publishes once per week on Thursdays during each semester according to the university schedule. The Red & Black does not verify, investigate, or endorse any classified ad. Readers are urged to use caution when responding to an ad.

I am subletting my room in a 3br/3b apartment at The Connection. The rent is $425, and that includes water, cable, and internet. Available immediately! 513-532-5934

TICKETS/ ENTERTAINMENT Alanfest: 3-day Art & Music Festival in Athens! 12 of the South's greatest bands playing in Athens, GA from March 28-30, 2014. All proceeds to be donated to the David Alan Lewis Memorial Scholarship in Landscape Architecture. Tickets $12 www.alanfest.org. Main Event at New Earth Music Hall on March 29th. OutKast is ON TOUR this summer!! YOU need some cash. Find a job at: redandblack.com/ classifieds

red&black classifieds RATES (per wk., 0-24 words)

Employment ........................... $20/wk Seeking Job ............................. $10/wk Roommates ............................. $10/wk Housing .................................... $20/wk Subleases ................................. $10/wk For Sale ...................................... $10/wk Computers & Electronics................................ $12/wk Wanted ...................................... $10/wk Auto ............................................ $10/wk Services ..................................... $10/wk Entertainment/Tickets ......... $10/wk Travel .......................................... $10/wk Yard Sales .............................$10/entry Events ........................................ $10/wk Announcements .................... $10/wk Personals .................................. $10/wk Lost & Found ..................................Free

FREE ADS - up to 25 wds.

Available for current UGA Students. (Merchandise must be price. One item per hsld per week. Ads must be received from UGA e-mail address only. No walk-ins or standard mail accepted.)

PLACE AN AD

• Visit redandblack.com/classifieds • Call 706.443.3011 • Email classifieds@randb.com • Deadline to place ads is 3:00pm every Tuesday for the Thursday edition. • All ads must be PREPAID • Set up an account to review your placement history or replace old ads


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April 3, 2014 Edition of The Red & Black  

April 3, 2014 Edition of The Red & Black

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