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Red&Black The

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Thursday, October 14, 2010

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Itchin’ for some tunes? The Week just got a makeover. Pages 4 & 5 Vol. 118, No. 43 | Athens, Georgia

Undocumented students can no longer apply By BRIANA GERDEMAN THE RED & BLACK A policy approved by the Board of Regents Wednesday means undocumented students will no longer be accepted to the University beginning fall 2011. The board heard and approved four recommendations by the Residency Verification Committee, which are meant to help universities properly classify students for tuition purposes. Starting in fall 2011, college application forms must make students aware of the penalties for knowingly providing false information on the form. Applications will also require applicants to state whether they seek in-state or out-of-state tuition. The other two recommendations that were

AFTER ARREST To charge or not to charge: the question facing police By JACOB DEMMITT | THE RED & BLACK Editor’s Note: This week, The Red & Black investigates fake ID use at the University. Check back Friday to get the perspective of bouncers downtown. You’re downtown, drunk, underage and have a fake ID burning a hole in your pocket. What do you do next? As a freshman, you were taught the rules of downtown Athens — don’t sit, stumble, jaywalk or look at a police officer the wrong way or you’re likely to be featured in the next day’s Crime Notebook. However, there may be much more to these downtown directives. Statistically, if you’re going to get stopped, you want it to be by anyone other than University Police. Of 85 students charged with possession of a fake ID last year, 63 were charged by University police officers. Although almost every offender found in possession of a fake ID by University Police is charged accordingly, AthensClarke County Police routinely find IDs on offenders but do not add the ID to the list of charges. Athens-Clarke County Police Maj. Carter Greene said this is because of a combination of discretion on the part of police officers as well stringent laws concerning when someone should be charged. “It could be discretion or it could be that they haven’t used the ID in an illegal manner,” he said. “It just depends ... Being in possession of a fake ID that says you’re a different age than you are is not a crime in of itself.” It depends heavily on what kind of ID is

No time table on decision By ZACH DILLARD THE RED & BLACK Georgia Athletic Director Greg McGarity confirmed Wednesday the Athletic Association took the next step in handling a potential NCAA violation by football player Caleb King. McGarity, in a brief telephone interview, said his office submitted the information pertaining to King to the Southeastern Conference office. The inquiry to the league office is in reference to whether King — a redshirt junior running back — violated NCAA rules by accepting a $500 loan from a female “friend,” as was stated in an April police report. “Basically, we are running this through the proper channels and at some point in time we will basically have some information,” McGarity MCGARITY said. McGarity said the issue was being handled by Eric Baumgartner, Georgia’s assistant AD for compliance, and that there is no time frame for the league to offer an answer. Baumgartner was unavailable for comment on Wednesday. When asked about the circumstances surrounding King being sent to the SEC office, head coach Mark Richt responded he was unaware of the situation.

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY NA | The Red & Black

Athens’ bus stops get musical makeover Everyone knows that around Athens, the music never stops — even when the bus does. The Athens Area Arts Council, in concert with the Unified Government of AthensClarke County and the Athens Transit System, recently installed its fourth of eight planned music-themed bus stops at Broad Street and Minor, entitled “Beat A Drum.” “They made us open up [one] side so that the bus could see who was inside,” Arts Council President Laura Nehf said. “They claimed that the drums on both sides blocked their view. When you’re doing these kinds of projects, functionality is of the highest importance. The art is the great add-

on that makes the functionality fun and inspirational, but they still have to be functional.” This spirit of collaboration between the county, transit system and arts council made the effort a reality, as funding for the project marked the first public/private partnership between the three. “The public match is that the bus shelters are paid for by the county up to the price that they would pay for every other green-wire bus shelter that you see out on the streets,” Nehf said. “Then the arts council raises through private and corporate donations the artists’ fees and the design fees for the bus shelters and the additional materials. That’s about $5,000 per shelter that the arts council raises above and beyond what the county pays for. The county

windy. High 74| Low 45

President Adams is at a tribute dinner for Falcons owner Arthur Blank. Don’t give up on our football team yet, Mike... we’re playing Vandy this week!

pays $9,160. The total bus shelter cost is about $14,160.” Serving to provide an inspirational experience to the Athens community, the bus stops came out of a project called “You, Me and The Bus.” The overall theme of the endeavor is “Art Rocks!” “I think we’ve had a lot of positive feedback,” Nehf said. “The artists were designing around a musical tribute to Athens. That’s why we have the ‘Bus Shelter That Rocks’ and a piano over one of them. Piano keys and treble clefs and music notes — it was all about music.” When the time came to accept design submissions, the arts council decided to go big. “We had a nationwide call for art in both rounds,” Nehf said.

GRILL FEVER

See BUS, Page 9

Index

BIG (BAD) DOG ON CAMPUS

Photo Courtesy Danny White

S Uga VIII, registered as ‘Big Bad Bruce,’ will begin his reign as the University’s new mascot with a ceremony before Saturday’s homecoming game against Vanderbilt.

WASILLA NATIVES, UNITE!

Homecoming week is really heating up with a parade and cook-out. Page 9

Where’s Mikey?

See BOARD, Page 3

Caleb King case sent off to SEC

S Students are often charged with fake ID possession downtown. ACC Police Maj. Carter Greene said being in possession of a fake ID isn’t a crime itself, but it becomes a crime if underage students are representing themselves as someone they See FAKE, Page 2 are not.

By SHAWN JARRARD THE RED & BLACK

approved involved changes in policy. Public institutions in the University System of Georgia must now verify that applicants are lawful U.S. residents, and if they are applying for in-state tuition, that they are Georgia residents. Public colleges and universities that have turned away any academically qualified applicants in the past two years will not be allowed to admit students who cannot provide proof of legal residency in the U.S. The Residency Verification Committee was formed to address three concerns — that the University system may be swamped by thousands of undocumented students, that those students were taking taxpayer dollars through in-state tuition

News ........................ 2 Calendar.................. 4

BARRING GUNS?

Find out which Alaskan band Sarah Palin shares a connection with. Page 8 Opinions .................. 6 Variety ..................... 8

Sports ...................... 9 Crossword ............... 2

Could you carry your handgun with you in your favorite bar? Page 7 Sudoku .................... 9


NEWS

2 | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | The Red & Black

Campus has little faith in religion study By NATHAN SORENSEN THE RED & BLACK Questioning your faith? You may want to ask an atheist for help. Atheists, Jews and Mormons scored the highest averages on a recent survey concerning Americans’ religious knowledge, but the results shouldn’t be taken as the word of any god, said one University religion professor. “You have to ask yourself, is this really the most appropriate test for gauging how much people know about religion in general or other religions?� said Sandy Martin, University professor and head of the religion department. “Someone who gets the answer wrong is not totally ignorant of that religion.� The survey, conducted by the Pew Research Center, contained a 32-question quiz on the basic tenets and history of the world’s

major religions, including Christianity, Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism. After administering the survey to 3,412 Americans, results indicate atheists, Jews and Mormons answered three to four more questions correctly than white evangelical Protestants or white Catholics. One question on the survey asked when the Jewish Sabbath began, for which the correct answer was Friday. Many participants in the survey probably answered Saturday, which meant they were aware and not totally ignorant of Judaism, Martin said. On average, Americans answered 50 percent, or 16, of the questions correctly. Atheists and agnostics scored highest on the survey, with a score of 20.9 out of 32. Most atheists have left a religious tradition and studied religions of the world, said Randall

Bourquin, chief officer of the UGAtheists. “I’ve found that the large majority of people who are actively atheists have often had kind of a break with a religious past; and it’s usually a process of inquiry and investigation — lots of reading, lots of YouTube videos and lots of discussions with friends, and that leads to a more broad and comprehensive understanding of a lot of religious issues,� he said. Jewish Americans also scored high on the test, according to the survey results. “As a Jew, it’s important to know about the world around us and take an interest in other religions to help build bridges to other communities,� said Marni Bronstein, director of social justice and awareness for Hillel at UGA. And of the seven questions focused on knowledge of the Bible,

Mormons scored the highest. Rudy Anderson, president of the Latter-day Saint Student Association, said this result was because of the focus Mormons place on personal study. “A big part of our message and what we teach is finding out for yourself, and is focused a lot on study and personal knowledge,� he said. The report pointed toward education as the most determining factor for religious knowledge. However, education and other demographic traits were equal, the report said people who do not live in the South scored higher than Southerners. But for Martin, the results of the survey should not be taken as a definitive result of American religious knowledge. “As a matter of principle, a test or survey is only as good as that test or survey — take it with a grain of salt,� he said.

FAKE: Police stop must be based on ‘specific’ facts ¢From Page 1 discovered and what the offender is doing with it, Greene said. It’s not always illegal to possess a fake ID if it’s not “being presented as an official state identification or driver’s licenseâ€? and the offender is not “trying to identify themselvesâ€? as someone or an age they are not, according to Greene. “If you’re trying to represent yourself as someone or a different age than you are, it could fall under obstruction or giving a false name,â€? he said. University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson said he feels University police officers also use discretion in charging, but people don’t hear about it. The best way to avoid an arrest, however, is to simply never be approached by police. According to a 1968 United States Supreme Court case, Terry v. Ohio, which set the standard for investigative stops, an officer can legally approach any individual on the street and begin asking questions. The court’s opinion from this case goes on to say the person “may refuse to cooperate and go on his way.â€? However, Williamson said he would not advise students to do this. “They may say, ‘I don’t want to make any statement.’ They can do that. That’s definitely within their rights,â€? he said. “But that doesn’t mean that they’re not going to get arrested. I don’t know if I would advise everybody of that. If you’ve done something wrong, maybe that’s the stance you take. If you haven’t, answer a few questions and you may be sent on your way.â€? The suspected individual may, however, be briefly detained if the officer has reasonable suspicion that a crime is being committed. This suspicion cannot be based off a hunch, but rather “specific and articulable facts,â€? according to Terry v. Ohio. “The question bouncing around the downtown area has been is it reasonable suspicion just because someone appears youthful and has been drinking,â€? said Matt Karzen, an Athens criminal defense attorney. “There’s no way that’s enough, in my opinion.â€?

ASHLEY NA | The Red & Black

S A cab picks up a group of students after a late night. An officer might stop a young drinker seen staggering.

On multiple occasions, University and ACC police have cited “youthful appearance� as the reason for stopping suspected underage drinkers. Connor and Nicholas Dillon are examples of two such students who were stopped by an ACC police officer after legally crossing a downtown street. According to the report, the officer “observed two white males with youthful appearances, in addition to appearing intoxicated, stagger across the street.� In another case, Lauren Danielle Tharp, 20, was approached by ACC police on Sept. 4 after she was seen “staggering on the sidewalk,� according to the report. Karzen compared these kinds of investiga-

PEARLS BEFORE SWINEÂŽ

BY

STEPHAN PASTIS

tions to questioning someone of a certain race, on a certain block, at a certain time of day simply because statistics say they are probably committing a crime. Although he wasn’t present for these arrests, Williamson said he trusts his officers acted properly. He also said many stops are made in order to protect students. “If we go downtown and stand at 2:30 [a.m.] and watch people leave, we will all agree we see a lot of staggering. But there will be some other people we see that we know are just way over the top. They’re just bad,� he said. “Do we just look the other way and not do anything and then we wait for them to get raped or robbed or step out in front of a car?... Tell me what you think I should just walk away from, and I’ll walk away from it. But don’t hold me accountable for when it goes bad too.� Although officers may be trying to protect students, these stops are often cited as the reason charges should be dropped. After Thomas Hale Avery was arrested and charged with possession of a fake ID on April 3, 2008, his lawyer submitted a motion to suppress the evidence because the stop was made “without a reasonable articulable suspicion of criminal activity.� As a result, the motion claimed all evidence, including the ID, was not admissible because it was “the product of an illegal stop, detention, frisk, search and arrest.� Although the courts never made a formal decision on this motion, Solicitor-General Carrol R. Chisholm submitted “amended accusations� which did not include the fake ID charges a short time later. Although Athens has been home to debate on what constitutes a proper stop, the Supreme Court defined it pretty simply in its opinion on Terry v. Ohio. Anything short of “specific and articulable facts� which indicate an indiscretion “would invite intrusions upon constitutionally guaranteed rights based on nothing more substantial than inarticulate hunches, a result this Court has consistently refused to sanction,� the opinion reads.

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Between Oct. 5 and Oct. 7, $40-worth of food merchandise was nabbed from a vending machine in Boggs Hall. University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson said the company that owned the machine claimed the items were missing and developed the potential time frame of the theft. Douglas Ross, director of Auxiliary and Administrative Services at the University, said vending machine break-ins are not common, but are not impossible. “I’m aware there have been a few of them on campus,� he said. “It’s like the old police saying — if somebody wants to break into a house, a business or a vending machine, they’ll find a way. [The machines] are certainly designed to make it difficult, but it does happen.� Ross said his department was cooperating with University Police and student judiciary to help track down any potential offenders. “You know you’re stealing. This is not an accident. You know you’re perpetrating a crime,� he said. “This is not something we just overlook.� Ross said stealing from a vending machine was no different than shoplifting and said the cost of the items stolen wasn’t the only thing an offender might have to pay for in the event he or she is caught. “If there’s damage caused to the machine, that is totaled up and added to the value of the theft,� he said. Harassing phone calls University student John Binamira was arrested and charged with aggravated stalking on Wednesday afternoon, according to the University Police Department. Binamira was also wanted in relation to a harassing phone call complaint. The complaint was reported by a female student in Oglethorpe House Tuesday. “This female student has had incidences with this individual in the past,� Williamson said. “She’s filed complaints with us in the past and he’s been arrested by us in the past.� Underage possession An arrest warrant was issued for University student Caroline Wingate on Tuesday. Wingate is charged with underage possession. “If there’s a warrant issued it usually means the person can’t be arrested at the time,� Williamson said. He said these circumstances usually involve the need for medical treatment, but he was unable to comment on the specifics of this case. “I don’t know if she’s turned herself in or not,� he said. Wingate declined comment.

CORRECTIONS

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The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it.

THE DAILY PUZZLE

Previous puzzle’s solution ACROSS 1 TV anchor’s program 5 Blazing 10 Bridge crosser’s fee 14 Give off 15 Strong winds 16 Mixture 17 Light & breezy You?� 61 Nelson __ 18 Book of 38 Novelty 62 Pencil’s maps 40 Pass away center 19 Entreaty 63 Slap 20 Vine sup- 41 Evening party 64 Char port 65 Finishes 22 Liza’s mom 43 Enemy 24 Charged 44 Nuisance 66 Records 45 Building 67 Identical atom wing 25 Check 46 Play on DOWN recipient words 1 Tidy 26 Cowboy’s 47 Bismarck, 2 Kuwaiti rope vertible __ Dakota leader 29 VP __ 11 Southwest 48 Wall paint- 3 Telegram Quayle jar ing 4 Fashion30 Noted 12 Claim 50 Even score able British against 5 Once more racecourse 51 Wisconproperty sin’s capi- 6 Singer 34 “Hell __ no 13 Goods cartal Domino fury like a ried 54 Of a wed- 7 Sick woman 21 Bathroom, ding cere- 8 Carter’s scorned� in Great mony 35 Flower ring successor Britain 36 __ down; 58 Prophetic 9 Pupil’s writtopsy-turvy sign ten assign- 23 Gathers 25 Agonizing 37 “Car 54, 59 Desert refment Where __ uge 10 Like a con- 26 __ apso;

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NEWS

Chancellor position to be open

FASHIONABLE AND SAFE

By POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK University System of Georgia Chancellor Erroll B. Davis Jr. of the Board of Regents will step down on June 30. John Millsaps, spokesman for the Board of Regents, said the Board isn’t close to selecting someone new. First, the Board Chairman Regent Willis Potts must form a search committee to launch a national search sometime in November. However, it is not certain when a new chancellor will fill Davis’ position. “The ideal thing would be to have someone come on board once Chancellor Davis does retire,� Millsaps said. “Of course, you can never guarantee the timing on that. It might work out, but there may be a time period where you have a gap and you have an interim person. At this point, it’s way too early to make any Photo Courtesy Blane Marble

sorts of predictions on that.� The USG chancellor is hired by the Regents to serve as the chief executive officer of the entire University System and to oversee all 35 institutions. “He has h e l p e d directly to evaluate, recommend and remove presidents DAVIS from institutions,� Millsaps said. “He works with the legislature and the governor and other educational agencies in the state. He has overall responsibility for the operation of the system.� When a search committee is formed, the Regents will then discuss the qualification requirements for the candidates. “One of the things the search committee will do initially is to work to cre-

¢From Page 1 and that undocumented students were taking away seats at colleges from qualified Georgia residents. The committee found the first two concerns were unfounded because there were only 501 undocumented students out of 310,000 enrolled in institutions in the University system in fall 2010 and they are all paying out-of-state tuition. The new policy is designed to address the third concern — that undocumented students could take away seats from Georgia residents. This semester, only 27 students at five institutions — the University, Georgia Tech, Georgia State University, Georgia College and State University and the Medical College of Georgia — fell into that category. The 27 undocumented students enrolled will be able to stay enrolled, but those five universities will no longer be able to admit undocumented students as long as they have to turn away qualified documented students. Undocumented students may still enroll at public institutions that do not have to turn away qualified applicants. The policy does not affect private colleges. “It’s not closing the door, because we have 31 institutions where we have plenty of room for anyone,â€? said John Millsaps, spokesman for the Regents. But not everyone agrees. Students and professors protested

THOSE WERE THE DAYS.... Editor’s Note: This Thursday series chronicles some of the most interesting, hilarious and monumental moments that happened this week in the University’s history. On Oct. 14, 1913, The Red & Black reported one of the nastiest dandy battles in University history: “Lo and behold the Junior class, the Class of 1915, has come to the front and in a meeting recently held declared that the Seniors were not the only ones that could wear derbies. They, the Juniors, were going to put stiff hats on their craniums, and nobody could keep them from doing thusly.� The Seniors passed a resolution saying they would be the only ones to wear derbies, and implored the rest of the student body to side with them against the derbywearing juniors “to establish good custom at Georgia.� The juniors continued to flout their hat-wearing about campus, took to walking with canes (another former senior privilege) and subsequently ruined good custom at Georgia forever. Happy birthday, hedges! On Oct. 12, 1929, the University’s beloved Sanford Stadium was dedicated in a game against the formidable Yale Elis. Our Bulldogs won, 15-0, with a mysterious player named “Catfish� Smith scoring all of Georgia’s 15 points on a day “many have called the most memorable one in Bulldog football history.�

WUOG celebrates 38 years of airwave glory this week. On Oct. 16, 1972, the University non-commercial radio station began broadcasting at 6 a.m. on the fourth floor of Memorial Hall. WUOG has since moved to nicer digs in Tate I, but the student DJs continue to play interesting local acts and invite little-known artists for “Live in the Lobby� sessions. — Compiled by Julia Carpenter

ate a job description of specifically the type of person they’re looking for in this specific situation for the job,� Millsaps said. “So at this point, they have not formed, and clearly have not met, to establish the parameters of the position they’re looking for.� When asked if someone like President Michael Adams could be appointed as chancellor, Millsaps said it’s a possibility. “I’m sure someone who is leading a major institution in the country would certainly probably be qualified for the job from that standpoint, but at this point I don’t know,� Millsaps said. However, Tom Jackson, vice president for public affairs, said he doesn’t think Adams would consider applying for the chancellor position. “[Adams’] statement has always been that he’s a campus man,� Jackson said. “He prefers to be on campus. That’s been his

statement in the past, and I don’t think it has changed.� Though Davis was not a university president prior to serving as chancellor, Millsaps emphasized Davis has done much to affect students’ directly. During Davis’ tenure, the system’s core curriculum was completely revised last year — including the elimination of the Regents’ test. Davis has also focused on campus safety and emergency planning at USG institutions. “Chancellor Davis has had a process where he visits two or three campuses every month and spending a day on the campus,� Millsaps said. “He meets with everybody on the campus during the day. He always meets with students, which has provided a lot of information for him to bring back and use to change some of the policies and process that have been brought in place.�

BOARD: Some students upset with policy

S University student Whitney Knight models a dress made of condoms Tuesday. JoAnna Schofill designed the dress, which was featured to promote sexual health on campus.

In another dress code snafu, on Oct. 12, 1967, The Red & Black reported on a particular memorandum sent to all female students, urging them to wear “street clothes at a proper dress length,� after several coeds were discovered to have been scandalously attending class in jumpsuits. The Red & Black ran an empty photo box beside the story with the following caption: “Maybe we can run this picture next week. We would like to see the accomplishments of the small group of co-eds who have the gumption to speak out against the ‘dress’ regulation.�

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at today’s board meeting, joined by members of the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia. Azadeh Shahshahani, a project director with the Georgia ACLU, said the ACLU and 30 other organizations sent a letter to the Board of Regents urging them not to approve the proposal. “We’re extremely disappointed,� she said of the new policy, adding that nothing in federal law requires the change. Many of the students affected by the policy came to the United States as children, she said. They were raised here and attended high school here, and it’s unfair to restrict them from attending public colleges. “By denying them the opportunity to capitalize on their full potential, it doesn’t bode well for Georgia,� she said. Ronny Ramirez, a senior at the University and vic e president of the Hispanic Student Association, also said the change was unfair. Out-ofstate students are admitted without concerns about whether they are taking the place of Georgia students, and undocumented students pay out-of-state tuition. “I think it’s wrong,� he said. “Anybody who’s qualified should have a right to get their education regardless of legal status.� Mayra Velez, a senior at the University and the interim president of Students for Latino Empowerment, said the three concerns that prompted the new policy were “pretty ridiculous.� If an undocumented student was

accepted, she said, that student was obviously more qualified than the Georgia resident whose seat was taken away. And rather than unfairly benefitting from taxpayer dollars, undocumented students contribute more to the universities they attend because they pay out-of-state tuition. At the University, “the effect is relatively small,â€? said Tom Jackson, vice president for public affairs. Only two undocumented students attend the University. Josh Delaney, president of the Student Government Association, said the policy is intended to protect students who are academically qualified to attend the University. He said the issue has received more attention than it deserves. “I think that the whole issue of undocumented students at public universities this year is being heavily politicized because of the election cycle,â€? he said. “It’s made it a bigger deal than it is ‌ I don’t think it was worth the Board of Regents’ time to examine it, honestly.â€? Compared to other states’ policies on undocumented students, Georgia’s position falls in the middle, Millsaps said. Several states are more permissive than Georgia, allowing undocumented students not only to attend but to pay instate tuition. South Carolina, in contrast, takes a stricter position than Georgia and prohibits undocumented students from attending any public college or university in the state.

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4 | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | The Red & Black

MUSIC NOTES

Editor’s Note: This week, The Red & Black introduces Music Notes, which will serve up weekly spoonfuls from the Athens musical cornucopia every Thursday. Check back every week for must-see shows, procrastination excuses and everything else we can fit.

Musicians: Did we miss your show? Mess up your information? Did you just hate your preview? Want to let us know about your upcoming shows? Want to talk to someone about your feelings? Contact variety@randb.com RE: “Music Notes” to update, inform or promote your band, your friend’s band or your mom’s band. Succinctly tell us what you sound like, send a picture, link us to your MySpace and invite us to your shows. And no Stairway.

THE RED & BLACK’S

GUIDE TO

ATHENS OCT. 14 - OCT. 20.

MUSIC IN AND AROUND FROM

Compiled by Chris Miller Designed by Ana Kabakova

Outside the Sandbox: Kenosha Kid

Dan Nettles doesn’t obey much. He doesn’t adhere to rules, fit norms or blend in. So how else could his band celebrate its third full-length album, “The Land of Obey,” other than by doing something different? Kenosha Kid, less of a band and more of a project that tests the limits of pop music via jazz philosophies, will be joined tomorrow night by Pride Parade, a raucous mix of dissonant hard rock and pop melodies, and Chrissakes, one of the meanest metal bands in existence around these parts. “I think the common thread is three bands that have a very distinctive band sound, and they all have a great deal of impact,” Nettles said. “None of the music is dumbed down.” Kenosha’s new release — recorded over five shows at The

MEXICALI GRILLE

THURSDAY

Courtesy Kenosha Kid

Flicker Theatre by highly-regarded local engineer Sloan Simpson — is a live capturing of the musically mind-blowing event that is a Kenosha Kid performance. “On the previous records we were trying to paint a more cohesive picture,” Nettles said. “But now we’re in a different live environment and we really get to stretch out and play in a more exploratory fashion.”

Seeing Kenosha live, one gets the opportunity to watch Nettles’ carefully and beautifully crafted melodies be melted down and recast amidst a musical conversation among Nettles, bassist Neil Fountain and drummer Marlon Patton. It’s only natural that such a unique stage experience be matched by the musical intensity and integrity of Pride Parade and

Chrissakes. “You could say that we’re all sort of unapologetic about what we do,” said Pride Parade guitarist Allen Owens of the three bands. Expect no apologies indeed. All three bands will test their limits at Caledonia Lounge tomorrow. It’s a rare occasion for Kenosha, used to playing smaller clubs, to explore the full range of its

dynamics. But Friday, Nettles said, “We don’t have to worry about anybody complaining about how loud we’re playing.” Kenosha Kid, Chrissakes, Pride Parade The Caledonia Lounge Friday, 10 p.m. $6 (21+) $8 (18+) www.caledonialounge.com

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THURSDAY FARM 255 10 p.m., free Nuclear Spring Moan-fuzz rock with punk attitude

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technical, emphatic rock Infected Mushroom L.A.-based electronica-rock; industrial drum and bass 40 WATT 9 p.m., $6 Blair Crimmins and the Hookers Rag-jazz straight from 1922 Moses Gunn Rock with authentic American roots LITTLE KINGS SHUFFLE CLUB 10 p.m. The Safes Riffy, guitar-centric pop-punk from Chicago Timmy Tumble Clangy rock floating in madness

FRIDAY

40 WATT 8 p.m., $12 in advance Chief L.A.-based four-piece indie folk/rock Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band Wailing, thumping garage-pop indie from Seattle Portugal. The Man Melodically inviting, upbeat pop-rock with a funky, danceable side THE CALEDONIA LOUNGE See “Outside the Sandbox” LITTLE KINGS SHUFFLE CLUB 10 p.m., $5 Grape Soda Spacey, drum-and-organ experimental pop

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SATURDAY 40 WATT See “Building Sounds”

THE CALEDONIA LOUNGE 10 p.m., $5 (21+). $7 (18+) The Goons Three-piece rock band in the guise of an indie group Ham1 Fun, jangly garage rock in cowboy boots Tim Chad and Sherry Bass driven synthy funk rock from Nashville FARM 255 11 p.m., free Ava Luna Brooklyn band plays nouveau, distorted funk soaked in soulful harmonies Bigfoot Raucous, incoherent punk Sleeping Friends Guitar-based bouncy, garage pop NEW EARTH MUSIC HALL 9 p.m., $12 Abandon the Earth Mission Electronic beats underneath ambient instrumentation/synths and spaced-out melodies Beats Antique Oakland-based raw, beat-centered, electronic world music Lynx Another Oakland resident, Lynx mixes misty crooning with rapping over beats and ambient samples THE MELTING POINT 9 p.m., $12 in advance, $17 at the door Allgood The former Allgood Music Co., still jammin’ out bluesy rock. LITTLE KINGS SHUFFLE CLUB 10 p.m. The Heap Rumbling, soulful rock ’n’ funk The Vinyl Strangers Throwback pop-rock with a doowop heart


The Red & Black | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | 5

MONDAY

40 WATT 8 p.m., $13 Rewards Whispery vocals and shimmering synthetic tunes from Brooklyn Twin Tigers Local dark indie rock heavy on fuzz and echoes punctuated with driving rhythms We Are Scientists Rootsy, driven indie rock with catchy, harmonized hooks THE CALEDONIA LOUNGE 9 p.m., $8 (21+) $10 (18-20) Christian Mistress Old-school metal with a shouting/growling female vocalist Savagist Athens metal veterans with influences such as “talons shredding flesh” Thrones Harvey Milk/The Melvins member Joe Preston gone experimetal utilizing samples and synths straight from hell LITTLE KINGS SHUFFLE CLUB 10:30 p.m. Boo Ray’s Backslidin’ Baptist Truck Stop A weekly tribute to all things country featuring down-home allstars

TUESDAY

Building Sounds: Beach House Baltimore band Beach House has been building for half a decade. Building a fan base, sure, building up contacts and contracts — normal indie-bandgetting-big stuff. But what Beach House is really all about is building a world with its music. It was 2006 when Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally laid the groundwork for what would be a very successful next four years by releasing their first, self-titled album. The record established the duo’s echo-filled, musical landscape sound, a sort of pop music from the off-shore shallows. Beach House amps up that tradition with this year’s “Teen

Dream,” released on Sub Pop Records. Essential elements of Scally’s delicate guitar and Legrand’s haunting, layered vocals maintain the atmosphere, but a live feel from the pulsing drums adds urgency and energy to the songs. This release also marks another level on which the band hopes to establish its own world. Included with the CD is a DVD with short films for each song created by a different artist, what Legrand calls a “visual curation.” “For us it was exciting because it was a risk … but it made us feel like we were giving a real package to our fans,” Legrand said. “I think this was

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TUESDAY OCT. 19

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fact that I don’t think we’re dead,” Legrand said. “This year hasn’t killed us. I think this year has just made us more excited about the future, working more, building more stuff.”

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40 WATT 8 p.m., $13 (adv.) Cymbals Eat Guitars Open road, wildly energetic and untamed pop rock The Thermals Declarative but melodic summertime rock from Portland

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one where we wanted to push a little bit farther and see what we could do.” Legrand and Scally have also taken steps to enhance the visual atmosphere at live shows to match their music. “We try to utilize visual things subtly, simply, to create a universe for people who are coming to see us,” Legrand said. Glowing pyramids cacn be found onstage with the band this time around, adding an ambiguous feel of otherworldliness to the shows, of which there are many. With 150 shows already played this year, Beach House is still on the road. “I’m just pretty excited by the

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6 | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | The Red & Black

Daniel Burnett | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Carey O’Neil | Managing Editor me@randb.com Courtney Holbrook | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Corruption wins for Nathan Deal C

alling all conservatives: Can someone please, anywhere, anyone, explain the appeal of Nathan Deal? Head like a bruised tomato, with eyes like dash marks and a grossly receding hairline, Deal may look like an overgrown county dentist coming off a three-day bender — but so what? After all, he’s facing Roy Barnes, a man long since rumored to be dead. Yet his judgment! Sure, Barnes got booted from office; and sure he looks half-asleep, all drawling and squintyeyed. But when’s the last time you read this headline: “Reopened bankruptcy could expose Barnes to more debt”? The dichotomy comes too easily. Roy Barnes is probably a corpse (who can walk! and talk! and run for political office!), but he’s not a crook. Briefly, though, some back-story: at least part of Deal’s millions that evaporated did so in loans given to his daughter and her husband to fund a business venture. Choosing to support his family, the former congressman found himself between little money and none at all. It’s a situation unquestionably made more awkward by Deal’s public status — his notoriety compounds his bad luck. And in that way, at least part of the Republican’s personal financial reality is understandable, relatable. Yet the other millions! “I don’t shy away from hard questions,” Deal once said, justifying his own — now-abandoned — quest for President Obama’s “authentic” birth certificate. Really, Nathan? Well here’s a hard one for you: how can the electorate be expected to trust you to manage their money, in everything from education to highway maintenance to arts programs in public schools, when you’ve so recently so poorly managed your own? Better, here’s something tougher: how can anyone put stock in a man spotlighted as one of the “15 Most Corrupt Members of Congress” by

Opinions

opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

ADAM CARLSON Crewsmostcorrupt.org? By all audiovisual account, across a score of impromptu interviews and backyard rallies broadcast online, Deal comes across, well, amenable. His personality doesn’t stupefy. But it arouses curiosity — and perhaps suspicion. Why is someone so quaint so full of baggage? And why’d he try, perhaps quaintly if also with great effort, to act as though all that baggage had grown legs and taken a long walk off a short cliff? Theories crop up in droves: he did it to secure the hotly-contested primary against Karen Handel (duh); he did it to prevent the conservative base from grouping him together with fellow bogged-down candidate John Oxendine (duh); and, maybe most subtly but also most tellingly, he didn’t want to be branded a liar — a manipulator — a conniver. … À la his former favored national political target, slippery ol’ Obama. Do I begrudge him his hypocrisy, his poorlythought-out decisions and decisions to cover-up those decisions? No. Deal is clearly out of his depth, humming along to a tune he doesn’t recognize, working all angles toward the center looking for a hold. But just because I don’t begrudge him, though, doesn’t mean I don’t also have a healthy dose of soover-it. When Nov. 2 rolls around, out my driver’s license will go as my hand darts for that electronic ballot. As it hovers over the screen, the question will invariably arise again: Barnes or Deal? The guy who lost his grip on the state’s support or the guy who lost his hold on his family’s finances? I’m voting with my wallet. Who do you think I’ll click? — Adam Carlson is a sophomore from Hiram majoring in magazines

I find it pretty rich that the cherub-faced, bowtied nanny-statists of SGA — who spend hours every year at Tate polluting our surroundings with blaring music while cornering and pestering us into voting for their buddies — would seek to ban smoking because it “infringes on the rights of others.” Would it KILL the stadium music managers to let “In the Air Tonight” play through to the drum solo? Why else does anyone listen to that song? Why does SGA, who almost no one voted for, think it can ban smoking for everyone — students, faculty, staff and visitors? They should really ditch those souvenir cups at the games. The smell of them is unbearable and god-awful. Can’t even enjoy a refreshing drink these days... I’ll stop smoking on campus when people in SGA stop acting like fools. Get a life ... and pass me a lighter. When did the Georgia Aquarium open up an Athens branch? Oh, wait — that’s just Stegeman’s “new façade.” Millions of dollars and no beluga whales? To those people who run me over at Snelling when I’m filling up cereal — can you not wait 30 seconds for me to do my job? If you had enough time to straighten your hair in the morning, you should have enough time to put on pants.

Braveheart can end with an arrest T

here was nothing malicious about my actions the night I got tossed around by a gang of Athens-Clarke County Police. Saturday night on Jackson Street, I was in a great mood. Georgia had just earned a muchneeded victory over Tennessee. I had just run into Jason Rawe, a fellow University student and a buddy of mine. Out of joy at seeing an old friend, I broke out into the monologue I used for my high school Drama final, the “Braveheart” speech — the same speech I used to deliver in front of the fire at camp-outs. People were laughing. My pointing fingers were teamed with a Scottish accent and an emotionally charged performance: “Yes, I’ve huurd, he kills men by tha hunddreds and if he were here, he’d consume tha Anglish with fireballs from his eyes, and bolts of lightning from his arse!” I was killing it. I was smiling when I “hit” the girl walking down the street. I hit her so hard she didn’t even stick around to talk to the police. “She walked away before I could identify her,” according to Officer Basinger’s police report. Give me a break. I turned around to look for Rawe’s approval, and instead I saw a look of horror — right before I got shoved from behind. A cop grabbed me. He refused to

News Editor: Mimi Ensley Associate News Editor: Rachel Bunn Sports Editor: Zach Dillard Variety Editor: Joe Williams Photo Editor: Meghan Pittman Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editors: Elaine Kelch, Beth Pollak, Jessica Roberts Online Editor: Will Brown Online Copy Editors: Lauren Cronon, Taylor Moss Editorial Cartoonists: Phillip Henry, Sarah Quinn, Bill Richards

MICHAEL BARONE tell me what I had done, and why I was being detained. So, like anybody else about to go to jail without doing anything illegal, I kept asking, “What did I do?” This must be what the cops meant by “repetitive conversation” in the report. Somehow, Basinger declared I was intoxicated — without giving me a Breathalyzer or issuing any field sobriety tests. The police report states, “I made contact with the offender who was intoxicated (glassy eyes, odor of alcoholic beverage from breath, repetitive conversation).” I’m 24 years old — it isn’t illegal for me to have beer on my breath. And if I was so intoxicated, why did it take four cops to slam me to the pavement? Speaking of the pavement, when the cop on top of me got his zip-tie handy, he transferred his knee onto my cheek to keep my face down. He then dragged my right hand out from under my belly, scraping off the skin from my thumb, almost breaking it, while two other policemen held me down. I might be biased, but that seems like excessive force. Another cop had the nerve to

break off a piece of some nasty curbside weed growing nearby, and began tickling my ear with it. All I could do was speak to him through eye contact — “Come on, man.” Rawe told me later he wished he had a camera, and that he asked the police if he could get me to verbally give him somebody’s number for him to call. “If you don’t quit talking to me, you’re gonna go with him,” one officer threatened Rawe, “Then, you won’t need that number.” What would that charge be? Asking too many questions after 10 p.m.? The Athens-Clarke County Police Department needs to get off the sidewalk and start worrying about the real criminals. They give out so many public intoxication and underage consumption tickets a weekend, they are missing — probably — a hundred DUIs. They took me to jail without telling me why. From what I can gather, it was for being loud in public. If you ask me, I think Officer Basinger should take a seat in one of journalism professor John Soloski’s lectures. Maybe there he’d learn something about the First Amendment. — Michael Barone is a junior from Stone Mountain majoring in magazines

Focus on testing stunts public education M C M

ost of us consider education a good thing. But if education is to be a meaningful and worthwhile endeavor, we must actively make it so. Students, parents and teachers could learn from this counterintuitive concept. Though a large majority of the populace wants to make education worthwhile and meaningful, our attempts to do so have been abysmal. Allow me to share a few of my experiences regarding our “dearly beloved” institution of public education. During my short stint of student teaching in the public school system, I have witnessed firsthand the failings of our schools. I wish I could fully articulate the amount of outright frustration and disillusionment that has arisen from my experiences. What was most surprising? More than half of my 11th-grade students were deficient at reading and writing. To make matters worse, a handful of them were doing so at an elementary school level. How is it possible that such students advance to

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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HARLIE EADOR

the next grade? There are a number of answers to this distressing question. For one, I believe many schools that are struggling will oftentimes inflate their numbers for various reasons — by passing students at any cost and to avoid being punished. As a result, students move up a grade and learn just enough to get by. Even students who do well at school are not necessarily learning to the fullest extent. In a society infatuated with numbers and test scores — memorization, not innovation — many schools feel an intense pressure to do whatever it takes to perform and achieve. I do not blame student motivation or performance for these feelings. I’m holding the structure of schooling and culture of testing responsible. Our common assumptions about school — a belief in tracking or

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Marinova, Jamie McDonough, David Mitchell, Stephanie Moodie, Nick Parker, Michael Prochaska, Aspen Smith, Adina Solomon, Nathan Sorensen, Tiffany Stevens, Zack Taylor, Amber Thomas, Katie Valentine, Paige Varner, Eva Vasquez, Mary Walker, Katherine Weise Chief Photographer: Wes Blankenship Photographers: Charles-Ryan Barber, Lexi Deagen, Emily Karol, Meagan Kelley, Nehemie Lucien, Natasha Peat, AJ Reynolds, Julianne Upchurch, Jenna Walker, Dina Zolan Page Designers: Rachel G. Bowers, Amanda Jones, Ana Kabakova, Christopher Miller, Robbie Ottley, Charlee Russell, Adam Wynn

grouping based on ability and our confidence in standardized test scores — are known as the grammar of schooling. And they have dictated our educational policies and practices for many years. But educational philosophers such as John Dewey and Alfred Whitehead have argued that the failings of our society have stemmed from our misunderstanding of the purpose of education. Is our goal to produce students with high-standardized test scores, or is our goal to cultivate a collection of independent thinkers that are capable of successfully functioning in society — and even improving it? Many have compared the modern day institution of school to a factory, with more of a focus on efficiency than student learning. An example of this that hits close to home is the Atlanta cheating scandal. Pressures to pass high-stakes tests mandated by the state and to make Adequate Yearly Progress under the No Child Left Behind program have been counterproductive. Instead of setting a

“standard of excellence,” this culture of testing has created a system that is more concerned with achieving just enough to pass the test. This leads to rote memorization and regurgitation of facts rather than cultivating literate, thoughtful and independently-thinking individuals. Yes, there need to be standards. But it’s gone too far. We need to put a halt to our obsession with testing, standards and numbers. I do not profess to be any kind of expert in my field, but if our society desires to truly make education a good thing, we must have a clear mission in mind. For those of you who survived the public school system, take a moment to reflect on your education. Did you learn at your fullest? Were you challenged to think for yourself? Most importantly, was school all it could have been for you? If not, then ask yourself why. — Charlie Meador is a grad student from Valdosta majoring in social studies education

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The Red & Black | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | 7

Travel draws students to fair By MARY WALKER THE RED & BLACK For professor John Carroll, studying abroad means seeing nature like you’ve never seen it before. Carroll works with a Maymester program focused on wildlife conservation in Botswana through the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources. “On the program, students camp in the bush for four weeks,” Carroll said. “We have many close encounters with wildlife — you cannot just walk around a herd of 50 elephants.” On Wednesday, students paraded through the Tate Grand Hall to see such study abroad programs and choose their next international adventure. Tuesday and Wednesday marked the 26th Annual Study, Work and Travel Abroad Fair hosted by the Office of International Education. With 80 study abroad pro-

STUDY ABROAD Office Address: OIE Study Abroad 110 E. Clayton St. Bank of America Building Phone: (706) 425-3274

grams in attendance, students saw several opportunities to travel the world. “The University fosters education beyond our own campus,” said Mary Alice Allen, the program assistant for Global Programs in Sustainability. The University is ranked ninth nationally in the number of students studying abroad, according to the University study abroad website. Students can travel to study wine in Cortona, Italy, or do research on climate change in Antarctica. “Students need to be exposed

to different people with different values,” said Robert Grafstein, a political science professor and leader of the China Maymester program. The China Maymester program allows students to travel to parts of China that most tourists don’t get to see. Part of the trip is hosted by a member of the Chinese government. “The United States is occupying a smaller and smaller part of the world economy,” Grafstein said. “China has become the second-largest economy under the communist regime.” The University works hard to make study abroad an option for all students. Out-of-state students pay in-state tuition, and for in-state students, HOPE can be applied to programs. “There are so many scholarships out there,” said Colleen Larson, a study abroad adviser. ASHLEE CULVERHOUSE | The Red & Black “And many students do not know S Maggie Perry with the University’s Oxford study abroad that you can apply HOPE to proprogram talks to a potential student at Wednesday’s fair. grams outside the University.”

Speech policy may hinder rights By JEN INGLES THE RED & BLACK The University’s policy to protect students from offensive speech and behavior may come into conflict with the right to freedom of speech. The Department of University Housing Community Guide includes a policy designed to protect students from acts or speech that are fueled by prejudice. “We want to protect students from insensitive words and actions that target them for being different from the mainstream,” said Assistant Director for Resident Life Russell Smith. But the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education has given the University’s policy on what the University calls “acts of intolerance” a red light. “This policy is very vague, in that it prohibits behaviors — including verbal behaviors — that ‘harm or threaten to harm’ a person or group,” said Samantha Harris, director of speech code research at FIRE . “If this referred only to physical harm, that would be a different situation. But since it prohibits intolerant ‘jokes’ and ‘com-

ONLINE Police Reports

Smith said this offense was being investigated, but there have been no new developments. Crystal Weigle, a resident ments,’ it clearly also applies to some undefined type of emo- assistant at Myers Hall, said all tional harm as well. At a public resident assistants are required university like the University of by University Housing to report Georgia, students cannot be any incident that may be offendisciplined simply for telling sive to any student, even if the offensive jokes or making intol- students involved are not erant remarks, however deplor- offended. “In order for us to cover any able those may be.” Smith said it is important to of it, we cover all of it,” Smith said. protect students against Smith and University hate speech. Police Chief Jimmy “Talk to a student Williamson both said who has been attacked some cases are dison a floor [of a residence missed by students who hall] for being different,” say their friend wrote or he said in response to drew the slur in quesFIRE’s stance. tion as a joke, or who Between Aug. 1 and say they are not bothSept. 27 there were eight reports of acts of intol- WILLIAMSON ered by the incident. When a student does erance filed with request an investigaUniversity Police. Each involved something written or tion, Williamson said it goes drawn on a dry erase or chalk through the Equal Opportunity board or posted on a bulletin Office. Smith said each incident is board. The content of the messages judged on a case-by-case basis reported were usually referenc- when being investigated. He said perpetrators are es to male and/or female anatomy. One bore the message usually not found, but that it is “Southern trees bear strange important for students to know fruit,” a reference to lynching. they can report offensive acts.

Guns in bars legal in state, some students ‘frightened’ By MARY WALKER THE RED & BLACK Having a gun in a bar may be legal in Georgia, but that doesn’t mean all patrons are happy about it. Georgia is one of four states to pass the “guns-in-bars” law in the last six months. The other three are Arizona, Virginia and most recently Tennessee. In June, Georgia passed a law clarifying the locations where permit-holding citizens can carry their concealed weapons. The law now explicitly allows bar owners to admit customers carrying concealed weapons. Bars are defined by the Georgia Legislature as establishments that serve alcoholic beverages and receive less than half of their income from food sales. Athens’ bar scene is legendary. Following the University being named No. 1 party school, Athens’ bars continue to thrive. And this new gun law raises the concerns of some members of the University’s bar-hopping population. “I am frightened to think that people are carrying guns around in

general,” said Amelia Kirbo, a senior from Bainbridge. “And being allowed to carry one while intoxicated seems dangerous.” The law establishes it is illegal to fire the weapon while under the influence of alcohol or any other drug. But this is difficult to regulate. Accidents happen. On Sept. 14, a man in Virginia accidentally shot himself in the leg while drinking a beer. “By allowing guns, it’s like we are asking for trouble,” Kirbo said. Prior to this bill there was a 1,000 feet school safety zone for all schools from preschool to college campuses. This safety zone no longer exists for the University. “The law was meant for K-12,” University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson said. “The 1,000 feet law was removed for college campuses.” Though guns are allowed within striking distance of campus, the University continues its zero tolerance toward guns in campus buildings and property. “The University follows the law exactly,” Williamson said. “You must be 21 years old, have a license and keep the gun in your car.”


VARIETY

8 | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | The Red & Black

Despite odds, Alaskan band flourishes nationally By JOE WILLIAMS THE RED & BLACK When John Gourely, a painter and carpenter from Wasilla, Ala., got the offer from a group of friends to fly down to Portland and try his hand as vocalist for their newly-formed band, he bought a plane ticket the next day. “I was never spontaneous — I was really shy,” Gourely said. “But these guys called me at the right time. They said, ‘Hey, you should come down to Portland and sing a couple songs for our band.’ I worked construction always, so I just had money to go buy a ticket and get out of there.” Biting the bullet on his social anxiety, Gourely went against his very nature to pursue his love for music, despite one glaring issue. He had never actually sung in a band before. “I fucking did not want to sing for a band,” Gourely said. “It’s the last thing a guy like me wants. I get really nervous in groups of people — I don’t get weird, I don’t turn into an asshole. I just like have panic attacks.” After years of playing his guitar long into the night, Gourely’s dedication paid off. His first band, Anatomy of a Ghost, was signed only a month after he made the trek from Alaska. “There wasn’t really a music scene that I was ever a part of. I just kind of grew up at 14 and 15, and I started building houses with my dad and family, and I just did home school and hung out with them,” Gourely said. “I always loved music and I grew up listening to a lot of it. Obviously, I listened to a lot of the Beatles and Motown, just pretty much oldies radio.” The hours he worked were long and hectic, but between meeting the demands of his young hammer-and-nail profession, Gourely met up with friends to write music. “[We] never had more than five or six songs at a time. We would just play for fun, and we always worked at it like it would be a job.” Gourely said. “And I was never good. I never practiced scales or anything like that. But I made these little demos.” What seemed like misfortune

PORTUGAL. THE MAN When: Tonight at 8 Where: 40 Watt Price: $12 advance at the time blossomed into the next stage of Gourely’s musical career — Anatomy of a Ghost broke up after garnering mild success, and what rose from the ashes was a new band with a firm goal, supported by a mild epiphany. “I really do feel like things happen for a reason, you know?” Gourely said. “That was the reason I realized, ‘You know what? You don’t have to be fucking Eminem or Marilyn Manson, that top of the top as far as mainstream goes. You can tour and have fun doing it without needing that.’” And thus, Portugal. The Man was born. With a strong passion for doing it their own way, the members — keyboardist Ryan Neighbors, bass guitarist Zachary Carothers, drummer Jason Sechrist and Gourely on lead vocals and guitar — have quickly made a name for themselves, releasing five albums and, by stern request from their fans, a full-length acoustic LP in the six years since their inception. However, hailing from Wasilla didn’t exactly come with the connections Gourely could have hoped for. Even other artists neglected to mention their Alaskan roots for a shot at a fresh start in the California sunshine. “Honest to God, it’s fucking harder,” Gourely said. “It seems like it’s this thing that writers grab, and they have something to write about right away. Who else is from Alaska? The long winters, fucking Jewel. And Jewel claimed California when she moved out, which is crazy to me. I mean the ’90s? That’s when you’d be lying and saying Alaska.” Like fellow Wasilla native Sarah Palin, the band’s step into the spotlight came with its fair share of hurdles and skepticism, especially in the studio. “Every time we go in with a new producer, [they] flip out and say, ‘This isn’t a song! You can’t play music like this,’ and we go, ‘No man, it’s like what we do.

Photo Courtesy of Portugal. The Man

S Portugal. The Man thrives on experimental, ‘outside the box’ rock to pump up fans. This is how we do it.’” A quick listen to Portugal. The Man is one of excitement and uncertainty, glazed with chaos. For example, the song “People Say” features a twangy guitar coupled with uplifting harmonies, nothing too out of the ordinary. However, the video for “Do You” is enough to start an allout church riot — a woman is sucked into a hole in the ground, a man jumps rope in a space suit, Gourely himself appears to be some sort of mutant, full-size Oompa-Loompa tripping on serious narcotics while a rope is pulled through his chest and he holds an inverted pentagram. Not exactly Matchbox Twenty. It is this very sense of creativity and “outside the box” thinking that has propelled the band both live and in the studio. “We sort of do the hip-hop production,” Gourely said. “I’ll just sit down and play acoustic guitar to a click track, put like a guide vocal to things, then chop everything up and find the right structure. It’s all pretty weird.” Breaking the mold from the manner in which rock bands typ-

ically write and record, Gourely purposefully takes a roundabout approach to everything he does. “It’s all about stepping out a little, having fun with it,” Gourely said. “Everything I do today is something that my teachers fucking gave me a big red mark on my papers for.” Transcending from rural Alaska to the national airwaves takes more than just crossed fingers and a funky recording process. The band’s very name represents its approach to music. “Portugal. The Man was just meant to be an alter ego,” Gourely said. “We would all have these alter egos. I knew I was always going to play with a band, so in picking my ‘Ziggy Stardust,’ I just went with a country because a country is a group of people with a single voice in the world. And it just made sense at the time. What’s bigger than life? Bigger than one person? A country. So Portugal just sounded good.” In fact, for a brief time, the band simply went by the moniker “Portugal.” However, the band feared fans

would not pick up on the largerthan-life meaning. “We decided to call it ‘Portugal. The Man,’ and to put a period so people would know Portugal is the man,” Gourely said. “The first time I saw it in print though, I went, ‘That’s going to be a hassle for everybody. Anybody who has to write about this band is going to have their editors going, ‘What the fuck is this? Did you randomly just start throwing in periods to see what would happen?’” Instead of counting earnings and worrying about what’s in store for tomorrow, Portugal. The Man’s carefree, in-the-moment attitude is one that is sure to resonate with fans at the 40 Watt Club Friday night. “I mean, obviously that’s everybody’s fucking goal, to be the biggest fucking band in the world,” Gourely said. “But it’s cool knowing you don’t need to do that. You don’t really need things to survive. You just need the bare necessities — you fucking need food and a place to sleep. That place to sleep can be a fucking van, it can be a tent, it can be anything. We just want to have fun.”

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At the intersection of films and faith, one University religious group directs traffic. Tonight as part of its “Faith Flicks” series, the Presbyterian Student Center will show the movie “For the Bible Tells Me So” — a documentary about religion’s conflict with homosexuality. Clay Mersmann, who leads the discussion after each film, said movies provide common ground for people of all faiths. “Film puts people in the same place,” he said. “You’re taken through the same ride. The film guides you through the emotions.” Mersmann, a sophomore from Snellville on the Presbyterian Student Center board, said past movie selections have stuck with him. One was “Through My Eyes,” in which young Christians shared their views on how churches respond to homosexuality. For these Christians, Mersmann said, God is the most important thing in the world.

Yet the gay Christians in the film were told their identities were at odds with the most important thing in the world. “After that, I definitely felt a strong inclination to question and push the beliefs of friends who are Christians who maybe aren’t as inclusive to gays,” Mersmann said. “I’m not OK with people using their Christianity to condemn homosexuality.” Other past films in the “Faith Flicks” series addressed a postapocalyptic world in “Children of Men,” African genocide in “Hotel Rwanda” and religious satire in “Saved!” Campus ministry intern Mitch Roper said he chooses movies with biblical themes for the series, especially the theme of creating “loving communities that Jesus would have us live in.” The movies aren’t censored — some contain violence, sexual content and language not typically heard in a place of worship.

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That adds more value to Christianity’s message, Roper said. “To avoid that is to set yourself off from the harsh reality we live in,” he said. “That makes Jesus’ gospel all the more meaningful because his gospel has something to say about the harsh realities.” Future movies include “Lars and the Real Girl” on Oct. 28, “Why We Fight” on Nov. 11 and “The Nativity Story” on Dec. 2.

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VARIETY & SPORTS

The Red & Black | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | 9

Siblings find success in different sports for Dogs By JAMIE MCDONOUGH THE RED & BLACK Family plays a large role in the careers of two Georgia athletes — a very large role. In fact, family and athletics are practically inseparable for the Dyllas. Senior swimmer Mark Dylla and his sister, Ann, both chose to move across the country from their hometown of Littleton, Colo., in order to play collegiate sports at Georgia. “I chose to come to UGA because of the world-class swimming coaches we have here,� Mark said. “I used all five of my recruiting visits and Georgia had the best facilities, coaching staff and school I could find.� Ann, a University volleyball player who is a year younger than Mark, followed in her brother’s footsteps. “In the narrowing of my school options, my brother’s decision to come to UGA definitely influenced mine,� Ann said. Since early childhood, both Mark and Ann were heavily influenced by their cousins and parents to begin playing sports. Their father, Bernie, played football for Northern State University and six of their cousins participated in collegiate athletics —

including a women’s basketball player at Stanford and a men’s golfer at Notre Dame. “When we were little, playing a college sport seemed like a natural part of life,� Mark said. “Because we had so many athletes in the family, I didn’t know anything else. I used to think it was like you go to school, pick a sport, get better at it and go play it in college.� After both of their children had signed at Georgia, parents Judy and Bernie Dylla worried about how much of their children’s athletic careers they would miss out on living so far away. Instead of immersing themselves into a life of constant travel, the Dyllas decided to move to Athens for half of the year, giving them enough time to see Ann play volleyball in the fall and Mark swim in the winter. “Because she was a freshman, it was a little weird at first for Ann that my parents moved here,� Mark said. “But, we both realize how much it has helped having them in Athens. If there is absolutely anything we need — ranging from getting our laundry done to giving a pep talk right before a meet — my parents are right there to help us.�

MAX BEECHING | The Red & Black

S Junior volleyball player Ann Dylla (4) and her brother, senior swimmer Mark Dylla, have enjoyed successful careers at Georgia — all while under the watchful eye of their parents.

Festivities top off homecoming week BUS: Athens artists celebrated tonight By EVA VASQUEZ THE RED & BLACK

Homecoming spirit is in the air, and just past the midpoint of the week, the biggest events are still to come. The pre-tailgate event — think football tailgate with music and free food, minus the beer — is sponsored by the Homecoming Committee of the University Union Student Programming Board. The tailgate will be the last chance for students to meet the Homecoming court before casting their final votes. All 10 members of the Homecoming Court — five girls and five guys — will be at the occasion, which takes place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Tate Plaza today. Students can place their votes at the event or later on Oasis. Voting on Oasis ends Friday at noon. As the spirit of competition continues, student organizations can still earn spirit points by simply attending and signing in at one of the most famous Homecoming events — the parade. The annual spectacle of school

spirit in its truest form will make its way through the streets of downtown Athens Friday at 6 p.m. With “Super Fan� Mike Woods leading the parade as grand marshal, the parade will feature several of the University’s brightest stars. Miss UGA 2010 Laura Lyn McLeod, University President Michael Adams, the Homecoming court and Hairy Dawg are just some of the University celebrities that will be featured in this years parade. And with 47 floats representing various student organizations, “the parade is the biggest event and takes the most planning,� said Luke Lukert, the coordinator of the Homecoming Committee. After the spirit-filled parade, the Dawgs After Dark Committee will host the annual Homecoming Carnival on Legion Field from 7 to 11 p.m. Dawgs After Dark is the division of the University Student Union Programming Board that deals primarily with late-night programming, which takes place on different Fridays throughout the entire school year.

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“Dawgs After Dark was created to be an alternative to going out and drinking for students,� said Molly Roland, coordinator for all Dawgs After Dark events. The carnival is an annual Homecoming event for the program that Roland said has become very popular among students. “It’s almost become like the parade or the street-painting,� Roland said. “It is just a part of the week.� Though the football game at the end of the week is obviously the big event, both Roland and Lukert remind students that Homecoming is about school pride above every else. “Though the football team hasn’t been at their best, it doesn’t mean you can’t love your school,� Roland said. “There are so many great things about UGA that ultimately have nothing to do with football.� But Lukert said that to him, a win at the Homecoming game is just another great University tradition. “Of course we will win Homecoming,� Lukert said. “We always win Homecoming.�

¢From Page 1 “This round we have a group from Lamar Dodd, and we have a local group from Armentrout Matheny, but we have a group that sent in from Philadelphia and we have a group from Kansas. We had almost 70 submissions from all over the country.â€? The first round of “Art Rocks!â€? consists of four stops that have already been installed, with two on West Broad, one on Alps and another on Baxter. Designs for round two have been chosen and will be completed next year. “The jury was composed of a couple of Athens’ commissioners, a couple of bus drivers — we had a couple of bus riders,â€? Nehf said. “We had artists and architects. We had a nice size jury, and everything was done blind in the sense that there were no names, or any region or anything identifying except for a number. And they just went with the description, the visuals and the artists’ statements.â€? Three of the eight design teams selected hail from Athens, and the reception today will honor their achievements along with others involved in the “You, Me and the Busâ€? initiative. “We’re going to have the artists,â€? Nehf said. “Artists are coming in from Philadelphia and from Kansas, and local artists and some of the donors and the jury. It’s going to be a pretty big celebration.â€?

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SPORTS

10 | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | The Red & Black

Coaches award strong ratings to scout team By MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK

FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

If there’s any play Vanderbilt has tried this season, there’s a good chance the Georgia scout teams have covered it. Head coach Mark Richt said Wednesday that the scout teams have been playing well at practice this week as the team looks to have its first winning streak of the year. “I think they did a great job,” Richt said. “The better job they do, the better chance we have to get better, or any kind of problems we might have.” Richt “challenged” the scout team by having his offensive and defensive coordinators rate them on a scale of one to five. Defensive coordinator Todd Grantham gave the offensive scout team a four, while offensive coordinator Mike Bobo gave the defense a perfect five. “The coordinators basically rate their performance during practice that determines how much they run after, if they run at all,” Richt said. Richt said the team has reacted positively to his speech following last Saturday’s 41-14 win against Tennessee, when he told his players not to think about “what could have been, but what could be.” “There’s still a lot of great things to be fighting for,” Richt said. “When you think about how hard you work, how long you work and all the preparation that goes into the season, and you’re only really guaranteed only 12

games, you really do need to treat them like they’re special and treasure them. Regardless of the record, these games are a precious opportunity to play between the hedges, especially this weekend, and play in front of the fans and take care of business.”

Fred Munzenmaier could take carries at tailback if necessary. Dismissed linebacker transferring to South Alabama

Freshman linebacker Demetre Baker, who was dismissed from the team following a DUI charge on Sept. 25, will transfer to South Alabama to finish his football career. Baker plans to finish Running back recoveries his fall classes at help with depth the University and enroll at his new With running school in January, back Caleb King where he will pracsuspended for the tice in the spring next two games, and play next fall. Washaun Ealey will Baker was disget the majority of missed from the carries against team the same Vanderbilt, with few week Richt healthy options RICHT announced his “no behind him in the tolerance” discidepth chart. plinary plan for Luckily for Ealey, the team. Carlton Thomas The 6-foot, 200practiced pound Baker will Wednesday without move from lineany interruptions backer to running after suffering a back, his high hamstring injury school position, at last Saturday South Alabama. against Tennessee. “Carlton got THOMAS Richt impressed some reps today by Uga VIII and he finished the practice,” Richt said. “I’m Richt got his first not sure how he’s going to chance to see the picture feel tonight or tomorrow, but it was encouraging to released of Uga VIII Wednesday and was see him do that.” impressed. Freshman Ken “That is a great-looking Malcome also had a full dog,” Richt said. “What a practice Wednesday after wonderful choice. injuries limited him Thirteen months, 55 Tuesday, and is available pounds and undefeated. I for Saturday if Thomas is hope he stays that way.” not ready to play. Big Bad Bruce, Uga “I think a lot of what VIII’s registered name, happens with Ken might will be unveiled before depend on what Carlton Saturday’s game against does,” Richt said. Richt also said fullback Vanderbilt.

MEAGAN KELLEY | The Red & Black

S Sadio Doumbia (above), a junior transfer from Auburn UniversityMontgomery via France, has brought a new energy to Georgia tennis.

Junior transfer brings ‘great work ethic’ to men’s tennis By RYAN BLACK THE RED & BLACK Sadio Doumbia has had quite an interesting itinerary on his journey to the University. The junior tennis player arrived in Athens via Auburn, Ala., but originally hails from Borderes, France. Doumbia came to the United States just over two years ago, at the age of 17, and had planned on playing tennis at the Division I level immediately. However, one class did not transfer, and it made him ineligible to play at any NCAA institution. Though Doumbia liked the two years he spent at Auburn UniversityMontgomery — where he compiled a 21-1 match record last season on his way to leading the school to a NAIA national championship — he is happy to be a Bulldog now. “The level of play is much higher here and we practice much more here,” he said. “There, we practiced like two hours a day, because in Montgomery it was raining a lot, like two or three times a week. Everything is a better here.” Like others who come to the United States from foreign countries, Doumbia

experienced some culture shock upon his initial arrival. “People [in the United States] are much more focused on being very good, productive, and they talk about being successful,” he said. “In France, they are much more cool, and they go about their life much more slowly. Everything here is like [you are] rushing. You have many, many things to do, especially in college when you are playing sports. You are very busy, so that’s the main difference, because in France, I was easy-going and I was playing tennis for hours and I did not have many things to do. Here, I’m going to school in the morning and then practicing in the afternoon.” When it comes to practice, Georgia head coach Manuel Diaz said Doumbia makes his presence known. “Personality-wise, he’s very bombastic, loud, excited and loves competition,” Diaz said. “He’s very supportive of his teammates vocally, always encouraging people around him, so I think he brings a lot to our team in the sense that he’s quickly becoming a good leader. He establishes for himself and those around him a great work ethic, because he really works as hard as anyone we’ve ever

had. I would say he’s in the top two percent of the guys we’ve had in the last 30 years. Just a great work ethic and a great passion for being the best — not only on the tennis courts, but in everything he does.” And on the tennis court, Doumbia has gotten off to a quick start this season, going 3-1 and reaching the quarterfinals of the Southern Intercollegiate Championships in his debut as a Bulldog last month. But putting the main focus on “winning” was an unfamiliar concept to Doumbia growing up in France, where having an aesthetically pleasing game is treasured above all else. “Here, they really want you to win,” Doumbia said. “In France, they are much more about you having a nice game, like looking good and having good ground strokes. Here, it’s only about winning, but especially in college, you have to win. You just line up and try to win matches. In France, we don’t talk about that. It’s just about looking good.” “Looking good” does have its advantages, though. Doumbia said in the many tournaments he has played against American-born players, they are very one-dimensional compared to their counterparts in France. “Most of the players here have big serves and good forehands, but no backhand,” he said. “They just have one game, one way to play. They just stick with it and try to do as much as they can with that type of game. In France, you have a lot of different serves — very nice forehands, very nice backhands, good volleys, good defense, good slices. They can do everything. They are not just very good at one shot. Here, players are really good at one or two things, so they are much easier to beat sometimes.” And beating people is Doumbia’s ultimate goal. Though he would like to get a degree in either law or accounting, he has tunnel vision in his plans to carve out a niche for himself on the ATP Tour. “I want to try to play on the pro tour for two or three years, try it, see how it goes, see if I can break into the top 100, and then after that, if I don’t do good, when I’m about 26, 27, I would like to go to law school,” he said. “But my main goal is to play pro tennis. That’s all I’m thinking about right now. I don’t want to imagine myself working for a finance company or accounting company. I don’t want to think about that right now. I’m just thinking about being a pro, and we’ll see how it goes.”


October 14, 2010 Issue