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An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Thursday, November 4, 2010

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Vol. 118, No. 47 | Athens, Georgia

Official advises keeping information off record By POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK Following The Red & Black’s articles regarding the recent Dean of Students search, University employees have been asked to be more cautious of what they put on the record, according to a document obtained

by The Red & Black. Rodney Bennett, vice president for student affairs, advised that “no written feedback or evaluative information should be kept for any candidates in any search process, including student positions,” according to the meeting minutes at the Housing Management

ON THE WEB Meeting Document Team departmental meeting Oct. 26. According to the document, “this is effective immediately,” and sharing verbal feedback is the suggested practice.

Though the document states, “this fundamentally changes how searches are conducted,” Bennett emphasized this is only a reminder — not a policy. “There is no new policy,” Bennett said. “There’s no policy that has been developed related to the retention of records. This has to do with the request

that [The Red & Black has] made of me related to the Dean of Students search and a reminder to the department heads that we work in an open records state, and they need to be mindful of documents that they’re maintaining and notes that they are keeping because those are subject to public review.”

After documents of the recent Dean of Students search were obtained and published by The Red & Black, Bennett said he met with department heads to ensure they are aware of state open record policies. “We had a discussion See DOCUMENTS, Page 2

UGA vs. AUGUSTA STATE When: Tonight at 7 Where: Stegeman Coliseum Price: Free

Basketball opens with exhibition Thompkins to miss with ankle sprain

(RE) CYCLE

By MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK The men’s basketball team is finally moving into the newly-renovated Stegeman Coliseum, but without its star player on the court. Starting forward and SEC Preseason Player of the Year Trey Thompkins will not play in tonight’s exhibition game against Augusta State after suffering a high ankle sprain during a scrimmage, head coach Mark Fox said Wednesday. “We’re going to do what’s best for this kid first,” Fox said. “We’re going to make sure he’s healthy before he plays. Knowing Trey and his competitive drive, that will be a struggle we’ll probably run into in a week when he’ll want to come back a little earlier than anybody wants him to.” There is no clear answer for when Thompkins will return. Fox said his chances of playing in the Bulldogs’ regular season opener against Mississippi Valley State at home next Friday are “extremely slim.” “It could be two weeks, it could be a month,” Fox said. “It kind of depends on how he responds to the treatment. We basically have left it where we’re going to treat him as aggressively as we can and re-evaluate him in a week.” Thompkins led Georgia with 17.7 points and 8.3 rebounds per game last season, earning a unanimous All-SEC first-team selection. A sure 2010 NBA Draft selection, he turned down the pros to return for his junior year. To combat the loss, the Bulldogs will rely on added depth, most notably at forward where seniors Chris Barnes and Jeremy Price will play tonight. “They’ve both played both spots up front and have some comfort level See GAME, Page 8

From clunker to classy By PATRICK HOOPER | THE RED & BLACK

O

PHOTOS BY EMILY KAROL | The Red & Black

S Donated bikes in the BikeAthen’s Bicycle Recycling Program are salvaged and fixed, then given to those in need.

ne man’s junker is another man’s roadster at the BikeAthens’ Bicycle Recycling Program. Operating out of the Chase Street Warehouses, the BikeAthens workshop allows volunteers to put themselves to work studying, stripping and salvaging worn-out bicycles that would normally go toward a landfill. Fortunately, these beaten bikes are given a second chance at utility when they pass through the workshop and into needy hands. Mike Ely, BikeAthens board member and BRP co-manager, cited the Athens Area Homeless Shelter, the Salvation Army and the Family Counseling Services of Athens, Inc. as the three largest benefactors of the program. “We provide some transportation assistance, but nothing longterm,” said Nora Blankenship, JobTREC program manager of the Athens Area Homeless Shelter. Blankenship said the BRP pro-

vides trusty transportation, which affords shelter dependents the opportunity to attend job interviews and commute to jobs. “All of the bikes we give them go toward employment purposes,” she said. BikeAthens Council member Richard Shoemaker, a retired teacher and University graduate, said it was always his dream to grow up to be a bicycle mechanic. The BRP gives him a chance to experience the thrill of that dream, devoting several hours a week to the workshop, but the true merit of the program lies in who it helps. “It’s important to a segment of the Athens population you don’t usually see,” he said. Though the main thrust of the program is to provide transportation to homeless and destitute Athenians, the BRP has a secondary objective of diverting extra See BIKE, Page 7

Student candidate returns to ‘normal’ Happy with campaign By JULIA CARPENTER THE RED & BLACK

MEGHAN PITTMAN | The Red & Black

S Glenn Stegall, a 21-year-old political science major, just completed his mayoral campaign. Though he won’t be in the Nov. 30 runoff, he still cherishes the experience he gained.

showers. High 57| Low 39

WITCHY WOMAN What famous University rivalry inspired some to use witchcraft? Page 3

Where’s Mikey? Adams has several meetings today. We may not find out what they’re about, however. Keeping records is apparently a bad idea at UGA. (Top story)

Now that his campaign for the Athens mayoral seat is over, Glenn Stegall has time to be a normal 21-year-old college student again. “What most students might find interesting is that I’ve never had a fake ID and I’ve never gone to a bar downtown, so now that the campaign is over I can probably do that,” Stegall said. “And I’m 21 years old.” Stegall, a senior political science major from Douglas,

Index

News ........................ 2 Music Notes ............ 4

first considered running for mayor two years ago while he was walking on North Campus. “I was coming back from my religion class in Peabody, and I was thinking, ‘Wow, I was really involved in the 2008 election. When this is over, there’s no needing me just kind of becoming your normal college student and having a whole lot of fun,’” he said. “I wanted to do something to affect my community.” Stegall soon began researching the Athens mayoral race. When he discovered his young age didn’t bar him from the competition, he announced his campaign for mayor in the fall of 2009. “I just really researched

what my chances were, and after I talked to a lot of people in the community, getting more involved, and speaking with a lot of friends who encouraged me to do it as well,” he said. This semester Stegall threw himself into preparing for Tuesday’s elections — all while having to balanc the typical schoolwork with the campaign. “When you’re really determined to do something, you’d be amazed at what you can do,” Stegall said. “A lot of my friends were kind of upset because I didn’t really have much of a life, or much of a fun life anyway. I didn’t have much leisure time there, but what

HARD KNOCKS

PUCKER UP Find out which sour brown tastes like a ’90s candy. Page 7 Opinions .................. 6 Variety ..................... 7

See STEGALL, Page 3

Sports ...................... 8 Crossword ............... 2

The sun will come out tomorrow, and Morton Theatre can prove it. Page 7 Sudoku .................... 7


NEWS

2 | Thursday, November 4, 2010 | The Red & Black

MAN ON THE STREET:

CRIME NOTEBOOK

SIXTEEN AND PREGNANT?

ONLINE

Police Documents Fraternity house burglarized Three University students reported more than $4,000 worth of items stolen from the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity house on Tuesday, according to the Athens-Clarke County Police report. “There’s a chance it might show up, but I’m counting it as a loss for right now,” one victim told The Red & Black Wednesday. All of the stolen items were located in common areas, but in different rooms, according to the victim. In total, a mountain bike, backpack, book and two MacBook laptops with a total value of $4,095 were reported stolen. The victim said the fraternity house has had some small thefts in the past. However, he said there’s never been anything quite “on this scale.” “All the doors lock and there are codes on them,” he said. “But I believe one of them was open.” Another victim told The Red & Black that “most everyone in the house was asleep at the time.” He said anyone could have come in. And he said he did not believe the offender was anyone affiliated with the fraternity or living in the fraternity’s house. “We definitely feel like it was an outside thing,” he said. “Someone probably decided to check doors and found an open one and had a nice little walk around.” He said he was typing a report, went upstairs and planned to come back down to the common room to get his laptop in the morning before going on with his day. But when he came back for the laptop, which is valued at $2,000, it was gone. “Whoever it was could have literally just walked through quietly,” he said. Police don’t know how entry was made into the house, but “at least three doors were standing or propped open,” according to the report. — Compiled by Jacob Demmitt

Thanks to television, being 16 and pregnant is no longer the secret life of the American teenager. And most teens polled by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy said shows they like that feature teen pregnancy — such as MTV’s “Teen Mom” — made them consider their own risk of getting pregnant and how to avoid it. In fact, 76 percent of the 1,008 teens polled said what they see in the

TAYLOR CYLE

TIP MORGAN

junior environmental chemistry major from Atlanta

pre-med senior biology major from Marietta “It’s a good thing because they’re too young to be having their future set in stone. But I’ve heard of some girls becoming pregnant so they can be on the show.”

“I don’t know if they help people deal with problems. It’s much better to leave it to up-front, honest discussions.”

DAMION MARTELL,

SUMAN MOMIN

junior environmental health science and biochemical engineering major from Mandeville, Jamaica

international affairs major from Johns Creek “‘Secret Life’ shows teen pregnancy as a way to get popular, as something to get attention for. The girl’s mom helps her out a lot. I think there’d be more consequences in real life.”

“The episodes are never fun. They’re struggling and suffering. They might have to make the choice to give the child up for adoption. You see how difficult it is.”

Club promotes pro-life DOCUMENTS: Avoiding record keeping described as an ‘unsavory’ practice education in Athens By PATRICK HOOPER THE RED & BLACK A new student group is taking a stand for unborn life everywhere. Though the group’s Facebook page links to the Students for Life of America website, the University’s Students for Life group shares a similar name but none of the other group’s clout. “We are an independent group without any official links,” said Peter Ascik, a chemistry graduate student from Asheville, N.C. “Getting the word out was a challenge.” Ascik cited the fall activities fair as especially useful, giving his fledgling group the chance to introduce themselves to the student body. This is the group’s first active semester on campus. He said he built the Students for Life around three core notions — supporting pregnant mothers in Athens, educating the community about life in the womb and calling attention to the loss of life caused by abortion and embryonic research. “Pro-life is always an issue,” he said of his decision to form the group

now. “It’s never gone away.” Ascik said the issue is particularly relevant today, as the field of bioscience has begun moving toward the use of embryos in its research. Steve Stice, director of the University’s Regenerative Bioscience Center, said there was no cause for concern for that kind of research at the University. “We’re not doing any research on embryos,” he said. “It’s prohibited by the [National Institute of Health] and by law for federally-funded research.” The NIH provides the University with its supply of stem cells. Athens Pregnancy Center Director Tricia Parker said some students volunteer but the center still welcomes more help. Parker said the center encourages raising one’s child as the first option and adoption as the second, but they do not turn away women who have chosen abortion. “We have a support group for girls who have had abortions,” she said. “I want them to know they have support.”

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

BY

STEPHAN PASTIS

TRANSMETROPOLITAN   PIZZA

media about sex, love and relationships can launch discussions about it with adults. So, The Red & Black wanted to hear it from University students — do shows like “16 and Pregnant” and “The Secret Life of the American Teenager” positively or negatively influence teens? — Paige Varner

PASTA

PANINIS

OUTDOOR PATIO / FULL BAR UPSTAIRS VOTED ATHENS’ BEST PIZZA THREE YEARS RUNNING

THE DAILY PUZZLE

ACROSS Previous puzzle’s solution 1 Prejudicial slant 5 African nation 10 Cried 14 Curved overhead span 15 Maris or Moore 16 Small electrical appliance remover 61 Memo 17 Tardy 43 Pickle jar 62 Blueprint 18 __ for; topper 63 One-masted selected sailboat 19 Stuff; over- 44 Bouquet holder 64 Walking fill stick 20 Force into 45 Landlord’s collections 65 Warbled servitude 66 Tithing frac22 Los Angeles 46 Become firm tion, often baseball 47 Went out 67 Yellow team with cheese 24 Neckwear 8 48 Book of item 9 maps DOWN 25 Danger 50 Feel miser- 1 Hay bundle 10 26 Relaxed able 2 Middle East 11 29 Cot or crib 51 Not as nation 30 Swerves smooth 3 Play divi34 In the dis12 54 Like a sions tance 13 school skirt, 4 Refuge 35 White lie often 5 Orchard 36 Bag carrier 58 “__ want for 6 Actress 37 Acquired 21 Christmas Lange 38 Takes tiny is my two 7 Insurance 23 bites front...” co. employ40 Recline 41 Error 59 Nimble ee 25

¢ From Page 1 about what we have learned as a result of the Dean of Students search and the documents that were kept — that [The Red & Black] did an open records request for and subsequently published,” he said. “And so I reminded the department heads that, as they are reviewing candidates and candidate credentials, they need to be aware that we operate in an open records state and any document that we create or maintain is subject to public review.” W h e n asked if Bennett encourages solely verbal collection of feedback for departments, he said no. BENNETT “No, I w o u l d encourage people to do it in whatever way they’re comfortable doing it,” Bennett said. “Sometimes you can collect feedback verbally and that’s fine. And other times you need to collect feedback in another form, and I think it’s OK to do it in the other form if that’s what the situation calls for. But I don’t think anybody should be reckless in just creating a bunch of documents and a lot of records that they really don’t need. I think you need to have a specific purpose for creating a record and maintaining a record.” Bennett said when conducting a search, he often writes down comments about the candidates in the margins or on the back of the paper, and all of those comments on the documents could be made publicly available. “If you don’t need to write that down, if you

Picture Yourself Here!

South Hampton Terrace 3 BR: $400 per BR

Required Passion Squirmed Author __ Stanley Gardner Rain hard Blasting substances, for short Assistance Shabby bars Small

stones 26 Raring to go 27 Prior to, to Shakespeare 28 Hell’s ruler 29 Overalls part 31 Dazzling effect 32 Poker term 33 Drive too fast

don’t need to keep that information, don’t keep it,” he said. “If you need to keep it, then by all means keep what you need to keep, but have a purpose and a reason for keeping it.” Frank LoMonte, executive director of the Student Press Law Center, said not keeping written feedback “just seems like a bad practice.” “As a general matter, an agency is only required to turn over documents that they actually have,” LoMonte said. “The question is, ‘Can you conduct your business in a way that undermines open records policies?’” John Millsaps, spokesman for the Board of Regents, said universities in the University System of Georgia don’t have to keep anything outside of the documents required by the U.S. Department of Labor. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission requires employers to keep all personnel or employment records for one year. Employers are required to also keep records of employee payroll, employee benefit plans and other employee records such as wage rates and job evaluations. LoMonte said universities should not purposefully abstain from keeping “written feedback or evaluative information.” “It certainly seems unsavory for a school to get around open records practices in order to avoid public disclosure,” LoMonte said. “It may technically be legal, but the public would be right to ask if this is a sound practice.” Josh Delaney, SGA president, said people have a right to know about all processes that occur in a public institution. “I think it’s important for all search processes for positions — be it student,

35 Evergreen 36 __ as a beet 38 Bird homes 39 “Diamond __” 42 Gazing 44 Drapery topper 46 Use mouthwash 47 Perish 49 Mininum 50 Hebrew “A”

51 Tams & berets 52 Stew pot 53 Actor Alda 54 Scheme 55 Warty hopper 56 Sicilian volcano 57 __ worthy; consider fit 60 Charged atom

South Hampton Village 2 & 3 BR: $385-$400 per BR

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staff or administrative — conducted by a public university that is taxpayersupported to be public. I think all citizens — students, journalists and whoever else — should be able to have a transparent look at what’s going on in the processes at that university.” Bennett said some candidates for jobs at the University may be in a situation in which they risk being fired if their supervisor finds out they are considering a job at another institution. “That’s the problem with doing searches that are so public — where [The Red & Black] published the name, rank and serial number of everybody,” Bennett said. “That’s sort of the backlash that we have to deal with. It’s that some of your best candidates will not apply because they can’t take the risk of having their supervisor or employer know they’re considering other jobs.” Bennett said the context of what the entry in the Housing Meeting document was referring to is that after DELANEY the recent Dean of Students search, staff should be more aware of what University documents can be made available to the public. “There’s no policy related to records, but with the stories that [The Red & Black] printed, it certainly provided opportunities for good discussion for processes going forward and a reminder of the Open Records Act,” he said. After the Dean of Students was announced, students expressed the need for more transparency on the administrative level. “Any search process should continue to have records that people can look back on in order to keep people accountable and make sure the processes are done in a transparent way,” Delaney said.

CORRECTIONS The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Daniel Burnett (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Carey O’Neil (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com


The Red & Black | Thursday, November 4, 2010 | 3

NEWS

THOSE WERE THE DAYS....

Athletes’ study aid goes mobile

Editor’s Note: This Thursday series chronicles some of the most interesting, hilarious and monumental moments that happened this week in the University’s history.

Can an iPad improve academic success? The Athletic Association’s use of technology has helped the graduation rate of student-athletes skyrocket. Wednesday afternoon, the University Council committee on Intercollegiate Athletics met to discuss a web-based program referred to as The Portal. The Portal is an online system that allows the academic advising staff at the Rankin Smith Academic Center to supervise student-athletes’ academic progress. Ted White, director of academic services, has promoted the development of the program for the past four years. The Athletic Association is now in discussion with Apple to get The Portal mobile. “Apple is very into the mobile technology and student-athletes are always on the run,” White said. White came to the University in May 2006. When he arrived, the University’s football and basketball student-athlete graduation rate ranked dead

CO-ED IS PURSUED BY AMOROUS GOAT Some female students have pets. Others have clingy boyfriends. But one poor University student had the worst of both worlds this week in 1924. “Mary and her little lamb have nothing on Georgia co-eds. Determined not to be outdone by any nursery rhyme, a sophomore house co-ed came home from her eight-fifteen class Tuesday morning with a nice fresh goat trailing her as closely as ever Hawkshaw trailed a desperado,” reported The Red & Black. “The co-ed got somebody’s goat, but fled from his advances into the shelter of Sophomore house, almost slamming the door in his face.” Female students today may be schooled on rape prevention and downtown safety, but how many girls in this century are savvy enough to cope with a sudden goat attack? WITCH CASTS SPELL ON LITERARY HALL Rarely do rivalries reach the tactics that one feud came to this week in 1970 when a Phi Kappa witch cast a spell on Demosthenian The two literary societies have been rivals for centuries, but Angie Wyllie, then a junior math major, took the friction up a notch when she built a tarot-card effigy of Demosthenian Hall and consulted the Dictionary of Witchcraft in order to curse Phi Kappa’s archrival. “Miss Wyllie quietly concentrated for 30 seconds on the evil spell she was about to cast. She slowly raised her head and said, ‘Disaster and ruin upon Demosthenian Hall forever!’ She struck down the effigy of tarot cards and blew out the candles.”

By MARY WALKER THE RED & BLACK

¢ From Page 1

RED & BLACK ARCHIVES | The Red & Black

This week in 1971 The Red & Black interviewed Fabian Fain, a student night watchman in Myers Hall, in an article on several “dragon slayers” in University dorms. Fain griped openly about the perils accompanying his position. “Peeping toms are a problem each spring quarter and during exams,” Fain said. Once halls became co-ed in 1967, University Housing employed students to monitor young ladies’ comings and goings and to protect the female residents from unexpected male visitors. FAIN Fain discussed the awkward duties his job sometimes entailed. “It puts me in a tough spot during a panty raid when everyone else is cooperating except me.” BLACK PLAYERS RECEIVE ‘FAIR DEAL’ Before the 1971 season, the Georgia football team was uniformly composed of a single color — not red or black, but white. Five football players broke the color barrier between the hedges: Horace King, Chuck Kinnebrew, Clarence Pope, Richard Appleby and Larry West. “The thing I’m most pleased with is that they let me play because of my abilities not my race,” Kinnebrew said. “I’d rather deal with prejudice than tokenism.” An interview with King, Kinnebrew and Pope in a Nov. 4, 1971, issue of The Red & Black revealed though the players were definitely aware of their prominence on the team, they didn’t feel coaches or other players treated them differently because of their race. “The coaches all try to treat us fairly,” Pope said. “They have been that way with all the players.” Kinnebrew said coaches and teammates treated him “as a person, not as a color.” “Of course, we are going to be in the public eye simply by being the first,” Kinnebrew said. “There will be more black athletes coming to Georgia, and being first, we are their example of what it’s going to be like.” — Compiled by Julia Carpenter

other people see as always being stressed out and working, I found exciting and thrilling to be working to affect government and affect people’s lives in such a profound way.” Stegall soon came to rely on three professors in the political science department — Paul Gurian, Audrey Haynes and Charles Bullock — as a “free campaign consulting team.” “I basically had some of the best experts in the state at my disposal, and that was great,” Stegall said. Bullock said he believes Stegall’s campaign may have inspired some future student bids for public office. “I would hope so, that it would serve as something

UGA’S NEXT TOP ENTREPRENEUR When: 5 to 6 p.m. Where: South PJ Auditorium More Information: Information session about the business idea competition yearlong competition is the information session today. Students will then choose whether they want to compete alone or in a team of up to six people. During the three rounds of the contest, students will outline ideas for their own businesses. Successful business ideas from previous competitions have included an iPhone app and a taxi service for downtown, Roach said. Next Top Entrepreneur will last until the end of the school year when a panel of 15 to 20 venture capitalists from across the country, who invest in promising

of a role model,” he said. “UGA students frequently become involved in campaigns, especially those who are either involved in the College Republicans or the Young Democrats, but it’s uncommon for them to actually become candidates themselves while still taking classes.” Stegall received a mere 4 percent of the overall vote in the Athens mayoral race, but he said the experience was one that will shape his future political endeavors. “In politics we have something called ‘progressive ambition,’ and I would definitely identify myself as one of those people,” he said. “You always try to move up, to the highest office you possibly can to create the most change, and that’s essentially my men-

MEGHAN PITTMAN| The Red & Black

S Glenn Stegall explains some of his campaign materials. During the Athens mayoral race, he had help from several University professors. tality here.” Stegall had just a few words of advice for aspiring student candidates. “Go after it, and don’t let those cynics keep you back,” he said. And the loss didn’t really faze him. “Even though I lost, it

was so rewarding,” he said. “We were able to bring education and that kind of power into the city. We were able to get a lot of things done, and I think we actually raised the bar for young people to actually be able to affect their community.”

Court expunges late fees for some tickets By BRIANA GERDEMAN THE RED & BLACK This month, students and Athens residents will have the opportunity to put Municipal Court citations behind them with the court’s first Amnesty Month. From Nov. 1 to Nov. 30, the court will waive late fees and warrant fees for tickets issued more than a year ago — prior to Nov. 1, 2009. The individual will still have to pay the original ticket. The tickets that will be forgiven are: traffic offenses, possession of less than one ounce of marijuana, driving under the influence, driving without a license, no license, shoplifting, animal control and unsafe/ unsanitary living conditions. Parking tickets issued by the Downtown Athens Parking System are not covered by the Municipal Court’s Amnesty Month. Leslie Spornberger Jones, munic-

Student business competition offers chance to win $100,000 Dreams of starting a company — and having $100,000 to do it with — are within reach for undergraduate and graduate students at the University. UGA’s Next Top Entrepreneur competition gives students the chance to win this prize and gain experience in developing their own companies — perhaps even starting them. “It’s something that you can’t be taught in the classroom,” said Charles Roach, a graduate assistant in the Terry College of Business who works with the competition. Chris Hanks, director of entrepreneurship at Terry, began the contest along with his former graduate assistant. Roach now works as Hanks’ assistant for the program’s third year. The first step to the

ors are supposed to read the tutoring reports each morning,” The program also contains an attendance section. If a studentathlete is absent for three classes they are suspended for the upcoming 10 percent of competition. “We have had students miss the SEC championship,” White said. The Portal applies to all studentathletes. It contains calendars for student-athletes that list classes, tutoring sessions, meetings and training programs. The program also contains a section for each course with syllabus information that can be changed by the counselors or instructors. “There is no other program like this in the country,” White said. “There is nothing as comprehensive.” The Portal going mobile would assist the communication between student-athletes and their academic advisers, especially while on the road. They hope to close their contract with Apple by December. The Portal has proven its effectiveness over the past four years. “We now rank second in football graduation rates, just behind Vanderbilt after just four years,” White said.

STEGALL: Professor hopes campaign inspires students

NIGHT WATCHMEN

By ADINA SOLOMON THE RED & BLACK

last in the SEC. Before being hired to the University, White worked with freshman football players at Louisiana State University, where he developed a hands-on program to assist student-athletes struggling academically. White began sitting in classes, observing tutoring sessions and asking students to show him their work. “Within one year we were leading the SEC in freshmen honor roll students,” White said of his work at LSU. The challenge at the University was to create a program to monitor the progress of more than 500 student-athletes. The program allows counselors to monitor the grades and attendance of a specific student or an entire team. The Portal uses the lighting system. A and B scores correspond with a green light, C with a yellow light, and D and F result in a red light. These lights indicate areas in which student-athletes are struggling or succeeding. “The traffic light allows the tutor to know, in general, how the student is doing,” White said. “And counsel-

business proposals, will choose the top two or three ideas. The venture capitalists will then fly to Athens and choose which team receives the grand prize of $100,000 to make its business idea into a reality. Financing for the competition, including the prize, comes mainly from area companies, Roach said. Venture capitalists and the Venture Capitalist Club at Terry also subsidize the competition. Roach said this year Next Top Entrepreneur hopes for 300 contestants, or 50 to 60 ideas. Most students who enter are sophomores, juniors, seniors or graduate students, and 30 to 40 percent are from Terry, but everyone is encouraged to compete, Roach said. “It’s going to be something that really helps your career throughout life,” he said. “Even if you don’t win, it’s not a loss.”

AMNESTY MONTH When: Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays in November, noon to 8 p.m. What: Pay overdue tickets with no late fees Where: Athens-Clarke County Municipal Court at 325 East Washington St. More Information: Call ACC Municipal Court at (706) 613-3690 ipal court judge, said the court decided to hold Amnesty Month to deal with older court cases. “It���s part of the court’s ability to work efficiently to keep up with any cases that haven’t been resolved,” she said. If a person who received a ticket does not appear in court by a certain date, a $50 late fee is charged. If the person does not appear in court within an additional 20 days, their drivers’ license is suspended, a $100

warrant fee is assessed and a bench warrant is issued, which can lead to the person’s arrest, Spornberger Jones said. She said some people may want to resolve their outstanding citations, but they may not have money to pay the ticket at first, and as time passes, they are reluctant to come into court because of the additional fees and warrants that have mounted. She said she hopes Amnesty Month will address those people’s concern. “It would give them the chance to resolve it without the late fee and the warrant fee being assessed,” she said. “We’ve got about 2,000 cases that we felt like people may not be wanting to resolve because of those things.” Amnesty Month will waive the late fee, the warrant fee and the bench warrant during November, but it will not reinstate the person’s license.


4 | Thursday, November 4, 2010 | The Red & Black

MUSIC NOTES

Compiled by Chris Miller Designed by Ana Kabakova Contact: music@randb.com

The Red & Black’s event guide to music in and around Athens from Nov. 4 - Nov. 10.

Audio/Visual Stimuli: OK Go

V

ideo didn’t really kill the radio star. Really, it just marketed the radio star. But OK Go doesn’t really dig that idea. “I think, especially with the kind of demise of the traditional record industry, the rules for what a video has to be have changed,” said Tim Nordwind, bassist of OK Go, a band known for its videos. “They no longer have to be marketing tools, they no longer have to be promotional items or advertisements for the record. They can kind of be their own separate art project that have their own value and stand alone.” And that’s exactly what OK Go’s videos do. If you’re not one of the 50 million people who has seen the band’s infamous treadmill dance video on Youtube (which won the band a Grammy), you might be confused. All of the videos produced by OK Go are dramatically original, intriguing and fun, from mind-blowingly complex Rube Goldberg machines to trained dogs. In no way are they the traditional big-name-director-tells-band-tostand-on-beach-and-look-beautiful, and the mission behind them is far beyond just selling records. “With record labels, the reason they wanna make a video is they want their bands to show up in the video looking like a shiny new car in a car commercial,” Nordwind said. “We’re mostly concerned with just good ideas and executing them well.” But what is all this mess about videos — this is a band, right? What about the music? To Nordwind, this is not a band that makes just videos or music or T-shirts. They make all of it. And they do it all really well. Well, their T-shirts kind of suck (just kidding). “We’re sort of the mind — and this is a super-naïve business model — that if we make good things then more good opportunities will come to us,” Nordwind said. The good things they have made,

Courtesy Day 19

on top of Internet sweeping videos, include three dynamic rock albums. The sound they create, if all you’ve heard is 2005’s “Here It Goes Again,” is infectious and driving, almost obnoxiously catchy melodically but still somehow dangerously original. Their newest record, “Of the Blue Colour of the Sky,” reaches into new depths, with a focus Nordwind describes as driven more by personal emotions and less by thematic goals. “I think thematically it’s a record about trying to find hope in what felt

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“This time around we were definitely hunting much more in the dark for feeling, and we were trying to feel our way through it rather than think our way through it,” Nordwind said. The idea that some people might be familiar with OK Go’s videos and not their music doesn’t bother Nordwind in the least. Everything that the band has created together is just another part of their creative expression. “Some people are gonna like the videos, some people are gonna like

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like hopeless times,” Nordwind said. “A lot of the record was written at the end of the Bush administration and the downturn of the economy — it was really a sort of scary place to be and personally the band was going through a lot of turmoil.” From that emerged a groove-based record that maintains its pop catchiness while pushing into more dissonant and melancholy realms. Funky dance beats and falsetto vocals are matched with lyrics about loss and pain.

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the music, some people are gonna like the music and the videos, some people are only gonna like us live but don’t like our t-shirts,” Nordwind said. “But what’s nice is that there is a good percentage of people I think who see one thing and end up liking another thing that we make, and I’m proud of that.”

THURSDAY 40 WATT CLUB See “Audio/Visual Stimuli” CALEDONIA LOUNGE 10 p.m., $7 (18+), $5 (21+) Guzik Down-home death metal Wolves and Jackals “The gospel of death,” apocolypto-metal Shark Heart Local prog-metal trio NEW EARTH MUSIC HALL 9 p.m. Big Gigantic Colorado-based funk-tronic soulful dance jams Ana Sia San Fran electronica: Bass that buzzes straight through your gut FARM 255 11 p.m., free The Humms Grungy psycho-pop that you’ll be humming for days (GO SEE) Mermaids Fun, fuzzy, clap-your-hands rock Nuclear Spring Moan-fuzz rock with a punk attitude Runaway Suns Texas dirty blues-rock; whiskey, women, wonderin’…

OK Go, Those Darlins, Samuel 40 Watt Club 8 p.m. $15 in advance TERRAPIN BEER CO. 5 p.m. Turbine Wholly American Americana with touches of funk, blues, rock, jazz FLICKER THEATRE & BAR 11 p.m., $6 Elf Power Major local psycho-folk sounds like a windy fall day Jacob Morris Ham1 member plays alt-folk with an English twang RPM 10 p.m., free Holy Liars Cowboy boot-stomping grimy rock THE MAX CANADA 6 p.m., free Greg & George Shallow Palace members play two-piece versions of their normally fist-pumping rock Nuclear Spring Moan-fuzz rock with punk attitude HENDERSHOT’S COFFEE BAR 8 p.m., free Kenosha Kid Genre-bending originals driven by jazz philosophies


The Red & Black | Thursday, November 4, 2010 | 5 Americana and soul influences

THE MELTING POINT 9 p.m. Kinchafoonee Cowboys Barn dance country that loves to rock and watch them Dawgs

FARM 255 11 p.m., free Delicate Steve One New Jersey man’s experimental, lyrical tunes performed by a five-piece Sunspots An intergalactic wind blowing a drum circle through the cosmos

BARNETTE’S 10 p.m., $10 “Voices Against Brain Cancer� Bloodkin Experienced Athens rockers with

NUÇI’S SPACE 7 p.m., $5 Up Until Now Local electro-duo whose singular mission is booty shaking

CALEDONIA LOUNGE See “Deep Roots�

WildKard Local rap with a guitarist and a sense of humor TERRAPIN BEER CO. 5 p.m. Bluebilly Grit Bluegrass standards and originals straight from the front porch GO BAR 10 p.m. Neon Blud Florida thrash-punk fronted by a hardcore maiden of metal Witches Frontline rock ’n’ roll with melodic

influences

S

FRIDAY

40 WATT CLUB 9 p.m., $12 in advance Man or Astro-Man? Surf-punk from the future, played in the ’70s Fiend Without a Face Psychobilly, surfpunk blues

FLICKER THEATRE & BAR 8:30 p.m. Women in the Round Three singer/songwriters playing acoustic originals

Courtesy Man or Astro-Man?

SATURDAY THE MELTING POINT 9 p.m. Brad Downs and the Poor Bastard Souls Southern stories over thoughtful roots rock Adam Payne Quiet folk rock just waiting to burst into a sing-along chorus William Tonks Local rock veteran playing

TUESDAY CALEDONIA LOUNGE 9:30 p.m., $7 (18+), $5 (21+) Dylan Gilbert Charlotte three-piece produces a cascade of melodic indie rock Artists of War Thudding, screeching techni-metal

Southern-styled rock originals. 40 WATT CLUB 9:30 p.m., $8 in advance Yacht Rock Revue Synthy ’80s pop covers of bands including Kenny Loggins and Steely Dan for members only Krush Girls Funky mixes brought to Athens for a decade by DJ A$$ Money CALEDONIA LOUNGE 10 p.m., $5 (18+), $7 (21+)

Falcones Melodic rock and punk-driven locals Native Kid Passionate, round-howl vocals in front of indie alt-rock HIGHWIRE LOUNGE 8 p.m., free Kenosha Kid Genre-bending originals driven by

Abandon the Earth Mission Electronic beats underneath ambient instrumentation/synths and spaced out melodies Qurious Ambient electronica smooth as the milky way and back by cosmic visuals NEW EARTH MUSIC HALL 7 p.m. The Mezmer Society Workshop and Show The sounds of gothic, 19th centu-

jazz philosophies THE GLOBE 8 p.m., free Ian McFeron and Alisa Milner Seattle-based Americana in the Dylan tradition WUOG 90.5 FM 8 p.m., free “Live in the Lobby�

ry Eastern Europe fronted by cabaret and belly dancers

WEDNESDAY

FARM 255 11 p.m., free The District Attorneys Echo-laden, rolling hill indie rock

CALEDONIA LOUNGE 10 p.m., $7 (18+), $5 (21+) Coco Rico Energetic indie rock Goldilocks Indie power-pop straight from the ATL Wowser Bowser Melodies in the key of funky indie pop, run through more than a few computers

RYE BAR 10:30 p.m., free Jazz Chronic A funk body with a jazz mind and a rock soul

Modern Skirts Local pop rock group that’s mastered the three-part harmony and funky drum beat, now moving on to more experimental pastures THE MELTING POINT 7 p.m. Seven Handle Circus Bluegrass/folk that loves whiskey and a good crowd

THE MELTING POINT 9 p.m. John French and the Bastilles Mellow indie rock, a folky feel with elegant harmonies Kyshona Armstrong Soulful, sincere, and sophisticated R&B folk

Emily Hearn Upbeat, folk singer/songwriter with mesmerizingly authoritative vocals RYE BAR 10:30 p.m., free DJ Killacut DJ mixes plus local rapper guests TERRAPIN BEER CO. 5 p.m., free Laura Meyer Hyper-bluesy alt-rock with spotlight on Meyer’s soulful vocals

Deep Roots: The Darnell Boys

A

lthough it may seem that today’s worlds of hip-hop and country exist on opposite ends of the universe. Actually, like almost all popular American music, it came from the same style: the blues. You don’t have to tell that to The Darnell Boys. Of the three Darnell brothers — Caleb, Austin and Gus — the latter two made names for themselves in town as rappers. Austin made his name in the highly regarded Deaf Judges and Gus performing as Gus D. at house parties and clubs since he was in high school. Then, about six months ago, they took the obvious next step — form a band that meanders back and forth from multi-part harmonies in the 1950s country tradition to gut-busting blues about evil women and whiskey. Wait, what? “I think for a lot of people, especially my brothers’ friends, they’re definitely surprised that I know how to actually play instruments,� said Gus, the youngest Darnell brother. “And all of my friends that I’ve told, ‘Hey, me and my brothers are starting a country band,’ they were definitely a little weirded out at first, but it’s gone over well so far with everyone.� The Darnell’s, all Athens

locals, were raised on country and blues, Gus explains, including the Allman Brothers Band and Hank Williams Sr. “We’ve grown up with it because all my uncles and my father, they all play music, and they all play country and blues music,� said Gus. “So we grew up with my dad listening to a lot of country and blues and bluesrock kind of stuff.� The first incarnation of the band actually consisted of just the two older brothers performing as Bellyache. After about a year and a half of writing and performing, they took a hiatus, reforming this year as The Darnell Brothers with the addition of Gus and then-bassist Joe Burkett and “junkyard percussionist� Patrick Weiss, who plays washboards and saw. On-stage the Darnells are constantly rotating, each taking his turn on different instruments and in different roles. “I play drums on some songs, I play guitar on some songs. We all take turns singing songs, we all take turns being the front man,� Gus said. “So I think that makes the live show interesting for sure.� Aesthetically, the jump for Gus and Austin from hip-hop to country/blues — especially in this old-time, family style — seems radical. But Gus

Other Events in Athens THURSDAY What: Men’s Basketball Exhibition vs. Augusta State Where: Stegeman Coliseum When: 7 p.m. Price: Free for students Contact: www.georgiadogs.com What: University Theatre Performance: The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Where: Fine Arts Theatre When: 8 p.m., through Friday Price: $15, $12 for UGA students Contact: (706) 542-2838 (tickets) FRIDAY What: Coffee Hour sponsored by International Student Life Where: Memorial Hall Ballroom When: 11:30 a.m. Price: free Contact: (706) 542-5867 What: Volleyball vs. Florida Where: Ramsey Student Center When: 7 p.m. Price: free Contact: www.georgiadogs.com SATURDAY What: Athens Farmers Market Where: Bishop Park When: 8 a.m. – noon Contact: www.athensfarmersmarket.net

What: Classic City Rollergirls Bout Where: Skate-A-Round USA When: 6 p.m. Price: $10 (adults), $5 (ages 6–10), free (ages 6 & under) Contact: www.classiccityrollergirls.com SUNDAY What: Boulder Bash Where: Bouldering Wall, Ramsey Student Center When: Noon – 9 p.m. Price: $15 for students; $18 nonstudents. Registration the day of: $20 Contact: (706) 542-8030 What: Sunday Drag Brunch Where: CinÊ When: 11 – 3 p.m. Price: $15 Contact: 706-549-3450, www.athenscine.com MONDAY What: BikeAthens Bike Recycling Where: Chase Street Warehouses When: 6 – 8:30 p.m. Price: free Contact: www.bikeathens.com TUESDAY What: Discussion: Black is Not a

Courtesy The Darnell Boys

explains it’s all actually linked together. “Hip-hop was born from the blues and being in a shitty environment and having to get through it, and the way to get through it is just doing music. Both are kind of a healing process, trying to just figure out what’s going on in your life and

Color of the Rainbow Where: Section G, Grand Hall, Tate Student Center When: 6 p.m. Contact: (706) 542-4077, vernon85@uga.edu What: Volleyball vs. Kennesaw State Where: Ramsey Student Center When: 7 p.m.

make it through,� Gus said. “It’s nice to have the brothers there to back you up on it.� The Darnell Boys, Matt Hudgins & His Shit Hot Country Band, John King Band The Caledonia Lounge 10 p.m. $7 (18+), $5 (21+)

Price: free Contact: (706) 542-1621, www. georgiadogs.com WEDNESDAY What: Getzen Lecture on Government Accountability Who: U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson Where: Chapel When: 10:30 a.m. Contact: (706) 542-7849

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6 | Thursday, November 4, 2010 | The Red & Black

Daniel Burnett | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Carey O’Neil | Managing Editor me@randb.com Courtney Holbrook | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Our Take

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

No transparency Rodney Bennett has advised that no written feedback be kept — what?

We might expect it from a totalitarian regime. We might even expect it from the U.S. government. But we never expected it from our own University. Rodney Bennett, vice president for student affairs, has advised that no written feedback be kept in future hiring searches. His reasoning: this newspaper. Bennett said the decision was related to The Red & Black’s open records requests in the Dean of Students search — you know, the one where a candidate was chosen despite the fact the voting records of the committee showed several other candidates were clearly favored over the eventual winner, Bill McDonald. Bennett was in charge of the hiring, yet he did not vote in favor of McDonald. Josh Delaney, SGA president and the one student representative on the search for the Dean of Students, didn’t vote for McDonald either. So who really made the final decision? We sensed something was fishy in the hiring process. Based on Bennett’s recent advice to limit paper trails and squelch transparency within the administration — we might be right. Instead, Bennett suggested faculty stick to verbal feedback — which, unfortunately, doesn’t quite fall into the domain of open records requests. He even met with department heads to remind them what citizens can find out by using open records requests. What secrets are being hidden inside those big buildings on North Campus that cause administrators to advise people not to keep records? And how far does this policy go? Bennett told one of our reporters that feedback is encouraged “in whatever way they’re comfortable doing it.” Unless it’s written, it would seem. Documents from the meeting state: “Vice President advised that no written feedback or evaluative information should be kept for any candidates in any search process, including student positions.” The editorial board of this newspaper wholeheartedly believes this is a clear ethical violation. The students of this University don’t deserve an administration that can hide behind closed doors, away from pesky open records requests. The students of this University deserve transparency. We deserve an administration that works for us, not a regime that keeps information from us. — Daniel Burnett for the editorial board

Thanks for talking about your almost-sexcapades at a volume that allows everyone on the bus to know about them. Getting so wasted that you start to look and sound like a Jersey Shore cast member mated with a hillbilly is never attractive. I know you think you once resided in a golden uterus, but that is no excuse to sneer at me when I smile at you out of politeness. To the girl in my Ed. Psych class who is 30 minutes late EVERY day, just don’t bother. Go away. You’re disturbing class. No, guy sitting behind me in biology, your cologne does NOT make me want to sleep with you — it makes me want to puke. Attention male physics students: just because you are in a male-dominated major doesn’t mean you can skip taking a shower. I exercised my constitutional right to tell the liberals to shove it. Did you? To the people who use curry, garlic, fish and other generally odorous ingredients, and then leave them in the sink while cooking in the kitchen of Creswell Hall: please stop. It smells awful. Eat some Easy Mac like the rest of us. To the kid playing “Angry Birds” in Economics — maybe you wouldn’t be failing if you were paying attention. I loathe the people I invite into my home for a party who eat my food, ruin my stuff and don’t even thank me. It’s Snelling. It’s not the end of the movie. Stop clapping. I hope you had a happy birthday Roseanne.

Hunting keeps ecosystem healthy A

drian Foster’s Letter to the Editor (“Hunting does not help lower deer population,” Nov. 2) shows how one should not speak on something about which they know little. The argument that hunting doesn’t affect the deer population is absurd. Hunting helps control the whitetailed deer population. The purpose of hunting as a management technique is to keep the deer population under carrying capacity, so that the population does not overcrowd the habitat. As the deer situation exists, populations in many areas are above carrying capacity; this means there are more deer in a designated area than the environment can handle. In other words, the deer are eating our surroundings to death. I agree these populations are much higher than they should be. However, it is not because hunters want more deer to hunt, but because there are not enough hunters. Foster is correct — non-lethal techniques are “more humane.” But they are impractical to implement. Peer-reviewed, published research has documented that effective sterilization requires capturing and sterilizing at least 70

News Editor: Mimi Ensley Associate News Editor: Rachel Bunn Sports Editor: Zach Dillard Variety Editor: Joe Williams Photo Editor: Meghan Pittman Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editors: Elaine Kelch, Beth Pollak, Jessica Roberts Online Editor: Will Brown Online Copy Editors: Lauren Cronon, Taylor Moss Editorial Cartoonists: Julie Bailey, Phillip Henry, Sarah Quinn, Bill Richards

percent of female deer. It’s also expensive. The equipment itself might not be, but the cost of manpower and work hours necessary for a successful project is excessive. University professors have done research — and are still doing research — on the effectiveness of non-lethal techniques. And as of yet, no alternative has outweighed the practicality and cost effectiveness of hunting. Finally, hunters in search of trophy bucks do not want a large population. Larger deer populations do not yield bucks with the desirable multi-point antlers, because there is less available food in the habitat for consumption. In fact, the smaller the population, the bigger the deer become — which is better for the “gun-toting lunatics” who want a head to hang on their wall. As a deer population increases, the size of individual deer decreases, the number of trees decreases and the number of diseased ani-

— Annaliese Ashley is a junior from Albany majoring in wildlife management

Empathize with struggles of immigration E D

mpathy: It’s a quality many of us take for granted. It’s a skill some students and lawmakers seem to lack. Judging from the antiimmigrant dialogue expressed in recent media debates, I’m guessing many students have never had a conversation with an immigrant. Let me introduce you to one. A family friend was considered an illegal alien for 15 years. (Let’s call him Dave). Dave grew up in wartorn El Salvador. From the age of six, Dave knew the weight of a pistol. His father made him hide one in his pants when he’d go out gambling. If the police stopped them, Dave says, they never would search a young boy. As a teenager, Dave shined shoes in the town square. One day, police shot the man next to him. “You don’t move,” Dave says. “You don’t look up. You just keep shining shoes.” Even taking a public bus put Dave’s life at risk. The bus would hit a government roadblock. Passengers without government papers were taken away. Miles down the road, a rebel roadblock was set — this time,

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

ANNALIESE ASHLEY

mals increases. Although not yet found in Georgia, chronic wasting disease is a result of overpopulation — and yes, the disease is as bad as it sounds. The infected animal essentially starves to death. Moreover, this meat is not safe to eat. The existence of this disease is another reason why educated hunters encourage lower rather than higher populations. Bottom line: the smaller the population (within reason), the healthier the deer, and the happier the hunters. As a non-hunter — which is different than an anti-hunter — I can honestly say I might not be able to actually shoot an animal. As a wildlife management student at the University, I can honestly say it is part of our role as humans to be a stewards to the natural world. But we must remember that our duty as a steward is more than just refusing to kill the warm and fuzzy creatures — it is maintaining a healthy ecosystem. If that means killing deer — which around here it does — then that is our duty.

Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Sarah Jean Dover Recruitment Editor: Sara Caldwell Senior Reporter: Dallas Duncan Staff Writers: Sereen Ali, Jason Axelrod, Ryan Black, Mitch Blomert, Rachel G. Bowers, Kelsey Byrd, Anne Connaughton, Adam Carlson, Julia Carpenter, Melissa Cohen, Kelly Corbett, Daniel Curran, Christopher D’Aniello, Jacob Demmitt, Chris DeSantis, Sarah Jean Dover F. Tyler Elrod, Michael Fitzpatrick, Briana Gerdeman, Sarah Giarratana, Emily Grant, Mariana Heredia, Drew Hooks, T. Patrick Hooper, Kathryn Ingall, Jen Ingles, Shawn Jarrard, Edward Kim, Heather Kinney, Alex Laughlin, Darcy Lenz, Polina Marinova, Jamie McDonough, David Mitchell, Deanna

EVON

YOUNG

those who had government papers were taken away. After he served a brief conscription in the military, Dave’s parents scraped together enough money to send him and his brother away from the civil war, to the relative safety of the United States. Dave arrived in Texas in the back of a sealed semi truck. He found a job laboring on a Texas ranch where he earned $10 a day working from dawn to dusk. He worked his way up to $12 a day, plus free beer. Then, Immigration Services picked him up and he spent six months in a holding facility. For Dave, this was heaven: Three meals a day and hot showers, idle time to relax and play soccer. Several days a week a man would come in and say, “Sign these papers and you can go home to El Salvador.” Dave eventually was released and made his way to Georgia. He married an American woman

Our Staff

Mitchell, Stephanie Moodie, Cody Nichelson, Nick Parker, Michael Prochaska, Aspen Smith, Adina Solomon, Nathan Sorensen, Tiffany Stevens, Zack Taylor, Amber Thomas, Katie Valentine, Paige Varner, Eva Vasquez, Mary Walker, Erinn Waldo, Katherine Weise Chief Photographer: Wes Blankenship Photographers: Charles-Ryan Barber, Miriam Camp, Lexi Deagen, Emily Karol, Meagan Kelley, Nehemie Lucien, Natasha Peat, AJ Reynolds, Julianne Upchurch, Jenna Walker, Dina Zolan Page Designers: Rachel G. Bowers, Amanda Jones, Ana Kabakova, Christopher Miller, Robbie Ottley, Charlee Russell, Adam Wynn

and gained legal resident status. He joined a forestry labor crew and, in three years, became the foreman. A few years later, he ascended to manager. Today, he owns the company. Now, Dave travels back and forth between his two lives, one in El Salvador, and another in Georgia. There, he owns a farm, a restaurant and a hardware store. Here, he owns a successful reforestation company. He pays taxes and abides by the laws of our country. Yet, I fear Dave will always be considered a second-rate citizen because of his accent, his appearance, his “otherness.” Most illegal immigrants pay taxes — for gasoline, food and other resources, if not to the IRS. Many work jobs other Americans refuse to work. And, realistically, they are not taking the seats of deserving college applicants. Undocumented students make up less than 0.2 percent of the students in Georgia’s 35 public colleges and universities. Many Americans snake

around these facts, so that at the end of the day they may sleep peacefully with a worldview of selfentitlement and privilege. Recall former football coach Barry Switzer’s quote, “Some people are born on third base and go through life thinking they hit a triple.” Why do so many of us feel we are more entitled to the pursuit of happiness than immigrants like Dave? Integrity and hard work have nothing to do with our luck or grace to have been born stateside. Unlike Dave, I don’t know true suffering. But the truth is, many illegal immigrants are merely attempting to escape a world of poverty and violence of which many of us know little. I know I would do the same in their shoes. Yes, immigration law needs major reform. We must make it easier, faster and more affordable for immigrants to obtain citizenship. Until then, I’m asking that we empathize and place ourselves in the shoes of an immigrant before espousing anti-immigrant rhetoric. — Devon Young is a senior from Danielsville majoring in magazines

Editorial board members include Daniel Burnett, Robert Carnes, Courtney Holbrook, Carey O’Neil, Meghan Pittman, Megan Thornton and Joe Williams.

ADVERTISING: 706-433-3001 Advertising Director: Natalie McClure Student Ad Manager: Lauren Jones Territory Managers: Sarah Carlton, Anna Lewenthal Inside Sales Manager: Haley Winther Account Executives: Kelly Pierce, Andrew Love, Sarah Overstreet Sales Associates: Ryan Benson, Carolyn Evers, Rebecca Tonne Advertising Assistants: Laurel Holland, Emily Johns Classifieds Representative: Jenna Vines Circulation Manager: Blake Molina Creative Assistant: Olivia Scarborough

Assistant Production Manager: Joshua Trey Barnett Production Assistants: Nicollette Childs, Jenni Chiu, Priscilla Kathe, Elaine Kelch Production Manager: Sam Pittard Publisher: Harry Montevideo Office Manager: Erin Beasley Assistant Office Manager: Megan Yue Cleaning Person: Mary Jones The Red & Black is published Monday through Friday fall and spring semesters and each Thursday summer semester, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a non-profit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


VARIETY

The Red & Black | Thursday, November 4, 2010 | 7

BIKE: Athens shop fixes bicycles for charity

Families join for creation of ‘Annie’ By HEATHER KINNEY THE RED & BLACK An echo of young voices rang clear across the stage of the Morton Theatre during dress rehearsals for the upcoming production of “Annie.� The youngest cast member on stage is four-and-a-half years old and acts alongside her mother. “Typically in theater we do not take them under the age of eight,� said Powell. The actors must be skilled in reading and writing for blocking purposes. Yet Powell insists on keeping families together on the stage. “If I can afford not to split up family, I won’t split one up.� She double-casts children as much as possible in ACT’s productions, claiming it produces more opportunities for them. “We have well over 150 or so people audition — we cast 70,� said Powell, while mentioning ACT productions can function with far fewer cast members. ACT’s rehearsal system for the cast is a two-tier structure for blocking. Children are blocked in their scenes from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and the adult roles are blocked from 8 to 9:30 p.m. “It is very difficult to be a child and go to school and to keep this kind of a schedule,� Powell said.

¢ From Page 1 waste away from landfills, according to Ely. True to its name, the BRP uses all parts of a bicycle, whether they are repaired, salvaged from a spent frame or sent off to be recycled. Connor Magill, a second-year law student from Atlanta, said he enjoys the disassembling process so much that it has become his unofficial job, which comes with its own title: The Destroyer. “It’s really hands-on,â€? Magill said of the BRP and his decision to participate in it. “You can do a lot of work with the bike. You can see the end result.â€? Fellow volunteer Basil Campbell, a 1985 University graduate, said the program gave him the chance to combine his love of bikes and service projects. It also gives him the chance to work with the vintage bikes he loves. As a long-time volunteer with more than six years of experience under his belt, Campbell often passes his mechanical know how onto the less-experienced volunteers. They in turn get the chance to work with various types of bikes and learn something about their complex, intricate construction. Campbell said every rider should know how to fix a tire, one of the many skills a volunteer will learn in his or her time at the workshop. “Bring an open mind and a sense of patience with yourself,â€? Shoemaker said of any newly minted volunteers. Only about 20 percent of the workshop’s volunteers knew a great deal about bikes before they came, according to Campbell. Unfortunately, the program has long suffered a lack of membership, enough so that volunteer effort often falls behind demand. “I’ve been told they have the bikes,â€? Blankenship said of shortages. “They just need people to volunteer to tune up the bikes.â€? BRP co-manager Jason Perry said those limitations motivated his decision to put the workshop’s goal for the upcoming Holiday Bikes for Kids program at 60 bikes. The workshop rarely has the manpower to surpass such a goal. Whereas the usual BRP caters to much of Athens’ homeless population, the Holiday Bikes for Kids drive caters exclusively to children. Volunteers begin tuning up donations on Nov. 14 and bring it to a close on Dec. 19. The main recipients of the Holiday Bikes for Kids program will be Fowler Elementary School and Children First.

When: Tonight at 7:30 until Nov. 14 Where: Morton Theatre Prices: Adults $15, students and seniors $12, group of 10 or more $10, free for country employees with a valid ID Alongside the young cast is a golden retriever in the role of Annie’s dog Sandy. Trained by its owner and stage manager Kelly Glikin, 21, who has worked with ACT for six years, the retriever takes stage directions from hand signals made by members of the cast it interacts with on stage. The introduction of props, drops and lighting to the stage has been gradual in the retriever’s training. “We have been trying to do it incrementally so that the dog can adjust to the additional chaos,� Powell said. ACT was recently presented the Georgia Recreation Park Association award for most innovative programming. According to Powell, productions such as this one will typically have a full house for each show. “The community at large has come to expect a specific caliber out of us,� Powell said. “Because we deliver consistently, they will come.�

drink up! Alright everyone, ready for a lip-puckering adventure? Because I’m about to introduce your mouth to New Belgium’s La Folie. This bodacious brew comes to us by way of New Belgium’s “Lips of Faith� series, which implies exactly what it means — this sour brown ale will have you squinting and squirming, in a good way. A lot of you out there are probably thinking, “There are beers that are supposed to be sour?� Well, I am here to tell you “yes� — now throw away that 30-pack of Natty and prepare to experience a bit of the funk. That’s right, this beer is funky — and I am talking “George Clinton and the Parliament Funkadelics� funky. It has a tremendously powerful aroma of citrus and dark fruits. The first sip of this beer is anything but subtle. It’s more like a steel-toed boot to the taste buds; the assault leaves them in shock. It features a nice malty backbone with notes of candied fruit. Remember the popular ’90s candy “Warheads�? To put it bluntly, this beverage tastes like drinking a black-cherry warhead that never loses it’s sour. It tastes as if this ridiculous candy has been repurposed as a masterpiece of a beer. Those willing to take a taste

EMILY KAROL | The Red & Black

S The BikeAthens Bicycle Recycling Program restores donated bikes and gives them to those in need. The shop’s goal for the upcoming Holiday Bikes for Kids program is to give 60 bikes, but volunteers are lacking.

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

Classifieds Rates & Information PRIVATE PARTY RATE (Applies to individual persons only)

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of the “funk� are a brave few. If you so wish to try this beer, however, you will be rewarded with “Beer Awesomeness.� So don’t be lame — push the limits of what you think beer should taste like. Or don’t — I’m sure that nobody is drinking that opened, stale tallboy in the back of the fridge. The only problem with the beer is it may be hard to find. I had this beer on draft a couple weeks ago at Trappeze Pub, but unfortunately, it is no longer there. It should be possible, however, to find some at Five Points Bottle Shop. — Zack Taylor

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The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

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SPORTS

8 | Thursday, November 4, 2010 | The Red & Black

Recent firing proves GAME: Fox looks to merit of McGarity develop depth in A

comfortable-looking chair is positioned at Greg McGarity’s sprawling desk in the top-floor corner office of Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall. From that chair, Georgia’s athletic director has a grandiose view of his new work environment. In the foreground, the University’s newly-upgraded track complex, Stegeman Coliseum, the current construction on the football practice facilities and a large portion of South Campus are displayed in plain view. Sanford Stadium looms just beyond eyesight, hidden behind the tree line. That chair has been filled for scarcely more than two months now — 64 days to be exact. But it took just 61 days for McGarity to show his true colors. On Nov. 1, McGarity relieved the head coach of Georgia’s volleyball program of his coaching duties precisely two months after officially moving his personal belongings into that impressive corner office. With the midseason move, McGarity has sent a powerful message reverberating through the athletic department. The message? Excellence is not simply a milestone, but an expectation. It did not matter that Georgia has never been a national contender in volleyball. Don’t take that excuse to the corner office. It did not matter that just two years ago coach Joel McCartney was considered another solid hire by Damon Evans and was one of the winningest volleyball coaches in the Division I ranks. Despite his .709 career winning percentage, McCartney compiled a career 29-45 record in the SEC and never advanced to the NCAA Tournament. Don’t take those numbers to the corner office. The man now residing in that office has grown far-too-accustomed to success to accept anything less — in any sport. Under the watchful eye of athletic director Jeremy Foley, along with the well-documented assistance of McGarity, the Florida Gators’ athletic program ascended to become one of the winningest athletic departments in sports across the board. Florida won 17 national championships during McGarity’s time there — including

team’s front court

ZACH DILLARD two titles for both football and basketball since 2006. Needless to say, winning became ingrained into McGarity’s way of running an athletic department. It will now be a requirement in Athens as well. The recent lack of success for Georgia volleyball played, at the very least, a pivotal role in McCartney’s midseason firing. Though the losing record may not have been the sole reason for the dismissal, McGarity reached his decision swiftly and made the change. “After a careful review of our volleyball program, a change is needed,” McGarity said in a brief press release. No prolonged explanation. No elongated quotes sugarcoating the situation. Just goodbye. With an athletic program suffering through difficult times — notably in the traditionally-strong football, baseball and gymnastics programs — a decisive leader such as McGarity is just what the doctor ordered for Georgia athletics. The eviction notices are not being issued for any of these sports’ coaches, but the McCartney firing should serve as a warning sign reading: “The new sheriff is officially in town.” And that sheriff has made himself nice and comfortable in that office chair at his desk in ButtsMehre. With such resolute decisions, Georgia’s athletic director appears set to catapult the Bulldogs back into the nation’s elite — even if he has to step on a few toes to do it. On Nov. 1, the first toes were stepped on, and every person involved in the program should now buy into McGarity’s vision if they hadn’t already. For if there is anyone not committed to excellence within the program, then it is obvious who will show them the door. Greg McGarity has shown his true colors — and Georgia supporters should be thrilled at the display.

¢ From Page 1 there,” Fox said. “We felt like this team had some versatility in its roster, and with [Thompkins’] injury we’re going to have to use that.” Part of that versatility includes the experiment of Travis Leslie at shooting guard, away from his usual small forward position. At 6-foot-4, Georgia’s other All-SEC firstteam selection spent the summer honing his ball-handling and jump shot to prepare for playing time in the backcourt, which is more suitable for his size. Fox said that Leslie’s transition to shooting guard will allow the Bulldogs to play a “bigger” game once Thompkins is healthy. But Fox doesn’t count out reverting back to a smaller, more athletic game if needed — especially with Gerald Robinson eligible to play after sitting out last season due to NCAA transfer rules. “Our team is deeper this year, and we’re going to test our depth from Day 1,” Fox said. “I think the one thing we’re going lean on this week for sure is our experience.” Augusta State comes to Athens after a successful 2009-10 season, going 29-4 with an Elite Eight appearance in the NCAA Division II Tournament. The Jaguars’ roster changed in the offseason, losing all five starters and leaders in every sta-

FILE | The Red & Black

S Junior forward Trey Thompkins will miss the exhibition game against Augusta State with an ankle sprain. tistical category. The highest-scoring returner is senior Frank Ndongo, who had only 5.4 points per game.

Top recruit sets date for announcement By MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK

RECRUITING NOTEBOOK

Football coaches will find out whether or not one of the nation’s top running backs is theirs in 2011 by as early as December — in the Georgia Dome. Isaiah Crowell, a five-star prospect out of Carver High in Columbus, told Scout.com last Thursday that he will announce his commitment “right after the clock runs out” in the Class AA state championship game on Dec. 10 in Atlanta. Crowell, the second-ranked running back in the country, is choosing between Georgia and Alabama. But in order to make his announcement in state finals,

Carver has to make it there first. Crowell said if the team doesn’t, he will make his decision during the signing period, which begins Feb. 2. Carver is 9-0 this season and a favorite to win the Class AA state title. Bulldogs commit Witchett back with high school team Class of 2011 commit Zack Witchett of Atlanta has rejoined his high school teammates after being dismissed for disciplinary reasons. Witchett was reinstated last Thursday and played the following night, helping Washington High to a 35-28

win against Druid Hills. The wide receiver and defensive back was dismissed from the team on Oct. 12 after an undisclosed incident with the Washington coaching staff. Witchett’s head coach Stanley Pritchett told the Atlanta JournalConstitution that the dismissal should WITCHETT not affect his scholarship with the Bulldogs. Witchett is a 6-foot, 185pound three-star prospect ranked 76th in the country among wide receivers. He committed to Georgia on June 4.


November 4, 2010 Issue