Issuu on Google+

Red&Black The

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

www.redandblack.com

Did you vote to help the cats? Find out about the referendum. Page 2 Vol. 118, No. 46 | Athens, Georgia

CLASSIC CITY SHOWDOWN

SEAN TAYLOR | The Red & Black

Nancy Denson (left) was all smiles at Buffalo’s on Alps Road Tuesday night. Gwen O’Looney and her supporters (above) waited for mayoral election results at Little Kings Shuffle Club. The candidates will meet in a runoff on Nov. 30 to decide who will be the next mayor of Athens.

ATHENS-CLARKE COUNTY MAYOR ELECTION RESULTS NANCY DENSON: GWEN O’LOONEY: SPENCER FRYE: CHARLIE MADDOX: GLENN STEGALL:

34 percent 23 percent 21 percent 18 percent 4 percent

Source: Athens-Clarke County Board of Elections DINA ZOLAN | The Red & Black

Denson, O’Looney to runoff for mayor THE RED & BLACK STAFF REPORTS It may not be over for the Athens mayoral race. In Athens, to win the mayoral race, a candidate must get 51 percent of the vote. The mayoral race is nonpartisan and has five candidates, which led to a runoff between candidates Nancy Denson and Gwen O’Looney. The runoff will take place on Nov. 30. Around town on Tuesday, supporters of all five mayoral candidates gathered to watch the election results come in. Denson lead in the polls most of the night — at least, that’s what Denson and the lead singer of the country band performing at her election party announced.

Deal holds strong lead for governor By MARIANA HEREDIA, KATHRYN INGALL and POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK

With 100 percent of the precincts reporting, Denson captured 34 percent of the vote. Denson and her supporters assembled at the local Athens Buffalo’s to wait out the night and mark the end of her campaign. Denson resigned from her position as the AthensClarke County Tax Commissioner on June 30 to run for mayor after more than three decades of public service. “I’ve been in office in Athens for 31 years and the tax office was running like a well-oiled machine,” Denson said. “I felt like I was at a point in my life where I could help the

KATHRYN INGALL | The Red & Black

S Republican candidate Nathan Deal led in the polls as results came in Tuesday night. Supporters joined See MAYORAL, Page 3 together at the Grand Hyatt in Buckhead to watch.

With 79 percent of precincts reporting at press time, Georgia has a new governor — and it seems like it will be Nathan Deal. The Gainesville politician took 53 percent of the votes. His opponent, Democrat Roy Barnes received 43 percent, and Libertarian John Monds took 4 percent. “I think we’ve had some very good people working for us all across the state — people that have stepped up and have been willing to go out and e-mail and call their friends,” Deal said. Deal said he believes Republicans — on the state and national levels — have an advantage this election cycle. “I think there is a mood all across this country of saying that we realize that we need to make sure the government is smaller and more efficient,” he said. “And I think that does help the Republicans because that is the position most of us have taken.” See GOVERNOR, Page 3

Broun downs Univ. grad for Congressional seat By RYAN BLACK, ADINA SOLOMON and KATIE VALENTINE THE RED & BLACK

KATIE VALENTINE | The Red & Black

Paul Broun (right) watches election returns with a supporter in Atlanta Tuesday. Broun defeated Democratic candidate Russell Edwards.

showers. High 57| Low 49

IDA-WHO? Some Georgia players have a tough time locating their next opponent. Page 6

Where’s Mikey? President Adams will attend an 11 a.m. seminar called ‘Educational Leadership in Tough Economic Times’ in the Chapel. We’re glad he’s attending.

ATLANTA — Paul Broun’s plans for the University are almost as big as his margin of victory over Russell Edwards in the 10th Congressional District race Tuesday night. With 87 percent of precincts reporting, Broun received 67 percent of the 10th District votes — putting him well ahead of former University student and Democratic candidate Russell Edwards. Broun said his long-term goal is to make Athens part of a hub of what he called the “biomedical research health care delivery corridor,” which includes Augusta and Atlanta, by way of the surrounding major highways of I-20, GA-316 and US-78. In

Index

News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 4

turn, he hopes this makes Georgia the top health care delivery state in the Southeast. “Of course UGA is going to be an integral part of that, tied in with the facilities at Augusta, which is a diamond just waiting to shine,” he said. “Then you look at Atlanta and see the facilities there, too. So I see the University of Georgia growing in stature. ... We just have a tremendous asset there. As world-class of a university as it is now, I think it’s going to continue to expand upon that.” Broun said this election was important for the nation because he thinks Americans are unhappy with the leadership in Washington. “American people are rejecting the policies of Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid,” he said.

LET’S PLAY A GAME The ‘Saw’ series is a cult hit — but does the 3-D version impress? Page 5 Variety ..................... 5 Sports ...................... 6

“They want to see something different.” Though Edwards may have lost, his supporters still believe he fought a good battle. “It’s such a hard race, and I’m not surprised,” said Julia Rutledge, a supporter. “But it’s disappointing.” When asked before the results were definitive if Edwards had a good chance of winning, Gail Hoge — a supporter of Edwards who made calls for his campaign — said she hoped Edwards would win. “We needed new leadership,” Hoge said. “I was glad we had a really good candidate this time around.” Also before results were published, Mehul Patel — a field organizer for Edwards who had known See VOTE, Page 3

HOME SWEET HOME Georgia swimming and diving knows how to protect its house. Page 6 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 5


NEWS

2 | Wednesday, November 3, 2010 | The Red & Black

Changes coming for cat shelter

MAN ON THE STREET: Elections Tuesday was midterm Election Day, and voters lined up in Athens on a cloudy day to have their voices heard. Athens citizens were able to cast their votes for governor, mayor and other officials, exercising one of the most important American freedoms. Two years ago, we elected our nation’s president, but today’s vote is just as important. The Red & Black asked some voters fresh out of the booth why they came out to vote during the midterms. —Compiled by Katie Weise

By KATHRYN INGALL THE RED & BLACK Athens residents will soon have a place to bring unwanted and stray cats. A new shelter renovation on Beaverdam Road should be finished by the middle of November, said Patrick Rives, the animal control superintendent. In July, the Athens Area Humane Society decided not to renew its contract with the city to provide a cat shelter. The Athens-Clarke Commission voted in September to spend $150,000 to renovate the facility that will contain 28 cages as well as hire three full-time staff members. “We needed a way to take in and shelter cats,” mayor Heidi Davison said. “Sometimes good people move and they need a place to surrender their animals.” Three of the 10 commissioners voted against the measure. Commissioner Doug Lowry said the money for the project should have come from the regular budget instead of the contingency fund. “The cat shelter is not an emergency. The contingency fund is for emergencies — or maybe not emergencies, but unforeseen issues,” Lowry said. Clarke County residents may bring cats they can no longer care for or strays to the shelter. The Athens Area Humane Society was receiving about 1,000 cats a year, Rives said. Suspected feral cats will be held overnight for observation. Since there is no clear test, the animal control staff will observe the behavior of the cat. Feral cats found to be part of a registered colony will be returned to the caretaker, Reeve said. Caretakers are responsible for the sterilization and vaccination of cats tagged in their colony. Feral cats found not to be part of a registered colony are euthanized, Reeve said. “The fact that UGA is here means there are a lot of new people coming into Athens every year,” Rives said. “That’s one of the things we caution students about when a student comes to adopt a dog. ‘Do you know where you’ll be living in one, two, three years?’”

KATIE WEISER

MARTIN KAGEL

LAURA FEDER

student from Seattle

professor from Athens

“You need to vote just so your voice is heard in the local elections. Midterm elections do count for something.”

“I’m voting for the first time because I just became a citizen. I’m going to take part in the political process.”

student from North Carolina

CLAIRE BUSH

JOSEPH LARISCY

preschool teacher from Athens

LAURA KAGEL Clemson University lecturer from Athens

lawyer from Athens

“You can make a difference in your neighborhood and state.”

University faculty who take steps to reduce their carbon footprints may expand their wallets in the process, officials say. The University is in the process of offering two new programs that will give offices and staff incentives to improve sustainability on campus. Rewards include cash prizes and funds allowing offices to replace equipment. Don Walter, director of Parking Services, said the University is considering a partnership with the Clean Air Campaign. If the partnership is finalized, participants would be matched with others looking to carpool through a program called Rideshare. “It’s part of our alternative transportation program. We already give out free parking passes to people who want to clean-commute,” he said. “We already have a pretty robust transportation program, so this would just be the icing on the cake.” University staff participating in Rideshare would receive $3 per day for up to $100. Walter said the Clean Air Campaign would provide funds. “[The prizes are] only for employees. It’s not for students,” he said. “And the funds are only an incentive to get started carpooling.” Carpooling will not be the only way staff can earn prizes. The Office of Sustainability is finalizing the details of another program. Offices that participate in the program may receive the ability to advertise themselves as a greenfriendly office.

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

BY

“It’s a voluntary certification program,” said Tyra Byers, sustainability coordinator at the Office of Sustainability. “What we’ve included is a toolkit that offices can use to reduce their energy impact. They can choose items under each of those categories that they can implement. And if they agree to do a certain number out of the available categories they would be a certified UGA sustainable office. So they would get a plaque on their wall, they would get to display the logo, and they would get additional resources.” Participants may also receive funds that allow them to replace outdated equipment with greenfriendly technology, Byers said. “But we’re still working through the details of that,” she said. One method offices could use would be to acquire a small attachable trash can called a “side saddle” trash can. The side saddle would work by acting as the main trash can, turning the larger, original trash can into the recycling bin. “Hopefully people will take more responsibility for their trash and produce less waste,” Byers said. Both Walter and Byers said many staff members and offices have expressed interest. However, many University employees were already participating in environmentallyfriendly practices, they said. “There’s a lot of office managers and people at UGA who are implementing sustainable practices already,” Byers said. “We just want to provide them with more support and allow them to connect with other offices that are doing the same.”

STEPHAN PASTIS

ELECTION DAY 2010

MEGHAN PITTMAN | The Red & Black

S The last voters cast their ballots at the Memorial Park Voting Precinct Tuesday. In addition to the statewide elections, such as the governor’s race, Athens residents could also vote for several amendments and referendums, the mayor and county commissioners.

CRIME NOTEBOOK Student reports harassing phone calls A student at Oglethorpe House dorm reported receiving multiple unwanted texts and calls from a person known to the student Monday, according to University Police reports. The student said the individual was sending rude texts and leaving unwanted voice mail messages, according to the report.

THE DAILY PUZZLE

ACROSS Previous puzzle’s solution 1 Lemon meringue __ 4 Clear the slate 9 Snake’s greeting 13 __ even keel 15 Persons, places & things 16 Doing nothwinning film 60 Grow weary ing for Leslie 61 Tree hous17 Beige Caron es? shade 18 Gem mea- 40 Dirt bike or 62 Twelve quad, for months sure short 63 Beholds 19 Drop of joy 64 Magnificent or sorrow 41 Rouse 20 Alaska sea- 42 Place to sit 65 Prepare 43 Adolescent Easter eggs port 45 Sunday din22 Partner ner entrees, DOWN 23 Boys maybe 1 Edgar Allan 24 Greek letter 46 Old-age __ 26 Plot acct. 2 Peruvian 29 Cool drink 47 Traffic tieIndian 34 Zones ups 3 Merit; 35 “Thou shalt deserve not __ thy 48 “No way, __!” 4 Translate neigh51 Caused a into symbor’s...” jagged bols 36 Edge wound 5 Laughs 37 Letter open56 Heroic story loudly er 38 __ in; pay- 57 Egg-shaped 6 Invisible ing attention 58 Ancient emanation 39 Oscarharp 7 Unexpected

“I care about the outcome. It makes a difference to me who wins, so I’ll do my part.”

“It’s critical for people to vote. We have too much complacency and no one votes. It’s one of our rights we shouldn’t give up. By not voting you are not getting your say.”

Faculty goes green with carpools By TIFFANY STEVENS THE RED & BLACK

“It is important because it’s one of the only ways you can have your voice be heard and it’s an obligation to your country and citizenship.”

Vehicles entered in Hull Street Parking Deck Two vehicles parked in the Hull Street Parking Deck were unlawfully entered Monday, according

CORRECTIONS ONLINE

Police Documents

to University Police reports. The owner of a silver Honda Civic reported the car was entered by way of an unsecured trunk lid between noon and 3 p.m. A portable Toshiba DVD player was reported missing. A black purse and a white iPod adapter were reported stolen from a green Oldsmobile at about 9 p.m., according to the reports. — Compiled by Tiffany Stevens

The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Daniel Burnett (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Carey O’Neil (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com

“It’s been proven through history, that women’s a mystery.” - Popeye

obstacle 8 Respected greatly 9 Hired assassin 10 Notion 11 Bench piece 12 Very dry 14 __ weapons; A-bombs, etc. 21 Exhibit-

ionists 32 25 Little child 26 Late 33 Egyptian President 35 27 Largest Greek 38 island 28 Lift with 39 effort 41 29 Recluse 42 30 Balanced; fair 44 31 Opera solos

Finger or toe Kuwaiti leaders Cucumber, for short Pesky follower Horrific Card game Unconscious state Daughters of one’s sis-

ter 45 Most infrequent 47 Volkswagen model 48 Fast planes 49 Mayberry kid 50 Father 52 Declare 53 In __; lest 54 Observed 55 Strong cart 59 Before

MILLER HIGHLIFE TALLBOYS $2 ALWAYS!

POWER HOUR SPECIALS "EVERYDAY ‘TIL 11 PM LIVE $1 NATURAL LIGHT DRAFT "$2 WELLS "$2 TALLBOYS MUS IC WEDNESDAY $4 JAMESON "ALL NIGHT LONG! NIGHTL Y! MON-SAT 9 PM-2 AM "140 E. CLAYTON STREET

Athens’ coolest, best-made, and largest boot selection. Since 1975 Downtown


NEWS

The Red & Black | Wednesday, November 3, 2010 | 3

GOVERNOR: Barnes remained upbeat ¢From Page 1 Brenda Gerspache, a ’64 University alumna, supports Deal because “he’s well qualified for the job and he’s been a politician for a long time,” she said. Helen Story, a retired teacher from Cobb County and ’73 University alumna, attended Deal’s election party in Atlanta “because I am a Republican and I want Nathan Deal to win.” While Deal and his supporters awaited the results Tuesday night, his grandchildren were busy drawing in their coloring books. “I think it’s neat that it’s a family affair,” said Deal’s niece Leah Hulsey from Gainesville. Oscar Poole, a supporter from Ellijay and owner of Colonel Poole Georgia BBQ, made a bold statement by wearing a yellow suit with a patriotic tie and hat to the event. “I came because I want to stomp this left-wing socialist trend in our government,” Poole said. “I’ve done quite well in this business, and I want every American to have the same privileges I have.” Jeannette Fusia, a junior from Clayton State University, came to support Deal for a more simple reason. “We need jobs back in Georgia. That’s the main thing,” Fusia said. “My parents have been out of a job

MELISSA HARWARD | The Red & Black

S Several supporters of Roy Barnes celebrated Election Night at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center in Atlanta. since Obama came into office.” Fusia was born in California, but her family is originally from Mexico. “For me, it’s easy as a student,” she said. “We have our education and other options, but they’re much older and it’s a little more difficult to secure a pretty good job.” And what does Deal tell his supporters as the final Election Day results come in? “Thank you for a suc-

cessful campaign,” Deal said. But despite the unfavorable results, the atmosphere at Barnes’ Election Night party was lively. Nevertheless, every attendee at the party did not have the same upbeat mind-set. Pat Alexander, a recently retired executive assistant who worked for the last seven governors including Barnes, said the early poll numbers did not faze her.

“I pay no attention to the poll numbers. I understand it is only a small sampling of the community,” she said. She also added that Barnes was a “fair man, the best man for the job,” and she said she would be willing to come out of retirement for the gubernatorial candidate. Like Alexander, Myran Belyue, a member of the National Action Network for Clayton County, said he was very optimistic about

Barnes. “He has supported the civil rights community, and he has been instrumental to different initiatives. We believe he is good for Georgia,” he said. Belyue mentioned bringing school bullying to the legislature and helping with the transportation problem in Clayton County as some of these initiatives. However, not every supporter was optimistic, even early on in the gubernato-

rial race. Lucy Smethurst, who directed the state’s Clean Air Campaign during Barnes’ last term, said she loved Roy Barnes, but she is not holding her breath. “I wish I could be [optimistic] because he is the man to get Georgia back to a first-class state,” she said. She added that it was hard for Barnes to make this difference in a state that is so deeply Republican.

MAYORAL: Stegall pleased with success of campaign ¢From Page 1 community in a different way.” Denson supporters remained positive throughout the night, especially as she led the polls around 10 p.m. “Nancy Denson is one of the most wellrounded candidates that we have,” Manuel Martin of Athens said. “She has a plan for Athens and in all of her policies that I’ve seen, she’s had Athens’ best interest in mind and I think she’s going to win.” Denson continually thanked guests and supporters throughout the night. “I appreciate all of the support from all of the segments of the community,” Denson said. “My door will always be open to students and everybody else in the community.” At Little Kings Shuffle Club, supporters of Gwen O’Looney’s bid for mayor gathered after polls closed. O’Looney garnered 23 percent of votes. Voters discussed politics under the glow of bar lights and laptops, staying upto-date on the latest results reported. O’Looney said she would like to see students registering to vote in Athens rather than in their home district. “They live here,” she said. “They are legally residents of Athens. They should embrace it as citizens.” O’Looney said she feels “great” about election night, and that she thought it looked like there would be a run-off between herself and Denson.

O’Looney said an issue she would fight for as mayor would be to make sure downtown worked for people in all of Athens’ many communities, including students. Supporters of Spencer Frye gathered at Ciné to watch the results of the election come in. Frye earned 21 percent of votes in the election. “I think we’re doing great,” Frye said. He said he was “cautiously optimistic that we can get to the runoff.” Guests at Frye’s event were supportive and also optimistic. Eddie Glikin, a cab driver, musician and Spanish medical interpreter, said he supported Frye’s focus on small businesses, the environment, and local music and arts. “I like that he’s trying to get away from the normal thought in Athens that the University is the main source of employment,” Glikin said. “There’s other ways of doing it — small businesses and the people.” He was “hopeful” Frye would make it to the runoff election, but said even if he didn’t, Frye would have an effect on Athens. “If nothing else, the points he has are very solid, and it’s getting people thinking,” Glikin said. In a rented office building on the west side of Athens, friends, family and volunteers of Athens mayoral candidate Charlie Maddox huddled around a projection showing precinct results. The crowd was hopeful for a Maddox victory.

“People have been ready for a change,” said Natasha Maddox, Maddox’s daughter and campaign manager. The mayoral candidate walked in late after he took a voter to the polls just before the election ended. The crowd greeted him with cheers and applause as he walked around talking to supporters and cracking jokes. Maddox only managed to gain about 18 percent of the vote. Despite the results, he said he is proud of the way the candidates carried themselves during the campaign and turns the responsibility over to the people. “The final choice is up to the people,” he said. “The campaign has never been about me and my advancement. It’s about the people of Athens.” Supporters of 22-year-old University senior Glenn Stegall gathered at his campaign office on Prince Avenue. If elected, Stegall would have been one of the youngest Athens mayors ever. Stegall captured nearly 4 percent of votes. He saw his age as an asset to his campaign. “My age gives me the ability to look at things objectively without looking into the past,” Stegall said. “You need to be able to see the current situation.” Stegall said communication is key. “I learned to be able to communicate with people and understand their needs,” Stegall said. “It’s been amazing to listen to people and give them solutions.” Stegall was pleased with the success of

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

S Student Glenn Stegall was one of five Athens mayoral candidates. the campaign. Though it was challenging, the county got his best effort, he said. “Students were extremely supportive of the campaign,” Stegall said. “Around campus, students showed a lot of support.” — Briana Gerdeman, Jen Ingles, Mary Walker, Drew Hooks and Sarah Giarratana contributed to this report

VOTE: Some supporters not surprised by loss ¢From Page 1 the candidate for two years — said Edwards had “cut” into Broun’s base of support in the 10th District. “I’m optimistic. I know it’s really an anti-incumbent year, and we’re really pushing for that,” Patel said. Edwards said there were many uncontrollable factors that would affect the results on Election Day, such as the political climate and even the weather. “At the end of the day, you can just do the best you can,” he said. Kell Pihera, who attended Edwards’ Election Night party, also wasn’t shocked Edwards lost, saying many had predicted the Republican Party would sweep elections across the country. Megan Seda, a Broun supporter from Columbia County, said she has been happy with they way Broun has represented the 10th District. She agrees with Broun’s views on small government and his goals to decrease government spending. “He has been a leader with changing the idea of how the government should work,” she said. “He’s changed the mind-set of what people expect from a congressman.” Several Republican Party supporters — some with University ties — felt confident about their party’s chances earlier Tuesday night. Abby Musselwhite, a junior at the University from Gainesville, was in attendance to support Nathan Deal. Musselwhite’s mother has worked for Deal for the past 18 years. “Knowing him personally, he’s a good man and he’s respectable” she said. “I think that’s important in a politician.” Another long-time Republican supporter was Marcia Boone. Her Republican roots stretch back to her youth, as she helped her grandmother in Indiana campaign for Dwight Eisenhower in the “I Like Ike” election of 1952. Boone graduated from the University in the late 1980s

Donate now at JULIANNE UPCHURCH | The Red & Black

S Russell Edwards addresses supporters Tuesday. Edwards’ campaigners said the University grad fought hard to stay in the race. with a degree in special education and now serves as the 13th District Chair for Republican Women. And on Tuesday night, she was preparing to party with her party. “I’m expecting to celebrate a Republican win,” she said.

Brand New Toys Please! All Ages Accepting Now Through November

To: From: The R&B


4 | Wednesday, November 3, 2010 | The Red & Black

Daniel Burnett | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Carey O’Neil | Managing Editor me@randb.com Courtney Holbrook | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Our Take

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

It’s not over yet This election season has been a wild ride so far, but we’re not quite done.

It’s down to two. Athens’ mayoral race is headed for a runoff between Nancy Denson and Gwen O’Looney. The editorial board encourages everyone eligible to vote in the mayoral runoff to keep paying attention. Denson and O’Looney may not know all your names, but your votes could make the difference in deciding who will take over from Heidi Davison as Athens’ next mayor. As students about to enter the real world, it’s essential to pay attention to our elected officials and keep them accountable. To all newly elected politicians around the state — we hope you’ll think of this University and its educational needs from day one when you enter the doors of the Capitol. To all student voters — good job. You exercised your Constitutional right. No matter the personal meaning of the election, or your own political disagreements, every University student has a civic duty to punch in his or her electronic opinion. Now you have the right to complain about any possible missteps these politicians take during the next few years. To all those who didn’t vote — make up for it on Nov. 30. We still need a mayor. — Courtney Holbrook for the editorial board

Rally gave crowd a sense of resolve I H J decided to make a lastminute trip to Washington, D.C., to attend Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert’s “Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear.” I won’t go into details about the lineup of the event itself. Instead, I would like to discuss the purpose and message of the event. I’ve been a member of large crowds in D.C. before, the largest of which being the 2001 inauguration of President Bush. I’ve been to standing room-only concerts, endured jam-packed subway cars and driven on I-285 in Atlanta during five o’clock rush hour. You know what I mean — those situations that bring out the worst in people. So, I went into this rally expecting the usual shoving and dirty looks, littering and general lack of respect found in large crowds. And I’m proud to say I was completely wrong. The point of the rally was to restore sanity in the media — to make all sides of the political argument accountable for what they say and how they present their facts. The message of mutual responsibility and accountability permeated the entire event. I watched as complete strangers took the time to talk to each other. One of my friends became ill, and immediately people started pulling water out of their bags, making their offerings without hesitation. In the 45-minute wait for the bathrooms, people let those with special needs cut to the front of the line. At the end, tourists picked up trash that wasn’t even theirs in an effort to leave the National Mall cleaner than when we got there. “We hear every damned day about how fragile our country is, on the brink of catastrophe, torn by polarizing hate, and how it’s a shame that we can’t work together to get things done. The truth is, we do! We work together to get

OLLY ORDAN

things done every damned day! The only place we don’t is here [in Washington] or on cable TV,” Stewart said. I believe this is true. And in fact, many of the people I talked to agreed “The Daily Show” and “The Colbert Report” were the only cable news shows they watched. It makes sense. We’re sick of the hate and ignorance being pushed by so much of cable media. I — like many in my 20-something generation — have grown up in the 24-hour media world. As an undergraduate, I was a political science major, and following the news was required. I got to the point where I would only read print media. I quickly became sick of the hate and downright nastiness of cable news. News is supposed to inform, not simply entertain. And frankly, I do not find people yelling at each other entertaining. I really don’t know if D.C. or cable news will take anything from Stewart’s powerful words. But I plan to continue acting in the spirit of goodwill I experienced at the rally. So now, we all come home from this rally — or come away from watching it — with two options. We can continue to complain about cable media and hide behind “The Daily Show.” Or we can stand up to our local news outlets and demand a higher standard in their quality. Clearly, Fox or MSNBC aren’t going to decide tomorrow to change their tone. The only way change will occur is from the bottom up, with the kinds of people who stood for more than seven hours at the rally in Washington. — Holly Jordan is an adjunct instructor of religion

Non-profit helps Athenians in need A

t 1 p.m. on July 1, 2020, every child in Athens will be on track to graduate from a post-secondary education. This promise was made to our community by one of its newest non-profits — Whatever It Takes — as a declaration of the organization’s commitment to eliminating Athens’ high levels of poverty through education. I do not believe, as some do, that University students are indifferent to the economic disparities between our world and parts of this town. But most of us do not consider Athens our permanent home. Consequentially, we pass through college without educating ourselves on the local problems we are surrounded by. As I transitioned from undergraduate life to pursue a master’s degree here, I took a step away from philanthropies geared toward students by involving myself in a local nonprofit serving Athenians in need. I began to view this town differently, discovering a world that drew me in with its needs and charm. It seems as though the more we learn about an issue, the more passionately we feel about it. As I began to put faces to the statistics I had always heard, it became impossible to not feel strongly about Whatever It Takes’ commitment to Athens. The graduation rate in AthensClarke County is approximately 70 percent, a statistic that has been slowly rising due to the commendable efforts of community members. Whatever It Takes is striving to raise this to 100 percent to begin breaking the cycle of poverty enveloping so many of our neighbors. Athens has taken great strides in recent years to reduce the pregnancy rate among our teenagers, provide mentors to at-risk youth, assist with college preparation for high school students and much more. However, data shows that

News Editor: Mimi Ensley Associate News Editor: Rachel Bunn Sports Editor: Zach Dillard Variety Editor: Joe Williams Photo Editor: Meghan Pittman Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editors: Elaine Kelch, Beth Pollak, Jessica Roberts Online Editor: Will Brown Online Copy Editors: Lauren Cronon, Taylor Moss Editorial Cartoonists: Julie Bailey, Phillip Henry, Sarah Quinn, Bill Richards

interventions are necessary much sooner than adolescence if permanent change is the desired outcome. Indicators such as a child’s reading level during the third grade can predict the degree to which he or she will succeed throughout primary and secondary school. Preschool attendance is an even faster indicator of a child’s success, proving that when a student has completed an early education program his or her likelihood of high school graduation increases about 14 percent. Because of this research, Whatever It Takes is implementing an innovative plan modeled after the Harlem Children’s Zone, a nonprofit with a track record of leading New York’s inner-city youth to success after high school. The strategy, according to www.witathens.org, lies in “emphasizing early intervention, focusing existing services in a limited geographic area, creating a culture of success, and using data to direct policy.” The organization’s 10-year plan will target Athens neighborhoods one at a time, linking residents to the services necessary for them and their children to succeed in school and in the workforce. The Alps Elementary School attendance zone includes the Jack R. Wells neighborhood on Pauldoe Street, one of the roads featured in The Red & Black’s series on crimeridden areas, and is where Whatever It Takes has begun its work. Whatever It Takes’ founding members have begun to engage families of this community, with a primary goal of developing a culture where children are expected to achieve and are given the resources

— Christina Graff is a graduate student from Marietta majoring in public administration and non-profit management

Mailbox

E-mail and letters from our readers

Change of mind after Georgia-Florida game Let me start off by saying I’m a Florida Gator — have been since 1973 and always will be. I bleed orange and blue, and I have a deep hatred for anything and everything red and black. You have to take into account I attended the University of Florida in the ’70’s, when UGA was getting the better of us... which is putting it mildly. In fact, I was the first person to have a brick on the Gator Walk leading to Ben Hill Griffin Stadium engraved with “Beat Georgia.” That being said, I never thought I’d be writing anything like this... Until today. My wife (also a Gator) and I attended [last] weekend’s UF-UGA game — arguably the most exciting one ever played. Once the game went into overtime, we both agreed that regardless of the outcome, both teams could be proud of how they played.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

CHRISTINA GRAFF

they need to do so. The compelling plans and passion of Whatever It Takes’ founders, mainly graduates of the University, gained vast support from Athens-area businesses, government agencies and non-profits. In addition to local support, Whatever It Takes was selected last month out of 339 applicants to receive a one-year, $500,000 planning grant from the Federal Department of Education’s “Promise Neighborhoods” program. Now, I am calling on University students to get involved. Many have used this space in the past to express the opinion that college students are self-centered and unmotivated — I am of the opposite opinion. As a past leader of a student-run philanthropy on campus, I have been repeatedly amazed at what our age group is capable of. Students are dedicated, passionate and naïve enough to want to save the world — just the type Whatever It Takes could use to help carry out its plans. Georgia Students for Public Administration is the first student group to get on board, and we want to encourage other students to do the same. Children need more than just food, clothing and shelter to succeed, and as college students we know that in today’s society a high school diploma is not always enough. A post-secondary education can include vocational training, military service, technical school, junior college or a four-year university, and the options a child has should not be dictated by his or her financial circumstances. Whatever It Takes will work to remove the barriers standing between all Athens’ children and these institutions.

Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Sarah Jean Dover Recruitment Editor: Sara Caldwell Senior Reporter: Dallas Duncan Staff Writers: Sereen Ali, Jason Axelrod, Ryan Black, Mitch Blomert, Rachel G. Bowers, Kelsey Byrd, Anne Connaughton, Adam Carlson, Julia Carpenter, Melissa Cohen, Kelly Corbett, Daniel Curran, Christopher D’Aniello, Jacob Demmitt, Chris DeSantis, Sarah Jean Dover F. Tyler Elrod, Michael Fitzpatrick, Briana Gerdeman, Sarah Giarratana, Emily Grant, Mariana Heredia, Drew Hooks, T. Patrick Hooper, Kathryn Ingall, Jen Ingles, Shawn Jarrard, Edward Kim, Heather Kinney, Alex Laughlin, Darcy Lenz, Polina Marinova, Jamie McDonough, David Mitchell, Deanna

Our Staff

(For me to say that about Georgia must mean I’m mellowing in my old age.) After the game was over we started walking down the switchback ramps amongst a sea of orange and blue. I noticed three young men — obviously UGA students — wearing black UGA shirts and baseball hats slowly walking in front of my wife and me. They looked as if they were carrying the weight of the world on their shoulders. As the crowd was moving slowly down the ramps, one of the young men walked over to the rail and looked at the crowd below on the next level. Perhaps he was looking for a UF fan to “start something” or perhaps he was simply staring into space. Regardless, there was a 4- or 5-year-old girl in an orange and blue dress on the shoulders of her deliriously happy Gator father who saw the young man looking down at her. She lifted her head, made eye contact with the young man, lifted

Mitchell, Stephanie Moodie, Cody Nichelson, Nick Parker, Michael Prochaska, Aspen Smith, Adina Solomon, Nathan Sorensen, Tiffany Stevens, Zack Taylor, Amber Thomas, Katie Valentine, Paige Varner, Eva Vasquez, Mary Walker, Erinn Waldo, Katherine Weise Chief Photographer: Wes Blankenship Photographers: Charles-Ryan Barber, Miriam Camp, Lexi Deagen, Emily Karol, Meagan Kelley, Nehemie Lucien, Natasha Peat, AJ Reynolds, Julianne Upchurch, Jenna Walker, Dina Zolan Page Designers: Rachel G. Bowers, Amanda Jones, Ana Kabakova, Christopher Miller, Robbie Ottley, Charlee Russell, Adam Wynn

her hand and slowly waved as if to say “don’t be sad.” A smile came across the young man’s face and he waved back as if to say “you’re absolutely right; there are some things much more important than football.” I only wished I had my camera out to take a photo, as that moment said everything there is to say about the game of college football. In closing, I want to end with two words that I will say in a nonsarcastic and non-taunting way for the first time in my life: Go Dawgs. SCOTT LUDWIG Peachtree City English

LETTERS POLICY Letters must include name, year in school, hometown, phone number, major or job title or other appropriate identification. Letters are edited for spelling, grammar, length, style and libelous material.

Editorial board members include Daniel Burnett, Robert Carnes, Courtney Holbrook, Carey O’Neil, Meghan Pittman, Megan Thornton and Joe Williams.

ADVERTISING: 706-433-3001 Advertising Director: Natalie McClure Student Ad Manager: Lauren Jones Territory Managers: Sarah Carlton, Anna Lewenthal Inside Sales Manager: Haley Winther Account Executives: Kelly Pierce, Andrew Love, Sarah Overstreet Sales Associates: Ryan Benson, Carolyn Evers, Rebecca Tonne Advertising Assistants: Laurel Holland, Emily Johns Classifieds Representative: Jenna Vines Circulation Manager: Blake Molina Creative Assistant: Olivia Scarborough

Assistant Production Manager: Joshua Trey Barnett Production Assistants: Nicollette Childs, Jenni Chiu, Priscilla Kathe, Elaine Kelch Production Manager: Sam Pittard Publisher: Harry Montevideo Office Manager: Erin Beasley Assistant Office Manager: Megan Yue Cleaning Person: Mary Jones The Red & Black is published Monday through Friday fall and spring semesters and each Thursday summer semester, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a non-profit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


VARIETY

The Red & Black | Wednesday, November 3, 2010 | 5

Quintet keeps music natural By ADAM CARLSON THE RED & BLACK

JONATHAN TYLER & THE NORTHERN LIGHTS

Jonathan Tyler would like to make something clear. “I don’t like going to see a band and one of the guys pushes a space bar on his Mac and the song starts,� he said. And Tyler would know: as front man of Jonathan Tyler & The Northern Lights, a Dallasbased five-piece, the music he makes is not coming from the speakers of a Mac any time soon. Indeed, the band’s latest work, April’s “Pardon Me,� was recorded live, with little consideration given to working over — and possibly overworking — the music. Though it shouldn’t be said that he and his band — which includes guitarist Brandon Pinckard, drummer Jordan Cain, bassist Nick Jay and singer Mo Brown — aren’t musically proficient. In fact, constant improvement is a continued goal. “We really are in love with music, and I feel like each of us is on a journey to master our instruments,� Tyler said. There’s a difference between diligence and obsession, though. “I also think you can wear yourself out over-analyzing things,� Tyler said.

When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $7 Thus, the group’s songs — like the galloping declaration of the title track or the rat-a-tat drumline in “Gypsy Woman� — don’t so much begin as kickstart. But it wasn’t always so. Way back when — roughly six or seven years ago — the group members first came together in Dallas, after Tyler moved from Birmingham. When they started making music together, their collaboration didn’t sound much like what it does today. Tyler described it as more European-influenced, an attempt to copy the sound of the music they liked. “Nothing really connected and stuck, so we just kept writing and playing,� Tyler said. “And that’s when things started to connect, when people started to come out to our shows.� The turning point came when the band decided to hew their work a little closer to home. “We all grew up around gospel, blues, real Southern music,�

Tyler said. Now, the band has grown comfortable in its own skin, mixing Americana and gospel influences. “We just play what feels right,� Tyler said. Discovering a niche has not only focused The Northern Lights’ musicianship — it’s also made the band more focused and energetic when performing live. Part of it is being completely in the moment and not holding anything back, a philosophy that Tyler feels sets his band apart. “There are just not a lot of bands anymore that are willing to be in the moment,� he said. Not The Northern Lights, who aspire not just to be in the moment, but to tear it wide open. “[We] definitely try and make it special every time we play,� Tyler said. “Special� translates into an extremely high level of energy in each performance, which can sometimes go a little haywire — but, perhaps, appropriately so. “They can get really out of control sometimes, which is awesome,� Tyler said. This tends to happen especially in places known for their music, Tyler said — Austin, Asheville and San Francisco, for

APPETIZING APPS A weekly series featuring our top app picks of the week

Coin Toss Available for free on Android

Knights Onrush 99 cents; free trial available on iPhone

Do you have a looming decision, but your pockets are less jingly than normal due to your status as a poor college student? Forget needing quarters — download a simple app instead! Whether you’re with your friends deciding who will talk to that blonde girl at Allgood, or you simply want to know if you have at chance to ace the test you stayed up all night cramming for, “Coin Flip� is here to help. Every day tasks are made exponentially easier with this app.

Does the idea of launching a bird at an egg-stealing green pig seem trivial? Then try your hand at Knights Onrush, which takes the classic castle defense game to a new level. Various villains with weapons come in waves to attack your castle, including catapults, dark knights, bomb throwers and more. Upgrades are available for your castle, and you can also earn sacrifice points, which are attained by feeding your foes to a giant dragon, or dropping them into a pit of fire.

— Elaine Kelch

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

Classifieds Rates & Information PRIVATE PARTY RATE (Applies to individual persons only)

(0-25 words) 1st Day/Skip days.....................................................$6.00 3 Consecutive Days.................................................$10.00 5 Consecutive Days.................................................$15.00 10 Consecutive Days...............................................$20.00

HOUSING AND EMPLOYMENT RATE (0-25 words)

1st Day/Skip days.....................................................$9.00 3 Consecutive Days.................................................$25.00 5 Consecutive Days.................................................$35.00 10 Consecutive Days...............................................$65.00

BUSINESS RATE (All commercial other than housing and employment) (0-25 words) 1st Day/Skip days.....................................................$7.00 3 Consecutive Days.................................................$19.00 5 Consecutive Days.................................................$31.00 10 Consecutive Days...............................................$61.00

FREE “FOR SALE� ADS University Community Only

(Private Party Merchandise, Under $101) (0-15 words) 3 Consecutive Days..................................................FREE (Merchandise must be priced. One item per hsld per week. Ads must be received from UGA e-mail address only. No walk-ins or standard mail accepted.)

CLASSIFICATIONS 10. Roommates 20. Housing 25. Subleases 30. For Sale 35. Computers 40. Wanted 45. Seeking Job 50. Auto 60. Services

75. Tickets 80. Employment 85. Travel 90. Yard Sales 95. Events 100. Notices 110. Personal 120. Lost & Found

REFUNDS: sGiven for ads not running as scheduled. sGiven for ads scheduled 10 days with 5 or more days remaining. sNo cash refunds

— Joe Williams

Courtesy The Northern Lights

S Hailing from Dallas, Jonathan Tyler & The Northern Lights combine Americana and gospel influences. example, “towns where people still go see live bands.� There, The Northern Lights’ passion tends to go over better; their knowledge of music and appropriating of various influences — including disparate performers such as Led Zeppelin, The Black Crowes and Willie Nelson — is better appreciated with an audience that better appreciates music. Simply, Tyler and his band

now showing “Live or die. Make your choice.� So ends every pre-recorded monologue the Jigsaw Killer delivers to his victims in the long-running “Saw� franchise, now the most financially successful horror film franchise in the world in unadjusted dollars. But now, the most terrifying thing about the franchise is that someone sits around thinking up Jigsaw’s deathtraps. But let’s give “Saw 3D� a fair shake. “3D� enjoys the presence of mainstay Tobin Bell, who continues to give the performances of his life as John Kramer/Jigsaw. Who else could turn a withered cancer patient into a horror icon so chilling he’s on par with killing machines Jason Voorhees and Freddy Krueger? Unfortunately, Kramer’s failing condition is an eerie parallel to the series as a whole: increasingly weak with each installment, finally dying in the third and living on his posthumous coattails. Bell is helped along on the acting front by Cary Elwes, who has been MIA from the franchise since his character vanished amidst Elwes’ suit against Lionsgate. Elwes, as the older, more jaded Dr. Lawrence Gordon, shines whenever he’s on-screen. Most others in the cast has a habit of RANDOMLY emphasizing words to

DEMONSTRATE their ability to EMOTE. It’s either that, or wail incoherently and drop curse words into your unintentionally funny dialogue while flailing around, trying to escape Jigsaw’s traps. Then does the 3-D do it for us? Not really. There are only two blink-and-you-missit instances of the technology being put to use. I found myself wishing it was utilized more, but I’m also relieved I was only subjected to two minimal scenes of flying giblets. There’s a story in here somewhere, one that’s smug enough to pull off a twist with every installment in an effort to reproduce that “gotcha� moment that kept people talking about the original, but it’s quickly splattered across the background like so much else in these movies. There are readings of redemption, Darwinism and catharsis to Jigsaw’s philosophy. But it’s really about a bitter old man throwing a postmortem temper tantrum, and the writers pretend it’s mildly noble. Gone is the simple terror of two people trapped in a room from the first “Saw.� It was a psychological horror more than anything else. We saw the trailers. “He doesn’t want us to cut through our chains,� Dr. Gordon mutters in weary realization. “He wants us to

Classifieds

FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED. Abbey West Apartments. $300/mo not including utilities. Close to Campus. Private bathroom. Pets Allowed. Spring and Summer Semester. Rachel678-371-7446 rmshuffield@gmail.com SUBLEASE AVAILABLE NOW in a 4BR 3BA apt! Shares use of bath w/ respectful guy. Other roommates quiet, relaxed, like the neighborhood. $375/mo furnished, all util incl! 706-254-1166.

3BR 2BA DUPLEX $750 W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $700 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, dw, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $450 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com

2005 VOLVO SEDAN S40. Black with grey interior. 64500 miles. Tinted windows. New tires. Clean, good condition. $10,900. 770-605-9589.

6 MONTH LEASES!

BARTENDERS NEEDED! EARN $250/day. No exp required. Will train. Call now 877-405-1078 ext. 842

1BR APTS W/ 1 MONTH FREE & NO PET FEE! Close to Campus & Downtown from $380-$425 NO SD w/ acceptable credit. That’s only $350-$390 w/ special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com. 706549-2500

Starting in January on S. Milledge Ave large one acre lots 4BR 4BA HOUSE $1100 3BR 2BA DUPLEX $800 2BR 2BA DUPLEX $700 Only 5 units remaining! hancockpropertiesinc.com 706-552-3500

2BR 2BA DUPLEX $650. w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $600 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, DW, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500

FEW HOMES STILL remaining for Fall! 3 and 4 bedroom brick homes. Close to campus, pet friendly. Starting at $250/BR. Dekle Realty 706-548-0580. www.deklerealty.com

2BR APTS $550- $650 w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ good credit! Blocks to campus & downtown. W/D included. Only $505-$596 w/ current special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706549-2500 3BR 2BA APTS $600$650 W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ good credit! Blocks to campus & downtown. W/D included. Only $550-$596 w/ current special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500

aren’t so fond of what’s been on the airwaves the last few decades. “Pretty much from disco on, music’s been ‌ I don’t know,â€? he said. “I feel like it’s turning into shit.â€? And The Northern Lights have set out to turn it back, one album and live show at a time. “That’s what it’s all about,â€? Tyler said. “Music, for me, is that journey.â€?

UPDATED 3BR 2BA condo, gate comm, behind Abbey West. Quiet and secure. $1050/mo, pets ok w/sec. dep. Geoff 706-2063560. Owner lic. Ga. RE agent lic. #302489. SUBLEASE 1BR 1BA in a 3BR 3BA. December to August. $350/mo. + 1/3 utilities. Walking distance downtown. DW, W/D, Pool. Pets okay. Stonecrest, 145 N Ave, 207-240-2456 coneil49@gmail.com SUBLEASE-THE LODGE of Athens- Premier Student Housing. 1BR w/private bath fully furnished from January 2011-July 2011. $440/mo. Female student preferred. kravchak@uga.edu.

COLLISION REPAIRS FOR much less. Insurance claims. Money back. 20 years experience. Quality service. Call Jerry 678-6441634.

! BARTENDING! UP to $250/day. No experience necessary. Training provided. 1-800-965-6520 ext 106.

BAIL BONDSMAN NEEDED. Speak English/ Spanish fluently. Reliable transportation. Background check required. No experience necessary. Compensation- $21,000 +. E-mail resume and references to: affordablebonding@gmail.com

SAW 3D cut through our —� Cue blood-curdling scream. And that’s what made “Saw� so great: the lurking terror of what could be. Six movies later, we’re washing down the stale scares of “watch this happen.� “Saw� has truly earned the title “torture porn.� No one goes to see these movies for the characters anymore. It’s about how badly Jigsaw slaughters them. It’s a big ball of halfbaked ideas wrapped up in bad decisions. Of course, the first bad decision was going to see this movie in the first place. — Patrick Hooper

COPYWRITING INTERNSHIP: FLEXIBLE, PT, paid position for self-starting COMM/JOURN/ENGL majors. Send 3 writing samples and resume to intern@paxtonhill.com

FULL TIME GYMNASTICS Director/Coach wanted. Competitive salary and benefits with YMCA. Email resume to lmastenymca@windstream.net

HOLIDAY INN IS looking for experienced Banquet staff. Please apply in person 197 E Broad St or online hi-athens.com STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM PAID Survey Takers Needed In Athens. 100% FREE To Join. Click On Surveys. UNIFORMS UNLIMITEDPRINCE Ave- PT positions available. Please e-mail jjwilson@uniformsunlimited.com for more info.

Arrested? Bond, James Bond, Inc. ) ! $("! )%& %Discounts )!!$ # $$#() # %$(  !##t-shirt

706-613-0007)"

Previous puzzle’s solution 6

8

2

9

7

4

3

1

5

7

9

4

5

3

1

6

2

8

1

5

3

6

8

2

9

4

7

9

1

7

4

2

8

5

6

3

8

2

6

7

5

3

4

9

1

3

4

5

1

6

9

7

8

2

4

3

1

8

9

7

2

5

6

5

7

9

2

1

6

8

3

4

2

6

8

3

4

5

1

7

9

The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

  )  ' %! #!$$#!jail)

2

5

7

6

3

9

4

8

1

1

8

3

4

7

2

5

9

6

4

6

9

5

8

1

2

3

7

5

9

4

7

1

6

3

2

8

3

7

2

8

4

5

6

1

9

6

1

8

2

9

3

7

4

5

8

2

5

1

6

4

9

7

3

7

3

6

9

2

8

1

5

4

9

4

1

3

5

7

8

6

2

Happiness tastes like booze. 256 E. Clayton St

1000 off w/ this ad

$

706-549-0166

Mon-Sat Noon-2AM


6 | Wednesday, November 3, 2010 | The Red & Black

SPORTS

Swimming and diving looks to extend home win streak By ROBBIE OTTLEY THE RED & BLACK Sometimes sporting records are so lopsided they become outlandish. Joe DiMaggio’s record 56-game hitting streak from 1941 may stand forever. The Atlanta Braves’ record of 14 consecutive division titles was an unparalleled accomplishment. And in 1916, Georgia Tech proved it could win a football game against a team that had discontinued its football program before the season when it defeated Cumberland College 222-0. The Bulldog women’s swimming and diving team may hold the Georgia equivalent of such an asymmetric record. Since moving into Gabrielsen Natatorium in 1995, Georgia’s women have lost only one home duel meet, a streak of 71 consecutive victories before last Friday. “I forget a lot of the wins, but you don’t forget the losses, especially when you have one in fifteen years,” head coach Jack Bauerle said. “It’s a remarkable record, and it’s certainly threatened every year. This is just another threat.” The last team that beat the Bulldogs at home was Florida, and the Gators were in an excellent position to break the home streak last Friday. Florida’s women won the swimming and diving national championship last year, and while Georgia’s women placed a respectable fifth at the meet, they nonetheless remained underdogs going into last week’s duel meet. “Last year they won [National Championships], they lost a few people, but they’re still gonna be tough,” sophomore Megan Romano said. But despite the expectations, Georgia won a convincing victory over Florida with a final score of 180-120 to extend the streak to 72. Highlighting the match were Georgia wins in both the 200-yard medley relay and the 400-yard freestyle relay, which helped to tip the match in favor of the Bulldogs. Romano swam backstroke in the medley relay and was Georgia’s second swim-

mer in the free relay. But even in the races where they didn’t finish first, Romano and her teammates were able to score crucial points for the Bulldogs. “This is one of those meets where everybody has to step up,” Bauerle said. “Whether you get a fifth place instead of a sixth or a first instead of a second, it’s pretty darn important.” Georgia’s men, however, did not fare as well on Friday. They lost to Florida by a score of 170-130 to start off their season with a two-meet losing streak. Nonetheless, the match saw many individual accomplishments for the Bulldogs, including junior Michael Arnold’s second-consecutive victory in the 50-yard freestyle. “I know almost from when I dive in that I can hang with this guy, if not blow him out,” Arnold said. “I’ve worked harder than this guy every day.” Friday’s match was a positive rebound for the Bulldogs after opening the season with struggles against North Carolina earlier last month. The men’s team lost in Chapel Hill 183-117, and while the women’s team won a 168-132 decision, the match was much closer than either team would have liked. And though Georgia wouldn’t characterize the performance as a positive occurrence, it nonetheless helped the Bulldogs to reprioritize entering the match against Florida. “I think we took UNC as a lesson kind of thing. We need to be more prepared, no matter who the opponent is,” Arnold said. “We’re gonna beat UNC at the end of the season.” The Bulldogs continue their season tonight with a meet in Atlanta against Georgia Tech and Emory. Because Emory is a Division III opponent, Georgia’s male and female swimmers will have the opportunity to race in competitive events outside their regular repertoire. “Some of us swim some of our thirdand fourth-best events … so we usually get excited to do an event we don’t do very often,” Arnold said. “I think we’ll just approach it like any other meet.”

WES BLANKENSHIP | The Red & Black

S Wide receiver Tavarres King said he does not know much about the state of Idaho, but he is looking forward to Saturday’s game against Idaho State.

Dogs wary of Idaho State upset By RACHEL G. BOWERS THE RED & BLACK

FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Mark Richt has never been to Idaho. Tavarres King said all he knew about the state was its association with potatoes and that it’s “somewhere over there.” The Bulldogs will host the Idaho State Bengals Saturday for Georgia’s third non-conference game of the season. But as the

Bengals come to town Saturday, the thought of an FCS team upsetting an FBS team lingers on the horizon. Richt said he won’t address that issue fully until the end of the week, but did say that he had an extra practice period Monday for the players to work on being in the right position during the

right plays. “When the week gets toward the end you start thinking a little bit more about the motivation KING for the game, not so much the motivation of the practice,” Richt said. King said he’s excited to play the Bengals and will learn their defensive backs’ names — as he does every week — so he can talk to them on the field and “let them know that I know who they are.” “It’s fun. It’s going to be a fun game,” the wide receiver said. “I’m still going to get the chance to do what I love to do, which is play football. It’ll be interesting and I’ll get the chance to meet some new people — meet the guys on the other side of the ball.” No comeback yet for Bulldogs Of Georgia’s five losses, three have been by a touchdown or less. In two of those losses, Georgia has come back from double-digit deficits in the fourth quarter to tie the game before eventually losing. The Bulldogs have positioned themselves to win games in the fourth quarter, but turnovers and defensive breakdowns have added to the loss column. “We’ve had ourselves in position in the Arkansas game and the Florida game to maybe come from behind, get in position to win,” Richt said. “But getting in that moment of truth and not making the plays that need to be made to win, so that’s been a little bit of a factor too [in the losses].” Quarterback Aaron Murray said Georgia has the talent to finish out the close games, but a handful of plays have been the difference and the things keeping the Bulldogs from reaching their full potential. “We’ve come back from games, but haven’t had that comeback victory yet. We’ve either won pretty good or lost when it’s really close where we’ve had a chance to win,” Murray said. “Every game we’ve been right in there and we feel that we’ve had the chance to win every game this year. It just hasn’t happened that way.” Grantham speaks about sideline gestures Todd Grantham made choking gestures Saturday toward Florida kicker Chas Henry, telling him he was going to choke and miss the overtime field goal. Georgia’s first-year defensive coordinator addressed the media about it Tuesday night. “Here’s what I got to say, I’m very passionate about the game. I’m very passionate about the University of Georgia being very successful as a program ... as a competitor ... sometimes you get caught up in the heat of the moment. I wish the situation hadn’t happened. It was a tough, hard-fought game. They won it. I’m ready to move forward and finish out the year strong.”


November 3, 2010 Issue