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An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

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Vol. 118, No. 56 | Athens, Georgia

University not affected by direct layoffs By DALLAS DUNCAN THE RED & BLACK

million budget reduction. “None of that ever transpired,” said Tim Burgess, vice president for finance and administration. “The University as a whole has not had any direct layoffs. We have not had an employee lose their job as a direct result of the budget cuts.” However, just because no one was laid off does not mean faculty and staff were not affected by the budget reductions. “This FY11 got aggravated,” Burgess said. “Just within a few

There are 1,418 University employees who were almost out of jobs for Fiscal Year 2011. The affected offices were spread all over the state, from the President’s Office on North Campus to the Bamboo Farm & Coastal Gardens in Savannah. The positions to be cut were on the list of proposed cuts given to the Board of Regents in February as part of a system-wide $300

MEN’S BASKETBALL GEORGIA 83, COLORADO 74

Basketball avoids close call for win BY MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK

days of the fiscal year starting, we got word from the Governor’s Office we would need to make additional cuts.” The University already had a number of positions that could not be filled because of money problems in FY10, and the latest cuts didn’t help matters. “You name it, we’ve done it, to absorb what for us has been about $180 million,” said University President Michael Adams. “We have done a big portion of that by not filling these

600 positions or so because the most expensive thing at the University of Georgia is labor. So we have had to make hard decisions about what we could fill and what we couldn’t fill, and that’s what we’ve done.” Hundreds of vacancies “What’s been the biggest impact with those cuts is it has stymied hiring,” Burgess said. “We’re up to hundreds of vacant positions. A good number of

BOULDER DASH

SARA CALDWELL| The Red & Black

Bulldogs prove to be ‘resilient’ against Buffs MICHAEL FITZPATRICK shooting 80 percent from the floor and held the Buffaloes to a dismal 15.3 percent (2-for-13). Georgia shared the basketball — had six assists on the eight made shots See RESILIENT, Page 7

See CUTS, Page 2

By MARIANA HEREDIA THE RED & BLACK

See WIN, Page 7

I

those are on the staff side but we have some on the faculty side as well.”

Privacy rights may be violated

Another scare, another win. After seeing a dominant lead disintegrate to a tied game at halftime, the Georgia men’s basketball team fought back in the second half to win 83-74 against Colorado on Tuesday at Stegeman Coliseum. The Bulldogs (2-0) went to the locker room tied 33-33 with Colorado after leading by as much as 17 points in the first half. However, the Bulldogs fended

f the first two games of this basketball season have taught us anything about Georgia basketball it’s this: The players are a resilient bunch. Through the first six minutes of its 83-74 victory Tuesday night, Georgia appeared poised to run Colorado out of Stegeman Coliseum and all the way back to Boulder, Colo. The Bulldogs jumped out to a 20-8 lead while

President Michael Adams said the University had to absorb $180 million in budget cuts.

SARA CALDWELL | The Red & Black

S Gerald Robinson (22, above left) and Chris Barnes (4, above) helped lead the way in Georgia’s 83-74 victory over Colorado.

Various University students were caught in the midst of the case between Deszo Benedek, a comparative literature professor at the University, and the administration. The students were accused of submitting fraudulent transcripts to the administration concerning Benedek’s Maymester in Budapest program, according to Stephen Humphreys, who successfully defended Benedek in a case that attempted to revoke his tenure. Earlier this BENEDEK month, the hearing committee and the University officially announced their decision to allow Benedek to keep his tenure. Benedek was accused of violating Board of Regents’ policies by misleading students about whether or not his study abroad program was University-affiliated and HOPE-supported. He was also charged with violating conflict of interest policies by promoting a program which he directed. In the case against Benedek, the University attempted to prove Benedek’s long-running study abroad program was not valid. In this attempt, the University sent student transcripts to four credit evaluation agencies. The transcripts included personal identifying information such as names and Social Security Numbers, Humphreys said. See BENEDEK, Page 3

Sandy Creek Park to host viewing of three gas planets Sight is out of this world By SHAWN JARRARD THE RED & BLACK Between Uranus and the moon, plenty will be on display in tonight’s sky — hopefully. “This’ll be the fall star watch, in which we’ll be looking at craters on the moon, the large planet Jupiter, Uranus and

GIANT PLANETS When: 7 - 9 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek Park Price: $2 Neptune, provided that the weather cooperates,” said Maurice Snook, a selfdescribed “dedicated amateur astronomer.” Snook is a member of the Athens Astronomical Association, the group that will be helping Sandy Creek conduct its “Night of the Giant Planets.”

sunny. High 64| Low 38

ON THE WEB Check out our website to learn more about free vehicle checks for students Thursday.

Where’s Mikey? Adams is scheduled to attend the 8 p.m. Lyle Lovett show at the Classic Center. Will Adams like Lovett’s country show? Nope... he’ll Lov-ett.

“For about 20 years, the Athens Astronomical Association, which is a pretty loose group of only about a couple of us — we used to be pretty active, 50 members or more, but now there’s only about two or three of us — we’ve helped Sandy Creek host their star watches about four times a year,” Snook said. One of the main attractions of the night will be Jupiter and its four largest moons — Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto — named “Galilean” for their

Index

News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 6

discoverer. “On Jupiter you can, of course, see the cloud bands, and the four giant Galilean satellites,” Snook said. “One of the satellites will be behind Jupiter, and we will watch it come out from behind. These moons of Jupiter, because of the inclination of their orbits, they lie right in a plane with us. So instead of seeing them go around Jupiter in a circle, we see them go back and forth because we’re seeing it edge See SPACE, Page 5

MEGHAN PITTMAN | The Red & Black

S Maurice Snook will be offering Athens residents the chance to see the celestial.

ROAD TO REDEMPTION An emphasis on leadership has the Gym Dogs ready for 2011. Page 8 Variety ..................... 4 Sports ...................... 7

HA HA HA HA Four finalists compete to be the funniest person in Athens. Page 5 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 7


NEWS

2 | Wednesday, November 17, 2010 | The Red & Black

Bloggers question copyright issues

CUTS: Staff members critical for campus ¢ From Page 1

Ownership scrutinized

By KATIE VALENTINE THE RED & BLACK Copyright infringement may not be the first thing on students’ minds when they post on their blogs, but they might need to be more cautious with their work in the future. Last month, according to Time magazine, a publication called Cooks Source magazine published a story about apple pie that a food blogger named Monica Gaudio had posted on her blog. Cooks Source credited Gaudio in the byline, but did not ask her permission to publish the work. When Gaudio wrote to the publication, Cooks Source’s editor Judith Griggs told Gaudio the Internet was “public domain” and she should be happy Cooks Source edited and published her work free of charge. William Lee, a professor MICHAEL HARRIS | The Red & Black of mass communication law, disagrees with Griggs’ S Junior Melissa Buckman writes and maintains the blog ‘Screw You, claims that the Internet is I’m Hilarious.’ She said she has considered copyright issues online. public domain and that publications have the right to publish another per- violators that the work is had around 120. to 60, that would definitely son’s work without per- copyrighted. She said she has be something I would look mission. “Unfortunately, I think thought about copyright into.” “This is a clear-cut students have been trained issues regarding her blog Randall Bourquin, a copyright violation,” he in many bad ways about before, because her mom senior from Suwanee, said said. “The editor of Cooks copyright, because they writes a monthly opinions he doesn’t think posting a Source is completely out grew up with Napster and column for the Atlanta copyright notice on his to lunch in her response.” other forms of illegal file J o u r n a l - C o n s t i t u t i o n . blog is necessary, since he Lee said even if the sharing,” Lee said. “The Buckman has talked to doesn’t blog professionally. magazine credited Gaudio ease of duplication doesn’t her mom about copyright Bourquin’s blog, “Sorry as the author of the story, eliminate the need to be infringement because her For Staring,” is a compilaher story’s copyright was vigilant in protecting your mom has had her work tion of humorous events still violated. copyrights and to respect posted and discussed on he witnesses throughout As soon as work is fixed the copyrights of others.” other websites. the day. in a tangible medium — Melissa Buckman, a “She has expressed “I never really considwhen it is written, posted junior from Alpharetta, concern for me that if I ered it,” he said. “It seems to a blog or captured in a has had her blog, “Screw keep doing what I’m doing, very strange to me that picture — it becomes copy- You, I’m Hilarious,” since the same type of thing will someone would steal conrighted. last January. The blog has happen,” Buckman said. tent off a blog for another “That’s sort of like tell- developed a strong readerBuckman said right outlet.” ing people, ‘This crack ship, and in May was fea- now she wouldn’t consider Bourquin said he would came from Ed.’ Well, big tured on stumbleupon. registering the work on consider posting a copydeal. It’s still illegal to have com, which Buckman said her blog and posting a right notice on his blog if that crack,” Lee said. caused an extra several copyright notice, because he posted something that To prevent a situation thousand people to view her blog does not have a he worked extensively on similar to Gaudio’s, Lee her blog. large enough readership and was worried that said students should regis“It was a pretty dinky for her to consider copy- someone might take it ter their work with the U.S. little blog for the first four right infringement a without his permission. Copyright Office and post months, and then that threat. “In the future if I wrote copyright notices on the happened, and it got “I just don’t think that something that was kind work they publish on their almost 1,000 views in one it’s got enough attention of universal in nature, and blog. day,” she said. for me to really consider it thought it could be taken Though the notice is On a normal day, at risk,” she said. “In a and distributed widely, I not necessary for a work Buckman said her blog hypothetical situation, guess I would copyright to be copyrighted, it is has between 30 and 60 where I’m getting 60,000 that, in light of recent helpful to warn potential views, and lately, she has views per day as opposed events,” he said.

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ing more time on administrative tasks, which eats into them being able to do what the public feels is their actual responsibility. Units that report directly to the President’s Office could have lost seven positions, according to the FY11 proposed budget, but Adams said he only knows of four positions that remain open — those were the results of people leaving the system. “That’s how we’ve lived for the past two years,” he said. “I doubt there is a department here that does not have some story like that.”

In the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences — which originally was slated to lose 311 jobs — the administration did all it could to keep employees. “Most faculty positions that have been lost were mainly through retirement, but we’ve had a couple people leave for taking other jobs, one or two people leaving for not getting tenure — all of these positions have been held open,” said Scott Angle, CAES dean. “They may or may not be filled in the future … but just because a posiThe cuts that hurt tion was vacant doesn’t mean we’ll David Lee, vice fill it in the exact president for same area.” research, and the Angle’s sentiunits under his leadments echo many of ership could have those throughout BURGESS lost 20 positions if campus. the proposed cuts “We have a couhad gone through. ple of positions that are “I think we were talking vacant right now but these about eliminating the are not a result of the bud- Technology Transfer get reductions,” said Operations, which is where Rodney Bennett, vice pres- most of those 20 positions ident for student affairs, were located,” he said, whose units could have adding this was one of the lost 12 positions. “I think top such offices in the any time you’re going nation. through a budget situation Lee said this departyou should look at vacant ment was not eliminated, positions. I’m not saying but a smaller graphics we would leave them office was. One employee vacant but I would ask, from this office was re‘What would the impact be assigned to the informaif these positions weren’t tion technology departfilled?’” ment, and another left. Burgess said the limited This office, however, was ability of departments to targeted to be cut before hire faculty and staff has FY11. reached a crucial point. He said he doesn’t want “What the president has to think about what haptried to project is we’ve pens if the budget in FY12 reached a critical mini- is worse. mum level of faculty,” he “There is no fat left,” he said. “The president said, said. “We’ll have to cut ‘We’ve kind of gone too far those programs further and we need to start delib- and possibly consider closerately looking at how we ing more offices. We really can hire more faculty.’” do not have anything that Burgess said the hiring we consider a real luxury initiatives Adams and the … If we’re forced to [cut administration began in the Technology Transfer August are helping, but in Operations], that’s a real some aspects of their jobs, negative to the University employees are suffering. and it would take us a long “What it’s caused is a time to recover from that.” general decline in responAdams said he did not sibilities of procurement want to speculate on the actions. We buy hundreds FY12 budget because of of things on this campus many unknown variables, and buying things is very but said his top priorities regulated,” Burgess said. included protecting faculty “It’s like throwing sand and staff from layoffs. into the gears of a machine “We have to have lab — it still works, but it people, we have to have doesn’t do it that quick.” people who keep up with He said another way chemicals, we have to have faculty feel the effects of police officers,” Adams the budget cuts involves said. “If we fired all of the the way they do their jobs. staff members, it probably With so many staff posi- wouldn’t solve all of our tions being gone, Burgess problems. And clearly we said professors are spend- have to have staff people.”

CRIME NOTEBOOK Bartenders cited for sale of alcohol to minor Three individuals were charged with unlawful sale of an alcoholic beverage to a minor during a series of enforcement checks using Athens-Clarke County underage operatives, according to AthensClarke County police reports. The operatives used their actual IDs. Sheyna Krystal Hopkins, 26, was cited after selling alcohol to underage operatives at Country Rock at around 10 p.m. on Nov. 11, according to police reports. On Nov. 13, student Abigail Rose Murphy, 18, was cited after selling Corona beer to underage operatives while bartending at Reds Tavern. Kyle Veitch, 26, was also cited while bartending at Roadhouse bar, according to police reports.

The Red & Black is now a donation center for Toys For Tots! Accepting New, Unopened Toys Donations Accepted Through the Month of November Drop donations off at The Red & Black offices located:

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Police Documents Student charged with financial transaction card fraud A warrant was released Monday for a University student connected to a financial card transaction fraud, according to a University Police report. The warrant was issued for University student Patrick Allen Robbins, who is charged with financial card transaction fraud. The charge is connected to a report filed Nov. 10 by a student who reported that on Oct. 19 her credit card number was used to make a purchase worth $97 at the University Health Center, according to the report. —Compiled by Tiffany Stevens

CORRECTIONS The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Daniel Burnett (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Carey O’Neil (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com


NEWS

The Red & Black | Wednesday, November 17, 2010 | 3

BENEDEK: Resounding Resolutions University Meeting response moves past ‘unusual’ declaration controversy

¢ From Page 1

Humphreys contacted the University in the name of the students whose transcripts were in question. Humphreys said one of the students, upon learning of the allegations by the University, requested any documents that might have information about his transcripts in an open records request. Humphreys said the University replied by saying that these documents did not exist and that the student should contact Noel Fallows, associate dean in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, for further information. Humphreys was unable to say whether the student contacted Fallows or not, and The Red & Black was unable to contact the student for any comments. Additionally, Humphreys said when his firm made the same open records request, the University replied by saying they could not release the documents due to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Humphreys said he thought the University gave an improper response. “It is an unusual response to say that no documents exist when those documents should exist,” he said. “Also, the student was directed to discuss the matter with the author of the documents. That’s putting a student in a very intimidating situation.” Tom Jackson, vice president of public affairs, said the University was unable to provide a representative to discuss the matter with The Red & Black. He said discussing such information would be a violation of student rights under FERPA. Humphreys also said the student involved attempted to contact President Michael Adams directly. “I know the student did not contact the Dean, but he did write directly to President Adams in protesting violation of privacy rights and protesting failure to follow the Open Records Act and protesting fact that he was basically defamed when UGA implied he committed academic fraud,” he said. Humphreys said the student received no response from Adams. Additionally, Humphreys said his firm tried to address this matter with the administration, the Board of Regents, the Office of Legal Affairs and the Attorney General, but he has received no response.

Palestine issue touched upon By MARIANA HEREDIA THE RED & BLACK Although Tuesday’s Student Government Association did not intend to talk about the possible Israel resolution, the issue still came up for discussion when Clark Fortson, a former University student and Athens resident, asked about it. Fortson asked Senator Katie Black if SGA took a different procedure or gave more time for discussion when it came to such perplexing issues. Fortson cited the Israel resolution as an example. Black answered that senators proposing the resolution may talk about it amongst themselves, but that it may not be brought up during meetings until the Rules Committee deems it for the floor. Fortson said although he was not a student anymore, the issue still interested him. “I was intrigued by what I read. I wanted to find out more. I’m not sure if I got the answers I was looking for,” Fortson said. Nevertheless, he also mentioned SGA adviser Ed Mirecki spoke to him after the meeting and said SGA is reconsidering the resolution. During the meeting, SGA also passed several resolutions including one that would give freshmen students the option to volunteer

JULIANNE UPCHURCH | The Red & Black

S SGA Senator Cameron Secord speaks about a resolution regarding volunteering for freshmen. The government group met Tuesday evening to discuss University issues. as part of the First Year Odyssey Seminar program. The resolution is in support of allowing freshmen students to replace one of the required events, which are supposed to get first-year students more involved with the University, for some hours of community service in the Athens area. Additionally, SGA passed a

resolution in support of allowing students to reschedule some of their finals if they have three or more finals on the same day. Further, the senators and Freshman Board also passed a resolution addressing the withdrawal policy as it relates to suspended students. The reasoning behind the resolution was to look further into

Decision to nix SGA Israel document deemed good choice By BRIANA GERDEMAN THE RED & BLACK An SGA resolution that would have declared University students’ support for Israel did not face a vote at Tuesday night’s SGA meeting. Instead, the resolution was withdrawn after students and student groups raised objections. The resolution garnered “overwhelming criticism” from students and SGA members, said Nate Christensen, president of Athens for Justice in Palestine. Regardless of personal opinions of Israel, some students were alarmed that SGA attempted to endorse one opinion on a politically divisive issue. Some were also concerned that it would further limit free speech on campus. “There are serious concerns about what kind of implications it would have for free speech on campus,” Christensen said. Although AJP wasn’t mentioned by name in the resolution, he said it “certainly was tar-

geting our group and other groups and individuals that are like us.” Anush Vinod, one of the SGA senators who originally sponsored the resolution, said it was not intended to alienate students who disagreed, but to demonstrate the importance of SGA. “We felt that this would push the organization forward, and we felt that this would get people talking and thinking about what SGA does,” he said. “A lot of senators did feel quite passionately about this issue and thought a lot of their constituents felt the same.” CHRISTENSEN Vinod said he was glad the proposed resolution had encouraged students to get involved and express their opinions, but he was “satisfied” with the decision made to withdraw the resolution. He said he hadn’t intended for the resolution to cause a political debate, and he felt

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the cases of students taking 15 hours who have been suspended and would automatically fail at least one class since University students are only allotted four withdrawals. SGA also passed a resolution that would officially make the Okefenokee Oar the official student body trophy of the Georgia/ Florida football classic.

AAEC ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ADPR ADPR ADSC ANTH ANTH ANTH ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARTS ASTR ASTR BCMB BCMB BCMB BCMB BCMB BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL

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there were other issues SGA wanted to focus on. “Since this didn’t directly affect the students … we felt that there were some other things that needed first priority,” he said. “We all have many other projects and resolutions that we need to be working on.” Although said he didn’t know the reasons the resolution was withdrawn, SGA president Josh Delaney said he thought the decision was a “smart choice.” “From hearing a little bit about what they were looking to do, I think it was a smart decision to withdraw it, because I don’t think it was going to accomplish whatever they wanted to accomplish with the debate that was starting to brew,” he said. The co-presidents of Dawgs for Israel, Lauren Light and Leslie Herskowitz, wrote in an e-mail statement, “Dawgs for Israel supports a peaceful resolution that sees a Jewish state of Israel side by side an Arab state of Palestine, with peace and security for both nations.”


NEWS & VARIETY

4 | Wednesday, November 17, 2010 | The Red & Black

Library debuts Indie sci-fi film iPad rental offers skeleton, program today treasure hunt in By LINDSEY COOK THE RED & BLACK

Today, Apple’s iPad will be available for use in libraries across campus. Although Apple has declared the product magical and revolutionary, students may not agree. The library purchased 10 iPads to be distributed among the Main and Science Libraries and the Miller Learning Center. Library leaders said the upgrade, which will allow students and staff to check out iPads for threehour intervals free of charge with their UGA ID, will benefit the campus. “This program is intended to provide students with the opportunity to try out a new technological tool and see how they like working on it,� said Caroline Barratt, director of Miller Learning Center Library Commons. The iPads will be equipped with relevant apps such as Google Mobile, Facebook and eventually such staples as Microsoft Word and Excel. University staff plans to incorporate student opinions and evaluate the decision via research gained from user questionnaires. “We will have a short survey for users to tell us what apps they used, what they would like to see and any other comments and suggestions they may have about the program,� Barratt said. Some technologically-minded students, such as first year English major Katherine Arnold, are excited about the upgrade and plan to check out an iPad. “It would be interesting to try out the iPads and see the difference,� Arnold said. Some students question the use of their technology fees — which are $114 per student per semester — for buying iPads. Sophomores Claire Goldsmith and Andrew Ackall said they think their fees could be allocated more efficiently to have the greatest effect on campus. Ackall suggested using the fees to buy more buses, though, given the recent complications with eLearning Commons, Goldsmith feels the fees should be used to aid programs already in place. “They should use the money to fix eLC,� said Goldsmith, a biology major from Lilburn. And some students don’t approve of the new technology at all. “I don’t approve of Apple products,� said junior Nina Williams, an Arabic major from Lawrenceville. “I have never had one that I liked.�

eLC outage causes problems for some

Athens screening

By KATIE VALENTINE THE RED & BLACK

By ELAINE KELCH THE RED & BLACK Lee Fanning is not Steven Spielberg or George Lucas. However, his indie film, “A Genesis Found,â€? may just remind Athens of another indie hero: Indiana Jones. “The best compliment I ever got was that the film is a do-it-yourself ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’â€? said the filmmaker via e-mail. “So maybe that gives some folks a frame of reference.â€? An independent feature film, “A Genesis Foundâ€? deals with the purported discovery of an anomalous skeleton at the Moundville archaeological site. “The idea first came while [I was] a senior at the University of Alabama,â€? Fanning said. “I initially wanted to do a period treasure-hunt story. ‌ When we decided to do a feature we obviously couldn’t afford to make the entire film period, so we decided to use some period flashbacks.â€? The setting of Moundville, an important archaeological site in central Alabama, was decided upon early. But “A Genesis Foundâ€? is not simply a historical-themed feature. What distinguishes it is its cross-genre motif — that other genre being science fiction. “I integrated the ‘ancient astronaut’ subplot because of my dad,â€? Fanning said. “I thought it would be a good tool to use to explore what we wanted to explore.â€? What Fanning and partner Ben Stark do explore is the fictional journey of Civilian Conservation Corps cadet John Patton Jr., who discovered and subsequently hid a skeleton in 1938 that was anomalous — neither man nor animal. Patton’s grandson, Gardner, becomes fascinated with his grandfather’s discovery 70 years later and is joined by a documentarian, Bart Thompson, and his girlfriend, Kelsey. Together they attempt to understand the nature of the skeleton and perhaps something other-worldly. “I think what’s so vital about [“A Genesis Foundâ€?] being told as a film is that, ultimately, the major theme explored is story,â€? Fanning said. “How stories and myth can both educate and manipulate, be both beneficial and detract and inform and mislead.â€? Even if a serious discussion of “big questionsâ€? is not a priority of audiences, Fanning assures “A Genesis Foundâ€? offers something for the general public. “I think first and foremost, ‘A Genesis Found’ is an adventure drama with a sci-fi edge. The approach is fairly traditional, though I do think there are elements where we’re defi-

S Lee Fanning’s independent film will be screening tonight at Baldwin Hall.

“A GENESIS FOUND� When: Tonight at 6 Where: Baldwin Hall Price: Free More Information: First 50 in attendance receive a complimentary DVD of “A Genesis Found.� Additional copies will be availabe for purchase. nitely trying new things,� Fanning said. “Don’t expect something bizarre or shocking or irritating.� What is shocking to Fanning is the warm reception the film has garnered from audiences and the media. “Overall, I think the response has been overwhelmingly positive. We’ve gotten a lot of press interest solely on the distribution infrastructure,� Fanning said. “We’re certainly not the first to do it, but it’s still not a common type of approach for distributing films, indie or not.� That “infrastructure� involves point-of-purchase sales of “A Genesis Found� on DVD at screenings, as well as mail-order copies and the ability to stream the film via the Internet. Innovative distribution models aside, “A Genesis Found� owes its success thus far to its content, heart and passion more than its packaging. “It’s a challenging film, but I think [it’s] generally pretty appealing, and it’s also a special treat for Southern audiences,� Fanning said. “That’s something Wonder Mill, my and Ben’s company, is pretty committed to: to telling Southern stories for Southern audiences, highlighting parts of the Southern experience and Southern mythology that aren’t translated outside of the region.� For early comers, 50 copies of the DVD will be given out free of charge. Additional copies will be available for purchase.

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Grades went unchecked. Assignments went uncompleted. PowerPoint notes went un-reviewed. On Thursday afternoon, eLearning Commons became inaccessible to University students and faculty. According to Greg Ashley, technology officer for Enterprise Information Technology Services, problems with the program began in October, but EITS professionals were able to restart the system and get eLC back online. The program experienced problems throughout last week, and on Thursday, the site crashed and was offline until early Sunday morning. Ashley said the failure was caused by a problem in eLC’s file system. “It’s a pretty complex issue, and it took some time to diagnose it,� he said. “We ultimately replaced that file system with another file system over the weekend and restored data back to that new file system.� Ashley said he can’t remember an outage of the previous program, WebCT, or eLC that lasted as long as the recent eLC failure. “When we architect these systems, we know how extremely critical they are to the mission of the University,� he said. “Historically, WebCT and then eLC have been up over 99.9 percent of the time, so we’ve had very few issues or failures around the systems.� Ashley said the problem was not preventable, but he is confident the new file system will prevent similar problems from occurring in the near future. “We’re confident that we’ve fixed that issue,� he said. “Moving forward, we’re always looking for ways to strengthen our systems and increase their availability.� Paula Lemons, an assistant professor of biology, said the eLC outage caused her to postpone a test for her introductory biology class that was originally scheduled for last Thursday. When eLC was experiencing sporadic outages last week, Lemons said her students were unable to access the materials needed to study for the test. “I had uploaded all my lecture outlines and clicker questions and feedback that I give to students about work they turned into eLC — and all that is pertinent to their studying,� she said. Lemons said the outage affected the lecture schedule for her class. She did not have enough time to develop a lecture for Thursday in place of the test, so the lecture she gives on the final day of class, which is usually a review of all the material covered over the course of the semester, will be cut. Some students said the crash wasn’t a problem for them. John Daubenmire, a freshman from Watkinsville, said the eLC shortages didn’t cause a major inconvenience for him. “I mean if I had four classes that all relied on eLC, then I could see how that could be a problem,� Daubenmire said. “But since I only have one that really uses eLC, it wasn’t really that big of a deal.� Michelle Cheng, a senior from Dunwoody, however, had a test last Thursday in her chocolate chemistry class, and said she was affected by the eLC shortages that occurred on Wednesday. “It was really frustrating not to be able to access eLC on Wednesday,� she said. “I couldn’t access it until late at night — maybe nine or 10. Almost all the notes were there, and it was just really frustrating that I couldn’t get on.� Despite the shortages, Cheng’s chocolate chemistry test was still held on Thursday. She said the fact that she could not access eLC on Wednesday could have affected her performance on the test, but she doesn’t know for sure. “I’m just glad it’s back,� she said.


VARIETY

The Red & Black | Wednesday, November 17, 2010 | 5

Comics compete for laughs Club offers tea time to discuss topic of HIV By HEATHER KINNEY THE RED & BLACK

By SHAWN JARRARD THE RED & BLACK

TEA TIME

Hot tea and HIV/AIDS will form the basis for discussion at today’s Tea Talk. Hosting the beverage and conversation is World Ambassadors. “World Ambassadors is one of the most diverse groups of students, both from undergrad and grad school,” said Danielle Alexander, a graduate student interning with the International Student Life office, under which World Ambassadors housed. “One of the things they’re doing is Tea Talks.” The talks are aimed at creating awareness and brainstorming solutions. “What it is, it’s kind of a smaller room, more of a discussion than a debate,” Alexander said. “A particular speaker leads the discussion on a topic that’s important in the world — usually it’s a social problem. They’ll just kind of explain what they know and what they’ve learned about the problem to the group, and talk about some of the human rights issues with what’s going on. And then we’ll discuss all of the factors that are influencing it, and how we can essentially work to change some of those things. We just sit around and discuss it while drinking tea.” Each Tea Talk varies widely in topic, and today’s event marks the third and last of the semester. “The first one we did had to do with Chevron’s pollution in Ecuador, and just explaining to all of the students what’s going on, what’s the history of the problem,” Alexander said. “The second one was about the laogai camps [Chinese criminal reform camps] in China.” For the final talk, World Ambassadors wants to bring the discussion a little

When: 4–5 p.m. Where: Tate Student Center, room 145 More Information: Drink tea while discussing the issue of HIV/AIDS locally and internationally closer to home. “The one [today] will be about AIDS, more locally,” Alexander said. “They’ll touch on some of the profile of AIDS and what it looks like today, and how it’s affecting citizens. They’re also going to bring it in more locally this time, and explain how AIDS is not just a problem that’s in some country far away. AIDS is prevalent throughout the United States. Some of the students are just presenting on what they’ve learned about AIDS here in Georgia and how we can help.” The selection of tea as a focusing agent has both practical and ideological reasoning behind it. “I think they essentially picked tea because International Student Life does coffee hour on Fridays, and so they didn’t want to call it anything related to coffee because it might get confused with coffee hour,” Alexander said. “So tea was the next hot beverage. But I think, too, in a lot of other countries tea is a more common drink, and so when political leaders sit around and discuss things, they would discuss it over tea. So I think that was kind of their thought behind the original naming of Tea Talk.” Students can bring questions if they want, but the tea will be provided. “They don’t have to discuss anything if they don’t want to,” Alexander said. “Just be ready to learn about something.”

MEGHAN PITTMAN | The Red & Black

S Three of the four gas giants — Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune — will be on display tonight, though Jupiter will be the most visible from ground.

SPACE: Jupiter eclipses visible ¢ From Page 1 on.” Gazers will get a chance to witness a celestial dancing of sorts as several eclipses occur about Jupiter. “They [the moons] will pass in front of Jupiter ... they’ll go behind Jupiter and disappear,” Snook said. “And then they’ll come out from behind Jupiter, and then they’ll go into Jupiter’s shadow, which means that one of the moons is having a Galilean eclipse. And so as you watch the moon, within five minutes it disappears. It’s out there in space, you see it nice and bright in the telescope and then all of a sudden it starts to get dimmer and dimmer and dimmer — and finally it disappears.” The solar system’s four gas giants include Uranus Saturn, Neptune and Jupiter, but only Jupiter will be on such grand display tonight. “Unfortunately Saturn is not out, so we can’t see all four giant planets, just the three of them,” Snook said. “They’re so far away, Uranus and Neptune, that in the telescope about the only thing you can tell is that Uranus is a little ball, and not a star, which are points of light even in telescopes. So that’s why we’re calling it the Night of the Giant Planets.” The Athens Astronomical Association will be providing its own equipment for the gazing. “There will be at least two of us, and we’ll have two big scopes and several other little smaller scopes,” Snook said. “Hopefully maybe we’ll get some more people to come out to Sandy Creek Park.”

Laughter is the best medicine, and who needs a giggle or two more than a campus full of stressed students? New Earth Music Hall will be hosting its third round of Last Comic Standing tonight, which pits local comedians against each other for a headline performance at New Earth and $250. “I wanted to do comedy in Athens but I found you basically had to get on a bill with musicians because comedy didn’t have enough draw at that point,” said Chris Patton, organizer for Athens’ Last Comic Standing. “I start-

ed brainstorming ideas of ways to get people out and I figured a competition would be a good way to get it started.” Last year, the competition featured 13 contestants. This year, it was bumped up to 20. “The show has done really well so far,” Patton said. “We are in the semifinals right now so we have four [comedians] left.” The audience is in charge of the vote, deciding who stays and goes by casting paper ballots. “The four [comedians] we’ve got left are definitely the best four that have been in the competition,” Patton said. Several of the final contestants are current and

COMEDY NIGHT

When: Tonight at 9 Where: New Earth Price: $5

past students at the University, including Robert Hayes, Kelvin Williams and Matt Gilbert. The comedians practice outside of the venue to prepare for the different rounds. “It’s fun to watch the heat get put on them when they move on to the next round and all of a sudden they have to come up with eight to 10 minutes of new material,” Patton said. “I like to see the comedians grow.”


6 | Wednesday, November 17, 2010 | The Red & Black

Daniel Burnett | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Carey O’Neil | Managing Editor me@randb.com Courtney Holbrook | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

SGA legislation not for students I

thought SGA stood for Student Government Association. Allegedly, SGA is comprised of elected students serving to represent the interests of the student body. This semester, I’ve yet to see a shred of evidence proving that to be true. Every day I pick up The Red & Black and read about some new outlandish legislation SGA is trying to propose. Smoking — good luck. Israel vs. Palestine — are they not allowed to tailgate on North Campus either? Most of the time, I’m not even aware there is a major student concern over these issues. Probably because there isn’t. Apparently, these student government members think they are as effective as the United Nations when it comes to international policy, and know better than the Food and Drug Administration regarding cigarette exposure. These fringe interest ideas have little to do with my daily life at the University or the lives of my fellow students and much to do with specific interests of the few. Coincidentally, those few happen to be SGA members. And they wonder why so few voted on their proposed cigarette ban and why such a limited number of students voted them into office in the first place. When the response from SGA to an actual campus issue such as the overcrowding of buses is “walk to class instead” — you have your answer. An

Opinions

authentic problem, not a lot of effort to solve it. The editorial board yesterday already enumerated several far more important and fairly obvious student concerns they shouldn’t even have had to list out. Buzzwords such as “budget cuts” and “17 rapes reported since June” would make anyone assume SGA has a built-in agenda for future legislation. But they seem to keep diverting from what the rest of us actually care about in order to tailor their résumés. Perhaps major issues such as campus transit would take more time and effort to fight for, but isn’t that the point? President Adams hasn’t exactly figured out what to do about the lack of state funding, but that doesn’t mean he’s going to start a campaign against UGG boots. If any SGA member decides to champion a cause that has anything remotely to do with uniting rather than polarizing the student body, I will listen with an open mind. But with a track record of such divisive proposals, all I see for SGA’s future is a continuing pattern of self-importance — and an ignorance of campus concerns. — Megan Thornton is a senior from Marietta majoring in newspapers and is on the editorial board for The Red & Black

Mailbox

Israel plan divides readers

540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

members of the group have a bias in favor of the AJP, they will allot funds even if the resolution passes. THOMAS SHATTO Senior, Peachtree City Chemistry With all the controversial issues that come up today, too many people stoop to the level of namecalling and personal attacks. I will stay away from this and just stick to the facts. First, as Stephen Thompson, the vice president of the Student Government Association, stated, “a resolution is a declaration meant to represent all University students.” How could a resolution supporting Israel represent the views of students that are pro-Palestine? Second, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit’s Democracy Index, Israel is not even classified as a “full democracy,” but rather as a “flawed democracy” with the same civil liberties score as Rwanda. Is this the example we want to hold up? Finally, it is not the purpose of SGA to take on international issues. SGA’s purpose is to “serve as a liaison between students, administrators, and organized governing bodies of the University.” These are the facts. ELIZABETH SHELDON Senior Port Orchard, Wash. Political science and International affairs

Senators’ mission to help campus I

t’s easy to sweep controversial issues under a rug, and it’s even easier to shove the blame to someone else. However, it’s usually the wrong thing to do. In the Student Government Association, we know issues as controversial as the proposed “Israel Resolution” are not things that magically appear or disappear. Likewise, we know “he said/she said” is nothing the readership of The Red & Black and the 35,000 students on this campus deserve. Some of you are angry, confused and hurt that a resolution was proposed advocating a “Pro-Israel” stance. This paper is asking “why?” First, let’s make this clear: we did not vote Tuesday evening on a resolution in regards to a Pro-Israel stance. The proposed resolution was pulled last Friday and was not placed on our agenda. We will not discuss this resolution any further. During the course of this semester, SGA senators were approached by University students to propose the resolution in question. To be clear, any student can write an SGA resolution, but it requires at least one SGA senator to sponsor it.

News Editor: Mimi Ensley Associate News Editor: Rachel Bunn Sports Editor: Zach Dillard Variety Editor: Joe Williams Photo Editor: Meghan Pittman Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editors: Elaine Kelch, Beth Pollak, Jessica Roberts Online Editor: Will Brown Online Copy Editors: Lauren Cronon, Taylor Moss Editorial Cartoonists: Julie Bailey, Phillip Henry, Sarah Quinn, Bill Richards

ADDIE HAMPTON In this case, two of our senators made the decision to sponsor this resolution. However, after discussions with student groups supporting both sides of the issue, the sponsoring senators decided not to pursue this resolution. At our core, SGA is a studentled organization whose sole mission is to serve the needs of our peers. We received numerous e-mails from students who were in support of this resolution, but an even greater number from students who were not. It was determined that it is not SGA’s role to pursue an issue that would potentially divide campus. Every student on this campus has at least one senator responsible for responding to his or her concerns. As an organization, we exist to respond to the student voice. So, if a student approaches a senator with an idea, question or concern, that senator should and will explore the issue. We support our senators’ actions

in advocating for the students’ proposed resolution, but we now realize the negative effect it could have on the students we serve. This is why we decided not to pursue the issue further. However, there was a lack of communication with our campus media outlets. We dropped the ball and we take full responsibility for this. The Red & Black was not wrong to run this story based upon the information they had. The editorial asking “why” was not unwarranted. We should always be able to defend our actions. However, it is unfortunate the proper information was not available to ensure an accurate story. Again, we take responsibility for this. We want to make certain you know we hear you. This situation has given us a renewed sense of what matters to you and it is our vow to continue to work on those issues. We encourage you to come to us with your questions, concerns and ideas so that we can be an advocate for you. — Addie Hampton is the Director of Communications for the Student Government Association

Love your body, no matter weight or hair D C

ark hair, small breasts, a wide nose, and wide hips: my body certainly doesn’t meet the blonde bombshell standard of beauty. But you will never hear me say I would change the way I look. We all have parts of our bodies that we despise, and none of us will ever be completely satisfied with our appearances. Trust me. I’ve been there. During my sophomore year I had the horrible realization that I’d gained almost 30 pounds since high school. I was in a constant state of denial. I remember putting on a pair of jeans and thinking, “That’s strange — my jeans shrank.” But my jeans hadn’t gotten any smaller — it was me who was getting bigger. I was unhappy with the way I looked, and I lost a lot of my self-confidence. Then the negative thoughts started to slowly seep in. You are ugly. You are fat. You are invisible.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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MEGAN THORNTON

E-mail and letters from our readers

The Athens for Justice in Palestine organization is right in fighting against the Israeli resolution, but they are wrong in their reasons (“Israel proposal unfair to Palestine,” Nov. 16). The point that they should be basing their fight off of is that the Student Government Association clearly has better things to do. But instead the AJP is saying that the resolution would “hinder free speech” and “intimidate students.” In no way would the passage of this resolution hinder free speech. If the resolution passed, the AJP would still be free to plaster up signs, have protests in the middle of Tate Plaza and do anything that they were able to do prior to the introduction of the resolution. And it would not “intimidate students” who disagree with Israel any more than a smoking ban would “intimidate” smokers. They are incorrect in their assertion that it would impact their group financially, too. The Small Clubs Allocations Committee is responsible for distributing funds to groups, and the five members who vote to decide to distribute funds will have their own opinions about the Israeli conflict regardless of the passage of the resolution. If four of the members of the Small Clubs Allocations Committee have a bias against the AJP, then they will not get funding even if the resolution fails. If four out of five

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Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Sarah Jean Dover Recruitment Editor: Sara Caldwell Senior Reporter: Dallas Duncan Staff Writers: Sereen Ali, Jason Axelrod, John Barrett, Ryan Black, Mitch Blomert, Rachel G. Bowers, Kelsey Byrd, Anne Connaughton, Adam Carlson, Julia Carpenter, Melissa Cohen, Lindsey Cook, Kelly Corbett, Daniel Curran, Christopher D’Aniello, Jacob Demmitt, Chris DeSantis, Sarah Jean Dover F. Tyler Elrod, Michael Fitzpatrick, Briana Gerdeman, Sarah Giarratana, Emily Grant, Anisha Hedge, Mariana Heredia, Drew Hooks, T. Patrick Hooper, Billy Hulsey, Kathryn Ingall, Jen Ingles, Shawn Jarrard, Edward Kim, Heather Kinney, Alex Laughlin, Darcy Lenz, Polina Marinova, Jamie McDonough,

RYSTAL

VILLARREAL

I was always beating myself up about it, so I knew I needed a change. I changed my eating habits, and lost 35 pounds in a little over a year. But my journey did not end there. I thought losing the weight would suddenly make me happier and more confident. Well, it didn’t. Those negative thoughts and emotions about my body were still there even though my old body was gone. A change on the inside was what I needed. We often think changing this one thing about our appearances will make everything else fall in to place. If I lose weight, I’ll meet the right guy. Or if I get my nose fixed, I’ll get that acting job. But it doesn’t always

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Kathryn Mercer, David Mitchell, Deanna Mitchell, Stephanie Moodie, Cody Nichelson, Tunde Ogunsakin, Nick Parker, Michael Prochaska, Aspen Smith, Adina Solomon, Nathan Sorensen, Tiffany Stevens, Zack Taylor, Amber Thomas, Katie Valentine, Paige Varner, Eva Vasquez, Mary Walker, Erinn Waldo, Katherine Weise Chief Photographer: Wes Blankenship Photographers: Charles-Ryan Barber, Miriam Camp, Lexi Deagen, Emily Karol, Meagan Kelley, Nehemie Lucien, Natasha Peat, AJ Reynolds, Julianne Upchurch, Jenna Walker, Dina Zolan Page Designers: Rachel G. Bowers, Amanda Jones, Ana Kabakova, Christopher Miller, Robbie Ottley, Charlee Russell, Adam Wynn

work that way. We need to learn to accept our bodies for how they are because they are always changing. And they will continue to change after we lose weight or undergo plastic surgery. Just ask anyone who’s had a face-lift. The fix isn’t permanent and eventually has to be redone. In 2009 women had more than nine million cosmetic procedures, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. This is a strong indicator to me that too many women feel the need to have an immediate fix to their appearance. Many of us knew girls in high school who would disappear for a little while and come back with a new nose, or some other minor adjustment to their appearance. And I’m sure that girl swelled with confidence over the next few months. But I bet if you check up on her now she will have some other complaint, about some other part of her body. Changing your appear-

ance will not make you happy. And it is possible to love your body without making any changes. First off, stop comparing yourself to other women. Your body is all that matters. Second, don’t let what you see on television or in magazines get in to your head. Most of these women have been airbrushed or the images have been altered to make them look that perfect. Last — and I know how hard it is — you must try and love yourself. Be proud of your socalled flaws. A good way to start is by making positive remarks about your own body, and eventually you will learn to accept it, and all of its “imperfections.” Because if you seek happiness through the reflection in the mirror, I’m afraid you may never find it. — Crystal Villarreal is a senior from Lawrenceville majoring in magazines and women’s studies

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SPORTS

The Red & Black | Wednesday, November 17, 2010 | 7

WIN: Entire team helps seal victory

RESILIENT: Dogs better at closing out wins ¢ From Page 1

¢ From Page 1 off an aggressive Buffalo offense in the second half to secure another victory in the closing minutes of the game. “That was a real hard-fought game,â€? head coach Mark Fox said. “We beat a very well-coached Colorado team, and I was extremely impressed with their team and the effort that they gave, and that’s a really good win for our team.â€? It is the second in as many games this year that Georgia overcame a second-half deficit, following a 72-70 win over the upset-minded Mississippi Valley State Nov. 12 — the first regular season game without injured star forward Trey Thompkins. Along with junior Gerald Robinson, who led the Bulldogs with 21 points, the Bulldogs had two other players in double figures for the night. Travis Leslie scored 19, while Jeremy Price added 17. Leslie was missing for the final three and half minutes of the game after fouling out, which became a common theme for both teams throughout the evening. Georgia had 26 fouls, while Colorado (1-1) ended with 30. As a result, both teams spent plenty of time at the free-throw line, which became the root of the Bulldogs’ troubles — they were only 27-for-43 from the charity stripe. “Our free-throw shooting was awful,â€? Fox said. “I told my coaches at a staff meeting two days ago that our free-throw shooting was about to cost us, because I have not been happy with our approach when we shoot them in practice.â€? For Colorado, the free-throw line sparked its first surge of the night, going 13-for-16 in the first half. Trailing Georgia 31-14, while going 2-for-15 from the field, the Buffaloes’ free-throw sharpshooting ignited a 19-2 run to close out the half tied at 33 points apiece. Leslie led Georgia through the early minutes of the second half — scoring 10 of his 19 points — the ninth and 10th coming on one of his signature dunks to give the Bulldogs a 52-46 lead. But Colorado continued to pester the Georgia defense throughout the rest of the half, regaining a 60-58 lead with six minutes left to play in the half. The Buffaloes were anchored by Cory Higgins, who scored 13 of his 15 points in the second half. Georgia continued to surge in the final minutes of the game, outscoring the Buffaloes 14-10 the rest of the way, led by Robinson’s six late points. “We knew we had to let our experience carry through at the end of a close game,â€? Robinson said. “We played a tough game, and with some of us in foul trouble, we knew we had to have each other’s backs out there.â€? Colorado was led in scoring by Alec Burks, who had 21 points. The loss is the first for Tad Boyle as the Buffaloes’ head coach.

(TOP) SARA CALDWELL (ABOVE) MEGHAN PITTMAN | The Red & Black

S Juniors Travis Leslie (1, top) and Gerald Robinson (22, above) led the Bulldogs with 19 and 21 points, respectively.

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— rebounded and held Colorado’s 3-point barrage to a goose-egg: 0-for-7. Basically, they improved on everything that nearly killed them against Mississippi Valley State and held a seemingly commanding 31-14 lead with 6:28 remaining in the first half. “We had a great start,� Georgia head coach Mark Fox said. Then it all came crashing down. Georgia started turning the ball over and missing shots left and right. Its white-hot shooting streak turned ice-cold as the Bulldogs ended the first half on a 4-for-17 skid. Even the high-flying Dunkmaster General Travis Leslie missed a onehanded slam — leaving the game wide open for a Colorado Buffalo comeback. Georgia allowed Colorado to finished the half on a 19-2 run by committing foul after foul. And Colorado hit free throw after free throw in the half, hitting 13-of-16 free throws. Conversely, the Bulldogs consistently missed theirs, shooting an abysmal 5-for13 from the charity stripe in the first half. “I think it was a lack of concentration,� said senior forward Chris Barnes, who himself missed eight free throws. “I know I shot terrible from the line and it was really funny when I made a free throw and the crowd started cheering. It was our focus and we have to be focused all throughout the game.� The last 6:10 of the first half was, dare I say, reminiscent of when Dennis Felton roamed the sidelines and when, like clockwork, Georgia would sleepwalk through large stretches of games and completely fall apart. Yet unlike the Felton days, the Bulldogs didn’t fold up the tent and go home. They battled through the stamping Colorado run. They battled through the excruciatingly tight officiating and the embarrassing amount of missed free throws. They even battled through the loss of Travis Leslie to fouls with 3:27 left while clinging to a 69-65 lead. The locker room at halftime was full of encouragement rather than dismay, and the Bulldogs showed it in the second half. “We knew we had to

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have each other’s back,� said junior guard Gerald Robinson, who had a team-high 21 points. “You have to learn how to win those close games. It’s easy to win blowout games, but to have the experience of staying together it gives confidence to everyone and will help us win these games in the future.� After Leslie was exiled to the bench for fouling out, the onus to lead the team fell to Robinson and Dustin Ware. Ware scored all seven points in the last 4:14 and hit four crucial free throws in the final minute to keep Colorado at bay. “Our backcourt played like upperclassmen,� Fox said. “They made the right plays tonight and kept us organized. It helps us to have experience like this. Close hardfought games help down the road. It helps even FOX more that we won but I’m very proud of our kids tonight.� These were the kind of games Georgia ROBINSON lost in past years, including Mark Fox’s first season in Athens. Last season, Georgia was 6-10 in games decided by nine points or less. Granted, the sample size is small, but Georgia has won both games this season is such fashion. And with its best player, Trey Thompkins — who has missed the past two games with an ankle injury — in street clothes. “We don’t have Trey and we had to look at the younger guys to step up and they did,� Barnes said. “They made big plays and it showed they are learning from the younger guys and this is really going to help in the long run.� It’ll help, because in the long run, this team is a whole new breed of Bulldog. This is the type of team that will be able to withstand comebacks and preserve leads late in games this season. It’s the resilient type. — Michael Fitzpatrick is a sportswriter for The Red & Black

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8 | Wednesday, November 17, 2010 | The Red & Black

Gym Dogs prepare as underdogs By ROBBIE OTTLEY THE RED & BLACK Commitment. Discipline. Enthusiasm. Leadership. Words such as these line the walls of the lounge in the Suzanne Yoculan Gymnastics Center, where Georgia’s gymnasts are practicing for their second year since the eponymous coach’s retirement. The 2011 season will also be the second under coach Jay Clark, and the second since the departure of Olympian Courtney Kupets. However, the upcoming season has one glaring difference from the last — in the spring, the Bulldogs won’t be defending a national championship for the first time since 2006. “It’s kinda that nasty feeling from last year, knowing we didn’t do as well as we could, that pushes you,” senior Cassidy McComb said. “Being in a different

position, that we haven’t been in years past, could be a good thing.” When a fan base becomes accustomed to an unprecedented run of prominence, much like the Gym Dogs’ five consecutive national championships, it can be difficult to call a season a success when it results in anything less than a championship. A particularly glaring mark on last season came when the Bulldogs ended a 26-season streak of qualifying for NCAA championships. But Clark pointed out that Georgia, which tied for second in the Columbia regional, was a tiebreaker loss away from returning to the national championship, and finished ranked fifth in the nation. “I don’t ever want to put a negative spin on what they did last year,” Clark said. “Everything they heard came from a predisposition of doubt. The pri-

mary talk last year was about the transition and not what the potential of that team was.” The year was challenging for Clark for a variety of reasons, but possibly most significant was stepping into a position of leadership after serving as an assistant coach under Yoculan for 17 seasons. Though Clark led his team differently than Yoculan did, he felt the familiarity of his time with the program meant he responded to setbacks much as Yoculan would have. The second-year head coach still believes he had a lot to learn about being a coach when he began his tenure, though. “You can’t really learn until you have to go through it,” Clark said. “When things don’t go well, you feel like you’ve let your fan base down or you’ve let your kids down and you wanna immediately reex-

amine things. While it’s an admirable trait, it’s probably not a healthy way to react to adversity.” As a part of his reexamination this offseason, Clark read books by John Wooden and Pete Carroll, particularly taking to heart their suggestion that the program’s core values need to be better defined. “The thing that I really got out of it was it’s important to define what your philosophy really is,” Clark said. “In some ways we probably plagiarized some of those ideas.” Clark and the other coaches always knew that the team emphasized leadership, but the coaches began to discuss exactly what that leadership meant. The focus on defining their philosophy now plays a major part of the team’s Monday meetings, even sometimes taking away from their practice time in the gym.

CHARLES-RYAN BARBER | The Red & Black

S Sophomore Kati Breazeal (left) and senior Cassidy McComb (right) look to rebound from last year’s disappointing Gym Dogs season. “It’s one thing to throw a word out to your team and expect them to understand how to implement,” Clark said. “It’s important to take time away from our physical trainings sometimes and really try to get them to understand these concepts and be invested in it.”

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Already, Clark says, he’s seen the team’s new focus pay off. Junior Gina Nuccio may have been battling an injury, but she’s still been in the gym supporting the team during practice, even if she can’t join them during routines. McComb has been showing a level of leadership and excitement greater than she has in past years. Another change comes in the level of difficulty of the various routines the Bulldogs expect to perform in the spring. In gymnastics, each routine is scored on two components: the difficulty score and the execution score. While Clark expects that much of Georgia’s competition will perform relatively conventional routines, he hopes to push his gymnasts to perform as hard as they reasonably can. In doing so, he’s continuing a Bulldog tradition of breaking the mold for college gymnastic routines. “Particularly at the collegiate level, [the sport] can get very static. … There are teams that we compete against year in and year out … that are very conservative,” he said. “If we can do it, we’re gonna do it. And if we win, we win big, if we lose, it’ll be usually by our own doing.” However, this year, the Bulldogs won’t be fully expressing that philosophy, as they plan to perform routines with less difficulty than previous years. The routines the Bulldogs will be performing still have the opportunity to score a perfect 10, but the Bulldogs have a greater desire to avoid injury in the upcoming season than in years past. “It would be foolish to try to push that envelope in a year when depth could be an issue,” Clark said. Clark’s girls agree with their coach. “If you can do higher difficulty, then do it, but if you can’t do it, then there’s no point,” junior Kat Ding said. Georgia will face what Clark calls an “incredibly tough” schedule this year, with home meets against SEC rivals Auburn, Florida, and Alabama, and nonconference competition against schools such as Utah and Michigan. But Clark said the Bulldogs will overcome these challenges. “This team has a grit about them that I think could serve us well,” Clark said. “The key for us is gonna be, can we execute when we have to, and hope that we get some breaks along the way.” His gymnasts share Clark’s optimism, and look forward to competing as underdogs, many for the first time in their Georgia careers. Unlike last year, Georgia will not open the season with a No. 1 ranking, but the Bulldogs expect being deemed long shots will allow them to focus their energy on a new goal. “People may not be expecting much from us,” McComb said. “We’re gonna let our gymnastics do what we plan on doing and just surprise everyone.” The Bulldogs have reexamined their values, their routines and their schedule. But the program’s overall philosophy, a proven success under Yoculan, remains the same. “We’re not gonna knee jerk and try to do anything radically different,” Clark said. “There was nothing philosophically different last year than there had been the previous 17 years that I was here.” And according to Ding, the values of Georgia gymnastics remain the same. “Georgia gymnastics has an air of success, and the least we wanna do is be able to uphold it,” Ding said. “Georgia gymnastics is all about heart.”


November 17, 2010 Issue