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Red&Black The

What do Dr. Phil and an undersea creature have in common? See page 7

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Thursday, March 4, 2010

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 117, No. 117 | Athens, Georgia

Staff Council unites to fight budget cuts By RACHEL BUNN THE RED & BLACK At Wednesday’s Staff Council meeting, the council tabled issues such as health care and staff pay raises to focus on a more pressing matter — the budget reduction proposal plan. The plan, released Monday, outlines what the University would do if forced to cut an additional $60 million from its fiscal year 2011 budget without raising tuition. “Friday, I was invited to a

meeting with the deans and the administration,” said Stuart Ivy, Staff Council president and IT manager at the College of Veterinary Medicine. “President Adams went over the details of the proposed budget cuts.” Ivy said Adams wanted to give the deans and other people who attended the meeting to prepare for the announcement so they would be able to answer any questions they may face. “It’s very evident no one wants to go through with the plan,” Ivy said. “The best way to avoid it is

by talking to the people who make the decisions in Atlanta.” Ivy said he encouraged all staff to call the state legislature and voice their disapproval of the proposed cuts. However, he said staff should contact the legislature not as a University employee, but as a private citizen. “We basically have three weeks,” said Jerry Daniel, vice president of the Staff Council and IT professional in the department of mathematics. The council discussed sending letters and e-mails and calling

people in the legislature as well as people and committees who have influence with the legislature. Ivy said he would send the members of the council e-mails with useful talking points to address when they contacted the state. He said he would also provide a list of legislators they could pass to others in their departments. “Put a face on UGA,” Daniel said. “It can’t be an abstract idea.” The council asked if pay cuts

to top-earning faculty had been discussed as an alternative to the cuts already proposed. Ivy said he did not think faculty salary cuts were being discussed at the administration level, but other council members said it had been mentioned in individual departments. “A number of ecology faculty said they would take a 20 percent pay cut,” said Terry Camp, head of the Odum Library in the Odum School of Ecology. See STAFF, Page 2

Ain’t that a shame

BUDGET BREAKDOWN

For continued coverage of the proposed budget cuts, including the student response meeting, turn to page 4

Agricultural programs hit hard by cuts By DALLAS DUNCAN THE RED & BLACK Upset is an understatement. Angry, appalled and devastated are more like it. Those were the words used to describe feelings toward the 29 proposed budget cuts for fiscal year 2011, at least 10 of which are related to services and opportunities provided by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “They’re devastating cuts that will have a significant impact on the state of Georgia,” said Scott Angle, dean of CAES, adding the cuts could slow what has been fast-growing enrollment at the college. On the list of proposed cuts is the elimination of the Georgia 4-H program in its entirety and a 50 percent reduction in the amount of county extension agents, two programs facilitating state agriculture. “Cooperative Extension takes the research to the people,” said Beverly Sparks, associate dean for extension. “We actually work with farmers in the agriculture industry and help produce agricultural products.” Sparks said 4-H and Cooperative Extension, a collaboration between CAES and FACS, have been in Georgia for more than a century. The 4-H program is an agricultural, environmental and leadership youth development organization with student members of all ages. “From my position, I get to see extension programs throughout the nation,” she said. “A lot of other states look to us and envy our 4-H program.” Sparks said she is concerned about the long-term effect of eliminating these programs, and student See CUTS, Page 3

Georgia loses big to Kentucky

(TOP) ASHLEY STRICKLAND (BOTTOM) WES BLANKENSHIP | The Red & Black

S (Top) Head coach Mark Fox started all of his seniors, though center Albert Jackson was held scoreless in 21 minutes of play. (Above) Forward Travis Leslie was held to just eight points against Kentucky.

By NICK PARKER THE RED & BLACK

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Senior night turned out to be a forgettable one for Georgia. For 36 minutes Georgia hung in there with SEC-frontrunner and No. 3 Kentucky. But a four-minute stretch to start the second half erased any visions of an upset, as Kentucky notched its 13th conference victory with an 80-68 win in front of a raucous sell-out Stegeman Coliseum crowd. Georgia (13-15, 5-10) opened the first four minutes of the second half with turnovers on six of its first eight possessions, allowing a 12-0 Kentucky run that built a 16-point lead the Bulldogs were never able to come back from. “That was a tough loss for our seniors. It was a hard-fought battle,”

head coach Mark Fox said. “We didn’t start the second half very well and we never recovered from that. There is no shame of losing to a terrific team. But this was an experience our team needed. We needed a game of this magnitude and we have to take this experience like we have all the others and learn from it and get better.” Added Georgia forward Trey Thompkins: “Kentucky is a team in the running for the national championship, and they have no weaknesses. We got a little complacent and lazy and we didn’t come out ready to fight for another 20 minutes and they did.”

Spring ball begins without ‘clear-cut’ starting QB By NICK PARKER THE RED & BLACK Georgia returns 10 starters on offense when the football team begins spring practice today. But the most pivotal offensive position remains unclaimed — quarterback. Logan Gray has the dual threat ability with a 4.4-second 40-yard dash time and experience in the system. Zach Mettenberger possesses the big, Matthew Stafford-like arm. And Aaron Murray owns the most accuracy and the lofty reputation he built in high school as one of the nation’s top quarterbacks. So which one of their talents will ultimately win the starting quarterback gig? “The quarterback competition,

the way we’re viewing it going into the spring is, it’s wide open. There is not a clear-cut No. 1 going into spring,” offensive coordinator Mike Bobo said. “Logan Gray will take the first reps with the No. 1 offense. But we are planning on rotating all three and giving all three equal amount of looks with the first group.” After ranking No. 118 out of 120 teams in the country in GRAY turnover margin a year ago — largely contributing to the substandard 8-5 season — the emphasis is clear for the three quarterbacks: take care of the football. “I’m going to be looking for guys

HAZING Look inside for more information about the alleged pledge paddling in the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity. Page 2.

sunny. High 53| Low 27

Index

that are going to know what to do, are going to be able to hit their target, are going to be able to handle the pressure of the job, and a guy that can lead,” head coach Mark Richt said. “I also have said that he must have a healthy respect for the football, so those are the things I’m looking for.” Bobo and Richt both say they doubt they’ll be able to name a starting quarterback after the spring. Bobo has said he’s not opposed to playing two quarterbacks if needed. “It’s definitely a big spring for us three quarterbacks. It’s pretty much going to determine who’s going to be the quarterback for possibly the next couple of years,” Mettenberger said. “We’re all really excited about the competition.”

TEARS IN HEAVEN Our Pick of the Week was named the fourth-best guitarist of all time by Rolling Stone Magazine. See page 5. The Week ................ 5 News ........................ 2

Opinions .................. 6 Variety .....................7

Kentucky 80, Georgia 68

See LOSS, Page 8

MONEY TALKS

JACKIE REEDY | The Red & Black

S Top Student Government Association leaders field student ideas on how to deal with potential $60 million budget cuts. Full story on page 4.

TOURNAMENT TIME The Lady Dogs don’t have far to travel as they begin the SEC Tournament tonight against Alabama. See page 8 for more. Sports ...................... 8 Crossword ...............2

Sudoku .................... 7


NEWS

2 | Thursday, March 4, 2010 | The Red & Black

Hazing case remains open STAFF: Group

No individual charges filed By JACOB DEMMITT THE RED & BLACK

As the Office of Judicial Programs continues its investigation into pledge paddling allegations against the University’s chapter of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity, University judicial sanctions have not been brought against any individuals directly involved in the hazing. The investigation was launched after an anonymous letter was sent to the Greek Life Office. According to the letter, a concerned parent felt compelled to alert the University after seeing injuries to his son’s buttocks sustained as part of initiation into the fraternity. “Ascertaining who was actually doing the paddling is very difficult for a variety of different reasons,� said Assistant Dean of Students Brandon Frye. “Right now, we are looking at this as an organizational case. The investigation has not been directed at any individuals.� When asked why this is the case, Frye responded, “Being an organizational event, the organization

condoned the actions as a whole.� Under Georgia hazing law, however, the individuals who paddled the pledges could face a “misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature.� This would fall under the code which states, “It shall be unlawful for any person to haze any student in connection with or as a condition or precondition of gaining acceptance, membership, office, or other status in a school organization.� No charges have been filed, though both Mark Timmes, chief executive officer of the national Pi Kappa Phi fraternity, and University chapter president Brent Stringer both confirmed paddling took place, according to documents obtained by The Red & Black. “We have not received any reports of hazing,� said Hilda Sorrow, public information assistant for the Athens-Clarke County Police Department. “So without a victim, we cannot investigate anything.� While the individuals involved in the hazing are not facing any charges, the chapter as a whole will learn what, if any, reprimands they will receive this week. “The national organization has been a good partner in this,� Frye said. “They have been very upfront.�

BY

¢From Page 1 Ivy said the budget reduction proposal, as it stands, probably will not be passed. “I don’t see how they can implement it all, or even a significant portion,â€? he said. Ivy said when contacting state representatives, it is important to remember this budget proposal is a small part of a much larger financial problem facing the state. “We are asked to be innovative; we are asked to do more with less — we need to ask the same of them,â€? said Shannon Scott, assistant editor at the Institute of Continued Legal Education. Daniel said staff and the Staff Council hold little political sway, and it would be in their best interests to focus on the most important aspects of the budget reduction proposal plan. “We can’t keep our jobs and

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their concerns to the state legislature. “We feel very emotional about protecting our University and the quality of education,� Camp said. “It’s not just the students — the staff are concerned as well. This affects the entire state. We’re absolutely amazed that the legislature thinks those cuts will be beneficial to the future of education.�

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keep all the programs. We want services, but someone’s got to pay,� Daniel said. Ivy said the University will not emerge from budget cuts unscathed. “The damage is going to be immense,� Ivy said. “Adams said the plan, if put in place, would cause irrevocable damage.� Camp said it is important for staff to mobilize and voice

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NEWS

The Red & Black | Thursday, March 4, 2010 | 3

Graduate CUTS: Proposal would cut research facilities across Georgia students showcase neurons ¢From Page 1

By RACHEL BUNN THE RED & BLACK If you ever wondered what the inside your brain looks like, just ask the graduate students in the neuroscience department. On Wednesday, the Undergraduate Neuroscience Organization hosted a tour of the BioResearch Center in the Paul D. Coverdell Center. Undergraduates were allowed to look at three different imaging machines, given a brief explanation of their function and told about some of the research graduate students are conducting at the University. William Oliver, a secondyear neuroscience Ph.D. student, said each of the three machines serve different purposes. “The holy grail is to be able to do it all,” he said. Oliver and other graduate students showed the undergraduates what the machines do. Oliver said the electroencephalography (EEG) requires study participants to wear a hat of sensors. “We use a net of sensors — about 256 — that measure the sensors of the scalp,” he said. Lauren Ethridge, a fourth-year neuroscience Ph.D. student, showed students a paradigm, or what would be examined and studied when using one of the machines. Ethridge said her paradigm and experiments focus on looking at the idea behind eye movement. She said neurons in the brain tend to oscillate, or move in circles, and the images a participant would look at flash or pulse because of this. “We look at frequency and tag neurons in the brain and see where you are paying attention at any given time,” Ethridge said. Ethridge said brain activity is tiny, and anything from blinks to a heartbeat can show up on the machines. “You have to do a lot of trials and average out the good stuff,” she said. Jordan Hamm, a second-year neuroscience Ph.D. student, said the University has one of the few magnetoencephalograph, or MEG, machines dedicated solely to research. He said the advantage of the MEG is that it has better source localization. Localization is important so researchers can study the parts of the brain causing epileptic seizures. He said MEGs are used when patients cannot use MRIs because they are pregnant or claustrophobic. Hamm said MEG machines are sensitive and are incased in a layer of copper as well as two layers of mew metal. “When your neurons are firing simultaneously, it creates a magnetic field,” he said. “To read a magnetic field on the outside of the head is ridiculously small. It’s been compared to trying to hear ant feet at a rock concert.” Oliver said he is using one machine to study how attitudes toward race affect brain functions in white males. He said the machine is often used to look at emotion and how those emotions relate to the brain and memory. The tour of the BioResearch Center was sponsored by UNO, a community service group, as an effort to reach out to undergraduate students interested in neuroscience and research. “UNO started as a group of people who were interested and wanted to do something with neuroscience,” said Logan Davis, president of UNO. “We want to reach out to undergraduates and take our passion and help the community.” Davis said each semester the group goes to local elementary schools and presents a program about the brain to students. Mani Valtcheva, vice president of UNO, said the programs employ methods that grab the kids’ attention. “We teach them about the brain, let them poke a sheep’s brain and stuff,” she said.

members are fighting the cuts. “Our 4-H’ers are becoming active,” she said, adding social media outlets are quickly becoming rallying points for students against the elimination of 4-H. Another large cut to agriculture education is the proposed closing of the State Botanical Garden of Georgia on South Milledge Avenue. Tim Burgess, senior vice president for finance and administration, said shutting down the gardens would be like closing a business. “We have visitors and school groups and others from all over the state that routinely visit that facility and learn from its research and its educational opportunities,” he said. “It would be a huge loss to the community, but it would be a big impact to the state as well.” A number of research and education facilities will also be closed, which could affect the state economically. Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, which assists

farmers with irrigation issues, is one such facility. “It was a complete surprise to us,” said Calvin Perry, the park’s research station superintendent. “It’s a shame — it’s a nice facility, the community appreciates what we do and it would be an economic blow to Mitchell County.” Perry said park employees were encouraging supporters and farmers to contact their BURGESS legislators. Joe Garner, research station superintendent of the Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, said they have already had to retire workers without hiring permanent replacements before this proposal was released. He said the center does research on a variety of crops, including blueberries and apples. “We provide a cold, hearty environment,” Garner said. “It allows scientists to research the impact of this environment on different

types of plants.” He said the budget announcement devastated the center’s staff. “Unfortunately, it’s a process that we’ve got to work towards and hopefully we can turn this ship around,” Garner said. The Attapulgus Research and Education Center, which could also be closed, is used to research how certain crops fare with extreme temperatures and pest. Billy Mills, research station superintendent, said closing the facility would affect the state detrimentally. “If they come up with new varieties that do need to be screened, it would be a loss not to have these controlled conditions,” he said. The Bamboo Farm and Coastal Gardens in Savannah face closure as well. “For $125,000, we run thousands of school kids through here,” said Lannie Lanier, head of extension in the Southeast district. “We also have horticulturalist exhibits, like the camellia exhibit, that you don’t find anywhere else. Those are irreplaceable.” Lanier said roughly 120,000

people visit the gardens each year. He said the gardens are funded more by the Chatham County Board of Commissioners than the state. “We apply to the state, to the University for Board of Regents grants and they’ve poured thousands of dollars into renovations,” Lanier said. “If this goes through, all that money will be wasted.” Burgess said the University was not advocating for any of the cuts. “These things are important, they matter, there’s a reason why they were being done and being operated to begin with,” he said. “It’s just that when you begin to have to lose huge amounts of revenue that you use to support operations with, you have to cease doing some things.” Angle said if the cuts pass, agriculture in the state and the University will suffer the effects. “There are cuts going on in almost every state,” he said. “I don’t know of any as big as the ones being prepared for CAES.” —Sara Caldwell, Julia Carpenter and Adina Solomon contributed to this article


4 | Thursday, March 4, 2010 | The Red & Black

NEWS

Budget worries spread across campus Cut proposal shrinks Over 200 enrollment numbers attend By SARAH GIARRATANA THE RED & BLACK Freshman enrollment has consistently been important to the University — but next fall’s incoming freshman class may drop by 500 students. In light of the financial crisis, the University System of Georgia directed the University to create a plan to cut an additional $60 million from its budget for fiscal year 2011. The plan included the elimination of temporary faculty, which would result in 500 fewer first-year students and 1,000 fewer transfer students for fall 2010. Though the cuts have not been finalized, the proposition of reducing the number of incoming freshmen and transfers got some students’ attention. “They would want to keep as many students as possible, because that generates revenue,” said Anne Holzhausen, a junior from Marietta. “That doesn’t make sense. You’d think they would want to make as much money as possible, especially when things are

tight.” Enrollment for spring 2010 was record-setting, bringing total enrollment to 33,620. According to the Admissions Office Web site, 4,725 new first-year students enrolled in fall 2009. But according to one University student, high enrollment doesn’t necessarily equate to high quality, and a reduction in admitted students could have a bright side. “It’s terrible, and it puts a lot of pressure on the University, but getting rid of some incoming students and teachers means you’re going to get the best students and the best teachers,” said Serena Premjee, a sophomore from Alpharetta. According to the admissions Web site, around 1,700 transfer students enrolled at the University in 2009. “I don’t think it’s fair that transfer students are being cut more than incoming freshmen,” Holzhausen said. “You’d think they would want to make cuts proportional.”

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By POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK University students are taking matters into their own hands. At last night’s meeting regarding the student response to the University’s proposed budget reductions, more than 200 students exchanged ideas and asked for clarification concerning the $60 million budget cut proposal released earlier this week, but one thing was clear — the students’ priorities are JACKIE REEDY | The Red & Black classes, the integrity of S Mehul Patel, a political science major from Grayson, voices his their degrees and jobs. “A lot of states have stu- opinion at the SGA budget cut discussion Wednesday night in South PJ. dents on their Board of Regents, but we don’t have tors, even if that means University should look to renovation of University one student on the board,” making a personal sacri- other resources it has President Michael Adams’ available rather than cut mansion and further sepasaid Student Government fice. “We know that the eco- necessary programs. rating the University Association President nomic crisis is difficult,” “The A t h l e t i c Athletic Association and Katie Barlow. On March 15, students Barlow said. “However, a Association wouldn’t be the coach’s salaries from from universities across tuition increase is not out around if it wasn’t for the state funding. “In 1785, the Legislature the state will travel with of the question, particu- University, so they should their student governments larly for this institution support us,” Demello said. created the first stateSome of the other stu- chartered university in to the state capitol build- and for the quality and for ing in Atlanta to voice the caliber of education dents’ suggestions includ- America, setting a precetheir concerns about the that we get here. As stu- ed making the HOPE dent for all future public $300 million budget cuts dents, we have to offer Scholarship means-based institutions of higher learnfacing the University something, and a logical as well as merit-based, ing,” Barlow wrote in the thing right now is a tuition selling advertising space column. “It is our hope System of Georgia. around campus and turn- that these difficult times As of last night, more increase.” Barlow did not want to ing off lights in unused will not dilute the stanthan 23,000 students had signed petitions opposing assign a number to the buildings. Both Barlow dards of education that the budget cuts, and about proposed tuition increase, and SGA Vice President have been such an integral 100 University students so she said “a modest Cameron Secord wrote part of Georgia’s history.” Though Barlow said the had signed up to go to the tuition increase is respect- down the ideas and welstate capitol on March 15. able.” But a tuition comed students to ask University should focus But Barlow said that 100 is increase is yet another questions after the meet- equally on the different groups affected by the not enough to represent a burden on some students ing was over. According to a column cuts, including faculty and school of the University’s who are having difficulties Barlow wrote in the staff, she said students size. In order to reserve a affording the University. “If they raise tuition by A t l a n t a J o u r n a l - also would feel the cuts. seat on the SGA buses “It’s really important traveling to the rally, stu- 20 to 30 percent, a lot of Constitution, in addition dents must RSVP at uga. people won’t be able to to a tuition increase, a few that the student image afford it, and I won’t be “bulleted” items on the gets put on this story,” edu/sga by Friday. will include Barlow said. “It’s about Barlow said if students able to afford to come here proposal oppose such budget cuts, because I’m out of state,” reducing administrators’ jobs, faculty, staff and the they need to be willing to said Victoria Demello, a six-figure salaries by 10 state budget, but it’s funbring a proposal of their freshman from Gastonia, percent, suspending state damentally about the stuown to the state legisla- N.C. Demello said the funding for the $750,000 dents.”

Faculty layoffs would make staying on graduation track more difficult By PAIGE VARNER THE RED & BLACK If the University’s budget cuts proposal is adopted, students will find it difficult to register for the classes they need to meet the graduation timeline they expected before Monday’s announcement, according to one University official. The budget cut proposal would eliminate 543 part-time and temporary instructors, decreasing the number of class sections available to students by 13 percent. “It’ll have a serious impact on the ability to stay on track,” said Tim Burgess, senior vice president for finance and administration. He said this class section reduction would affect colleges in proportion to how many part-time and temporary instructors they have on staff. “We know how these 543 part-time faculty are arrayed across the units, in arts and sciences, education and SPIA,” he said. “More than half of these are in arts and sciences.” University officials seem to be aware of the potential affects of such a cut.

The budget reductions proposal points out the immediate need for the very people whose jobs may be in danger. “Part-time and temporary instruction faculty fill a gap that has been created by almost a decade of decreasing financial resources that no longer permits almost exclusively hiring tenured, research oriented faculty to teach our students,” the document reads. Sujata Iyengar, associate professor and undergraduate coordinator for the English department in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, sent an e-mail to English majors Tuesday about how budget cuts could affect their school. However, she only said she had no idea. “The cuts are so enormous that I am extremely worried that every aspect of our intellectual community in Park Hall would be affected, including advising, instruction, undergraduate research, and internships,” the e-mail read. Terry College of Business academic advisers also don’t know their school’s plans for section

cuts. “We haven’t discussed anything,” said Kathy Cohen, academic adviser for legal studies, real estate and risk management and insurance. “We haven’t heard a word about it.” Rachel Baginski, College of Education academic adviser, said what is most typical with budget cuts in the communications sciences and special education department is an increased difficulty when students try to find electives. “All programs I advise are set and will continue to offer the same classes,” she said. Burgess said the University does not support the budget cuts. “The proposal is a response to a fairly extreme request,” he said. Burgess said he hopes the legislature will choose another solution to the budget crisis. “The University of Georgia itself has already taken $100 million in cuts in the last two fiscal years,” he said. “Then to turn around and suggest $60 million on top of that? Higher education should be the highest priority for the state government.”


THE WEEK

The Red & Black | Thursday, March 4, 2010 | 5

The Red & Black’s event guide to happenings — news, variety and sports — in and around Athens and Atlanta from March 4-March 10.

Spring Break Edition

Compiled by Michael Prochaska Designed by Ana Kabakova

PICK OF THE WEEK: Eric Clapton He shot the sheriff, brought tears to our eyes with a heart-rending elegy for his son and he’s going to sound wonderful. Without Eric Clapton’s contribution to rock ’n’ roll, The Beatles would never have released “As my Guitar Gently Weeps,” Cream would have fallen flat, the world may not have seen the likes of John Mayer and the “Layla” montage in “Goodfellas” would have been replaced with a less-fitting, mediocre tune. Clapton is the only person to be

THURSDAY What: Performance: UGA Symphony Orchestra Who: Mark Cedel conducts When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Concert Hall Price: Free Verdict: Hugh Hodgson Concert Hall might not be Athens’ most popular music venue, but it still offers a timeless genre of music sadly absent in downtown Athens. Contact: www.music. uga.edu

SUNDAY

What: Spring Break Forever Tour Who: Jenny Owen Youngs, Bess Rogers and Allison Weiss When: 9:30 p.m. Where: The Earl 488 Flat Shoals Ave., Atlanta Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18-20) Verdict: Who needs the beach when urban Atlanta gives you the best flavor of female troubadours since Joan Baez teamed up with Joni Mitchell?

FRIDAY What: Fresh Fest Who: Salt-n-Pepa, Biz Markie, Whodini, Doug E. Fresh When: 8 p.m. Where: The Civic Center 395 Piedmont Avenue NE Atlanta GA Price: $42-$74 Verdict: Biz Markie and Salt-nPepa got what you need so take your girlfriend or ‘just a friend’ to this concert. Contact: 404-523-6275 What: TOMS Founder Blake Mycoskie speaking at UGA When: 1:15-2:15 p.m. Where: The Georgia Center in the Mahler Room

Verdict: Ugg boots became even uglier when Mycoskie decided to run a business that would use your money to purchase shoes for children in need. Find out how it all started at this lecture. Contact: www. tomsshoes.com What: The Highballs When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: $8 Verdict: This Athens wedding band has ‘proposed’ to play for those who are a long way from marriage. Contact: http://www. meltingpointathens.com/BuyTickets/

SATURDAY What: Not For Sale (GA) Meeting Who: Pattie Harrelson When: 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Where: Atlanta Union Mission 165 Ivan Allen Jr. Blvd. NW Verdict: Slavery still exists in America. Help end the cruelest form of human oppression. Contact: Lauren Connell: 770815-9465 What: Geocaching Adventures When: 1-3 p.m. Where: North Oconee River Greenway 1180 E. Broad St. Price: $2 ACC residents, $5 non-residents Verdict: Live like a pirate with a modern-day treasure hunt. Contact: 706-613-3615

What: Memorial Service Who: Kenneth Fischer, longtime saxophone professor When: 2 p.m. Where: Hodgson Concert Hall Verdict: Pay respects to a cherished and beloved late saxophone professor who will never be forgotten. Contact: 706-5423737, www.music.uga.edu What: Superflight Kite Day When: 2-4 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek Park Price: $5 ACC residents, $8 non-residents Verdict: Revisit your childhood at Sandy Creek Park. Hot chocolate and cider will be provided. Contact: 706-613-3631

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Nappy Roots

The Rattlers

inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame three times and was listed as No. 4 on Rolling Stone magazine’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.” As a prolific songwriter and innovator of blues-rock, Clapton has entered each decade with platinum success. Just like his musical idol, blues pioneer Robert Johnson, you can’t help but wonder if Clapton sold his soul to the devil, too. Though that legend is as old as Clapton’s greatest source of inspiration, his legacy is built on prodigious guitar

A concert to benefit the Boys & Girls Club of Athens

$25 advance, doors at 8 p.m. music at 9:00 Tickets at SchoolKids Records or www.40watt.com

What: Men’s tennis vs. Auburn When: 2 p.m. Where: Dan Magill Tennis Complex Price: Free Contact: 706-542-1621 What: Women’s History Month Program on Jeannette Rankin Who: Sponsored by the Institute for Women’s Studies When: 3-5 p.m. Where: Oconee County Library, 1080 Experiment Station Rd., Watkinsville Price: Learn about Jeannette

Rankin, the first elected female U.S. Congressman who paved the way to further women’s rights. Contact: 706542-2846, tlhat@uga.edu What: Ani DiFranco When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Variety Playhouse 1099 Euclid Avenue Atlanta Price: $36 Verdict: This queen of folk and prominent feminist has become the Joan Baez of the 21st century. Contact: 404-524-7354

selections all night! Verdict: Jazz roaring trumpets and Latin folk guitar unite at this unique concert. Contact: 706-549-7051

What: Spring Awakening When: 8 p.m. Where: Fox Theatre Price: $18-$46 depending on location Verdict: German teenagers explore human sexuality in this Tony Award-winning rock musical. What: Casper and the Cookies, Lesbian Afternoon, Timmy Tumble When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+) $7 (18-20) Verdict: Tumble your way in to Caledonia for music from

cookie-eating, lesbian, friendly ghosts! What: Broadway on Bull St. When: 8 p.m. Where: Savannah Theatre, 222 Bull St., Savannah Price: $35 Verdict: Leave the beach humming all your favorite Broadway earworms. Contact: 912.233.7764 What: Baseball at Kennesaw State When: 5 p.m. Where: Kennesaw Price: $6

NO WHERE BAR

240 N. Lumpkin St. / 706-546-4742

6 pool tables  Live Music  14 TVs 2 dartboards  4 video games  PGA

TUESDAY What: Terrapin Bluegrass Series featuring BlueBilly Grit When: 7 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: BlueBilly Grit fuses multiple genres and blends traditional bluegrass songs with edgy rock beats. Contact: 706-549-7051

Who: Eric Clapton When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 9 Where: Gwinnett Center: Arena at Gwinnett Center, Duluth, GA Price: $58-$98 Contact: 770-813-7500

WEDNESDAY

MONDAY Who: The Stereofidelics, Incatepec What: The Hoot! When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $2 Terrapin pint

talent. Clapton will bedazzle audience members with his “woman tone” guitar riffs and culture defining songs. He is a legend, making a mark on the 21st century with a tour stop in Atlanta, one that is history in the making.

PRIVATE PARTIES NOW AVAILABLE What: Baseball vs. Kennesaw State When: 5 p.m. Where: Foley Field Price: Free for students Contact: 706-542-1231, www. georgiadogs.com

WE NOW HAVE TERRAPIN RYE, FULL MOON, AND SIERRA HARVEST ON DRAFT

This Week’s Live Music:

Tuesday 2 nd : Laissez Funk Wednesday 3 rd : Nathan Sheppard Thursday 4 th : Mama’s Love


6 | Thursday, March 4, 2010 | The Red & Black

Chelsea Cook | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Daniel Burnett | Managing Editor me@randb.com Yasmin Yonis | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Our Take

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

It’s census time

Completing the census is too important, too easy, and illegal to simply ignore There are 10 questions to answer. It will take 10 minutes, and it will affect almost everything in our community for the next 10 years. It is census time, and many students don’t know whether they should fill out the survey in Athens or at home, or whether they should fill it out at all. Occurring once every 10 years, the census is a once-in-a-decade opportunity to help your community. It helps determine the best way to allocate $300 billion in federal money and the reapportioning of House of Representatives seats. Those that fill it out and return it are making money for their community. For every Clarke County citizen who fails to be counted by the census, the Athens community loses around $1,700, which could go toward improving things like transportation, education and elderly and public health services. University students are especially important when it comes to filling out the census survey. Many local businesses and programs use information from the census to determine potential business sites and ventures that would be important to a college student. Filling out the census is also the law; Title 13 of the United States Code requires your response. Even though the next 10 years will see new University students, the student population is a vital part of Athens in the use of public roads, water, hospitals, police assistance and more. The ever-evolving Athens-Clarke County and University community deserves to be appropriately represented in our government and in federal aid. — Nathan Sorensen for the editorial board

Mailbox

E-mail and letters from our readers

Basing story on anonymous letter raises ethical issues I have an ethical objection with the Red and Black’s coverage of Pi Kappa Phi. In the print edition, prominently on the front page, the paper quoted an anonymous source — seemingly anonymous even to the paper’s editors! — that not only accused the fraternity of extremely violent hazing, but also enforcing secrecy about which with a threat of murder. The article went on to cover other aspects of the anonymous letter. After investigating these accusations, the fraternity’s national organization found them “unsubstantiated and [they] do not believe them to be true.” In the context of a reputable, on-the-record denial, it is unethical, irresponsible and potentially libelous to treat those accusations as fact on the front page layout of that article. EDDIE BECK Junior, Atlanta Mathematics

Crimewatch lacks any news value Dear Editor: I wake up in the morning, walk to class, grab a seat, and open up my copy of that morning’s Red & Black. I am a little astonished at the fact that The Red & Black staff find it news worthy, relevant and appropriate to have a section devoted to exploiting the mindless “criminal” and delinquent reports that happen countless times every night in Athens. While the staff at The Red & Black may find it to be outstanding journalism to report and uncover the real outlaws of Athens, think twice next time

you decide to print a two column piece about a “24-year-old jay-walker.” Thanks for your time to read this letter which will almost certainly be ignored. JOEY BURNS Sophomore, Richmond, Va. Business

Cutting teachers deeply perturbing I’m deeply perturbed by the proposed budget cuts and the cutting of hundreds of faculty positions. Many of us students will sorely miss and realize how great the instructors are to us students. Virtually all the ones I have had have worked tirelessly for their students, teaching as well as possible, and making as much effort as possible to meet us. These people give a good face from the faculty to the students. If anyone should get fired it’s the professors who only care about the laurels and their work and who seem to care very little about the students’ performance and are quite unenthusiastic. As we head into the next phases of the budget cuts, we should all take a step back and reflect on what is truly nice about this university and what we’ll miss the most. It’s up to us to change it. BRIAN WILSON Freshman, Los Angeles Business

LETTERS POLICY: Letters must include name, year in school, hometown, phone number, major or job title or other appropriate identification and are edited for grammar, length, style and libelous material.

Villarreal correct in assessment of beauty

T

hey almost always say it after a sideways glance: “She’s cute, for a black girl.” Or an Asian girl, or a Latina. Or it comes out this way: “Sure she’s nice. I’d guess I’d date her but you know me, I like white girls.” I’ve heard such comments many times from both friends and strangers, and for a white guy who grew up in predominately white suburbs, I’m surprised that men construct so many qualifiers based on race. These comments are obstacles that reinforce a peculiar and dangerous mindset that focuses on qualifiers not only on a woman’s appearance but their value. These judgments can have far reaching effects, and the perpetrators are not only men. That’s why I agree with Crystal Villarreal’s assessment of beauty in her column “Ethnic features not seen as beautiful” on March 1, that each of us, male or female, has an impact on which “features are … accepted as Beautiful.” Her idea that “It’s important for society to embrace diversity in beauty,” is about more than appearances. How people define attraction obviously varies widely. This is understandable given the mix of hormones and psychology that’s more art than science in determining physical attraction. However distress for both women and men flows from the perception that “normal” white traits like, pale skin, thinness, and straight hair are the most desirable. The representations of non-white beauty in media often supports this standard, with celebrities such as Beyonce Knowles, America Ferrera

News Editor: Carey O’Neil Associate News Editor: Mimi Ensley Sports Editor: Rachel G. Bowers Variety Editor: Courtney Smith Photo Editor: Katherine Poss Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editor: Beth Pollak Recruitment Editor: Brittany Binowski Editorial Cartoonist: Bill Richards Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Casey Bridgeman Senior Reporter: Carolyn Crist

and Taylor Lautner portrayed as “exceptions” to the white-centric beauty pageant that is Hollywood and cable television. These prominent ethnic celebrities convey an ambiguity of racial features that are at most slight variations from the white standard. Seen by hundreds of millions of people the portrayal of a specific type of beauty in media has set a global standard that spans diverse cultures and is dominated by the “white” definition of beauty. If I make it sound like attractiveness is a big deal, it’s because for some people it really can be. The pressure to conform to these standards and be considered “equal” to those who happen to have socially desirable “white” traits is evident. Studies by CNN and the Web site Careerbuilder.com show that people who view themselves as attractive, make more money, and report themselves as happier than those who consider themselves unattractive. Attractiveness even lends credibility to politicians. It’s no surprise that the media are constantly drawing attention to the appearance of President Barack Obama the first black — but not too black — president and his wife and family. It’s not just another aspect of their rock-star-like fame, the Obamas’ appearance is carefully balanced on the same standard as

— Scott Hurn is a senior from Hartland, Mich., majoring in newspapers and English

No ‘rhyme or reason’ to a sense of beauty

T

his I know is true: shampoo stings your eyes, Earth is round and I’m ugly as hell by conventional standards. I won’t sugarcoat it. I have the physique of a second-grader. My smile looks like a Picasso painting. My eyes are bloodshot from incessantly playing on Xbox Live with kids in Mexico (anyone know what “pendejo” means?). Not surprisingly, the woman I’m dating is only my second serious girlfriend. Apparently, catching mono from a girl who sneezed on me while kissing another guy doesn’t count. Look at my mug shot on this page; I can’t even look good there. I’m a living, breathing “not if you were the last man alive” kind of guy. But I never pulled a Crystal Villarreal and cried foul because the opposite sex doesn’t desire me. In her March 1 column, “Ethnic features not seen as beautiful,” Villarreal laments how in America, certain “ethnocentric” features are looked down upon, e.g. dark skin and frizzy hair. She bemoans, “Something happens to a woman’s confidence when you’re constantly being shown that there is an ideal woman, but it isn’t you.” She pleads with society “to embrace diversity in beauty.” I wish Villarreal pursued a less futile venture — like, oh, I don’t know, anything else. Her kind of appeal to revolutionize beauty standards is fruitless. There simply isn’t rhyme or reason

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

SCOTT HURN

ethnic celebrities. Attractiveness can be important part in appearing convincing, note that taller political candidates are more successful. So what’s the answer? If not everyone can conform to an irrational standard why does it exist? It exists in part because constructing conditions and categories for people is so easy. Because seeing a deviation from the “norm” as undesirable is a convenient way to avoid trying to know a real person. The unrealistic standards help simplify how men and women see each other, and since media comparisons are ever present the standard is easy to maintain. Just because standards exist doesn’t mean that they have to be believed, and many advocacy campaigns such as “black is beautiful” and “real women have curves” have attempted to draw out a public discourse on the perception of beauty. Let’s not worry about an unobtainable norm. Like these campaigns let’s emphasize broader definitions of beauty and worth. Instead of concentrating on what traits might not be biologically present in certain people, let’s focus on what makes people attractive in the fuller sense, not just physically attractive. What you might have found once unattractive in an old ex, could be intriguing on someone new. The more open the definition of beauty the less power “normalcy” will have not only on physical attraction, but personality, interests and ideas.

Videographer: Jordan Hester News Writers: Rachel Bunn, Sara Caldwell, Julia Carpenter, Jacob Demmitt, Dallas Duncan, Briana Gerdeman, Raisa Habersham, Ashley Hieb, Brittney Holmes, Jennifer Johnson, Alison Loughman, Jacob Lovell, Polina Marinova, Stephanie Moodie, An Ngyuen, Diana Perez, Michael Prochaska, Caitlyn Searles, Anna-Corley Shedd, Adina Solomon, Tiffany Stevens, Paige Varner, Katie Weise Sports Writers: Benjamin Bussard, Chris D’Aniello, Zach Dillard, Michael Fitzpatrick, Drew Kann, David Mitchell, Nathan Sorenson Variety Writers: Katie Andrew, Becky Atkinson, John Barrett, Harper Bridgers, Adam Carlson, Melissa Cohen, Anne Connaughton, Kathleen Dailey, Matt Evans, Anna

MICHAEL YU for most aspects of the human understanding of aesthetics. Some parts of it make sense. In some cultures, for example, wide hips in a woman are desired so she can more easily bear children. But there’s no logic behind why, for instance, I like women with long, slender legs. I can reach the top shelf of my bookcase just fine. Still, I harbor an ardent fascination for females with that attribute. The impulse to desire other people because of their physical features is firmly embedded in a primal region of our psyche. Each person’s understanding of aesthetics is fiercely subjective. No amount of psychological wizardry and wrist-wringing — or column-writing — can modify such a visceral instinct. Villarreal should realize that playing the victim of society’s alleged prejudice runs counter intuitive to her M.O. Any woman trying to convince me she’s a catch should actually try to espouse her desirability. I won’t buy a girl dinner to listen to her spout mantras like “every suggestion to change something about you to appear more ‘normal’ and less ‘ethnocentric’ chips away at self-esteem.” Shattered self-

Our Staff Krakovski, Sophie Loghman, Cyndyl McCutcheon, Rachael Mirabella, Crissinda Ponder, Tyrone Rivers, Wynn Sammons, Ashley Strickland, Zack Taylor, Katie Valentine, Eva Vasquez, Nicholas Welsh, Michael Whitworth, Joe Williams Chief Photographer: Wes Blankenship Photographers: Frannie Fabian, Lindsay Grogan, Michael Harris, Emily Karol, Jon Kim, Dorothy Kozlowski, Blake Lipthratt, Lauren Moot, Sarah Pelham, Lily Price, Jackie Reedy, Daniel Shirey, Ashley Strickland, Jon-Michael Sullivan, Molly Weir Page Designers: Courtney Clark, Jessica Clark, Brittany Guthrie, Jennifer Guyre, Amanda Jones, Ann Kabakova, Thomas Nesmith, Robbie Ottley, Darline Oyemakinwa

esteem is not sexy. I am also turned off when I’m labeled a bad person because I actually have an opinion of what beauty is. The hypocrisy in Villarreal’s argument infuriates me. She decries how society forces its standard of beauty onto innocent women. But she is forcing her standard of beauty onto society by insisting that we should see frizzy hair and dark skin as attractive. Not to be self-righteous, but in this instance, I wish Villarreal would follow my example: I’m not a handsome guy, but being unattractive doesn’t stop me from being smart, funny, charismatic or talented. [I am not smart, funny or charismatic, but my girlfriend says I give good backrubs and my mother says I played the kazoo very well at my first grade class concert, so maybe I get a check-minus for talent?] It’s no secret that women will choose Brad Pitt over me, but that isn’t an indictment on me as a whole person. My life isn’t a failure if I don’t appear in the Abercrombie catalogue. Plus, as Michael Jackson taught us, drastically altering your appearance in the pursuit of perfection can lead you down a dark, dark road. Besides, Brad Pitt has Angelina Jolie, so he would never sleep with any of you. — Michael Yu is a senior from Houston, Texas, majoring in newspapers

Editorial board members include Paige Bowman Daniel Burnett, Chelsea Cook, Dallas Duncan, Michael Fitzpatrick, Raisa Habersham, Patrick Hooper, Nathan Sorensen, and Yasmin Yonis.

ADVERTISING: 706-433-3001 Advertising Director: Natalie McClure Student Advertising Manager: Matt Gonglach Territory Managers: Anna Lewenthal, Catherine Merritt, Daniel Pugh Account Executives: Katherine Blackstad, Alia Chernnet, Stacey Joseph, Chris Merville, Taylor Rawlins, Jennifer Rooks Sales Associate: Kristy Hansen, Lauren Jones Classified Manager: Amanda Goforth Classified Representatives: Lindsay Lock, Jessie Phelps Ad Assistants: Emily Johns, Thomas Pulliam Circulation Manager: Blake Molina

Ad Creative Assistant: Chase Dudley Production Manager: Sam Pittard Production Staff: Josh Barnett, Dru Fickling, Priscilla Kathe, Elaine Kelch Receptionist: Amanda Goforth Office Manager: Erin Beasley Assistant Office Manager: Megan Yue Cleaning Person: Mary Jones Publisher: Harry Montevideo The Red & Black is published Monday through Friday fall and spring semesters and each Thursday summer semester, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a nonprofit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


VARIETY

The Red & Black | Thursday, March 4, 2010 | 7

SIMPLIFIED SPRING BREAK

Savannah has history with a touch of kitsch Editor’s Note: This is the fourth installment in a weeklong series profiling last-minute spring break trip ideas. Throughout the week, the destinations will get closer to Athens, for even the most lastminute planners. Athens to Savannah 225 miles, about 4 hours by car The beauty of the old city, as many residents willingly share, is that Savannah still has too much to tell. Obscurity and rumors mix with sweet Southern gossip to weave tales, some true, some exaggeration, that continually draw visitors from all over the world. For Georgia residents, Savannah is waiting right in our backyard. Yes, the true story behind “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil� fatefully occurred in Mercer House on Monterey Square. “Forrest Gump� was filmed watching a feather float down from the sky on a bench downtown and Uga, our University’s beloved bulldog mascot, stays with the Seiler family in his own beautiful historic home in Savannah. While there are plenty of designated tours, the city was originally designed on a grid pattern, broken up with uniquely scenic squares and parks. Every turn reveals something old and something new, including historic homes, funky art shops and one-of-a-kind finds. The easiest way to discover Savannah is study a map and make your own tour.

LILY PRICE | The Red & Black

S Sam Perren, Jason Moody, Larry Cardinal and Mark Spurlock (from left) were inspired by the vision of Dr. Phil as a squid and used it to fashion their band name, Doctor Squid.

Doctor Squid makes it all up By JOE WILLIAMS THE RED & BLACK When it comes to creating original music in Athens amongst a sea of indie bands which seem to share a common ancestor, Athens pop-rock quartet Doctor Squid has found a way to stand out amongst the masses — have fun, leave the work behind and free-style rap until you come up with a band name. “We went through that struggle that every band goes through, that ‘what should our band name be’ kind of thing,� said lead singer and guitarist Larry Cardinal. “So then we decided to not push it, and just sort of let it emerge.� “It got to the point where we had a show schedule, just not a band name,� said lead guitarist Mark Spurlock. With the pressures accumulating and a looming schedule in the

distance, the band turned to a familiar favorite — free-style rapping. “We were talking about Dr. Phil one day and how he does that whole serious, ‘You know, you’ve got to eat healthy, every day!’ type of thing,� Cardinal said. “We thought, ‘What if Dr. Phil became a squid, but kept his show?’� Bassist and singer Sam Perren’s input made the band name fully stick. “I may be a squid, but I don’t think you should beat your wife!� Perren said in his best Dr. Phil impersonation. While Cardinal is belting out high notes or harmonizing to Perren, keep an ear open for his lyrics. “We’ve performed songs that didn’t have lyrics written for them, and just had Larry wing it,� Spurlock said. “And other times we’ve written lyrics and had Larry

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

PRIVATE PARTY RATE (Applies to individual persons only)

(0-25 words) 1st Day/Skip days.....................................................$6.00 3 Consecutive Days.................................................$10.00 5 Consecutive Days.................................................$15.00 10 Consecutive Days...............................................$20.00

HOUSING AND EMPLOYMENT RATE (0-25 words)

1st Day/Skip days.....................................................$9.00 3 Consecutive Days.................................................$25.00 5 Consecutive Days.................................................$35.00 10 Consecutive Days...............................................$65.00

BUSINESS RATE (All commercial other than housing and employment) (0-25 words) 1st Day/Skip days.....................................................$7.00 3 Consecutive Days.................................................$19.00 5 Consecutive Days.................................................$31.00 10 Consecutive Days...............................................$61.00

1, 2, 3 & 4 BR newly built houses close to campus & downtown! W/D, large BRs, pets ok, 706-713-0626 AVAILABLE NOW! ONE roommate needed for newly renovated 3BR 2BA house. Preferably male who likes music. 10 minutes from UGA. $275 + utilities. Call 706-215-9017

$1280 4BR 4BA house on S. Milledge. Alarm systems, W/D, no pets. 706552-3500 hancockpropertiesinc.com $1650/ MO. 4BR- or 5BR Windsor Place Condo COMPLETELY REMODELED (5pts. area) All new flooring, cabinets, granite countertops, plumbing & electrical fixtures, appliances, & HVAC. Looks brand new. 4 HUGE BRs, 3BA 2 LRs, lg. utility room, huge deck and pool. Downstairs LR can be used as an additional BR. Approx. 2500 Sqft. MUST SEE! 1 un-remodeled unit for $1400 avail. now or prelease for fall 2010. Owner/Agent Ambrose Properties 706-549-2500. $750/MO 2BR 2.5BA Quiet Condo in Appleby Mews, W/D, fridge, microwave, DW, pool. Walk to campus. Available immediately. 678330-6167. 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 5 BR. Awesome Walk and Bike to downtown and campus Houses Pre-leasing for Fall! Many historical houses with old world charm, modern amenities. Porches, yards. Pet friendly. $350-$1500 mo. These go fast! Email for list: luckydawg96@hotmail.com

1BR 1BA LYNNROCK Apts. $490 with DW, water included. Block from campus off Baxter St. Text “lynnrock� to 41513 Joiner Management 706-353-6868 www.joinermanagement.com 1BR APTS CLOSE to campus, downtown and shopping. Starting at $380. ONE MONTH FREE ON SELECT UNITS! No Pet Fee! 706-549-2500 2, 3, & 4 BR HOUSES CLOSE TO CAMPUS STARTING AT $800. W/D INCLUDED. ZONED MULTI-FAMILY AND PET FRIENDLY 706-549-2500. 2BR 1BA APARTMENT in 5Pts. Great for Grad Students. Close to campus. W/D, DW, CHAC, Pets OK. Avail. 8/1 $700/mo. 706-369-2908. 2BR 2BA DUPLEX. One month free rent and no security deposit with acceptable credit! 2 miles from the arch, W/D, DW, Microwave, ceiling fans, pest control, and free security system. Large yard, no pet fee. $650/mo. Security deposit of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 2BR 2BA ON College Station. Huge apartment, FP, deck, lots of closets, DW, W/D, CHAC. Avail. now. Pets OK. $575/mo. 706-369-2908. 2BR APTS STARTING at $550. ONE MONTH FREE! Close to campus, downtown and shopping. W/D included in unit. No Pet Fee! 706-549-2500.

forget them the next day‌then we wing it again.â€? In fact, the ability to improvise is a cultivated skill for Cardinal. “I kind of take pride, though, in being able to say stuff that makes sense and no one notices that they are made up on the spot,â€? Cardinal said. “Sometimes they don’t make sense, but they still don’t notice because my flow is so smooth and heavy.â€? In 2008, on a tight budget and with little time to prepare, the band hit the studio. In true Doctor Squid fashion, they recorded their first self-titled album and laid down tracks they previously had not even had the time to work out in practice. “I was literally on the phone with Larry as they were printing the final cut of the CD asking what he wanted to

DOCTOR SQUID with MyNameIsJohnMichael, Clay Evans and Groove Tangent When: Tonight; doors open at 6, music starts at 8 Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 name the songs,� Spurlock said. Though, as often happens with the band, this touch of rushed decision-making was a success. “For us, the focus is always on just trying to write good songs in just a very simple and basic kind of way,� Spurlock said. “I wouldn’t say we’re not trying to be innovative, but our focus is always making music that people can honestly just enjoy.� Other band members agreed. “The difference is we’re just brilliant, to sum it up,� Cardinal said.

EAT: The legendary Pirate’s House, the oldest establishment in Savannah located at 20 East Broad Street, offers a “Legendary Southern Luncheon Buffet� for just

Classifieds

2BR CONDO FLATS 1/2 block off Milledge, 3 blocks from campus and DT. Total renovation including stainless steel kitchen appliances, hardwoods, faux granite counters, W/D. $850/mo. 706-540-7896 www.ugastudentrentals.com

3- 4BR 4BA Home for lease. 15 min from campus. Student subdivision. HW, tile baths, big yard, appliances included. $900$1000/mo. July 1st Susan 404-388-2571. 3BR 2.5BA townhouse on Milledge. Now preleasing for Fall. Great location, pool, sand volleyball, basketball. Incl. W/D, on bus line. Call Paul 678-4620824. 3BR 2BA DUPLEX One month free rent and no security deposit with acceptable credit. 2 miles from the Arch, W/D, DW, Microwave, ceiling fans, & alarm system. Large yard, no pet fee, $750. S/D $600 fully refundable. Owner/ Agent 706-549-2500

3BR 2BA NICE house eastside, quiet neighborhood, W/D, pets ok. $1000/mo., 706-713-0626 4BR 4BA TOWNHOUSES CLOSE TO CAMPUS. 2 LARGE LRS, LARGE UTILITY ROOM, W/D, DW, GARBAGE DISPOSAL, LARGE DECK, ALARM SYSTEM. 2500 SQFT. $1500/MO. 706-549-2500. 5BR 3BA HOUSE. Zoned for students and close to campus. W/D, DW, CHAC, front/back porches, den, $1900/mo. avail Aug 1st. Call Matt 404-808-3190. AMAZING RENOVATED 5BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. from campus. 2 LRs, 2 kitchens, big BRs, huge deck, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $2100/mo. 706-369-2908. AWESOME HOUSE & Amazing location! 530 W. Hancock. 3-4BR 1BA. Brand new remodel, W/D, Fenced yard. Pets free. $1700/mo. Marc 646-3540848 or andersonmc@yahoo.com. BARNETT RIDGE FLATSEastside $625. Lots of room for the price. W/D, DW included. Text “Barnett� to 41513. www.joinermanagement.com Joiner Management 706-353-6868 CEDAR BLUFFS EASTSIDE location. 2BR 2.5BA and 2BR 2BA flats $670. W/D, DW included. Text “Cedar� to 41513. Joiner Management 706-3536868 www.joinermanagement.com

CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN Three 4BR 3.5BA houses. Kitchen and laundry room appliances, spacious bedrooms, wood floors and carpeted bedrooms, pets welcome. $1100-1300/mo. Call 706-540-1257 FALL PRELEASES. BEST rentals in Athens! 1-5BR houses, apts, condos, In the heart of UGA/Dwntn/5pts. Avail Aug! Call 706-369-2908 for more info. GIGANTIC 5BR 3BA condo. End of Lumpkin St. 2500 sq. ft. 2 LRs, huge laundry rm., DR, FP, big deck. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1500/mo. 706-3692908.

GREAT 4BR 4BA house. 1/2 mi. from campus. Front porch, back deck, nice yd., DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. Special! $1500/mo. 706-369-2908. LOVELY NEW HOUSE. 4BR 3BA. Half mile to campus. Big rooms, hardwood floors. DW, W/D, CHAC, pets okay. Avail. 8/1. $1750/mo. Call 706369-2908 NOW PRE-LEASING 4BR 2BA townhome. Close to campus, in 5 pts next to memorial park. W/D, DW, ice maker, back patio and much more. 706-296-9546 www.cityblock.biz NOW PRE-LEASING for Fall! 1 to 4 bedroom houses. $350-$1,500. Close to downtown and Pet Friendly. These lease up fast! www.deklerealty.com 706-548-0580

DOWNTOWN APARTMENT SUBLEASE $1000 (negotiable) 2BR 2BA splitlevel penthouse, ideal location by arch, vaulted ceiling, gorgeous views, downtown/ north campus, furnishing optional. Available immediately. 404-580-6512 LOOKING TO SUBLEASE one room in Whistlebury apt. Rent is $415/mo. plus utilities. Apartment complex has pool, within walking distance of downtown. Looking for someone to move in immediately. For more info call 770-402-1804

KILL ROACHES AND RATS! Buy Harris Famous Roach Tablets & Harris Famous Rat Killer Guaranteed to work. Available at Normal Hardware. 1328 Prince Avenue.

HONDA SCOOTER 50CC. $900 OBO. Runs like new. Very low miles. Very fast. Bulletproof reliability. Don’t need license, insurance, registration. Park anywhere without permit. 678-234-8781

DRIVE BY TRUCKERS tix for sale. Sat March 13, Variety Playhouse, Atlanta. 2 avail. Will sell as pair or singles. Jim 678-661-0353

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STAY: Savannah Pensione, located at 304 East Hall Street directly in the Historic District, is reasonably priced and a good choice when on a budget in this semi-luxury resort area. Prices start at $25 per person for a shared room of three or more and $45-65 for a private room. PLAY: Savannah itself feels like one big shopping district, but there is a method to the madness. River Street is a good place to start, but try exploring City Market, Factor’s Walk and Broughton Street. The old and eclectic reside right next to each other, from exclusive designer shops to antiques to bars for honey tasting. Look for Shop SCAD, located at 340 Bull Street, a gallery store that sells artwork and designs by students, faculty, staff and alumni of the Savannah College of Art and Design. If the beach is your scene, drive an extra 20 minutes to discover the serene beauty of Tybee Island. Known as Savannah Beach to the locals, the untouched nature of the island provides a pristine 3-mile beach, budgetfriendly places to stay such as beach cottages and locallyknown good eats like The Breakfast Club, none of which should be missed if you’re going to Savannah. — Ashley Strickland

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LIFEGUARDS WANTED. WORK at Legion Pool on the UGA campus. Late May through mid August. Competitive pay. Applications available at Tate Information Desk. Call Jamie 706542-8512

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THE RED & BLACK ADVERTISING DEPARTMENTis now looking for organized, accountable students to work with our print and online classifieds. Be a part of a fun, active environment where you can learn and earn close to campus! Work between classes. Please contact Natalie McClure, Ad Director, for more information 706-433-3009 or nataliem@randb.com.

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under $14. Opened in 1753, the restaurant claims it was the watering hole of pirates from all seven seas. For any sweet tooth cravings, stop by River Street Sweets at 13 East River Street for a praline, homemade fudge and old-fashioned candies.

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The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

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SPORTS

8 | Thursday, March 4, 2010 | The Red & Black

Diamond Dogs rack up five errors in loss to Alabama BASEBALL

By DREW KANN The Red & Black

Alabama 13, Georgia 2

A season-high five errors plagued the Georgia baseball team Wednesday night, as the No. 25 Bulldogs were defeated handily 13-2 by the Alabama Crimson Tide in the SEC-opener for both squads. “We just couldn’t do much tonight, didn’t get anything done tonight,” Georgia head coach David Perno said. “I thought [pitcher] Chase Hawkins was the one bright spot for us. I thought he was competitive and he gave us a chance but we just didn’t take care of the baseball and we couldn’t string any good atbats together.” Sophomore left hander Chase Hawkins got the start for the Bulldogs, giving up four earned runs on five hits in 3.1 innings of work. Georgia (6-3, 0-1) fell behind early in the bottom of the first as Alabama first baseman Clay Jones drove in the first of a career-high six RBI’s on the night. Alabama third baseman Jake Smith added an RBI single to put the Crimson Tide in front 2-0. The Bulldogs squandered a potential run-scoring opportunity in the third when third baseman Kevin Ruiz led off the Bulldog inning with a double. Georgia’s Johnathan Taylor and Colby May had consecutive pop-ups to centerfield by ended the Bulldog third inning after a bunt attempt by Todd Hankins. Three of the Bulldogs’ five errors on the night came in the bottom of the third inning, as two unearned runs allowed the Crimson Tide (6-0) to stretch

the lead to 4-0. The Bulldog bats took a chunk out of the Alabama lead in the fourth inning. With two outs, freshman designated hitter Brett Deloach launched a double off the left field wall, scoring two. That was as close as the Bulldogs would come, as a four-run Crimson Tide outburst in the bottom of the fourth extended the Alabama lead to 8-2. Three Alabama hits and another Georgia error allowed the Crimson Tide to take a 10-2 lead in the fifth, before Alabama’s Jones smacked a threerun home run in the seventh to put the game out HAWKINS of reach for the visiting Bulldogs. Georgia returns to action starting this Friday, when they travel to Tallahassee, Fla., for a three-game weekend set against the 6th-ranked Florida State Seminoles. “I think [the errors] are something that we’ve done a pretty good job of staying away from considering the lack of depth or lack of starters that we have in the middle of the field but it finally caught up to us tonight so hopefully we can regroup and get better for this weekend,” Perno said.

SPRING 2010

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FILE | The Red & Black

▲ Senior point guard Ashley Houts and her Lady Dog teammates will take on Alabama in the first round of the SEC Tournament tonight.

Lady Dogs begin SEC Tourney By BEN BUSSARD The Red & Black The Georgia women’s basketball team (22-7, 9-7) will make its shortest road trip of the year tonight, but the team will vie for perhaps its biggest prize. The Arena at Gwinnett Center — located fewer than 50 miles from Athens — is the site of the 2010 SEC Women’s Basketball Tournament, and the Lady Dogs look to take advantage of the tournament’s close proximity to Athens. “I feel like our fan base is bigger in Atlanta, so hopefully we can bring those people into the Gwinnett area,” senior center Angel Robinson said. “I think the biggest advantage we have is home court advantage ... it’ll be like a home court away from home.” Georgia’s first-round match-up also serves as an advantage for the Lady Dogs, as they will be taking on an Alabama Crimson Tide team (12-17, 4-12)

they defeated twice this season by an 18.5-point average margin of victory. Despite the lesser opponent and being close to home, the tip-off time of 9 p.m. proposes some challenges of keeping players focused for head coach Andy Landers. “It’ll be different,” Landers said. “The biggest difference is the hours in the day leading up to the 9 o’clock tip [but] I trust the maturity and the focus of our team and I trust that our maturity and our focus during the hours leading up to that game will be greater than Alabama’s.” Georgia enters the tournament on a two-game winning streak, and senior point guard Ashley Houts is aware of how important momentum will be as competition heats up. “I think the past two games we’ve made some bigger strides in the fact that we’ve gotten better in a lot of different aspects,” Houts said. “I think the biggest thing is just the

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GEORGIA VS. ALABAMA When: Tonight at 9 Where: The Arena at Gwinnett Center More Information: The contest will air on Fox Sports Net momentum that it gives and the confidence that it gives us going into this weekend.” Following their school record 16-0 start this season, the Lady Dogs stumbled down the stretch, losing seven of their final 13 games. But Landers thinks his team is returning to its early season form. “It’s exciting to me, and I think it’s exciting to [the players] that we seem to be climbing back to a level of play that we know we’re capable of, and we might even go past where we have been,” Landers said. “I’m excited about the opportunity to play four [games] but I’m also mindful that one is the big number. You just gotta go out and do what you got to do to beat Alabama.”

LOSS: Point deficit too big for Dogs to overcome ➤ From Page 1 Georgia battled Kentucky in the first half, entering halftime with a four-point deficit. But the transition speed of Kentucky’s star guard John Wall was too much to handle in the second half. The freshman notched 14 of his game-high 24 points in the second half. “They came in and just really came out aggressive and they just capitalized on our mistakes,” guard Dustin Ware said. “We weren’t really in sync like we should be or like we were during the first half and it definitely hurt us at the start.” Behind three consecutive 3-pointers Georgia cut the Kentucky lead to nine points with 5:18 remaining, igniting the dead Stegeman Coliseum crowd with visions of a third doubledigit comeback at home. But Kentucky’s length on the perimeter and in the interior bothered Georgia all night, blocking 14 shots and holding Georgia to just 40.3 percent shooting. “They’re the biggest team in the country, so they have a lot of size around the rim and on the perimeter also,” forward Jeremy Price said, who scored a season-high 19 points and grabbed six rebounds on the night. “And their guards are pretty long, so that affected us.” Georgia was unable to get critical stops — or buckets — down the stretch, and down nine points was the closest the Bulldogs would get to Kentucky the rest of the game. “We just kept fighting and clawing but we just couldn’t get some key stops down the stretch,” guard Ricky McPhee said. “We just needed that stop and we couldn’t get it, and we just couldn’t finish it off.”

March 4, 2010 Issue  

March 4, 2010 Issue of The Red & Black