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Red&Black The

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 118, No. 101 | Athens, Georgia

HOPE SCHOLARSHIP

MONEY TALKS, MONEY MATTERS

House passes HOPE bill, Students take interest in fees changes minimum GPA By MARIANA HEREDIA THE RED & BLACK

By KATIE VALENTINE THE RED & BLACK Students may not have to work as hard as they thought to keep their tuition fully covered by HOPE. The Georgia House of Representatives approved the HOPE Scholarship overhaul bill Tuesday in a 152-22 vote. The bill included an amendment that made the minimum college grade point average for Zell Miller Scholars a 3.3, instead of the previously proposed 3.5, in order to keep the standards similar to honors program requirements at Georgia’s research institutions. At the University,

the minimum cumulative GPA for the honors program is a 3.4. Under the bill, Zell Miller Scholarships, which will cover full tuition, will be awarded to high school students with at least a 3.7 GPA and a combined 1200 DEAL SAT score on reading and math. Returning college students can become Zell Miller Scholars if their high school credentials match these criteria. University See BILL, Page 3

It could mean a couple months of rent, a new job, more stress or just another number in your student account. Eight hundred and thirty-three dollars per semester in student fees could even mean an education. “The first thing that came to my mind was — I’m going to have to move back with my dad and drop out,” said Chyna Spivey, a sophomore psychology major from Alpharetta. Spivey said she depended heavily on her student loans to pay for college, and the possible HOPE scholarship cuts could affect her ability to afford an education at the University. “To hear we’re going to have to pay up to $2,000 — it could potentially change everything,” she said.

Under the new HOPE scholarship plan, students would have to pay the full $833 per semester in student fees. This amounts to $1,666 per year. Spivey said she would have to find a job for the summer, and she would try to find one for the rest of the spring semester. “My studies will be affected. I’ll have to split time between a job and school. I study so much already,” she said. “I’m not one of those people that doesn’t have to go to class or study to make As. I have to study 10 hours for a test to make those grades.” Ed Mirecki, director of student activities at the University, said he expects to get more inquiries about the student activities fee now that the money is coming from students’ own pockets. “They should take an interest in where that money is going. We would hope See PAY, Page 3

Officials sheepish about farm animal flock

Fox restores belief in basketball program By ZACH DILLARD THE RED & BLACK

By ADINA SOLOMON THE RED & BLACK

Chris Barnes never liked seeing blue. Georgia’s senior forward never liked seeing the oranges, crimsons or purples in the stands, either. But blue was the worst. For his first two seasons in Athens, Barnes often found himself in unfamiliar territory, looking up into a crowd only to find colors different from those on his own jersey — even when the Bulldogs were playing in the friendly confines of Stegeman Coliseum. “That was almost every game where we would look up into the stands, especially when we play people like Kentucky, we’d look up into the stands and see more blue than we see red and black,” Barnes said. These were not the types of aesthetics BARNES Barnes had imagined when he signed his letter of intent to play for the Bulldogs. But for many Georgia fans, attending home games at Stegeman often became an afterthought — a product of a lack of interest and, more importantPRICE ly, the team’s lack of success. Barnes and fellow senior Jeremy Price were freshmen and sophomores on Georgia teams that went a collective 7-25 in the Southeastern Conference during the 2007-08 and 2008-09 seasons. It was the tail end of a dismal stretch of games under former head coach Dennis Felton, and as a result, empty seats littered the arena when the Bulldogs played in Athens. “I remember back freshman and sophomore year, it would be like a few games — maybe only two or three games — that the fans would come out and show us a lot of support,” Price said. Attendance was down. The players were down. And Felton, who had compiled an 84-91 record over his six years as head coach, was on his way out. Even an NCAA Tournament

Have ewe seen the East Campus sheep? A fenced-in herd of sheep on East Campus are bleating away — and no one knows why they’re here. A sheep flock behind the University’s Hugh Hodgson School of Music appeared on campus to the surprise of students living in the East Campus dorms and many University departments. Phone calls on Tuesday to University Parking Services, Housing Services, the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Animal and Dairy Science Department at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences provided no answers. None of the departments called knew why a flock of sheep was grazing near student dorms. Tyler Murray, assistant farm manager in the Animal and Dairy Science Department, was at a loss for words for why the sheep were brought to East Campus. “I don’t know who owns those. I’m trying to find that out myself,” Murray said. “It doesn’t have anything to do with the farm.” He speculated that the sheep may be at the University in order to graze the area and cut back weeds. “There’s been other places who have used sheep where it’s overgrown,” Murray said.

See BLUE, Page 8

mostly sunny. High 69| Low 42

FRANCES MICKLOW | The Red & Black

S Mark Fox arrived from the University of Nevada two years ago, inheriting a program that hadn’t been relevant in years. Since then, he has helped Georgia become an NCAA Tournament contender this season.

GOOD AIM The Gym Dogs are targets. But they’re trying to ignore the bullseye. Story on page 7.

Where’s Mikey? President Adams has a 30 minute meeting with the SACS Reaffirmation Review committee. Put your best foot forward, Mikey.

Index

News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 4

BAND TOGETHER? King/Cobb has five ‘friends.’ Not bad for a band only two weeks old. Page 6 Variety ..................... 6 Sports ...................... 7

FRANCES MICKLOW | The Red & Black

S There are several sheep in a pen on East Campus. No one at the University could explain why they are there.

BIRTHDAY HOORAY He rhymes. He writes. He teaches life lessons. It’s his birthday. Page 5 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 7


NEWS

2 | Wednesday, March 2, 2011 | The Red & Black

SGA ends party system

University wireless gains speed following improvement Work scheduled to continue By AJ ARCHER THE RED & BLACK

By KATHRYN INGALL THE RED & BLACK The Student Government Association voted Tuesday to abolish the party system within the organization, SGA president Josh Delaney said. “The system is broken,� Delaney said in a phone interview Tuesday, adding that the “necessary evil� of the system is no longer necessary. Delaney addressed SGA about this issue at Tuesday night’s meeting. “The current party system is exclusive,� Delaney told The Red & Black. “It has kept a lot of thoughts, a lot of ideas out of the conversation.� KATHRYN INGALL | The Red & Black Tuesday night, SGA also voted in favor of a resolution to raise SGA executive com- S Student Government Association president Josh Delaney speaks at Tuesday night’s meeting. SGA pensation from its budget. “The reason I’m bringing voted to raise compensation for its executives. this to SGA tonight is I look at the role of being SGA pres- receives $7,500 in compensa- about this,� he said. “I think ident or vice president as akin tion. Georgia State’s presi- it sends the wrong message to being a job,� said Senator dent receives $6,600. to students.� Greg Wilson. Auburn University SGA Senator Greg Locke spoke Wilson said he didn’t think executives receive $8,500 and in favor of the change because the $1,000 for president, vice student government execu- of the hours the executives president and treasurer posi- tives at the University of spend on their job. tions was sufficient compen- Florida receive $8,995. “Sometimes they hide from sation. The resolution did not janitors because they still “I think we can all agree have specific numbers for the have work to do,� he said of that our SGA executives are increased compensation, but SGA’s office in the Tate under compensated for the leaves the amount to next Center. work they do,� he said. year’s administration. President Josh Delaney Wilson said compared to Senator Wells Ellenberg said it was personally difficult the student government orga- said raising the salaries of to hold his job with University nizations at other colleges in executives is not the right housing and work in SGA. the state and in the SEC, the message to send during tough “Every student should feel University’s compensation is economic times. like they have the opportunimuch lower. “I just feel like in general ty to run for SGA president,� Georgia Tech’s president this is the wrong time to talk he said.

PEARLS BEFORE SWINEÂŽ

BY

STEPHAN PASTIS

Students are now able to log on to Facebook faster after the most recent changes to the University’s Internet connection. The Internet availability at the University is continuing to improve, according to Enterprise Information Technology Services. As of Feb. 12, there is a new 1-gigabyte per second network connection on the TransitRail network. The TransitRail network will provide faster access to sites such as Facebook, Netflix and Pandora. This expansion, along with the University System of Georgia’s grant of additional bandwidth on the PeachNet network, has diminished Internet congestion at the University. “Based on speed tests, communicaRIVERS tions during peak hours have significantly improved,� said Brian Rivers, information security officer for EITS. On Feb. 13, The Red & Black reported the wireless connection on campus was running at speeds as low as 1 megabit per second instead of the normal 12 to 15 megabits per second. One of the possible reasons for the slowness was the increase in the use of high-definition video and peerto-peer sharing on the wireless network. Although work has been done, it is not yet over. Rivers said EITS intends to further improve the wireless infrastructure. “We will be deploying additional measures like wireless encryption as well as some performance improvements for wireless authentication,� Rivers said. There are speculations that the increase in bandwidth could create potential concerns regarding an increase in Internet attacks. EITS

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PeachNet Network: UĂŠ/Â…iĂŠ1Â˜ÂˆĂ›iĂ€ĂƒÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ-ĂžĂƒĂŒiÂ“ĂŠÂœvĂŠ iÂœĂ€}ˆ>ĂŠ}>Ă›iĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ1Â˜ÂˆĂ›iĂ€ĂƒÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ>Â˜ĂŠ >``ÂˆĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜>Â?Ê£ääʓi}>LÂˆĂŒĂƒĂŠÂŤiÀÊ ĂƒiVœ˜`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂŒÂ…ÂˆĂƒĂŠÂ˜iĂŒĂœÂœĂ€ÂŽĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ/Â…iĂŠL>˜`ĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠiĂ?ÂŤ>Â˜ĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂœÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠ ÂˆÂ“ÂŤĂ€ÂœĂ›iĂŠÂ˜ĂŒiĂ€Â˜iĂŒĂŠVœ˜}iĂƒĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠ Source: EITS has plans to protect students and reduce the possibility of an attack. “The network operations and security staff are working to improve the capacity of our Internet security equipment in order to minimize the impact these attacks could have on the Internet performance,â€? Rivers said. Taylor Bartz, a freshman pre-med psychology major from Suwanee, said he is glad the Internet connection improved throughout the month of February. “I am busy all the time, so when I sit down to do homework it’s the only time I have,â€? Bartz said. “If the Internet does not work at that time, I am put in a stressful situation.â€? Emily Saeger, a graduate research assistant in Grady College, said she is also looking forward to an even stronger Internet connection, so she may better conduct class for her students. “Sitting through a lecture class with no visual element is not the worst thing in the world, but professors like to have students as engaged and tuned in as possible,â€? Saeger said.

After six years away from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, David Lee may be returning. Lee, vice president for research at the University, is one of three finalists vying to become vice chancellor for research at UNC. He joined the University in his present position after serving as LEE UNC chairman for the department of biochemistry and biophysics. Lee was unavailable for comment Tuesday. Jere Morehead, University senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, said in a statement he hoped Lee

would decide to remain at the University after considering the position at UNC. “I think Dr. Lee is doing an excellent job at the University of Georgia, but I certainly understand his willingness to explore a possible return to UNC-Chapel Hill, where he spent most of his academic career,� Morehead said. Lee is one of several administrators who have either considered positions outside the University or left the University in the past year. Garnett Stokes, dean of the University’s Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, applied to fill the position of provost at Miami University in Ohio

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during fall semester. Barbara White, University chief information officer and associate provost, plans to step down from her position Dec. 31. Tom Jackson, University vice president for public affairs, said it’s a compliment to the University when professors and administrators are considered by other universities. “When you have good people, other people are going to be competing for them,� he said. “If he does go, it will be their tremendous gain and our great loss.� Jackson said he was unsure what the University would do if Lee was accepted for the position. “It would be speculative to jump ahead right now,� he said. “He’s not gone yet.�

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Vice president of research up for chancellor job at UNC-Chapel Hill By TIFFANY STEVENS THE RED & BLACK

Low expectations: Less disappointment.

UNIVERSITY NETWORKS

CRIME NOTEBOOK Orange thrown through Church Hall window A dorm room window on the north side of Church Hall was reported broken Monday after an unknown individual threw an orange, according to a University Police report. Informants told police the damage to the window occurred between 7:50 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Damage was estimated to be less than $500, according to the report. Cell phone theft at Ramsey reported A University student reported Monday her cell phone was taken from the girls’ locker room at the Ramsey Center on Feb. 22, according to a University Police report. The student’s LG cell phone, valued at $200, was reportedly taken from an unsecured locker between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. The incident reported Monday makes the sixth of its kind reported at the Ramsey Center this semester. — Compiled by Tiffany Stevens

The Cosmopolitan Club, pictured with Tuesday’s “Exhibit wraps up desegregation events,� was organized in 1920, not just following desegregation. Monday’s “Pharmacy ruling clears Regents in copyright case,� should have stated that the appeals court returned the case to the district court to determine if there is a need for an injunction. The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Mimi Ensley (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Rachel G. Bowers (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com

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NEWS

MANDATORY STUDENT FEES UGA

Georgia Tech

Georgia State

Georgia College

Activity

$75

$123

$92

$123

Athletic

$53

$123

$251

$175

Health

$191

$150

$35

$95

Recreation

$14

$54

$53

---

Institutional

$200

$194

$168

$175

Student Center

$80

---

$36

---

Technology

$114

$107

$85

$68

Transportation

$103

$72

$46

$64

Other

$3

---

$48

$84

Total

$833

$823

$814

$784

PAY: Some want optional fees ¢From Page 1 students are knowledgeable about taking advantage of the services,” he said. “Certainly with this whole HOPE issue, I would imagine they would be more aware. That’s the mindset we operate from. We are accountable to students, and we want them to be interested.” Students at the University pay $75 for the student activities fee and $14 for the recreational fee per semester. Mirecki said students should try to take advantage of the programs provided by the student activities fee because these programs are part of what makes the college experience. “There’s so many different opportunities and programs and services that ANTHONY make the collegiate experience at the University of Georgia that people should try to keep that in mind,” he said. “If you start to nickel and dime things — does that take away the fabric of what makes UGA what it is? That is a discussion about a much larger conversation about HOPE, tuition and fees.” Spivey said she is in a complicated situation. She would like to take advantage of the programs provided by the fees, but her time is limited. She said only paying certain fees would make things easier. “That should be optional,” she said. “I should be more involved, but I don’t have the time. If I’m not, why do I have to pay?” However, Mirecki said waiving the fees would drastically change the University and students’ experiences at the University. “How would that impact campus if we take away programs and services? We don’t get to be UGA anymore. Students come to Georgia instead of Georgia State because of what we offer,” he said. “What are we willing to cut and what are we will-

y m d n u I fo . . . t a R 2 B www.joinermanagement.com

ing to live without? Unfortunately, that’s the situation.” Jerry Anthony, associate director of Campus Life, said students should also take some caution when comparing how much they pay in fees to other schools. “When you look at those numbers and say, ‘We have to pay this, but they don’t have to pay that.’ Well, the difference between a clinic and a full-blown health center makes a huge difference in how much your fee is going to be,” he said. Additionally, Mirecki said students need to realize how much of their money is really going toward certain activities. “We’re operating on the philosophy that students need to be informed. We need to have information available,” he said. “This past fall, I was hearing from students saying ‘I want my fees back from the Ludacris concert.’ Eight hundred dollars in fees doesn’t pay for Ludacris. For that concert in particular, it was 12 cents per student.” Still, Spivey said it would be easier if students could just pay for the services they were actively using. “Paying fees for classes is not a big deal because I’m taking that class, and I love the [football] games. We get great deals. I would pay for that too,” she said. Mirecki said one of the challenges right now for the student activities department is providing this information to students. “That’s our struggle. We want to be transparent and help students understand. That is a challenge,” he said. “We need to really be prepared to have that information available. Where is the best place and way to put that — that’s a challenge we’re working on.” Spivey said she was understanding about having to pay the fees now, however. “I understand why we have to do this. We don’t have any money. Our nation doesn’t have any money. I get that there have to be cuts,” she said. “I’m a psychology major. I want to help people. I want the opportunity to do that, but if it’s taken away, it’s taken away.”

We’ll help you find yours! 706-353-6868

The Red & Black | Wednesday, March 2, 2011 | 3

BILL: More time left for input ¢From Page 1

uphold its end of the bargain.” students who maintain a Delaney said the change 3.0 will have 90 percent of in tuition coverage would their tuition covered by affect college students HOPE. who chose to come to the Stephanie Mayfield, University because of the press secretary for Gov. free tuition they were proNathan Deal’s office, said vided under HOPE. in order to find out wheth“Students made finaner students qualify for the cial and academic plans Zell Miller Scholarship, based on current HOPE universities will have to go requirements, and many back through each stu- will have to dramatically dent’s high school tran- alter their plans,” he said. script, noting GPAs and Mayfield said the goverSAT scores. nor chose not to Tom Jackson, keep college stuvice president for dents under the public affairs, said original HOPE covhe didn’t know who erage in order to at the University preserve the scholwould be responsiarship. ble for determining “We wouldn’t which students are have been able to eligible for the Zell preserve it in this Miller Scholarship. way if we had done “I don’t know JACKSON that,” she said. where our capacity “Serious decisions lies to go back through had to be made there.” high school transcripts,” The bill will now move he said. “I think we’ll just on to the Senate, which have to handle the legisla- Mayfield said could haption as it passes.” pen later this week or early Josh Delaney, president next week. of the Student Government The bill took one week Association, said he’s glad to go from proposal to the college GPA for Zell passed by the House of Miller Scholars was Representatives — a timereduced to a 3.3, but he line that some legislators said the bill needs to found short for such a include a grandfather large bill. clause, which would allow Brian Thomas (D returning students to keep Lilburn), chairman of the the full tuition coverage Georgia minority caucus, they received when they said the bill passed quickentered college. ly, but there is still time for “It’s almost like a con- public input before it goes tract,” Delaney said. “We to the Senate. upheld our end of the bar“It did move more gain by maintaining our quickly than most bills do, 3.0, and the state needs to but there will be time on

HOPE BILL CHANGES In a 152-22 vote, the Georgia House of Representatives passed the HOPE bill. The bill passed with one major change — Zell Miller Scholars must keep a 3.3 GPA instead of the 3.5 GPA proposed in the governor’s original legislation.

the Senate side to address more concerns,” he told The Red & Black. Delaney said the fast pace of the bill was understandable, since parents needed to know as soon as possible what the changes to HOPE would be, but he worried that important opinions may not have been heard before the bill was seen by the House. “I’m worried that if it goes too quickly, we’ll miss out on some valuable voices in this debate,” he said. Delaney said he would encourage University students to contact their state senators during the next few days and tell them what they think about the HOPE overhaul proposal. “Tell them you think that students should be grandfathered in under the contract they were enrolled under,” he said.

Get StudentNotesTM for midterms. You can pick up notes 5 days before your test. For information, call (706) 546-1440 or go to www.studentnotes.com AAEC ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ADPR ADPR ANTH ANTH ANTH ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARTS ASTR ASTR BCMB BCMB BCMB BCMB BCMB BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL CBIO

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4 | Wednesday, March 2, 2011 | The Red & Black

Mimi Ensley | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Rachel G. Bowers | Managing Editor me@randb.com Courtney M. Holbrook | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

SGA must prove campus purpose I

t is strange to see a single-party government panic. But that’s exactly what is happening to our beloved Student Government Association. Monday’s Red & Black featured desperate pleas to students from both representatives of the SGA and The Red & Black editorial board. Fortunately, this shows SGA recognizes its need to justify its existence. In a year where HOPE is being slashed and students are worrying about how they will pay for their educations, SGA has presented highly visible resolutions on Israel and cigarettes. Bravo. They couldn’t even drum up enough interest in their organization to get more than one party on this year’s ballot. So I am inclined to disagree with Mimi Ensley’s column for the editorial board (“Get involved now,” Feb. 28). The ball is not in the court of students to prove they care by voting — but in the court of SGA to prove why students should vote. Why should students spend their valuable time going onto OASIS to vote for a single-party government that all too often serves as the scapegoat of Dear Leader President Michael Adams? Why should we legitimize an organization that views the opinion of 6 percent of students as a mandate? Would those students do more for the University than Josh “The Voice of the People” Delaney? It’s quite possible. But how would ambitious students pad their résumés without the help of a position representing us? They might have to engage in such worthless pursuits as student research or charity work. Adams would have to take responsibility for his own decisions, rather than

Opinions

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JACOB SHEPHERD shifting the blame to students and their supposed representatives. The horror! Though these consequences would be hard to bear, many students would be willing to endure them. It is time for SGA to step out of its bubble and talk to the people it claims to represent. It is time for the members of SGA to prove their values to the students of the University. Let’s talk this out. If they want a forum to defend themselves, I have one. Thursday, the Demosthenian Literary Society will be debating “Be it resolved, the UGA Student Government Association should be disbanded immediately.” This is an excellent opportunity to discuss the role of the SGA on campus. I invite all SGA members or potential members to come out and prove their values. If you believe what SGA does is vital for this University, please come out and tell us why. It is your duty as our representatives to do so. And as a one-party system, SGA needs to prove it still cares about democracy. What better way to prove you love democracy than by coming out and debating your fellow students? If you don’t, people might start thinking SGA is a dictatorship. And that is a bad position to be in these days. — Jacob Shepherd is a senior from Newnan majoring in history and international affairs and is the president of the Demosthenian Literary Society

Stop whining about our HOPE cuts A

few years ago, I ran out of money. Now, I’m almost out of patience. If I hear one more North Cobb suburbanite complain, irony-free and with whining turned to 11, “I don’t want to have to take out student loans,” I will snap. News flash for the uneducated: HOPE is not the end-all, be-all. It does not pay for all of my education, or even the great majority of it. After accounting for room and board, book costs and other expenses each year, I’d guess it covers only two-thirds, or maybe less. The rest I cover with debt: $5,500 for my freshman year, $6,500 now, and a projected $7,500 for the year before graduation. All told, it’s $19,000 I’ll owe the government — at a reasonable interest rate, to be sure — and with a lenient installment plan that spans 10 years. Long after I hope to have made a name for myself as the nation’s foremost blogger of cat memes, I’ll still be paying back the remnants of my time here. This isn’t whining: I chose the student loan route, instead of leaving the burden for my parents. I stand by that choice. But in all the discussion about HOPE’s monetary woes and Gov. Nathan Deal’s plan to correct

ADAM CARLSON them, there is an ugly strain of selfentitlement and self-pity in those vocal outcries of the upper-middle class. The phrases are carefully-worded: education should be a priority. We should not stiff the future generations to pay off the debts of the present. It’s the subtext that’s ugly: Zell Miller came up with this scheme to get me to the voting booth in the first place … and now you’re going to take it away? And that’s what I’m whining about — and publicly deriding and loudly condemning. Who are these people complaining Georgia isn’t giving them a fair shake by no longer subsidizing all of their state-run education? There are those, I imagine, who complain because they have a good reason to: money is tight. Deal’s new plan will only make it tighter, strangling wallets everywhere. And then there are those who complain needlessly. Based on my anecdotal skew, those most likely with their mouths wide-open don’t seem well

acquainted with actually attempting to pay off the bills accrued from the University. Tuition? Who cares! HOPE will cover it. Room and board, books, lab fees and weekly allowances? Who cares! Mom and dad will cover it. The New York Times published a story (“Georgia Facing a Hard Choice on Free Tuition,” Jan. 6) about the pending HOPE crisis and how it may affect college students in Athens. The article opens with an anecdote introducing a catchy little phrase: Hopemobile — a car given to students by their parents as a sort of “thank-you” for saving them so much money by going to school in state. I cannot begin to describe how ridiculous I find the idea, if these cars do exist. And if they don’t, the metaphor remains apt: for that sliver of the University community who find themselves in penniless-pinching duress, the Hopemobiles are rapidly running out of gas. Maybe when they get out to push, they’ll finally join the rest of us who have to walk. — Adam Carlson is a sophomore from Hiram majoring in magazines and film studies and is a variety writer for The Red & Black

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E-mail and letters from our readers

Pence Amendment v. Planned Parenthood debate angers students I would encourage Jonathan Linn to do some research before comparing emergency contraception to abortion (“Pence Amendment maintains our values,” March 1). Emergency contraception is NOT the abortion pill, RU-486. It is a very high dose of the hormones found in birth control pills, such as levonorgestrel and progestin, and attempts to prevent pregnancy from happening. It WILL NOT terminate an already existing pregnancy or adversely effect an existing pregnancy. If you’re going to write an opinion article that includes facts, please make sure the facts you’re giving are accurate. RUTH WALKER Junior, Watkinsville Psychology I take issue with the claim that the Pence Amendment maintains “our values.” If you look at the numbers of women who have utilized Planned Parenthood’s resources, it seems like it only upholds “someone’s values.” Jonathan Linn (“Pence Amendment maintains our values,” March 1) claims that his issue with Planned Parenthood is that our tax dollars are going to prevent unplanned births. Well, Linn, as someone who has worked in a pharmacy in a low-income area for the past few years, I can tell you another area that our tax dollars go to that you seem to have overlooked: Medicaid. Medicaid is supported by tax funding, and I would hazard a guess that many of the children on Medicaid that I

see in the pharmacy on a regular basis were not planned. I don’t know about you, but I’d rather have my tax money go to low-cost birth control for a couple for a few years than pay for 18 years of medical expenses for the child they didn’t want to have. Abstinence isn’t a realistic option for most people, and not everyone can afford contraceptives. Wouldn’t it be a logical extension that if they can’t afford contraceptives they probably can’t afford medical care? So maybe the Pence Amendment maintains YOUR values, but maybe if you were a woman, or poor, or both, you could see how much damage it has the potential to do. CHRISTINA BRUCE Grad student, Hoschton Pharmacy Jonathan Linn (“Pence Amendment maintains our values,” March 1) is correct about the absolute effectiveness of abstinence compared to birth control or condoms. No one questions this. The real debate concerns teaching people to be abstinent or to use contraceptives. In this, the latter clearly shines. People are going to have sex; telling them not to or to wait until marriage is foolhardy. Besides the fact that there is nothing morally problematic about pre-marital sex, abstinence education leaves out those who do not wish to marry — or are legally forbidden to. Providing citizens with contraceptives to prevent pregnancies and STI’s works. I see nothing wrong with Linn’s imagined

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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Planned Parenthood utopia of condoms being given out like “lollipops at grocery stores.” This isn’t encouraging intercourse — sex drives do that well enough. This is encouraging safety. Preventing unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections is a public health issue. Why shouldn’t the government be involved? ALAN REESE Senior, Savannah Music performance and Music theory Comparing the services provided by Planned Parenthood to asking a friend to loan you $5 for condoms is like comparing the services provided by homeless shelters to asking a friend to loan you rent money or grocery money. In Jonathan Linn’s column (“Pence Amendment maintains our values,” March 1), he seems to believe that providing contraception to people who couldn’t otherwise afford it is something that the state shouldn’t worry about. Although I agree with Linn that abstinence is obviously the best way of avoiding unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, it is simply unrealistic to believe that people will stop having sex just because these services are not readily available or now cost money. I’m pretty sure the issues that arose from unprotected sex were the reason for the advent of Planned Parenthood in the first place, things like the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s. It is the state’s business to protect its citizens, even from themselves, and reducing the possibility of illegitimate or

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unwanted children and STDs and providing counseling for those who face these problems would seem to be a very worthy allocation of funds. The reason Planned Parenthood “markets unplanned pregnancy as a preventable monster” is because that’s exactly what it is. For as long as there have been people, there has been sex out of wedlock. So why is it now considered evil to try to prevent something that could ruin a life, or ‘lives’ if contraception is not available? Perhaps when we live in the perfect world Mr. Linn imagines already exists where people are abstinent until marriage, because they have no way of having safe sex, perhaps then there will be no need for Planned Parenthood. Until then, the Pence Amendment will only be detrimental to society at large. JULIA OPPENHEIMER Senior, Mobile, Ala. English

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NEWS

The Red & Black | Wednesday, March 2, 2011 | 5

MAN ON THE STREET: University students help Dr. Seuss’ birthday Kindergartners and college students join in celebration. Today is a day of jubilation. Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, is having a birthday, so shake your caboose. He provided us with stories and clever rhyme schemes. His images have bounced around in

our dreams. From “The Cat in the Hat” to “Horton Hears a Who,” he’s sometimes political, but he’s really fun, too. So, which is your favorite? Don’t tell us, we’ll guess. The Red & Black wants to see which book is the best. — Charles Hicks

ANDREW COWAN

LAURA ROBINSON

senior management information systems major from Stone Mountain

sophomore biology major from Moultrie “I’d have to say ‘Green Eggs and Ham.’”

“Good question. ‘Green Eggs and Ham.’ I think it was one of the first books I ever read.”

MONICA HASELDEN

SARAH BRINSON

senior speech communication major from Savannah “‘One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish.’ I had the lines memorized.”

junior health promo promotion major from Dublin “Probably ‘The Cat in the Hat.’”

TYLER RICKS

EMILY BECK

sophomore finance and economics major from Gwinnett

junior marketing major from Tallahassee, Fla.

“‘Green Eggs and Ham.’ My birthday is St. Patrick’s day, so every year my mother would make us green eggs and ham..”

‘“One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish.’”

ANDRES GIRALDO

sophomore biology major from Cali, Colombia “‘[Oh], the Places You’ll Go!’ I got it for high school graduation.”

to reform local education By NATHAN SORENSEN THE RED & BLACK

In recent months, education reform has taken on a new face and a new name — Michelle Rhee. As the former Chancellor of District of Columbia Public Schools, Rhee has become a well-known national figure for her ideologies in education reform, ideologies which have included closing schools and firing teachers. She has spoken with many state and local education boards around the nation, and has even spent time explaining her policies and philosophies on national TV with Oprah Winfrey. Jim Marshall, associate dean for academic programs in the department of education, said there is more than just Rhee’s way to reform education. Marshall pointed to J.J. Harris, a 2-year-old elementary school in Athens that works collaboratively with the University to provide professional development for elementary school students as well as undergraduates. “Education reform is happening there,” Marshall said. “It just shows that you don’t have to do it with a red pen and an axe.” Rhee’s ideologies have brought about much talk of reform in education but also much public scrutiny over her work in the DCPS school system. Many educators and administrators have found her methods in the DCPS system a necessary change which brought about quick results. But there are also many who found her methods extreme and even anti-progressive. For Marshall, Rhee and her policies are simply one way of reforming education. “Michelle Rhee is just one perspective in education reform,” Marshall said. “But there are other perspectives to look in to as far as reform is concerned: professional development of educators, focusing

more on the relationship the community plays on a school district and paying more attention to how achievement is assessed.” For some students in the education department, the hard-nose evaluation of teachers is the integral part of Rhee’s ideas of reform. Ana Cambias, an English education major from Chilé, said firing a teacher is sometimes necessary. “I support getting rid of a teacher that’s ineffective, but there are also other mitigating factors to consider, such as a high crime rate, too many students, or a shortage of supplies in a school system or community,” Cambias said. While serving as the chancellor for DCPS, Rhee closed dozens of schools, fired hundreds of teachers and cut the central office administration in half. “Michelle Rhee is working out of a corporate reform model and that concerns me,” said Stephanie

Jones, associate professor of elementary and social studies education. “A corporate model makes me think their idea of reform is pointing toward competition instead of cooperation.” A part of Rhee’s model for reform also includes hiring enthusiastic and young teachers quickly, a tactic which Jones said was not conducive to effective longterm reform. “We have to have teachers who are willing to stay in the classroom for a long time, and the model for recruiting and training teachers really quickly is not a sustainable education reform model,” Jones said. Jones said much of Rhee’s success seems to stem from her personality. “She’s young, charismatic and articulate,” Jones said. “These attributes seem to have provided the conditions for national limelight.”

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VARIETY

6 | Wednesday, March 2, 2011 | The Red & Black

DANCE FOR A CAUSE When: Today from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Where: Botanical Gardens Price: $5 suggested donation, $10 T-shirts

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

S Program attendees will get to exercise Zumba style while also raising money for Children First at the Botanical Gardens.

Latin dance event will help children By KELLY CORBETT THE RED & BLACK Tonight, Zumba — a fitness program inspired by Latin music — is not just an exercise trend, but a way to raise awareness for foster children in Clarke and Oconee counties. The State Botanical Garden of Georgia is hosting “Dance for a Cause” to raise money for Children First, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing safe environments for children in times of family crisis. “I’m hoping that more people will learn about Children First and the CASA program,” said Susie Weller, volunteer coordinator for Court Appointed Special Advocates. “As well as have a good time, because Zumba is always a good time.” CASA is one of the four programs administered by Children First. In 2010, the garden hosted a similar event and raised more than $1,000. For this event, about 10 Zumba instructors will teach two to three songs each. There will also be refreshments, food and door prizes. Michelle Vaught, Zumba instructor at the garden and around Athens, will teach dances to three songs at the event, including “Shots” by LMFAO. “It’s really amazing to do something you love for a good cause,” she said. There will also be live drums, said Cora Keber, education coordinator for the event. “It’s going to be really awesome,” Keber said. “The energy is amazing and the garden is incredible to host an event like this.” Children First is using the money to go toward a recently-purchased house off Pope Sreet. The group will also hold an event at Casa Mia in the fall. Children First has around 40 volunteers. “We are always looking for people who are wanting to advocate for children,” Weller said. Volunteers must be 21 years old by the time their 40 hour training is complete. “It’s a big commitment, but it’s amazing the impact it has on the children and the community they represent,” Weller said. “The volunteers are the heart of the program. We need them and love them.”

CHRIS MILLER | The Red & Black

S Taking a different approach to ‘being a band’ — the members wrote their first songs after first writing song titles — King/Cobb performs its debut show tonight, throwing caution to the wind.

On a whim, band accepts first show By CHRIS MILLER THE RED & BLACK Here lies the tale of King/Cobb, the band that wasn’t, then was, and whose future is as uncertain as it’s past. A few months ago, a group of friends who regularly gathered in an unassuming house on Barber Street decided to formalize their musical diversions into a concrete form, a band if you will, for the most noble of reasons. “We were like, ‘We have to start a band and name

KING/COBB When: Tonight at 9 Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+) $7 (18+) Also Playing: Arturo In Letto, The Jersey Barrier, Dylan Gilbert it King/Cobb cause we’ll get some girls and be popular,’” said vocalist and junior Thomas Bauer. And so they did, sort of. They continued their regular “jam sessions,” which involved experimenting with limited musical

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knowledge and the plethora of synthesizers, drum machines, stringed instruments and microphones scattered about Bauer’s room. They spread the word to friends and acquaintances, piquing interest only to break off and proudly announce that they were going to rehearse. “When we would tell people we were playing, we would actually be playing stuff,” said Louis Arnold, vocalist, guitarist, keyboardist, lyricist and a sophomore. “But we’d still just be sitting there, not playing anything solid, not trying to write anything down.” Not necessarily a charade, but the notion that they were a formal band might have been slightly misleading. Nonetheless, the quintet soldiered on, bubbling with creativity, constantly coming up with ideas, but not necessarily fulfilling them all the way to song form. “We wrote a set list, just names, then we figured out what would sound good going with those names as the song title,” Arnold said. “So we wrote all the song titles before we had any music.” The products of the band’s creativity were not limited to song titles. Album names — “Love Sinks” will be its premier — art, themes, theatrical plans, even ideas on fulllength concept albums and a Greatest Hits have been in the works. Meanwhile, the word continued to spread, and now the band page on Facebook shows five friends and thirty “Likes.” Not a bad following for a band that had, only a few weeks ago, no structured songs written, much less shows performed or recordings made. Then Bauer came across local musician and friend A.J. Weiss of Arturo In Letto, who offered King/Cobb an opening slot at a show. “So we had a show Jan. 12 lined up, which was like

the week after I told him we would play, and we didn’t have anything,” Bauer said. “Then he cancelled the show on us, which was great.” But when Weiss offered the band another slot, the one tonight, well, they again were in need of some songs. “We were still in the phase where everyone wanted to be in a band and we just had a lot of [musical equipment], so we started practicing and actually trying to make songs,” Bauer said. What the band has come up within the past few weeks is a loose set of off-kilter, comedy laden songs ranging from ultrapsychedelic folk to deranged, chunky rock, relying heavily on Bauers’ eccentric vocals, mildly nonsensical lyrics, and looped rhythm tracks. On top of that comes promised theatrics, including ideas — that may or may not come to fruition — such as tossing Krystal burgers into the crowd, a home-made lamp microphone stand and a cardboard train parading through the audience. “I definitely think being in Athens is a big influence on [the performance art aspect],” said Bauer, an Atlanta native. “It’s definitely an atmosphere that makes me feel comfortable presenting something like that in front of an audience.” As has so many times been proven in Athens, anyone with a little creativity and will can start a band, and the audience can decide for themselves whether they enjoy it. In fact, some of Athens’ biggest bands were started adhering to principles of unrestricted creativity and joy, just like King/ Cobb. And if it doesn’t work out as well as it did for the B-52s? “The thing we’re looking at right now is that, this is the last show we HAVE to play,” Arnold said. “I mean, it’s the first one, but it’s also the last one.”


SPORTS

The Red & Black | Wednesday, March 2, 2011 | 7

Walk-on hears chants, embraces opportunity

Gym Dogs remain ‘a target’ By CHRIS D’ANIELLO THE RED & BLACK With 10 national championships since 1987, including five in a row from 2005-09, the Georgia gymnastics team is used to having a target on its back. But this year, that target on the Gym Dogs’ backs has been particularly evident. The conference portion of the schedule is wrapped up, and each SEC opponent the No. 6 Gym Dogs faced all year posted its highest team score at the time against them. “I guess what that means is most people still consider us to be a target,” head coach Jay Clark said. “Georgia’s been good for a long time, so we know we’re probably going to get everybody’s best shots on most nights because they want to beat Georgia. When you’ve dominated in the past, you’re going to have that target for a while.” On Friday, Georgia posted its season high and first score of the year more than 197 with a 197.225, but was bested by now-No. 3 Alabama’s season high of 197.675. “That doesn’t change what we do,” Clark said. “We prepare based on what our team is capable of doing. We are not in a position where we can change things or do things differently based on who the opponent is, that doesn’t happen.” Sophomore Noel Couch echoed her coach’s thoughts on ignoring the opponents and focusing only on Georgia gymnastics. “All these teams keep putting up their high scores against us,” she said. “But we’re not even focusing on them. Whether it’s practice, whether it’s a meet, we’re focused on winning today and what we’re doing.” Senior Cassidy McComb admitted, however, that having other teams gunning for her and her teammates does drive them in training. “It kind of fuels our fire,” McComb said. “Because we know they’re going to be on their game, so we’ve got to be on ours.” The Gym Dogs have been “on their game” the last few weeks, scoring 49 or higher in 13 straight events, starting on Feb. 4 against Arkansas. And this new-found consistency is something the team stressed heavily. “I feel really good about what we’ve done the past couple of weeks,” Clark said. “And I feel good about the way they’ve gone about their business consistently in the gym. Consistency and confidence are gradual things and

By MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK

FRANCES MICKLOW| The Red & Black

S Noel Couch and her Gym Dog teammates are just outside of the top five in the rankings, but the bullseye remains on their backs as one of the teams to beat. the past three weeks of training I feel good about.” Though the Gym Dogs have suffered two home losses to Alabama and No. 1 Florida during their 13-event streak of 49s, Clark pointed out that winning or losing individual matches is less telling about a team in gymnastics than most other sports. “We want to win every meet we compete in,” he said. “There’s no question about that. But the reality is that this is a sport where that is really not that much of a consequence.” Clark recalled the 2009 Alabama team that finished the year with a losing overall record, but the Crimson Tide ended up placing second in the NCAA

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on a regular basis, advising him on his progress as a player and how to present himself on and To the casual eye, Matt off the court. Bucklin looks like a normal “He tells me he’s proud of University student and hardly a how I’m doing,” Bucklin said. Georgia men’s basketball play- “He definitely gave me some er. advice on how I should act in He’s 6-foot, 170 pounds and the gym and that not only is a marketing major. He doesn’t would my performance on court tower over his classmates and be important, but as a walk-on turn heads on campus, like my performance in the classsome of his teammates. room would be important as Perhaps it’s that average Joe well.” normality that has made the It was that kind of advice junior guard a fan favorthat motivated Bucklin ite and the most chantthrough the walk-on ed name by the student process, which started section near the end of after an established blowout games at career at Pope High Stegeman Coliseum. School in his native “I don’t know why Marietta. they do it,” Bucklin said. Following in the foot“It would be good to steps of his older brothknow that they respecter Mike — who played ed the hard work I put in for Georgia during the BUCKLIN at practice.” 2002-03 and 2003-04 seaBucklin has played in sons — Bucklin attemptonly seven games this season, ed to walk on the summer averaging just 2.1 minutes per before his freshman year in outing. 2008, but the Bulldogs had His only offensive tally this already reached their 15-player season was a free throw against maximum for the season. High Point on Dec. 21. Rather than giving up and But when Georgia is on the pursuing the life of a normal positive end of a blowout, the student, Bucklin stayed in chants for Bucklin begin — and touch with the program, evenhe’s aware of it. tually earning a spot on the “At some point you’re in the team after a player was diszone and you can’t really hear missed before the start of the it,” Bucklin said. “But at that 2008-09 season. point of the game, it’s fun. I’d “During my freshman year I be lying if I didn’t say that in loved being part of the team,” the back of my head I was Bucklin said. “I was kind of thinking I might get a chance wearing my gear everywhere. I to play.” loved it.” The “We want Bucklin” When Fox was hired as head chants were heard during coach in 2009, his introduction Georgia’s 64-48 win over South to Bucklin came with a scholarCarolina Saturday. With 1:12 ship offer, ensuring him a spot remaining on the clock and a on the team for the remainder win already secured, Georgia of his time at the University. head coach Mark Fox cleared The offer was special for him his bench, sending out Bucklin. and his family, who had all The crowd celebrated his University tuition and fees arrival as if it was a statement picked up by the University — of victory. along with some new benefits. “It still feels like it comes “Eating for free,” Bucklin down to the last possession,” said. “It helps my parents out a Fox said. “But I guess the last lot.” 30 seconds you could enjoy it.” Since then, Bucklin has felt Even though his on-court at home in the Georgia men’s presence late in the game may basketball program, earning not factor directly into the respect from his teammates Bulldogs’ victories, Bucklin is despite his low-key status on humble in regards to his grow- the court. ing student fan base. Off the court, however, he is He learned his humility more than low-key — and the through noble advice from a chants by the student section family member — and distin- let him know that. guished basketball coach. “Anytime you can get out Tom Izzo, Michigan State there, it’s fun,” Bucklin said. head basketball coach and “It’s a lot of fun when I can get Bucklin’s uncle, talks to Bucklin in the last two minutes.”

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championships behind only No. 1 Georgia. “It’s all a matter of when you peak and how you’re able to progress,” he said. “And we feel like we’re doing a good job of improving. The unfortunate thing is everyone else is improving too.” Clark did not want to downplay the importance of winning, however, especially at an historic program such as Georgia. “You never want to lose, you’re always disappointed when you lose, and you don’t want to diminish that fact,” he said. “At Georgia, our intention is to win them all ... You don’t expect to lose here and the fans don’t expect you to lose.”

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8 | Wednesday, March 2, 2011 | The Red & Black

SPORTS

BLUE: Coach makes basketball relevant ¢From Page 1 appearance in 2008 — stemming from a three-day miracle run that crowned the Bulldogs as SEC Tournament champions — could not turn the tides of the program. If anything, some loyal fans believe the tournament appearance only made matters worse. “I really think that the month before we went to the SEC Championship [in 2008] and the year after we won it were really the low point,” said Nathan Lawrence, a fifth-year senior in the basketball pep band who has attended nearly every Georgia game since the 2006-07 season. “Dennis Felton sort of bought himself another year and we just didn’t get any better.” The University’s basketball program reached its tipping point when a Jan. 28, 2009, trip to Gainesville, Fla., yielded a lopsided 83-57 loss to the Florida Gators and sent the team to 0-5 in the SEC. With Georgia floundering in a seven-game losing streak, Felton was relieved of his head coaching duties during the season with the team’s overall record at 9-11. Price, Barnes and the rest of the Bulldogs played the remainder of the 200809 season under interim coach Pete Herrmann — finishing dead last in the SEC East. The team began looking forward to the next coach to attempt to right the ship in Athens. The only question: Who?

LSU VS GEORGIA When: Tonight at 8 Where: Stegeman Coliseum More Information: Tickets are $2 for students.

‘Believe’ When former Georgia athletic director Damon Evans made the move to fire Dennis Felton on Jan. 29, 2009, rumors immediately started swirling as to who he would name as Felton’s successor. Missouri’s Mike Anderson and Oklahoma’s Jeff Capel, two successful head coaches in the Big 12 Conference, were two popular candidates thrown out for public discussion. Virginia Commonwealth University’s Anthony Grant, who eventually took the head job at Alabama, was another in vogue choice during that 2009 offseason. There was even a time when coaching legend Bob Knight was being clamored for amongst the Georgia faithful. But very few had their eyes fixated on Reno, Nev. There, a 40-year-old basketball coach at the University of Nevada was on yet another successful campaign in the Western Athletic Conference. He had compiled five consecutive 20-win seasons in Reno, including three trips to the NCAA Tournament. In Evans’ mind, he was just the man for the job. “I know this is going to be a great day when we look back on the history of

Georgia men’s basketball program,” Evans said in a news conference at the time Fox was hired. “Mark Fox is one of the country’s brightest up-and-coming coaches.” But taking over a troubled team in a major conference on the other side of the country was no small task for Fox and his staff. Georgia had not finished above fifth place in the SEC East since 2003. The returning players were comprised of a group of talented, yet inexperienced players — led by then-rising sophomores Trey Thompkins, Dustin Ware and Travis Leslie. And, worst of all, it was a team that had lost faith. “We talked about the mentality in our locker room and that’s where it had to start,” Fox said. “The players’ issue was, when I first came in, they said they wish there were more people coming to the games. And I just said, ‘Listen, if you’ll play the game right that’ll bring people back before you even win. Winning will cure most of your ills.’” The players, according to Barnes and Price, bought in immediately— even when the victories did not come. As the two seniors had experienced before, the Bulldogs sank to the bottom of the SEC East last season. Finishing with a losing record of 14-17, Georgia did not even secure a single win on the road. But Fox had restored the team’s passion. The team competed. By taking down three

ranked opponents in Stegeman Coliseum, en route to compiling a 12-4 record at home, the Bulldogs proved they could play with the best of teams. And as for the losing record, Price noted that nobody promised it would be easy. The only promise was that, eventually, Fox would get the job done. “He’s a consensus-builder. You can believe in him because he plans the work and he works the plan,” said Nevada athletic director Cary Groth, who promoted Fox to head coach of her basketball program back in 2004. “He’s filled with integrity, he does things the right way … so it’s easy to believe in him. And when you believe in a head coach or you believe in an employee, that’s 99 percent of it.” ‘Uncharted waters’ FRANCES MICKLOW | The Red & Black

Chris Barnes has seen his fair share of red and black in his senior year. The 6-foot-8 forward is now able to glance into the rows of Stegeman Coliseum to see sold out, Georgiafriendly crowds at home games, knowing he has been a part of the rebuilding process under Fox. It has been exactly what he signed that letter of intent for, a far cry from his freshman and sophomore seasons. “There’s been a lot of changes. The program has really turned the corner,” Barnes said. “Coach Fox told us from day one if we play hard and play the game good that the fans

SJeremy Price has seen a quick turnaround in two years under Georgia head coach Mark Fox. would come back. And we’ve noticed that we’ve had sold out crowds almost every night, it don’t matter who we play.” And Fox has changed the culture of Georgia men’s basketball. In less than two years, he has transformed the program from irrelevant to relevant, from conference afterthought to being circled on opponent’s schedules. Georgia is 19-9 this season entering tonight’s showdown with LSU— which is coached by Fox’s

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close friend and former Nevada head coach Trent Johnson — and is a team teetering on the edge of an NCAA Tournament berth. “It’s amazing when you look back on the record. Even the year Georgia went to the NCAA Tournament [in 2008], that year we were 4-12 in the league,” Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity said. “Think about going through the season 4-12 and you know that at some point in time that you’re not in the hunt, you’re not in the conversation of being on the bubble, you’re just not even in the conversation.” Fox’s team has people talking now. Most NCAA Tournament bracket prognosticators predict Georgia is in the postseason tournament at the moment, a feat not lost on the players, its fans or others within the athletic program. A win on Georgia’s Senior Night would not only give the Bulldogs their first non-vacated 20-win season since 1997-98, but it would help complete a slow climb back to where Barnes and Price have wanted to be since that improbable run their freshman year: the postseason. Both seniors can taste it now, even if it was a flavor long forgotten. “It’s about time we start feeling like this around this time of the year,” said Price, who played 23 minutes in the 2008 NCAA Tournament game. “This group of seniors, if you look back on their last three years, we’re in uncharted waters. Usually this time of year, Georgia basketball has not been relevant,” McGarity added. “So now you’re seeing the dynamic of the juniors looking to the seniors and saying, ‘Hey, tell us what it’s like to be in the discussion.’ And they’ve never had that feeling before.” But Mark Fox has. Fox was in the discussion for years at Nevada, twice advancing to the Sweet Sixteen as a head coach or an assistant. And Fox is in the discussion again, less than two years removed from taking over a troubled program. If there were skeptics in the beginning, as Groth said, those naysayers are long gone now. “He’s perfect for Georgia. I think Coach Fox could turn around any program because he does it the right way, he builds consensus,” Groth said. “I think you are going to have Coach Fox for a long time, as long as you can keep him.” After helping to build and sustain success at Nevada, Fox has found a way to establish it in Athens. But he did not take the easy route. He did not choose the route every person agreed with. Perhaps Fox’s team needs another win or two to cement its place in the NCAAs, but the culture has already taken a turn for the better. Fox will be the first to admit the job is not, and may never be, entirely finished. But the 2010-11 season has helped his program take a giant leap forward. “There’s some truth in the fact that it’s hard to stay on top, but it’s hard to get there, too,” Fox said. Wherever “there” is, Fox has the team on its way— and in the nick of time. After all, Chris Barnes was sick of seeing blue.


March 2, 2011 Issue