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Red&Black The

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An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

AthFest

Thursday, June 23, 2011

www.redandblack.com

Celebrating 15 years of local arts

Vol. 118, No. 143 | Athens, Georgia

It’s here. The annual five-day musical blow-out to beat the heat. Bringing in around 200 bands and performers, 50 artisans and compilations showing the best in everything from comedy to local films, AthFest is overflowing with enough entertainment to please even the pickiest consumers. To help you sort through the abundance, here are some of the festival highlights.

Easter Island >> Family ties have been a source of strife for some artists and bands over the years. But the same bonds that have disbanded so many are the same that brought the members of Easter Island together. This band born of brothers managed to turn their admittedly “yuppie angst” gab about girls into a five-piece postrock group that’s quickly gaining notice.

Story, Page 5

Ciné >> Take a break from the battle of band choices and lay back with a local feature film. With choices ranging from local and national shorts, to independent documentaries about the Internet’s effect on the music industry, Ciné is catering music-centered cinema to the Classic City. Here are our picks on what to view once past the ticket booth.

Story, Page 5

Bar Crawl

>>

Reptar

Reptar is roaring back with a rowdy new EP. And while “Oblangle Fizz, Y’all” may not suit Saturday-morning cereal, its discordant mix of techno, boogie and funk is sweet enough for several reruns. The newest playful release from Athens’ popular “sexpopelectro” band won’t leave listeners looking for the remote.

If the length of AthFest’s lineup seems intimidating, we’ve got you covered. With local and regional favorites packing Athens’ venues, navigating these summer nights can seem intense. And that’s not counting the non-music performances that are well worth consideration. Find the events to fit your festival itinerary with our daily listings in the best of downtown viewing.

Online, redandblack.com

Story, Page 4

TEXT COMPILED BY TIFFANY STEVENS, TOP PHOTO BY ANDREA BRISCOE, CINÉ PICTURE BY AJ REYNOLDS

Index

ON THE WEB

PADDLE DOWN

News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 6 Variety ..................... 4 Sports ...................... 7 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 7

ÝDgj]Ûaf^gÛgfÛÛJ>8Û Treasurer’s release. ÝI]na]oÛg^ÛI]hlYjÛ album ‘Oblanga Fizz, Y’all’ ÝGj]na]oÛg^Û=dY_hgd]Û Awards show

Local residents take to rowing down the Oconee River from Athens to Dublin. What brought forth this journey? Find out on page 3.

Warnell pushes private funding By POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK The dean of the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources says the college is in good shape despite the cuts to its budget year after year. But the numbers tell a different story. The college has lost more than $1.4 million in funding, two faculty and more than seven staff positions since fiscal year 2009, according to the University’s FY12 budget narrative. “We’ve tried to tighten our belt a little bit,” said Mike Clutter, dean of Warnell. “We’re very lucky to be in the position that we’re in. We have a very large endowment for our school and that endowment has allowed us to mitigate many of these cuts unlike other schools and colleges.” The college is dealing with the budget cuts by redistributing its resources. As state funds decline, salaries that were traditionally covered by state funds are now primarily being covered through private funds such as endowments and grants. “We contin- CLUTTER ue to press very hard on raising funds for our endowment and those kinds of things, but clearly it’s a tough time out there to try and raise money right now,” Clutter said. Like the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Warnell manages thousands of acres of land across the state. The College of Agriculture is selling its 522acre research farm as a result of the newest budget cuts. Although selling several of its properties can provide additional revenue for Warnell, Clutter does not plan on putting them on the market just yet. “Right now, the real estate markets are such that it’s not the opportune time to do that,” he said. “We’ve decided to wait until the market recovers a little bit until we try and sell those parcels.” In FY07, the college had a total of 125 support staff. Warnell now employs 103 support staff members. The faculty base grew from 53 to 57, but the undergraduate enrollment also increased by 143 students. “I have had discussions with both students and faculty,” Clutter said. “Obviously they’re both very concerned about it. Faculty from the perspective of particularly wanting to understand things like raises and the possibility of raises because it’s been about three years since faculty received a raise. There were some faculty who were concerned if there would be funding for their positions.” Students are also concerned about losing faculty. Henry Pepin, a rising senior wildlife and pre-vet major from Thomasville, said his wildlife techniques professor taught for a semester See WARNELL, Page 2


NEWS

2 | Thursday, June 23, 2011 | The Red & Black

Local activists work to ‘liberate’ with helping hand By CHARLES HICKS THE RED & BLACK

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Red &

Ryan Lewis has spent his Friday nights hanging out at CinĂŠ since late 2008 or early 2009. Last week, just before midnight, he was sitting at one of the movie theater’s booths flanked by townies young and old spitting out conversations on topics neither here nor there. He has been on the radar of underground Athens for almost two decades — since he was a student at the University. “I’ve lived here since 1993, when I came to UGA,â€? Lewis said. While he was at the University, Lewis majored in sociology and art. But he checked out early. “I went for like three and three-quarters years and two different majors and ran a record label,â€? Lewis said. “So I was sort of doing all that and touring, so I never wound up finishing.â€? But Lewis has accomplished at least one thing for Athens — being a major player in the Washington Street Liberation Army — a community of local activists. “The WSLA started in 2009 to do local outreach and activism stuff that sort of takes all of the weirdos, all of the art and music and stuff, drinking people on this side of town that don’t necessarily know about the activism things they could be doing and teaches them about things they could be doing to help people,â€? he said. The WSLA has accomplished a lot for the community, he said. “We’ve done some clean up things,â€? he said. “We’ve done toy drives, dinner for the women and children’s homeless shelter. A

Black’s Charles Hicks hung out at CinĂŠ on Friday night with Ryan Lewis the ‘minister of propaganda’ for the Washington Street Liberation Army, to talk about the WSLA, local activism and dropping out of college.

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

By day, Washington Street Liberation Army ‘minister of propoganda’ Ryan Lewis is the communications director of Whatever It Takes, an Athens-based education nonprofit. bunch of stuff like that. And now we’re raising money for scholarships to send girls that can’t afford to go to the Girls’ Rock Camp.� Last Friday, the group raised more than half of the money required for one full scholarship of $300. A girl who wants to go to the Rock Camp must first write a letter to the group explaining her interest, and then the group attempts to raise money for her, Lewis said. One of the regular initiatives the group supports is a local tent city next to the Carmike 12 on

Lexington Road. The tent city residents didn’t quite know what to think when the WSLA members showed up with blankets and bottled water and cleaned up the place, Lewis said. “When we got out there to tent city,� he said. “The people were like, ‘Are you guys from a church? Are you guys gonna make us do something? Do we have to sign something?’ And we were like, ‘No.’ And they were like, ‘Well who are you?’ and I think Andy [Rusk, the founder and ‘generalissimo’ of WSLA and good friend of Lewis’s] said,

Public intoxication charges dropped for SGA Treasurer

EDITOR’S NOTE: Each week, The Red & Black will focus on one college within the University for a closer look at how the fiscal year 2012 budget cuts will affect its faculty, staff and students. Next week, we will focus on the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.

ONLINE

By TIFFANY STEVENS THE RED & BLACK

Full Story

Public intoxication charges against Student Government Association Treasurer Inman Porter, 21, were dropped June 20 after the Athens’ Solicitor General’s Office determined Porter’s behavior did not meet charge requirements. “The Georgia statute requires an element of boisterousness,� chief assistant solicitor general Ryan Hope said. “You’ve got to have that level of boisterousness or vulgar language, and that just wasn’t in that report, so that’s why we didn’t prosecute it. We wouldn’t be able to prove it beyond a reasonable doubt.� Porter was arrested and charged June 11 after an Athens-Clarke County police officer was dispatched to the Inner Loop and Tallassee Road in reference to a shirtless male running down the highway, according to the police report. Porter told police he was running on the Loop because he was dropped off by friends after a rafting trip and that he was unaware of his location, according to the report. Porter later told The Red & Black he was not dropped off by friends and was walking to a gas station alone. “We got done with the river trip,� Porter said. “My brother was in town. I

wanted to give him a call.� Out of 61 public intoxication cases resulting in arrest since the beginning of 2011, Porter’s case is one of only two where charges were dropped. Hope said dropped charges in public intoxication cases were unusual. Dropped cases are dismissed on grounds such as lack of witnesses or possible mistaken identity, he said. “Many people who are charged with public intoxication under an ordinance are just going to maybe pay off a ticket or something along those lines,� Hope said. Porter’s father, Dubose Porter, served as the Georgia House of Representatives minority leader in 2010. His mother, Carol Porter, ran for Lt. Governor in 2010. Porter told The Red & Black Wednesday that his parents “used to be politicians� and his parents’ political careers “absolutely� did not affect his case’s outcome. “He didn’t do any tests. It was in the middle of the daylight. I remember absolutely everything,� Porter said. “I’m not saying the cop made a misjudgment — I’m saying that it was a misunderstanding.�

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

Warnell could eliminate the research support for its aquatic biotechnology program as a result of budget cuts.

BY

STEPHAN PASTIS

THE DAILY PUZZLE

Previous puzzle’s solution

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but the University found another professor for the following semester. Pepin thinks the move was made for monetary reasons. “This new professor brought in more grant money and had done more research,� he said. “We lost a really good teacher because they needed more money and that’s usually how they go about getting it – through grants and things like that.� For now, Clutter said he is not pursuing any budget-related layoffs. “The fiscal year 2012 budget does not require the layoff for any technical staff members,� he said. “Right now, that’s not really a part of our budget reduction plan.� However, “the fiscal year 2012 budget reductions require the layoff of as many as three technical staff members, the elimination of a vacant web developer position and two vacant administrative support positions,� according to Warnell’s FY 2012 budget development document. In spite of the budget cuts, Clutter remains optimistic about the future. “We think the economy is slowly starting to recover, and we’re going to see our budgets recover probably over the next couple of years,� he said. “We haven’t grown like we wanted to, but relative to a lot of schools and colleges on this campus, we’ve been able to digest the cuts because of that endowment support.�

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just a bunch of townies that like to drink beer and help people.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; And they were like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Alright!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Liberation Armyâ&#x20AC;? might sound harsh to some, but Lewis said the name was meant to be a joke. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s based a lot on satire, because Republicans in the 2008 election talked about liberal people being socialists and all that stuff,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So we were like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ha ha,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calling us socialists, so what if we just embraced it and pretended like that was just our thing.â&#x20AC;? Rusk ordered Army surplus

black berets in imitation of the Black Panthers, and Lewis designed a button with a lightning fist to put on them. If people came out to participate in WSLA activities such as hiking up into tent city or cleaning up woods communities, they got a beret for helping out. While the berets are now tokens of the past, many people still show up to volunteer and fundraise for local initiatives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all kinds of people,â&#x20AC;? Lewis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are definitely dorm kids â&#x20AC;&#x201D;people that just sort of find out about it and come down, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something to do on a Friday. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exciting to me, because I like seeing people being able to get into local activism when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sort of new to town. But then on the other hand, there are people who come who are like in their 60s. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s generally just progressive people that like to hang out on the weird side of downtown.â&#x20AC;? But even non-progressives are welcome to come chill on Friday nights at the independent movie theater on Washington Street, Lewis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to kick someone out for thinking something different than we do,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re obviously not going to be here fundraising, or cleaning or helping out for a liberal cause if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in it.â&#x20AC;?

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The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it.

Editor-in-Chief: Polina Marinova (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Wil Petty (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com


NEWS

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More than 350 people, including students and faculty, began a 106-mile journey on the Oconee River from Athens to Dublin. The paddlers are expected to arrive at their destination on Friday.

Paddlers voyage for good cause Hundreds row out of Athens By JOE WILLEFORD THE RED & BLACK Attention isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t often given to the Oconee River â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and when it is, it usually isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t positive. That may have changed over the weekend, as hundreds of paddlers converged in Athens to begin a week-long journey on the river that draws its headwaters here. Friday, more than 350 people, including several University students and faculty, gathered for the seventh annual Paddle Georgia, a 106-mile trip on the Oconee River from Athens to Dublin in Middle Georgia. Participants spent the first three nights in town, camping out at Clarke Central High School. For two days, they paddled the rivers in and around the city, exploring and enjoying one of Athensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; largest resources, but one that is often overlooked. The event, sponsored by the non-profit Georgia River Network, aims to

connect participants of ranging ages and experience with the river. Joe Cook, coordinator of Paddle Georgia, said the event was created to explore more of the river than a daily paddling trip can offer. These trips usually display the â&#x20AC;&#x153;exciting and prettyâ&#x20AC;? aspects of the river, said Cook, and deny participants the opportunity to truly experience the river. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The idea is that when you do a seven-day trip you get to see not just the riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beauty, but also how we use the river â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and how we abuse the river,â&#x20AC;? Cook said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to show people how we depend upon our rivers.â&#x20AC;? In Athens, paddlers passed through the State Botanical Garden, but also the wastewater treatment facility. To experience the entire river like this is not an easy task, requiring much preparation and hard work, such as negotiating with private property owners. For Cook, however, the work is well worth it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about going out and having a good time and learning about our rivers,â&#x20AC;? he said. Several members of the

University community are receiving class credit for participating in Paddle Georgia and are studying the river as they travel. Five graduate students, led by Brian La Haie, associate professor in the College of Environment and Design, are participating in the event as the beginning of a thru-session class, informally titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paddle Georgia.â&#x20AC;? They will attempt to view the river through a â&#x20AC;&#x153;series of different lenses,â&#x20AC;? said La Haie, spending their time mapping and recording their trip â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and possibly setting a precedent for future projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every new initiative needs a group of pioneers to launch it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what this group is,â&#x20AC;? La Haie said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re now going to open up our eyes and see what the river has to offer and hope that in the long-term that we can develop a partnership with the Georgia River Network and possibly apply what we learn this year as a model for other rivers.â&#x20AC;? The ultimate goal of the course, La Haie said, is to gain an appreciation for the rivers of Georgia, specifically the Oconee, because â&#x20AC;&#x153;the only way to

fully appreciate the river is to get out on it and to be a part of it.â&#x20AC;? The Oconee River has and always will be extremely significant to the Athens community, providing drinking water and a place to discharge treated wastewater, said Ben Emanuel, University graduate and Oconee River Project Director for Altamaha Riverkeeper. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it will show people what a great river we have in Athens,â&#x20AC;? Emanuel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If 300 people want to come from all over the state and country to paddle the Oconee River for a week, then maybe thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s telling us something about the resource we have in our backyard. And hopefully the more that people get out and enjoy the river, the more theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to protect it.â&#x20AC;? Emanuel and other participants hope the event will continue to grow and raise awareness of river conservation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here in Athens, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a tremendous asset, and something that if developed, could be a tremendous amenity for the community â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it could be a very positive thing,â&#x20AC;? Cook said.

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Students still awaiting their HOPE status By EMILY PATRICK THE RED & BLACK Students arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only ones adjusting to the recent HOPE revisions: financial aid offices around the state will have to make changes as well. After summer semester, the HOPE Scholarship will decrease in value by 10 percent. The new Zell Miller Scholarship, which has more rigorous academic requirements than HOPE, will pay for the difference between HOPE and the full amount of in-state tuition. To receive HOPE with the changes, students must retain a 3.0 GPA. For the Zell Miller Scholarship, students must have graduated from a HOPE eligible high school with grade point average of 3.7 and an SAT score of 1200 or an ACT score of at 26. They must also maintain a college GPA of 3.3. The University and the state of Georgiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial aid branch â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Georgia Student Finance Commission â&#x20AC;&#x201D; must work together to evaluate current studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; eligibility for the Zell Miller Scholarship in addition to incoming studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; eligibility. GSFC is responsible for reexamining studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; high school GPAs to determine who would have been eligible for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zellâ&#x20AC;? when they graduated, and individual colleges will determine who is eligible now. However, GSFC is authorized by the state legislation to oversee all scholarship decisions and request refunds from students and schools if

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ZELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; REQUIREMENTS UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;LÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;-/Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;ääĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;  /Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6; UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;°Ă&#x2021; UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â?Â?i}iĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;°Ă&#x17D; funds are incorrectly distributed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In order to be eligible for Zell now, a student has to have been eligible at the time they graduated from high school,â&#x20AC;? said Tracy Ireland, director of postsecondary student and school services at GSFC. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our role, looking at what their high school GPA was back then.â&#x20AC;? Ireland said that they have compiled records that document studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; scholarship eligibility who graduated high school from 2007 onward. That file was sent to postsecondary institutions around the state. Each institution must now determine if the students on GSFCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list meet the college GPA requirement of 3.3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In order to be eligible now, a student must have been making the required GPA now in college, so the postsecondary institutions have to evaluate that,â&#x20AC;? Ireland said. GSFC held HOPE training programs in late May and early June to inform postsecondary schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; financial aid offices of the changes taking place. The Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of Student Financial Aid is in the process of

determining which students are eligible for the Zell Miller Scholarship based on their current GPAs. Nancy Ferguson, the assistant director for HOPE/Scholarships/SAP of OSFA urged students to be patient while the University works to determine their scholarship status. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be a labor intensive process; however at UGA, we are very fortunate to have talented and dedicated programmers, so a lot of the work will be automated,â&#x20AC;? she said in an email. Ferguson would not speculate as to when the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zellâ&#x20AC;? recipients will be announced, but she said that students will be notified through their UGA email accounts. Some students are confused about the distinction between the revised HOPE Scholarship and the new Zell Miller Scholarship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know the particulars,â&#x20AC;? said Mike Klodnicki, a senior biochemistry major from Marietta. Sara Beth Ribot, a rising sophomore from from Cartersville is also confused about the scholarship changes. Though she expects to receive 100 percent of tuition in the fall, she worries students who have been out of high school longer might not be so sure about their statuses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know the GPA requirements are changingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going higherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure exactly what they are,â&#x20AC;? she said. Ferguson said students who are confused about the HOPE revisions or the Zell Miller Scholarship should contact the OSFA.

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THE WEEK

4 | Thursday, June 23, 2011 | The Red & Black

Compiled by TIFFANY STEVENS

Designed by JAN-MICHAEL CART

The Red & Black’s event guide to happenings — shows, films and events — during AthFest 2011 from June 23 to 26. Courtesy Wired 2011

Bringing together the best in current house, dubstep and electronic acts, Saturday’s Athens Dance Music Festival promises to be electrifying.

PICK OF THE WEEK: WIRED 2011

F

eaturing 20 acts on two stages, this event mixes experimental hip hop, electro-house music and dubstep. Local and statewide artists showcase some of the best electronic music in the region. Come and listen to some of today’s DJs create beats worth dancing to.

THURSDAY Events & Opportunities What: “Firewall of Sound” (2010) Where: Ciné When: 7:30 p.m. Price: $5 general; free with wristband Verdict: This documentary that looks into how the Internet has affected the independent music

SATURDAY Events & Opportunities What: “Girls Rock!” Where: Ciné When: 2 p.m. Price: $5 Verdict: Lessons in empowerment should always be packaged with power chords. Come watch this documentary about Girls Rock Camp, a week-long band camp where girls ages 8 to 18 learn to play instruments while simultaneously learning about self-protection and self-worth.

Where: New Earth Music Hall When: Saturday, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Price: $10 general; $5 with wristband Contact: 706 542 8283

industry.

Music

What: Athens Picture Show: Shorts Program Where: Ciné When: 9 p.m. Price: $5 general; free with wristband Verdict: Showcases documentaries and short films from local directors. Contact: www.athenscine.com

What: Wild Moccasins Where: 40 Watt When: 11:30 p.m. Price: $2 general; free with wristband Verdict: Pop-punk beats and Bangles-esque vocals will make you doubt the venom in this group’s sound. But their infectious hooks will paralyze you. Contact: www.40watt.com

Contact: www.athenscine.com What: “Athens Teenscreen” Where: Ciné When: 4 p.m. Price: $5 general; free with wristband Verdict: Featuring films from the next generation of local film directors, this lineup includes a mix of funny and serious tales from Athens teens. Contact: www.athenscine.com Music What: The UGA Accidentals

FRIDAY Events & Opportunities What: “Athens Burning” (2011) Where: Ciné When: 9:30 p.m. Price: $9 general; $5 with wristband Verdict: Documenting the burning of Athens landmark The Georgia Theatre, this film includes a history of the Athens music scene from the 1970s to the present day. Contact: www.athenscine.com What: “Sprockets Music + Video Show” Where: Ciné When: Midnight Price: $5 general; free with wristband Verdict: A compilation of this year’s nominated videos for Best Music Video and Audience Choice. Contact: www.athenscine.com Music What: Easter Island

Where: Pulaski Street Stage When: 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Enjoy the University’s own male a cappella during Athens’ celebration of homegrown music. Contact: www.athfest.com What: The Welfare Liners Where: Hull Street Stage When: 2:15 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: With homespun tales and familiar bluegrass backings, this local band will leave you feeling oddly nostalgic about The Classic City. Contact: www.athfest.com

Where: Pulaski Street Stage When: 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: This group’s smooth alt-rock sound brings to mind some of the work of Jimmy Eat World, but with musical tension and honest lyrics that are their own. Contact: www.athfest.com What: Futurebirds Where: Pulaski Street Stage When: 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: With tracks that will transport you from the oldwest longing to an electronicinfused ancient Asia, the Futurebirds may fly you to the past faster the future. Contact: www.athfest.com What: Gringo Star Where: The Melting Point When: 10 p.m. Price: $10 general; free with wristband Verdict: This group is classic punk contained in a tight-knit four piece. The ‘50s guitar work and vocals will make you take a double-take at the calendar.

SUNDAY What: Rachel Farley Band Where: Pulaski Street Stage When: 2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: This artist’s strong country growls leave nothing to be desired, and outpace many of the tinny country twangs of her contemporaries. Contact: www.athfest.com What: Lingo Where: Hull Street Stage When: 2:45 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Price: Free

Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com What: Modern Skirts Where: The Melting Point When: 11 p.m. Price: $10 general; free with wristband Verdict: The famous alt-rock band is sure to please long time Athens music fans with their catchy lyrics and calming melodies. Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com What: Holly Belle Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club When: 9 p.m. Price: $5 general; free with wristband Verdict: Holly Belle’s haunting piano work and exulting vocals remove the possibility of pretentiousness away from her folk stylings. The singer/ songwriter won’t leave you shying away from solo acts. Contact: www.athfest.com

Verdict: This band’s pulsating vocals and synthetic backings might leave you searching for the right dialect, but they won’t leave you searching for the beat. Contact: www.athfest.com What: Dank Sinatra Where: Hull Street Stage When: 4 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: With their strange mix of intermittent lite-rock and synthetic house music, this group doesn’t exactly recall Ol’ Blue Eyes. But a calming vibe isn’t exactly lost of them either. Contact: www.athfest.com


VARIETY

The Red & Black | Thursday, June 23, 2011 | 5

Easter Island look for ‘better things’ By NAT FORT THE RED & BLACK

ANDREA BRISCOE | The Red & Black

Multigenred, five-piece Athens group Easter Island will be the first band to perform on AthFest’s outdoor Pulaski Street stage.

When Asher Payne moved to Athens to live with his brother and pursue a master’s in vocal performance at the University, the brothers began to combine songs that led them to start Easter Island. Easter Island—made up of vocalist Ethan Payne, vocalist and pianist Asher Payne, lead guitarist Nate Thompson, drummer Patrick Ferguson and bassist Ryan Monahan—is an Athens post-rock band less than a year old. The group is one of the finalists in the “Best Upstart” category of Athens Flagpole Music Awards. It’s also the first band to take the Pulaski Street Stage for AthFest. Ethan and Asher grew up together in Gwinnett County, and Ethan met Nate Thompson, from Memphis, Tenn., while studying at the University. “We were all roommates at some point,” Thompson said. Ferguson, also a member of the

punk-rock band Five-Eight, possesses “an edge that is welcomed,” Asher said. Post-rock, shoegaze, 90s pop and dream rock are a few of the descriptions of Easter Island’s genre. Easter Island’s EP “Better Things” is stunning and pensive. The lyrics and slow-to-medium tempo are similar to Radiohead, Travis or Coldplay, and provides a refreshing chill to the hot summer of Athens. “Proud” eases the listener into a meditative place, which becomes slower, quieter and cooler with momentary bursts of emotional intensity. “The song ‘Proud’ landed the financial support to pay for the LP, which we are currently working on,” Thompson said. “It gave us the push to do everything else.” “Better Things” is as addictive as “Proud,” and its dreaminess builds to a climax that gently calms and ends the track. The piano in “Into Bedrooms”

Ciné movies at festival hit or miss

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There isn’t much a movie theatre can do during a music festival right? Wrong. In fact, Ciné will be showcasing a wide variety of music documentaries and local films throughout AthFest. However, there is only so much time in the day, and no one wants to spend all of AthFest at the movies. So to help guide you in what should a part of your AthFest experience and what can be skipped, here is a semi-informative, mostly subjective and hopefully funny preview of this year’s hits and misses. “The Found Footage Festival” — See It No, this isn’t a competing event to AthFest, it’s a random compilation of VHS tapes brought to you by Joe Pickett from “The Onion” and Nick Prueher from “The Late Show with David Letterman.” Being presented will be everything from old work-out videos to employee training videos, all shown with Pickett’s and Prueher’s observational commentary. Though it has the possibility to border on self-indulgence, “The Found Footage Festival” should be one of the highlights of Ciné’s lineup. “The Secret to a Happy Ending”/“The Drive-By Truckers: Go-Go Boots Episodes” — Hit or Miss Why are these two documentaries grouped together? Because they both deal with the local Athens band the Drive-By Truckers. “The Secret to a Happy Ending” is a retrospective look at the band during three years of touring and its struggles with typical band problems (egos, drugs, groupies, you know the drill). The second film, “The Go-Go Boots Episodes” gives fans an in-depth and personal look at the influences and making of that album. So fans of the Drive-By Truckers should probably see one—if not both—of the films. If you’re not a fan, stay away, simple as that. “Firewall of Sound” — See It

conveys a tiredness and loneliness that lingers into the next track, “Second Handers.” With lyrics such as “she’ll destroy you/she’ll want you all at once,” “Second Handers” exemplifies another one of Easter Island’s genre labels, “yuppie angst.” “We don’t have anything to complain about but girls,” Ethan said. The tracks of “Better Things” balance vocals and instrumental work. This balance displays the band members’ versatility as songwriters, singers and instrumentalists. “We want to push this as far as we can,” Ethan said. “Right now, we want to make music we want to listen to and others to listen to.” The band has received national attention, as Paste magazine selected Easter Island to compete for a spot in Rombello, a music festival on a cruise ship sailing from Tampa, Fla., to Cozumel, Mexico. “This has been the strongest we’ve been so far,” Asher said.

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In a manner similar to Tosh 2.0, The Found Footage Festival combines the best of old VHS findings into a compilation of hilarious clips. to explore musical avenues. However, considering the screening will also provide volunteer sign-ups and music lessons, this seems more like a recruitment video than a thought-provoking documentary. So unless you plan on volunteering at camp, this is one to miss. “Sprockets Music and Video Show” — Hit or Miss This is a presentation of all of this year’s music videos up for Best Music Video and Audience Choice Award. “Sprockets” features some of the best talent AthFest has to offer all in the same place. However, as good as the music videos may be, isn’t part of the fun of AthFest seeing and hearing live performances? Your call. That exhausts the list of feature length films, but that’s not all folks. Ciné is also showing a wide variety of short films by young and local filmmakers. The shorts are grouped into two groups, one on the films of young Athenians, and the other on the movies

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“Firewall of Sound” is an in-depth look at the independent music industry and its complicated relationship with the Internet. The film contains a wide range of interviews, many with local musicians and producers, giving the audience first hand insight into the world of independent music. This should be required viewing for any local musicians—much like “The Godfather” for men and “When Harry met Sally” for women. Even for non-musicians, festival goers will probably enjoy “Firewall of Sound.” “Girls Rock!” — Miss it Remember what I said about the possibility of selfindulgence in the “Found Footage Festival”? Well there is a greater chance of that here. Don’t get me wrong, the Girls Rock Camp—which produced this movie—is a great program for young girls

Futurebirds find its nest in the Classic City By HOLLY YOUNG THE RED & BLACK The Futurebirds are flying back to AthFest—this time as a headliner for the annual festival. The Athens-based country rock band will be returning to play at the festival for the third year in a row. “The first year we played a 1 a.m. set at Tasty World,” drummer Payton Bradford said. “Last year we were at 5 [p.m.] on Saturday on the big stage, and this year we’re headlining the big stage on Friday.” Its albums feature country and folk infused rock played on a variety of instruments, including guitars, banjo, mandolin, pedal steel and drums. Each member of the band contributes their own songs—some of which work out better than others. “Everyone writes their own songs—chords and lyrics—then we get together and everyone puts their stamp on it,” said vocalist Carter King. Several voices can be heard throughout the songs, too, belting out

catchy, slightly off-key harmonies. The result is a whiskeyenthused mixture of campfire songs that lend themselves to foot-tapping. Since releasing its first hand-painted EP in 2009, the band has gained nationwide popularity with its rustic singalongs and backwoods vibe. Earlier this month, the group headed to Manchester, Tenn., to play their biggest venue yet— the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival — where the band was well received by attendees. To date, the six-piece band has released one fulllength album and two EPs. Their first self-titled EP was released in 2009, followed by a full-length album in 2010. That album, entitled “Hampton’s Lullaby,” was released on Los Angelesbased label, Autumn Tone Records. Under the same label, its first EP was re-released this year, followed by a second EP entitled “Via Flamina.” And there’s more on the way.

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6 | Thursday, June 23, 2011 | The Red & Black

Polina Marinova | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Wil Petty | Managing Editor me@randb.com Charles Hicks | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

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Storm gives a new meaning to status P A S

urse. Taekwondo uniform. Flip-flops. That’s all I had when Mother Nature locked me out of my apartment. I intended to leave my apartment last Wednesday night for an hour to throw kicks in taekwondo class. But when I returned, red and blue lights of a police car were parked at the street by my complex. The officer told me lightning from last week’s storm had made a tree fall, knocking down power lines in front of my apartment’s entrance – its only entrance. The possibility of potential electrocution also made it impossible to walk in, the officer said. He didn’t expect the power lines to be fixed until early the next morning either. Standing soaked in the rain and thunder, I felt frustrated to suddenly have no toothbrush, no change of clothes and no apartment, because a tree lay on the ground. It wasn’t fair. This couldn’t happen. What was I supposed to do? But then I realized I am lucky. In Athens-Clarke County, more than three out of every 10 people in 2009 lived below the poverty line, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Thousands of people inside our county do not know where their next meal will come from or even where they’ll sleep tonight. Unlike me, who ordered a large pizza and stayed on a caring friend’s futon when the tree closed off my apartment, others will be stuck on a bench down-

DINA OLOMON

town. And it’s not like homeless people are lazy. Most of the homeless hold a job – sometimes more than one – but they can’t make ends meet because of low salaries. It seems like it would be difficult to find a job above minimum wage without a college education. My experience put my situation in perspective and made me think of the people who don’t have homes to get locked out of. Statistically speaking, I will probably never be homeless because of my education and race. Losing my apartment for a night made me appreciate that. I won’t need to worry about what I’ll eat or where I’ll sleep. Even with my blocked-off apartment, I still had places to go and money in my pocket. But the 34.1 percent of Athens residents under the poverty line aren’t as lucky. I wouldn’t want to be trapped without my laptop and clothes again, but I’m thankful for the wake-up call and the reminder that not all people can return to their homes. Purse. Taekwondo uniform. Flip-flops. That’s more than some people have. — Adina Solomon is a junior from Atlanta majoring in public affairs reporting

Bill of Rights needs FDR economic plan I f there is one thing Democrats and Republicans can agree on, it is the importance of the Bill of Rights. Americans of all political stripes consider freedom of religion, speech, press and assembly to be essential for our democracy to function. For centuries, our ancestors have struggled to ensure individual human rights are respected by our government. But it is becoming readily apparent these individual rights are not enough to lay the foundation for a just society. We must recognize government is not the only entity capable of violating our liberty. Unrestrained corporate power is oftentimes the greatest threat to human freedom. We need an Economic Bill of Rights. Despite our love for democracy, our workday lives are grounded in the experience of oppression. Our capitalist economic system is not democratic but totalitarian. Our No. 1 economic right is the freedom to enter into a subservient role in the workplace. While on the job, we have no control over what we do, what we produce or how we produce it. We have no freedom of expression while at work. We do not get to vote for our bosses. In the end, the products and wealth we create are not owned by us, but by the few at the top. If we are unsatisfied with this arrangement, the only other economic right we are given is the freedom to be unemployed, homeless and hungry. Depressing a person’s

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JONATHAN RICH

income profoundly depresses their personal freedom. True individual freedom cannot exist without economic security. I am not the first to think this. President Franklin D. Roosevelt realized this in 1944 when he proposed an Economic Bill of Rights. FDR believed “people who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.” The Economic Bill of Rights would include the right to a job, a living wage, housing, medical care, education, social security and freedom from monopoly power. FDR saw the implementation of the Economic Bill of Rights as his major goal after World War II. But he did not live to see his dream come to fruition. Almost 70 years later, we are scarcely any closer to implementing these economic rights. With a little hard work and determination, we can make FDR’s dream become reality. We can vote with our dollars for the kind of world we wish to see rather than accepting the injustice that is. Americans must make a choice. We can have capitalism or we can have democracy. But we cannot have both. — Jonathan Rich is a senior from Alpharetta majoring in sociology

Does Adams deserve raise? Yes: Experience pays No: Off with the head

W

hen I heard about University President Michael Adams’ $50,000 raise last week, I thought “Let him eat cake!” But here’s the thing: I meant it. President Adams has earned his cake. He is one of the most experienced university presidents in the nation, and he has been with us for 14 years. The University needs Adams to attract new faculty and programs. With the exception of a few financial hiccups, Adams’ conduct at the University has been unimpeachable. In a time where leaders with poise are few, Adams shines as a rare and appropriately expensive asset. His level of experience and expertise comes with a price tag that students should be glad to see paid: Adams’ professionalism benefits us more than $50,000 in the long run. And as the economy gets worse, his job only gets harder. Next time you’re sitting around crying about the ‘injustice’ of Adams’ pay raise, try building a medical school and planning an engineering program with the corporate equivalent of food stamps. Then you’ll really have something to cry about. The problem is, other groups that aren’t as strapped for cash as the University are vying for Adams’ interest. He was a prime candidate for the NCAA presidency, but luckily, he expressed disinterest out of loyalty to the University. We must reward his loyalty and keep him comfortable here. Furthermore, the $50,000 pay raise seems much more acceptable considering it came from the UGA Athletic Association, not the University System of Georgia. The UGA Athletic Association does business separately from the University. At no time does it divert funds from academic uses, nor is it under obligation to give its funds to them, although it does so annually to the tune of $30 million to $40 million. The $50,000 raise is not going to detract from the UGA Athletic Association’s contribution to academic pro-

Staff Writers: Umarah Ali, Jason Axlerod, Ryan Black, Rachel G. Bowers, Chris Brandus, Natalie Fort, Tucker Green, Mariana Heredia, Alex Laughlin, Kristen Nipper, Tunde Ogunsakin, Emily Patrick, Nathan Sorensen, Gordon Syzmanski, Joe Willeford, Holly Young Photographers: Andrea Briscoe, Jessica Cantrell, Avery Draut, Adam Liow, Sean Taylor Page Designers: Rachel G. Bowers, Jan-Michael Cart

EMILY PATRICK grams, so there’s no harm in letting Adams have it. But the outrage over Adams’ pay raise isn’t really about assessing his value: it stems from skewed morality and hypocrisy. It’s easy to lambast Adams for taking an extra $50,000 when all you have in your bank account is $50. But you feel you deserve that $50, don’t you? The majority of people in the world have far less than University students. If you expect Adams to give you his $50,000 because you have less than him, then you should put your $50 in the feed the homeless parking meter downtown. Yeah, right. That’s your beer money. Being excessive and wasteful is part of being human: even our bodies can’t use everything we give them. It is hypocritical to criticize Adams for his bounty when students have a similar excess compared to the average man on the street in the Congo. Students who criticize Adams’ $660,318 a year are just feeling sorry for themselves: they’re worried they won’t be able to make that much one day for themselves. And with that negative attitude, they’re probably right. I want to live in a society in which my abilities and contributions are considered for their intrinsic merits. I don’t want to be limited — financially or otherwise — because dishonest bankers broke the economy or because imprudent home buyers defaulted on their mortgages. President Adams’ salary may be extravagant, even unnecessarily so. But if we limit his earning potential, we acknowledge that our own earning potentials may be limited as well. I’m not willing to make that concession. We can’t waste time whining and crying. We must keep our eyes clear and look out for our own piece of cake.

I

t has been over a week since the Board of Regents announced University President Michael “The Keebler” Adams’ $50,000 raise, and I am still fuming. How can the so-called leader of this University even contemplate accepting an increase in pay while the rest of our faculty and staff are praying their jobs don’t get cut? Was it not two weeks ago that the College of Agriculture announced they were having to cut 18 more staff members and sell a research farm just to stay afloat? But once again, Adams has chosen to ignore the University’s well-being in favor of focusing on his own selfinterests. This is just another example of how the University has become morally bankrupt under Adams’ leadership. Could Adams have stepped in and said now is not the time? Absolutely! After all, he is chairman of the UGA Athletic Association who had a hand in approving his deferred compensation. But no — since the money doesn’t come from taxes or tuition, I guess that just makes it OK. And so The Keebler plays the fiddle while the University burns. If anyone’s job is on the line, it should be his. What’s funny is the last time I criticized Adams’ salary, I got called into the principal’s office to meet with The Keebler himself. Apparently, since you can’t squash freedom of speech, you have to intimidate students from invoking it instead. As I sat there, Keebs went on about how my column was a detriment to the University. He mentioned the fact that many other university presidents make more money than he does — or did. After the raise,

JEREMY DAILEY Adams is now the highest paid president in the University System of Georgia. It seemed to skate over his mind that I was criticizing him more than the money. And Adams gave me a laughable excuse for calling me in. “I am a teacher at heart,” he said in regards to my column, “And I felt that your education was lacking something.” That’s right. Lacking something. Well Dr. Adams, I am a student advocate at heart and I feel your leadership is lacking something. The University community lost confidence in the president’s office long ago. I’ve heard many alumni withhold donations to the University simply because The Keebler is still at the helm. But because Adams cozies up to some of the good ol’ boys on the Board of Regents, he has been allowed to serve here for too long. It is past time for a change to come. The Keebler knows all this, and therefore, he should just resign. But because he is too self-absorbed to see the bigger picture, it is time for students, faculty and staff to take a stand. There is too much whispering and not enough screaming. Contact the Board of Regents. Call the President’s office. Let them know that you are fed up. After all, if the University has to make more cuts, why not start with the head? — Jeremy Dailey is a first-year law student from Conyers with a degree in political science

LETTERS POLICY Letters must include name, year in school, hometown, phone number, major or job title or other appropriate identification. Letters are may be edited for spelling or grammar, and are subject to editing for length, style and libelous material.

— Emily Patrick is a senior from Atlanta majoring in English

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VARIETY & SPORTS

The Red & Black | Thursday, June 23, 2011 | 7

NBA DRAFT 2011 Two of the best basketball players to step onto the court in Stegeman Coliseum — Travis Leslie and Trey Thompkins — will find out if they will have homes in the NBA, as the 2011 Draft begins tonight at 7 on ESPN. TRAVIS LESLIE Position: shooting guard, small forward Measureables: 6-foot-4, 205 pounds Draft Stock: Rising Upside: His athleticism has caught the eyes of NBA scouts, as his high-flying dunks and transition play has made highlight reels since his sophomore season. His body control and power only makes his style of play stronger, as he gets most of his points from his ability to crash the offensive glass and dominant transition play. Areas of improvement: As much of a physical specimen Leslie as is, his long-range jump shot leaves something to be desired. He lacks the range of a typical NBA shooting guard as well as the ball-handling skills of an elite shooting guard. If Leslie can vastly improve his fundamentals and combine that with the talents he already posseses, he will find a permanent home in the NBA. Projected round and pick: Leslie’s athleticism and physicality has helped shoot up on mock draft boards, going from the mid-second round to as high as late in the first round. Possible destinations: ESPN’s NBA Draft Tracker has Leslie going to the Washington Wizards with the 34th overall pick. But draftexpress.com has Leslie going to the Chicago Bulls with the 30th overall pick, the last pick of the first round.

FILE | The Red & Black

TREY THOMPKINS Position: power forward Measureables: 6-foot-10, 239 pounds Draft Stock: Down from the start of the 2010-11 season Upside: Graceful in the post with soft hands, Thompkins was a steady go-to for Georgia and can attack on both sides of the rim, using his 7-foot-1 wingspan to his advantage. He can score facing up, has a decent jump shot with range and has the ability to make his teammates better. Areas of improvement: His athleticism and conditioning have raised a few red flags among scouts, as he weighed in with 15.5 percent body fat at the NBA Combine in May. He needs to improve his conditioning and work on the defensive aspect of his game, which will help improve his toughness as well. Projected round and pick: A second-rounder after his weigh-ins hurt him at the Combine, though some mock draft websites still list him as a late first-round pick. Possible destinations: ESPN’s NBA Draft Tracker has Thompkins going to the Golden State Warriors with the 44th overall pick. But nbadraft.net has Thompkins going late in the first round to the Boston Celtics with the 25th overall pick. — Compiled by Matt Tompkins

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By EMILY PATRICK THE RED & BLACK Gentlemen, hold onto your ladies. Ladies, hang on to your clothes. “Frat Monster” is coming to town. The latest short film from writer, director and University alumni Bryce Colquitt is part of the “Athens Picture Show: Shorts Program.” Colquitt’s film tells the story of a group of outraged freshman girls—and their sexually curious RA Larry—as they take revenge on the philandering big man on campus, Bert Berkowitz, also known as the frat monster. “Frat Monster” is the second film that Colquitt and the other members of his group, Wonderpony Productions, will exhibit at AthFest. Last year, they showcased “Pair Down,” a silent short about two unlikely roommates. Colquitt began making short films with his friends when he was 15 years old. “We watched all the movie-geek, fanboy movies for the first time like ‘Pulp Fiction’ and ‘Raging Bull.’ We were like, ‘There’s a lot more to this than taking your girlfriend to the movies,’” he said. “I just fell in love with art movies, cinema, whatever you want to call it.” FRAT MONSTER His filmmaking When: Tonight at 9; Friday aspirations gained at 7 p.m. momentum in 2009 Where: Ciné when he participated in the Cannes Price: $5 or free with Film Festival study AthFest wristband abroad. However, the people Colquitt met at the festival had a greater influence on him than the films he viewed. What inspired him most was “just being around people with that creative mindset.” “I went on the Cannes study abroad and I guess that’s when that decision to work in the industry solidified, because that’s when I saw how films are sold and how everything works and that I could do it if I wanted to,” he said. In spring, he worked on the set of “The Wettest County in the World,” a film starring Shia LaBeouf, Tom Hardy and Jason Clarke. He is currently assistant to an executive producer of the Billy Bob Thornton project, “Jayne Mansfield’s Car.” Colquitt hopes to continue to build Wonderpony Productions while learning about the film industry by working on sets. “I want to keep working on movies right now before I go to grad school,” he said. “The stuff that I’ve learned being around movies—the dos and don’ts of being around a set—you don’t learn that in school. I want to get as much of that education as I can before I go to film school and focus on my stories.” Colquitt has already learned to take advantage of the talents of his friends. Many of the films he has already made are funny, but he does not have a personal preference for comedy. His influences include Paul Thomas Anderson, director of “Boogie Nights,” and Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar, both of whom typically make dramas. He makes comedies because he knows many talented comedic actors. “My friends who act in these movies are just really funny,” he said. “That’s where the inspiration for what kind of movies we want to make comes from.” According to his colleagues, his open-minded, opportunistic, directorial mindset pays off. Jennifer Wang, whom Colquitt met while working on “The Wettest County in the World,” expects good work from him in the future. “He tries to get everybody he knows into everything he does because it creates opportunities for people,” she said. “It’s probably going to help his career in the long run.”

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8 | Thursday, June 23, 2011 | The Red & Black

SPORTS

Area rivers offer summer fun Rafting season in full swing

McGarity ‘scratched surface’ of agenda in first year as AD By RACHEL G. BOWERS THE RED & BLACK

By TUCKER GREEN THE RED & BLACK Summer just isn’t complete without getting a little wet. From the idle to the intense, there are several river adventures available for day trips near Athens, offering simple tubing as well as advanced whitewater rafting. Big Dogs On The River, located on Atlanta Highway in Athens, offers kayaking down the Middle Oconee River. Customers park and are shuttled 15 minutes upstream, then given a boat and paddle to meander their way 3.5 miles downstream at their own pace. “There’s no other place to do Courtesy Georgia Outdoor Recreation Program this in town,” said T.J. Stephens, manager of Big Dogs On The Tucked away in North Georgia, Athens is surrounded by River. “We have this beautiful several rivers that provide opportunities for rafting and resource right in the middle of day trips for University students and nature lovers alike. Athens that we want to take advantage of.” Stephens said his company considers itself steward of the Oconee River. Its motto is MIDDLE OCONEE RIVER “keeping it clean and green.” CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER Outfitter: Big Dogs on the River “We figure if people are enjoyOutfitter: Cool River Tubing Where: 2525 Atlanta Highway ing the river, they’ll want to take Where: 590 Edelweiss Strasse, Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday care of it.” Stephens said. Helen (63 miles from Athens) through Saturday; 1 p.m. to In Danielsville, just 20 miles Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. everyday 4 p.m. Sunday outside Athens, the Broad River Price: $5 a person; $10 a person Price: $15 a person Monday Outpost offers daily trips down with water slide pass; $9 a perthrough Thursday; $20 a person the Broad River. Customers can son for all-day tubing pass Friday through Sunday ride in tandem canoes, whitewaPhone: (800) 896-4595 Phone: (706) 353-6002 ter rafts, recreational sit-in kayWebsite: coolrivertubing.com Website: bigdogsontheriver.com aks, or stable sit-on-top kayaks. “The Broad River Outpost CHATTOOGA RIVER BROAD RIVER operates with an educated and Outfitter: Wildwater Rafting Outfitter: Broad River Outpost helpful staff to make your tip Where: 1251 Academy Road, Where: 7911 Wildcat Bridge, hassle-free and comfortable,” Long Creek, S.C. (75 miles from Danielsville (20 miles from said Michael Moody, owner of Athens) Athens) Broad River Outpost. “It’s a Hours: Hours vary from trip to Hours: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday world away but only a few miles trip; refer to website for reservathrough Friday; 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. from Athens.” tion information. Saturday, Sunday and holidays Sixty miles from Athens in Price: Prices vary from trip to trip; Price: $15 a person Monday Helen, University students can refer to website for reservation through Friday; $20 a person find Cool River Tubing. The information. Saturday and Sunday company offers a one- or twoPhone: (800) 451-9972 Phone: (706) 795-3242 hour tubing adventure down Website: wildwaterrafting.com Website: broadriveroutpost.com the Chattahoochee River. All trips include a tube, life preserver and shuttle service. The company also has dual river about 75 miles away in Wildwater Rafting. “The trips water slides and lockers to store South Carolina. are scheduled in such a way clothes and valuables while tubWildwater Rafting offers a that people typically don’t see ing. range of activities on the each other or overlap each “It’s a short distance from Chattooga, including guided other.” Athens, and a great day trip,” beginning, intermediate and Scenes from the movie said Teri Sims, owner of Cool advanced whitewater rafting, “Deliverance” were filmed along River Tubing. kayaking, overnight trips and the Chattooga, and Wise said Those wanting to get a little canoeing. one of the distinct features of further from Athens will the “It’s not a crowd scene; it’s the river is the lack of human enjoy the Chattooga River, a much more of a wilderness trip,” intrusions, such as buildings, designated “Wild and Scenic” said Jack Wise, CEO of roads, or bridges.

UP A CREEK

probably closer as a result of all the tough times we’d experienced.” Greg McGarity recognizes he After what McGarity called “a can be impatient. tough fall” for the football, volleyHe knows it takes time for any ball and soccer teams, he said the large staff to click on all cylin- winter and spring sports began ders. to pick up and had some “fantasAnd he knows he must find tic finishes.” the delicate balance between He said the spirit and energy allowing his staffers to flourish of his staff created an environwhile still teaching how he wants ment in which everyone felt they things done. could thrive. “And I still think that’s one of “I think that there’s no quesmy weaknesses is just being tion we can all get better — everypatient. I’ve talked to so many body. Every employee feels like people in the profession that tell they can get better in everything me that it takes time to do cer- they do,” McGarity said. “That’s tain things the way you want the part of kind of setting the them done,” McGarity said. “It foundation on what we’re all causes you some sleepless nights about, which is doing the right because you know at the end of thing every day and trying to out the day it’s going to be a reflec- work people and try to do the tion on your institution, whatever best job we possibly can to move you do.” the institution forward. But since being hired as But it’s been a lot of fun.” Georgia’s athletic director Outside of the responin August 2010, he has sibilities as athletic direcstarted to find that baltor, McGarity calls himself ance as he fine-tunes his simple. leadership and manageHe spends most of his ment skills. And he continfree time at his home with ues to work on his patience, his wife Sheryl and enjoys something he said has working in his yard. After been the hardest lesson to 19 years away from his learn throughout the last McGARITY home town and the comyear. munity he grew comfort“You don’t want to do the work able in, he said he has slipped for [the staffers],” McGarity said. right back in where he was when “You try to provide the guidance, he left. the resources and try to help “But I think the neat part guide them because they’re never about it is getting back into the gonna learn how to do it them- Athens community has been realselves unless they try it them- ly, really easy,” McGarity said. “I selves.” think everybody’s welcomed us McGarity called the last year with open arms and blending “a blur.” back into the community has This time last year he was in been very, very easy.” Omaha, Neb., at the College In the blur of the year, World Series with his son Alex. McGarity said the first time it hit And now he occupies a corner him that he had landed his dream office in the Butts-Mehre Building job was when he found himself with one of the best views on standing in Sanford Stadium campus. before kickoff of the first home After making it known he football game last season. The wanted to re-establish a founda- Red Coat Marching Band filled tion of trust not only among his its usual section and began playstaff but also among the student- ing a tune McGarity had not athletes, fan base and University heard in Georgia’s stadium in community, McGarity had a clear nearly 19 years — the alma agenda in mind for the athletic mater. department. But he said there is “That was the first ‘aha!’ still work to do. moment that you realize that, “We’ve just kinda scratched ‘Hey, this really did happen,’” the surface on what we really McGarity said. “It’s one thing wanna do,” McGarity said. “I that took just a few seconds to think that our staff really went to get used to, but once you were work hard. We focused on really around your staff and your team talking about accountability, and things, it kinda brought it integrity and honesty and trans- back to, ‘Hey, we’re back at the parency in everything we did and University of Georgia and it’s I think our staff became really really fortunate to be back.’”

June 23, 2011 Issue  

June 23, 2011 Issue of The Red & Black

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