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An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Friday, June 10, 2011

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 118, No. 141 | Athens, Georgia

‘EXPECTING MIRACLES’

College of Agriculture loses 18 staff, sells local research farm By POLINA MARINOVA | THE RED & BLACK

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is forced to sell its 522-acre Plant Sciences research farm located in Oconee County as a result of budget cuts.

For the University’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, downsizing is nothing new. But after the announced budget reductions for fiscal year 2012, it’s getting old. “With the most recent cuts, we simply didn’t have anyone left to retire or move from state funds to contractual funds,” said Scott Angle, CAES dean. “We’ve done all that in the past. We had no more rabbits to pull out of the hat this time around to try to save jobs.” As a result, Angle was forced to lay off 18 CAES staff and put up a large research farm for sale. Since the beginning of FY09, the college has lost more than $21.7 million and 355 positions. And though no faculty was laid off as a result of budget reductions, faculty hiring initiatives were also postponed. The University’s full-time professorial faculty See CUTS, Page 2

POOLING IT TOGETHER Rising costs of Legion Pool send some to other waters By CHARLES HICKS | THE RED & BLACK

Some like it hot. But others like it wet. Legion Pool is open for the summer, and many locals are taking advantage of it. But some are not. Stephaine Jackson, a 20-year old resident of Parkview Extension, said she didn’t think the pool was for people like her or her younger brother, Josh. “Hardly any of us go over there,” Jackson said. “There’s pools around here that are a dollar to get into. I’m pretty sure that over there it’s way more than a dollar just to swim over there.” Jackson said she has lived in Parkview Extension — a lower-income neighborhood located less than 500 feet from Legion Pool — for 13 years. But she said she has only been to the pool once when she participated in a summer camp. “If they wanted people like from over here to go, then I think more people would know about it,” Jackson said. “If people over here don’t know about it, then we figure it’s just not for us.” And it’s not for people like Jackson. Legion Pool “is operated as a service for UGA students, UGA employees, Friends of Campus Life and their guests,” according to the website of the Department of Campus Life for the Division of Student Affairs. “It’s not a city pool,” said Greg Albanese, the University’s associate director for facilities. “It’s not connected with that. So rates have gone up slightly over time, but it’s a pretty fair price.” Legion Pool does not receive funding from the student activities fee and makes the majority of its funding from admissions costs. The admission rates have risen in order to counter the deficit the pool leaves behind in the fall, Albanese said. “Usually in any given year, there will be several thousand dollars less than the income we’d need to cover the expenses,” he said. Maintenance costs are the central reason for the price of admission to the pool, Albanese said. “The problem we’ve got now is the price of chemicals are going up, the water bill is going up and the electric bill is going up,” he said. “In any given year, the water bill could be anywhere between $10,000 and $12,000 worth. The electric bill could be $10,000. The total cost of all the labor for the pool is maybe like $30,000. And then we’ve got garbage fees, general expenses, safety supplies, lifeguard supplies and stuff like that. It See POOL, Page 3

Index News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 6 Variety ..................... 4 Sports ...................... 7 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 7

KATHRYN INGALL | The Red & Black

ADMISSION: LEGION POOL General admission: Student - $3.50 Employee - $4 Child (3-15) - $3 Guest (accompanied with UGACard holder) $4.50 Friends of Campus Life (with membership card) - $4.50 Season Pass (Unlimited visits during 2011 season): Student: $75 Employee: $90 Friends of Campus Life: $105 SEAN TAYLOR | The Red & Black

Kip Hicks (top) enjoys a day at Legion Pool with his daughter Jessie Hicks. People unaffiliated with the University must first purchase a membership card before using the pool. Other pool-goers (bottom) spend the day at city pools such as the one in Bishop Park for a $1 fee.

OLD SCHOOL Are cassettes making a comeback or is it a mix-take? Find out for yourself by flipping over to page 7.

ON THE WEB Check out our website to read about: ÝÛDg[cÛKjaYdÛl]Ye¿kÛkm[[]kk ÝۗD]]c¿kÛ:mlg^^¿Û^adeÛj]na]o ÝÛ:`][cÛgmlÛYm\agÛg^Û?]jk[`]dÛ Walker, who is in Athens. ... And much, much more!


NEWS

2 | Friday, June 10, 2011 | The Red & Black

CUTS: University’s reputation at stake ¢ From Page 1 declined nearly 5 percent while its enrollment grew more than 7 percent, according to the University’s FY12 budget narrative. A comparison of full-time CAES faculty members from 2007 to 2010 shows a decrease of at least 10, with the downsizing in nearly every department. “Our guidelines were that we could only lay off staff,â€? Angle said. “All those 18 who got letters were all staff – some clerical, some technical.â€? The cuts are more detrimental on the “Bâ€? unit of the budget – which supports cooperative extension and outreach. The “Aâ€? unit of the budget supports the undergraduate academic mission. Tuition and fees helped to offset the budget cuts of the “Aâ€? unit. “Students are first,â€? Angle said. “We’ve tried to protect the teaching experience. I would hope most of our students would say they haven’t seen any effect from these budget cuts.â€? However, with less funding, more students and not hiring new professors, the “teaching experienceâ€? may not be the same as it was several years ago. “We’re down to the same level of funding we had in

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

The University’s Plant Sciences research farm now only has three full-time workers when it historically operated with six full-time staff.

PEARLS BEFORE SWINEÂŽ

BY

EDITOR’S NOTE: Each week, The Red & Black will focus on one college within the University for a closer look at how the FY12 budget cuts affect its faculty, staff and students. We begin the series with the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences. 1998, with 5,000 more students than we had in those days,� said Tim Burgess, senior vice president for finance and administration. “To expect that you can do the same things you can do today with the same level of funding you had in 1998 is expecting miracles. All of us are trying to perform miracles, but that’s a huge expectation on everybody’s part.� Hillary Thornton, a junior from Folkston and Student Government Association CAES senator, does not think her college experience has changed as a result of the reductions. “In spite of all of the budget cuts, I think that CAES has continued to function phenomenally,� she said. “However, I feel

STEPHAN PASTIS

that if there are more budget cuts in the future, dayto-day life of students will be affected drastically.� Students may think they’re shielded from the budget cuts because none of their professors have been laid off, but the continuous downsizing has a ripple effect, Burgess said. “When you can’t hire the quality faculty you need, when you can’t offer enough of the right course sections to the students who come to UGA and when basic things like procurement become real problems, it begins to deteriorate to the point where you lose your reputation,� he said. “You’re not the same quality institution from top to bottom. That’s the concern, and that’s the focus we have in ensuring that doesn’t happen.� To absorb more of the reductions, the College of Agriculture is also selling its 522-acre Plant Sciences research farm in Oconee County. The farm has historically operated with a full-time crew of six, but due to past budget cuts, it now operates with three full-time workers, according to the CAES website. Angle said selling the farm will not have a significant effect on research because the college can

CRIME WEEK University employee accused of robbing students at gunpoint

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A University food services worker, Tommy Ray Williams IV, 22, was arrested by Athens-Clarke County Police on Wednesday on multiple felony charges, including armed robbery and burglary. The victim told the arresting officer that he and his friends were at their apartment on Riverbend Parkway when three males entered around 10 p.m. on Tuesday and robbed them at gunpoint. A victim recognized one of the suspects from the dining hall, but did not

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Find full stories, police reports know his name. The victims told the officer they then followed Williams to the apartment and planned to confront him, but decided to contact the police instead. After the officer arrived, he ran the tag of the vehicle a victim had identified as the car used in the robbery. Williams was booked into the ACC jail at 5:13 a.m. Wednesday. The remaining two suspects have yet to be identified. Student charged criminal trespass

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A University student was charged with criminal trespass intrusion upon property by an AthensClarke County Police officer at 6 a.m. on Sunday. Reeve Joseph Wainright, 25, was found sleeping on the living room couch of a house on Tara Way. According to the police report, the residents climbed out of the house through the bathroom window and waited for the police to arrive. The police entered the house and saw Wainright sleeping on the living room couch. He appeared to be very intoxicated. Wainright was arrested and transported to the ACC Jail. His shoes were not found on the property. Student charged with disorderly conduct, barred from The Grill

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move the research to other locations. However, the farm is not only used for research purposes. According to the CAES website, â&#x20AC;&#x153;although the primary focus of the (Plant Sciences Farm) has been applied research, many faculty also use the facility to support fundamental research, teaching and extension activities.â&#x20AC;? Angle will use money from the sale to renovate the CAES infrastructure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our research infrastructure is in very bad shape, very poor quality,â&#x20AC;? Angle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are the No. 4 College of Agriculture in the United States, but our infrastructure nowhere reflects our standing among our peers. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s embarrassing.â&#x20AC;? Though no faculty will be laid off in FY12, the new cuts may harm the colleges and departments within the University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done everything we can do to avoid layoffs in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; unit but what thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meant is extremely tight budgets across the campus for operating units, hundreds of vacant positions and repairs that go undone,â&#x20AC;? Burgess said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those things are all happening at the expense that we can try and avoid layoffs.â&#x20AC;?

A University student was charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct at 2:45 a.m. on Saturday. University student Allison Poindexter had thrown up outside the bathroom. According to the police report, after the manager asked her to leave, her friend and University student Jessica Ricketts struck him. When police arrived, the manager then barred both students from the restaurant for the next two years. Ricketts was arrested and transported to ACC Jail. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Compiled by Yetunde Ogunsakin

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CORRECTIONS The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Polina Marinova (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Wil Petty (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com


NEWS TV SPOT Those interested can email ugacasting@gmail.com with name, age, ethnicity and relationship to the University for more information.

Alumni to film ‘better’ TV spot By KATHRYN INGALL THE RED & BLACK The University’s game day TV spot this fall will feature the Chapel Bell, an R.E.M. song and maybe even you. A group of University alumni have donated their time and skills to produce the new commercial featuring hundreds of student and alumni extras. “What happened is, I think like a lot of Georgia alumni, I was disappointed with the UGA TV spot,” said alumnus Mike Martin, creative director of the commercial. “Rather than be a voice of criticism, I wanted to do something about it.” Martin and a core group of three other production professionals are working to create a new commercial, first to air on Sept. 3 during the Boise State football game. The production team is calling for students and alumni to be part of the filming June 16. The commercial will feature a line of people standing alongside the Chapel Bell to show a cross-section of University students and alumni. Martin said the group is looking for between 200 and 300 people. The process began when Martin posted a thread on LinkedIn to see if other alumni were interested in getting involved and was surprised when the group received more than 1,000 comments. The group approached Tom Jackson, vice president for public affairs, about producing the TV spot. “We put out a call for bids and they were the low bid because so much of it was donated time,” Jackson said. Martin said the idea of using the R.E.M. song, “Oh My Heart,” came when he and the group heard the song while working on the project in a coffee shop. “I heard the song and it was so perfect for a concept,” he said. After approaching R.E.M. about using the song, Martin said they were willing to donate its use. “They really loved it because they love Athens so much and they wanted it to be a celebration of the University and the town of Athens,” he said. Jackson said he expected feedback on this year’s spot to be more positive than last year. “It wasn’t very positive last year, so we’re hoping it will be better this year.” The TV spot will be shown at football games, basketball games and other sporting events. Martin said many college commercials show generic images of professors holding test tubes and students throwing frisbees on campus. The group has instead chosen to showcase what makes the University and Athens special. “We want people to choke up a little bit and be proud of being a Bulldog,” he said.

The Red & Black | Friday, June 10, 2011 | 3

POOL: Legion relies on dues to make up revenue ¢ From Page 1 adds up.” To help combat the deficit, beginning this season, anyone — like Jackson or her brother — who is unaffiliated with a member of the University, must first purchase the newly created Friends of Campus Life annual membership card for $35 before being allowed to use Legion Pool. Then they must pay $4.50 each time they attend the pool, unless they opt to purchase a $105 adult season pass, $60 child season pass or a 25-visit pass for $87.50. The Friends of Campus Life was started in order to fill a gap left behind by the Student Alumni Association, Albanese said. “We used to have a relationship with the Alumni Association where if you were a member of that, you could bring your membership card to the pool, and then you could pay cash at the gate or buy a pass,” he said. “But the Alumni Association last year moved away from a dues-based membership.” Therefore, a new dues-based membership program was needed for members of the community, Albanese said. That is, for people like Leah Goodwin who graduated from the University in 1989. Goodwin has been coming to Legion Pool for the past three years and brings her two children to play with their friends. Goodwin said her season pass was worth it. “It’s not as expensive as some of the private clubs, and it’s also a good crowd,” Goodwin said. “My kids always see a lot of their friends and neighbors and schoolmates and that kind of thing.” Legion Pool is a hot spot for teenagers as well. A whole group of friends can come with a parent who has a Friends of Campus Life membership card and pay the

KATHRYN INGALL | The Red & Black

Sonia Anders and her sons Christian, 6, (left) and Nickolas, 3, (center) buy snacks at Legion Pool’s concession stand. Entry fees cover some maintenance and staff costs. price of guest admission — bypassing the need to purchase a Friends of Campus Life membership of their own. Rebecca Lopez, a recent graduate of Monsieur Donovan’s Catholic High School, was at the pool with her two younger sisters, Roxanna and Rachelle. They come to the pool about three times a week. “It’s mostly word-of-mouth,” she said. “So, you usually bring your friends, and they bring their

friends, and it grows from there.” The atmosphere of Legion Pool seemed different than other pools, Lopez said. “It’s cleaner,” she said. “I guess it’s mostly the environment of it. And because it’s in the University, it makes it feel better.” Legion Pool may not be costefficient for everyone, but there are other options in the area. Admission to the five pools in Athens-Clarke County pools is only $1. Costs to operate the

University names Thompson to post, sparks ethics debate By KATHRYN INGALL THE RED & BLACK Human rights groups are calling the University to reconsider the hiring of a law professor involved in the deportation and torture of a Canadian citizen in Syria. “I don’t think someone who conspired in torture should be teaching law students,” said Maria LaHood, a senior attorney with the Center for Constitutional Rights. The law school announced the hiring of Larry Thompson as the John A. Sibley Chair of Corporate and Business Law in May. Thompson served as deputy attorney general in 2002 under President Bush when he signed an order refusing Canadian citizen Maher Arar’s request to be deported to Canada instead of Syria, where he was tortured for nearly a year. LaHood represented Arar and maintains his right to due process under the Fifth Amendment was violated when he was detained for nearly two weeks without charges and deported to Syria despite protests that he would be tortured. “Thompson, along with others, sent Maher Arar to Syria to be tortured and therefore violated his rights under the Constitution and international law,” she said. The Torture Victim Protection Act passed in 1991 ensures detainees who assert a reasonable fear of being tortured in a country may not be deported there. “He had a well-founded reason to believe — and so did the officials — that he would be tortured in Syria,” said Amy Ross, a University geography professor who has researched international justice issues. “I would stress that we need accountability and full transparency on this hire and whether or not they took into account the concerns of human rights lawyers.” Thompson has taught at the University in the past, most recently in spring 2011 as a visiting professor. “We are delighted that Professor Thompson is our new Sibley Professor,” said Rebecca White, dean of the law school. “Professor Thompson is one of the finest lawyers I know and has had a very distinguished career in both the public and private sectors, serving, for example, as deputy attorney general of the United States and as senior vice president and general counsel of Pepsico.”

Thompson was contacted at his Pepsico office for comment, but he did not respond by press time. Arar entered JFK airport in New York on Sept. 26, 2002, in transit from Tunisia to Canada. He was detained and questioned there because he was identified as a “special interest alien who was suspected of affiliations with a terrorist organization,” according to a Departmnt of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General report. A Canadian public inquiry into his detention later found the Canadian government provided U.S. officials with false and incendiary information. At the end of the two -and-a-half-year investigation, Arar was awarded $10.5 million in compensation. After year-long imprisonment, Arar earned a THOMPSON doctorate in electrical engineering. Arar’s case became a well-known example of the U.S. government’s practice of rendition, or moving terror suspects to other countries for interrogation. Alex Neve, secretary general of Amnesty International Canada, said Arar’s case highlightWHITE ed much wider concerns of human violations in the war on terror. “The important message is to turn to the U.S. government to insist on an independent investigation of all officials involved,” he said. “Even though it’s been more than eight years since Maher Arar’s deportation to Syria, by no means is it too late to ensure some justice in this case.” Arar sued the U.S. government, but his case was dismissed by the Court of Appeals due to national security concerns. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case. LaHood said she would like to receive a public U.S. apology and redress for Mr. Arar as well as a full criminal investigation. “Where we can’t get justice and accountability from the government, I believe we should have accountability from institutions like the University of Georgia,” LaHood said. “And their decision to hire Mr. Thompson should be looked at closely.”

pools, which are open to everyone, come from the county tax fund. Kent Kilpatrick, the internal services division director for the Athens-Clarke County unified government, said that the pools were already receiving many visitors this season. “The temperatures are in the 90s and sweltering,” he said. “And it’s only June. A lot of people are coming to the pool to get away from the heat.”

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THE WEEK

4 | Friday, June 10, 2011 | The Red & Black

Compiled by TIFFANY STEVENS

Designed by JAN-MICHAEL CART

The Red & Black’s event guide to happenings — news, variety and sports — in and around Athens from June 10-15.

PICK OF THE WEEK: ‘AS YOU LIKE IT’

L

overs wishing to get into their crush’s head could take a leaf out of Rosalind’s book — just escape from a murderous relative, dress in drag and bro-out with them in the forest. That will get the job done. Shakespeare’s tale of love in the forest of Arden is fraught with unrequited love and misplaced affections. The play has

FRIDAY Events & Opportunities What: Athens Showgirl Cabaret Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club When: 10 p.m. Price: $3 Verdict: RuPaul couldn’t give face any better. Spend an evening entertained by Athens’ finest drag

so many breakups, makeups and half-hearted affairs that it comes off like a documentary on Fleetwood Mac. But a hilarious script and superb acting will more than make up for any irritation caused by the main character’s manipulative tactics and romantic drama. The Rose of Athens Theatre’s production will have you hanging on the

edge of your seat and rooting for your favorite couples. Just check your rose colored glasses at the door, and enjoy the show without the sting of cupid’s bow. Where: Ashford Manor When: June 8 - 12, 8 p.m. Price: $12 student; $17 general Contact: (706) 340-9181

queens and kings.

Music

What: Unthinkable Waves Exhibit Where: This-Way-Out When: 6 p.m. — 8 p.m. Price: $1 donation appreciated Verdict: Vernon Thornsberry delivers more than coffee during this showing. The exhibit will feature Thornsberry’s art and literature, and feature live music by the Hobos.

What: Chromazone Where: Amici Italian Cafe When: 10 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Chromazone members say they’re applying what they’ve learned in the music business program to the real world. Their sound proves they’ve learned well. Contact: (706) 353-0000

Courtesy Rose of Athens Theatre

Rose of Athens Theatre’s “As You Like It” presents the humorous side of unrequited love and mistaken identity in this classic comedy.

SATURDAY

them over a pig roast, fish fry and live music. Just bring a bib and clean your plate. Contact: www.BlindPigTavern.com

Events & Opportunities What: “Twelfth Night” Where: Athens Community Theatre When: June 9 - 11, 8 p.m. June 12, 2 p.m. Price: $12 — 15 Verdict: Another Shakespearean tale of mistaken identity. Watch The Town & Gown Players take you through Viola’s romantic mishaps while disguised as page-boy Cesario. Contact: (706) 208-8696 What: Peach Clobber Where: Athens Arena When: 4 p.m. Price: $12 single bout; $20 both Verdict: It’s a face off between four of the state’s rollergirl teams. The Classic City Rollergirls’ Bad News Bs are taking on the Rome Rollergirls. Bout is followed CCRG All-Stars vs. the Atlanta Rollergirls’ Sake Tuyas. Contact: (770) 617-6096 What: 4th Annual 10 Year Anniversary Where: Blind Pig Tavern When: 4 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: 10 year anniversary celebrations normally come about only once. That’s not enough for the Blind Pig Tavern. Rejoice four times over with

SUNDAY Events and Opportunities What: “Something’s Afoot” Where: Piedmont College When: 2 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Murder and music always go together, which is why Scooby Doo episodes always had a musical interlude.

What: Matt Joiner Where: The Melting Point When: 8 p.m. Price: $6 advance; $8 door Verdict: Former member of The Rattlers, Matt Joiner, will be playing his blues and classic rock inspired music with guest John Keane. Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

What: Marty Winkler and Friends Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar

What: “Battle: Los Angeles” (2011) Where: Tate Theatre When: 8 p.m., 10 p.m. Price: $2 general; free students Verdict: It’s marines vs. aliens as invaders from another planet try to destroy L.A. Aliens are always trying to destroy major cities, so we can rule out sneak attacks as one of their strong points. Contact: union@uga.edu What: “An Ideal Husband” Auditions Where: Athens Community Theater When: 6 p.m.

What: Drafts and Laughs Where: The Pub at Gameday When: 9:30 p.m. Price: $5 Verdict: An old saying commands us to “eat, drink, and be merry.” Take age-old wisdom to heart with an inexpensive afternoon of beer and comedy.

What: Kyshona Armstrong Where: Front Porch Bookstore When: 6 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Moving from a career as a musical therapist for prison inmates to a professional musician, Kyshona Armstrong has no problem in expressing herself in these folksy ballads. Contact: (706) 372-1236.

Live Music

Events and Opportunities

Events and Opportunities

Music

This musical comedy, which originally premiered in Atlanta, spoofs murder mysteries, primarily the works of Agatha Christie. Contact: 706-7788500 ext. 1355

MONDAY

TUESDAY

What: Athens Farmers Market Where: Bishop Park When: 8 a.m. — Noon Price: Free Verdict: With fresh fruits and vegetables coming in to season, how can resist the local harvest? Contact: www.athensfarmersmarket.net

Events and Opportunities What: Canine Cocktail Hour Where: Madison Bar & Bistro Courtyard When: 5 - 7 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Share your afternoon with your favorite pet. Just don’t share your drink. Contact: www. indigoathens.com What: Full Moon Canoe Ride Where: Sandy Creek park When: 9 - 11 p.m. Price: $8 general; $5 with own canoe/kayak Verdict: Summer night strolls in the moonlight are good. Summer night canoe rides in the moonlight are better. Contact: (706) 613-3631

Price: $7 Verdict: Some of these ballads may be fairy tales, but they won’t send you to sleep. Mary Winkler and Friends features composers of music for Rose of Athens ‘Alice.’ This group sports smooth vocals, beautiful lyrics and comical lyrics. Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com

Price: Free Verdict: Oscar Wilde said that “scandal is gossip made tedious by morality.” Those acting in Wilde’s play about political scandal and blackmail won’t find his rapier wit tedious at all. Contact: www.townandgownplayers.org Live Music What: Shithead Where: Caledonia Lounge When: 9:30 p.m. Price: $5 for 21 and up; $7 for 18 and up Verdict: The singer’s Cobain-esque and grunge leaning style leanings might leave you feeling a little dirty. But the band’s humorous lyrics will clean out your system. Contact: www.caledonialounge.com

Contact: 706 - 353 -2831 What: “Skyscraper” (1996) Where: Cine When: 8 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Whoever thought Anna Nicole Smith as a helicopter pilot would be convincing was obviously affected by highaltitudes. But the absurdity of this “Die Hard” rip-off is what makes it part of the Bad Movie Night series. Contact: www.athens.com

WEDNESDAY

When: 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Live Music What: Clay Leverett and Friends Where: The Melting Point When: 7 p.m. Price: $5 Verdict: Straight from a tour with George Jones and Loretta Lynn, this band’s twang won’t leave you blue. Come out for a night of tales of girls that got away, hearts that were broken and other southern heartaches.

What: Emotional Abuse Support Group Where: Call for Location When: 6:30 -- 8 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Get support for emotional abuse from this group led by Project Safe. Contact: (706) 543-3331. Live music What: The Ron Jonsons Where: Rye Bar When: 6 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: From soothing jazz stylings to blazing salsa rock, this progressive band provides a pleasing blend of styles that’s sure to leave you satisfied. Contact: www.myspace.com/ryebarathens


VARIETY

The Red & Black | Friday, June 10 2011 | 5

Music business breeds band Chromazone blazing trails By WIL PETTY THE RED & BLACK The members of Chromazone are more than just another Athens band. They are a musical family. Originally formed in February, the band started playing shows through the music business program at the University. “We do a lot of events with music business,” drummer Danny Zagoria said. “A lot of people did fundraisers through the program and needed bands for the fundraisers. So we jumped on like five of those.” Three of the group’s four members are involved with the music business program. Bassist Ben Consuegra is an English major at the University. “We call ourselves ‘Electronic-fused funk rock,’” Consuegra said. “But we don’t play any funk. We gotta change that.” As the band continues to evolve, it has brought forth a strong blend of general rock instruments and electronics. Influences for the fourpiece range from Disco Biscuits to Led Zeppelin. The music sounds like the love child of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and STS9. “We’re trying to think like 2011 in the broad terms, try to add in things like the sampler, mix boards and Ableton,” vocalist and guitarist Jordan White said. “My dad calls it Pink Floyd of the 21st century.” It is that confidence which gives the band its swagger. In a short time span, the group has played several Athens shows, released demos and performed at the Allegreen Music Festival. “We’re not going to sell ourselves short,” White said. “We’re going to get there.” The demos are produced by the group.

Zagoria does the producing while the other members give their input. “We make our own records for now because we have the ability,” Consuegra said. Recording was done in bedrooms while using the shower to record the vocals. Chromazone credits much of its sudden success to the people its members know. “The fact that for some reason we are friends with a lot of other people in bigger bands in Athens makes it easy for us to find gigs,” Consuegra said. While the group has made the Classic City its home base, none of the members are originally

CHROMAZONE When: Friday at 10 p.m. Where: Amici Italian Cafe Admission: Free from Athens. White is from Dalton, Consuegra and Zagoria are from Atlanta and keyboardist Matt Lewis hails from Texas. In the future, Chromazone is looking to expand its fanbase, as well as release a full-length album. But for now, the band will continue making demos and performing in the Athens area. “We’re going to try and do a lot of demos this summer,” Lewis said. “When we get enough money and songs we’ll make an album.”

SEAN TAYLOR | The Red & Black

Athens electronic-rock four-piece Chromazone has implemented what it has learned at the University’s music business program.


6 | Friday, June 10, 2011 | The Red & Black

Polina Marinova | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Wil Petty | Managing Editor me@randb.com Charles Hicks | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Our Take

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

We’re here for you The Red & Black is your summer news source for everything at the University

S

ummer’s here. That means hanging out by the pool, taking classes or exploring the campus for the first time. And for us at The Red & Black, summer means keeping you informed about campus issues. That’s right. We publish on Thursdays during the summer thru term. And on top of that, our staff will ensure our website is updated daily. But we don’t put out a paper just because we can. We write every single article with you in mind. We will work to bring you stories full of information you should know. For instance, you can expect to see complex issues such as budget cuts broken down in a way you can understand. We will also tell you how much you’ll have to pay attention in class next semester in order to meet the new HOPE requirements. And turn to our Variety section to keep up with all things AthFest. You can check out “The Week” to find fun things you can do in Athens every single day. Finally, the long-awaited Georgia Theatre will open its doors on Aug. 1, and we’ll give you a taste of what’s to come. Getting those stories involves talking to University administrators, faculty, staff and students. We ask the tough questions and piece together full-fledged stories. That’s our job. Your job as a reader is to tell us what you think, what you want to see more of and what you think we can do better to serve you. If you don’t agree with an article, tell us. We want to hear the good, the bad and the ugly. You can send us a letter – or even better – write a column for our opinions page. Anyone can write in, so let your voice be heard. I encourage you to use this paper not just as a distraction in class, but as a tool to discuss University issues you care about. The people who work at The Red & Black are all students like you. If you have something to share with us, I promise that we’ll listen to what you have to say. So take a break from the crossword and shoot us an email. Tell us what you want to see in the space surrounding the puzzle. We want to put “student” in “student newspaper.” So dive in. The heat is on. — Polina Marinova for the editorial board

Stop being hard on sorry, fallen Weiner C ongressman Anthony Weiner (D - NY) seems to have gotten himself into a sticky situation. And the problem is at its climax. After evidence kept rising up about the Brooklyn representative, Weiner admitted to having inappropriate contact with females via Twitter and email. His admittance and unwillingness to resign has stimulated a media frenzy. But people shouldn’t be so hard on Weiner. Let’s get one thing straight – Weiner is not nuts. Congressman or not, Weiner is just like your average Peter. See, men have a tendency to be led astray by their thoughts and desires, and Weiner has become a victim of his anatomy. Known for staying firm in his convictions, Weiner has built a reputation for himself as a strong member of the Democratic Party. Whether or not you agree with him, Weiner always rises up to new challenges and never refuses to jump in and tackle new obstacles. But at his press conference a few days ago, Weiner flashed a part of him we rarely get to see. After tears leaked from his eye, Weiner revealed his soft side to the public. One thing is for certain though — Weiner is sorry. And he needs to be forgiven. I’m not sure we know all the private parts of this situation yet. There seems to be a conspiracy in the works. Although there may have not been a Twitter hijacking, off and eerie

JEREMY DAILEY

things seem to be surrounding this case. For example, publisher and commentator Andrew Breitbart appears to have come into this situation knowing a conspicuous amount of information. He even claimed to have x-rated photos of Weiner’s. Perhaps Breitbart gave rise to this whole situation. After all, when it comes to manipulating, Breitbart is known to be the master. Baiting someone like Weiner is probably a lot easier than it seems. Whatever the case may be, it would be a shame if Weiner was sacked. Weiner has done so many things while he has been up in D.C. that I would hate to see him discharged. But like always, coverage of this will soon begin to shrink. It won’t take long for the media and the American people to move on to the next scandal. Give it a week and Weiner will be relieved of their prodding. Weiner will then be free to start planting seeds of re-election in his constituency. If we give him the chance, Weiner will pump up his reputation once again. Members of Congress should be supplied the opportunity to erect their stature despite a middleage crisis such as this. Let’s be the bigger person and lay off Weiner. — Jeremy Dailey is a first-year law student from Conyers with a degree in political science

Hiring a torturer is not a good idea P

rofessors have a moral imperative not only to teach the truth, but to educate for social justice. And the University has a responsibility to hire professors who fulfill this democratic obligation. Unfortunately, the University has failed at achieving this ideal. Recently, the University hired Larry Thompson, the former deputy attorney general under George W. Bush, to the position of the John A. Sibley Professor in Corporate and Business Law. Thompson will be teaching courses on corporate law and white collar crime. As deputy attorney general, Thompson was responsible for deporting Canadian citizen Maher Arar to Syria, where he was imprisoned and tortured for nearly a year. Arar was detained in New York and held in solitary confinement, where he was accused of having ties to al Qaeda. Arar was denied access to a lawyer and was not given a trial in open court. After being tortured for almost a year, Arar was found innocent of any links to al-Qaeda. The Canadian government officially apologized and awarded Arar a C$10.5 million settlement. But the U.S. government has not apologized for its torture of this innocent man.

News Editor: Kathryn Ingall Associate News Editor: Sarah Giarratana Variety Editor: Tiffany Stevens Photo Editor: AJ Reynolds Design Editor: Amanda Jones Copy Editor: Lauren Blais Online Editor: Mark Miller

Thompson has yet to be prosecuted for his crimes even though he signed the deportation order with full knowledge that Arar would be tortured in Syria. He violated international law and the U.S. Constitution, which guarantees due process of law and fair trial. Worst of all, he did all of this without a shred of proof that Arar was guilty. Thompson should be shunned by all those who value freedom and democracy. A human rights violator and torturer by proxy has no place at any respectable institution of higher learning. And yet, Rebecca White, dean of the University law school, has defended Thompson’s appointment. “To have someone with his experience and status on our faculty will benefit not only our students, but the law school and the University as a whole,” she said, according to the Ottawa Citizen. What relevant experience does Thompson bring to the table? His willingness to violate human

— Jonathan Rich is a senior from Alpharetta majoring in sociology

University right in requiring some courses

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raduation ceremonies came to an end. Within days, I found myself waking up bright and early on a Tuesday morning preparing for my last two Maymester classes in my college career. I was sour after I realized I had to finish a Franklin college requirement I had forgotten to do to when I added a major early in my sophomore year. But a girl’s gotta do what she’s gotta do. That meant taking a geography course I not only didn’t want to take but was going to be of no use to my education. I grudgingly trucked into the Geography building and sat in the back of the bright room. I looked around at the white walls, and found myself staring into the faces of several younger students. Sighing and with no regard to who was listening, I thought in desperation of days I could be spending at the pool. But I was going to spend three weeks in this room. There was no possibility of escape. The usual occurred. I looked over the syllabus, highlighted when my

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

JONATHAN RICH

rights? His callous contempt for his fellow man? His inability to accept responsibility for his actions? I cannot think of a single benefit of having a torturer on staff at the University. Instead of fulfilling his democratic commitment as an educator, Thompson will teach law students how to make the world a worse place. His appointment sends the message to students that crime does pay, and torture and secrecy trump human rights. Thompson may hold knowledge of the technical aspects of the law. But there is more to law than technical experience. Our laws are ultimately based on the Golden Rule: “love thy neighbor as thyself.” And University law students need a professor who can teach them the just application of law to serve democratic values. The University has substituted prestige for morality. If the University wishes to uphold its tradition as a school of excellence, then it needs to do better than that. Let’s hire a professor of law who can uphold our democratic values. We deserve better than this.

Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Sarah Jean Dover Recruitment Editor: Jessica Roberts Staff Writers: Umarah Ali, Jason Axlerod, Ryan Black, Chris Brandus, Tucker Green, Mariana Heredia, Alex Laughlin, Kristen Nipper, Tunde Ogunsakin, Nathan Sorensen, Holly Young Photographers: Avery Draut, Sean Taylor

CASEY BRUCE assignments were due and crossed my legs under my desk to hide the cell phone in my lap. Dr. Amy Trauger, a blonde woman with green eyes and mom-to-be, stood before us. And — wouldn’t you know it — she made us laugh. I was amused, but only slightly, as I was convinced the class was going to be a bore. The first day we discussed how places and space shape our sense of meaning. The intricacy revolving around why we hold some places in higher regard than others came to fruition in my mind. I found myself on the first day jotting down notes, interspersed with ideas about my own sense of place. Two weeks later, I was discussing what I was learning in class with anyone who would listen and bear with me as I poured out ideas about geography and its relevance in our lives. The films we

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watched in class fit into the subject matter that we discussed. The textbook wasn’t boring. The prevalence and importance geography has in our culture, economy, societal conceptions, values and religion began to make perfect sense to me. Space and place in geography are interconnected to everything, and everything is connected to it. They’re seamless ties, and the manner in which we shape our perspectives deals with the meanings and emphasis we subject certain spaces to. I found myself enjoying the class. And I was sad when it ended. Certain classes in our college careers change our lives. They remind us why we journeyed to college in the first place. It is for courses that will mold our knowledge and help us to understand the world. Not for the potential salary we will make. Human geography explained spaces and places to me. I was not an advocate for every required course the University and individual colleges subject us to.

But I am thankful for those rare exceptions that occur in our education when we finally realize, “They were right. I should have taken that course.” The University should continue to make some courses in our education required for this specific reason. Without them, we cannot understand or appreciate the world, our culture or our spaces from the many perspectives we are presented with and confront in our daily interactions. I am having one of those moments. I hope you can too. — Casey Bruce is a senior from Stone Mountain majoring in magazines and film studies

LETTERS POLICY Letters must include name, year in school, hometown, phone number, major or job title or other appropriate identification. Letters may be edited for spelling or grammar, but are subject to editing for length, style and libelous material. All letters will be published — either in print or online.

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VARIETY & SPORTS

The Red & Black | Friday, June 10 2011 | 7

Play gives crash course in acting By NAT FORT FOR THE RED & BLACK

FILE | The Red & Black

The injury to Georgia outfielder Johnathan Taylor, shown batting early in the season, made for a tough year for the Bulldogs.

Diamond Dogs endure amid tough challenges By RYAN BLACK THE RED & BLACK David Perno admits coming to grips with the devastating neck injury to outfielder Johnathan Taylor made this season — his 10th as the Georgia baseball head coach — his toughest “without question.” But for Perno, confronting delicate, heart-rending issues is not a one-year anomaly. It was not so long ago a similar injury to infielder Chance Veazey put the coach in an identical situation. “Chance’s [injury] was no different than JT,” Perno said of Veazey’s 2009 scooter accident which left him paralyzed from the waist down. “The setting was much different in how it happened, but as far as two young men who are two huge pieces of your program, the energy guys, the left-handed hitters, the guys you know regardless how difficult things got, they were going to give you everything they had every minute. “When you lose two ‘heart and soul’ guys like that in two years to tragic incidents and life-changing injuries, it’s still a struggle to understand and grasp why those two young men, and why it happened to our program,” he added. And for a program with a rich tradition, an injury, no matter how damaging, is something a team must overcome. And overcome is what Georgia did following Taylor’s injury TAYLOR in March, which came during a time of struggle for the Diamond Dogs. “You’re 3-8. You don’t have time to reset or start over,” Perno said. “You’re in the middle of it, so we just tried to manage the best we could.” However, Perno was mindful not to downplay the effect of Taylor’s injury, which also left him paralyzed from the waist down. “It’s as tough as it gets,” he said. “You’re playing the most difficult schedule in the country, you’re getting ready to start SEC play, you gotta play against the defending national champions the first weekend and then you’ve lost one of the most important players on your team. And you’re coming off a horrible year. The deck was stacked against us, it seemed, all year. Somehow, someway, we kept finding a way to win one more game and stay alive.” The Diamond Dogs showed resolve by finishing the season 30-24 after Taylor’s injury — a resolve giving Perno hope for next year. Having all of his key players back for next season doesn’t hurt, either. “For the first time in two years, I really feel like we have great momentum,” he said. “The [MLB] Draft is going on, and yes, we’re going to lose some guys, but we’re keeping Levi Hyams and Michael Palazzone, Pete Verdin. We’re going to have a tremendous senior class next year.” He went as far as to compare next year’s seniors to those Georgia had in 2008, which included among its ranks All-Americans and first-round draft picks Gordon Beckham and Josh Fields. That squad made it to the national championship game. Perno has similar expectations for next spring’s edition of the Diamond Dogs. “There is no question that will be our goal,” he said. “We’ll have to back down and figure out how we can make our team the best team we can make it first, but at the same time, there is no doubt with the senior class we’re going to have next year, the junior class right behind them and the solid freshman class coming in that it’s definitely going to be an Omaha-built team.”

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Despite being one-third of the typical rehearsal time, 42 hours was all it took for a group of 20 students to pull off a production of “Taming of the Shrew.” Ray Paolino, University associate professor of theater and film studies, directed the performance as part of a Maymester Shakespeare class. Actors used the entire space of the Cellar Theatre, interacting and running through or around the audience. During the performance, frequent laughter and cheers provided proof the actors mastered Shakespearean vocabulary and humor. “It was fun, challenging and interesting to watch students thrust into the situation,” Paolino said. “It’s interesting to watch them in the pressure cooker to see what happens.” “Taming of the Shrew” provided non-stop action and humor. Some student actors played more than one character, often switching roles at a moment’s notice. Not all students were veteran performers. For some, “Taming of the Shrew” was their first production. “There is a big difference between first time and the first time in a Shakespeare play,” F. Tyler Burnet, who played Petruchio, said. The production involved a wide range of students, majors, nonmajors and graduate students. “One of the biggest challenges is the range of

ALAN LIOW | The Red & Black

Tressa Preston (Katherine), F. Tyler Burnet (Petruchio) and other student actors perform “Taming of the Shrew” at the Founder’s Garden on June 7. experience,” Paolino said. Understanding and conveying Shakespearean language was another challenge students faced. Libby Ricardo, who played Bianca and served as one of the assistant directors, said that paraphrasing Shakespeare’s language for student actors was one of the most difficult aspects. “Practical application is the best tool for learning,” Ricardo said. Student actors normally spend two weeks reading and understanding the play when it’s a full pro-

duction, but in Paolino’s class, they had only two days. Because of the short time frame, the focus rested primarily on the actors’ performances with minimal attention to costumes and stage setting. Ricardo said the play was produced “without any sort of spectacle.” The students used whatever they could find — whether owned, found or borrowed. “I’m just grateful for the opportunity,” said Tressa Preston, who played Katherine. “What we’re doing with it is worthwhile and exciting.”

WILLIAM TALES “Taming of the Shrew” is the first play in the Serendipity Shakespeare Festival. “As You Like It,” performed by Rose Theatre of Athens, runs June 8 to 12 at 8 p.m. Town and Gown Players presents “Twelfth Night” June 10 to 12 and June 16 to 19 at 6 p.m. Go to www.roseofathens. org and www. townandgownplayers.org for more information.

Cassette sales and production still popular Bands use tapes for rare tracks By HOLLY YOUNG THE RED & BLACK Don’t pawn your parents’ dusty tape player just yet: cassettes are making a comeback. You won’t find new cars with cassette decks anymore, and last year Sony officially stopped manufacturing Walkman cassette players. But for some people, tapes — like records — evoke a sense of nostalgia. Collectors say there’s a personal feel one gets from holding a tangible format that one cannot get with digital, and that seems to be why cassettes are still “in.” “CDs are just boring and pointless middlemen now,” said Steve Miller, owner of Athens-based music label Hail Shitar. “I love digital music and iPods etc, but that is for listening only. A tape or vinyl release is for owning and exploring.” Todd Ploharski, owner of downtown music shop Low Yo Yo Stuff, said that within some genres, particularly underground and experimen-

tal, cassettes have remained popular since the ‘80s. These groups have spurred a tape resurgence, preferring the rich analogue sound over digital music. Ploharski joked that cassettes are “better than crappy CDs.” “Sales are up, for sure,” he said. “We sell them every day.” But not owning a cassette player could be a drawback for local consumers. “I only have two cassettes and one’s the Moulin Rouge soundtrack,” said Hannah Tucker, a junior psychology and classical culture major. “If my car had a cassette player I would totally whip out the soundtrack and put it in there.” Danielle Cannady, an English and English education major from Decatur, said she only owns Disney cassettes. “By the time I got old enough for ‘real’ music, CDs were popular,” Cannady said. Cannady said she has a cassette player in her car, but never thought about using it. “Flip to side B in the middle of driving?” she said. Student musician Matt Parsons, a senior biochemistry and biology major, also said he isn’t too fond of

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The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

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8 | Friday, June 10, 2011 | The Red & Black

SPORTS

Golfers in constant drive for excellence By RACHEL G. BOWERS THE RED & BLACK Chris Haack sat in his office perusing player files and media guides, familiarizing himself with the program he just inherited. He read about the 13 SEC Championships then-head coach Howell Hollis led the Bulldogs to and the 268-57-7 record Hollis’ teams compiled from 1946 to 1970. He saw the 31 golfers then-head coach Dick Copas helped become All-Americans, as well as the seven SEC Championships Copas’ teams won. It was 1996, and Haack was given the reins of the program to continue what his predecessors started. “I felt like I was just kind of a gate keeper of what was already a great program,” Haack said. “My goal is always to just leave it in better shape than I found it and if I can do that, the next guy can take what I’ve done and improve upon that as well.” After winning the program’s only NCAA titles in 1999 and 2005, seven SEC titles and coaching arguably the best trio in program history — Russell Henley, Harris English and Hudson Swafford — Haack has elevated the program to new heights. “To be able to say you play golf at Georgia is a really big honor and Haack, I think, is about as good as it gets,” rising junior Bryden Macpherson said. “Now being around the other teams and seeing the other coaches, you just realize how lucky you are to have someone like that. It’s been a really, really exciting year and a half for me and I just hope it keeps getting better.” Those new heights include a run in this year’s NCAA Tournament, all the way to the final two holes of the final match — before the Bulldogs fell to defending champions Augusta State 3-2 in Stillwater, Okla. Haack said expectations of this year’s team were high, causing a great deal of pressure to build up throughout the season. He said heading into the last week of the tournament, his team had to take a step back to realize “golf is just a game” and it needed to enjoy themselves more. “We just tried to keep it loose. The golf course is already hard enough, you can’t be in bad spirits out there to be honest with you,” Swafford said. “We’d play pranks on

Courtesy Georgia Sports Communications

Russell Henley (above) qualified for the U.S. Open Tuesday, and helped the Bulldogs advance to the final match of this year’s NCAA Tournament. each other. We went to movies. We just hung out. We went to dinner. And it was just really relaxing to be honest with you.” Macpherson, Swafford and English all credited Haack with being the team’s anchor and confidence booster. And English said Haack has been more than just a coach in his four years at Georgia. “He’s been not only a coach but just a mentor to all of us,” English said. “He knows all the ins and outs of golf and life, it seems like, and he’s just really brought us a long way and helped us in our careers and helped us to grow up over the years. I’m not the same person I was freshman year. He’s definitely had a lot to do with that and helped me grow up.” With Henley preparing for the U.S. Open, English trying to make the Walker Cup Team and Swafford playing in tournaments while preparing for Q School, Haack and his program now move forward with a hole that trio filled for so long. But Haack and Macpherson are confident in the three freshmen arriving this fall. Valdosta natives Sam and Sepp Straka —

who are twins — will join the team, as well as Moscow, Pa., native Nicholas Reach. “You always have good players and they move on and you gotta bring in some more young guys and just continue to develop them,” Haack said. “Hopefully these three new guys coming in next year will join the guys that are already here in returning, and we’ll be able to continue the tradition of being competitive and putting a good product out on the golf course, and hopefully contending for championships.” With Henley, English and Swafford’s Bulldog careers wrapped up, they move on to try their hands in the professional ranks. Swafford joked he’s being “kicked out” after five years as a Bulldog, and English is excited to see where the team can go. “I’ve learned so much here from Coach Haack and our assistant coaches ... and competing with the team,” English said. “I’ve made some of the best friends I’ll have for the rest of my life. It’s bittersweet, but I definitely think it’s time for me to go. Some new Bulldogs will step in and fill mine and Russell and Hudson’s shoes.”

THE BIG THREE The end of the men’s golf season also closes the careers of three top Bulldog players. Harris English, Hudson Swafford and Russell Henley leave Georgia as one of the most dominant trios the SEC may ever see at one time. Here’s a look at their accomplishments: English: Earned All-SEC honors all four years at UGA, including first team in 2009 and 2010. Earned AllAmerica honors from PING, Golfweek and the Golf Coaches Association of America. Named to the SEC Academic Honor Roll all four years at UGA. Tied ENGLISH the Texas Golf Club course record in 2010 with a 6-under 65. Henley: Earned All-SEC and AllAmerica honors in all four years at UGA. Named National Player of the Year by Golfweek in 2010. Won the Stadion Classic at UGA, becoming only the second amateur to win a tournament on the Nationwide Tour. Tied the school record for wins in a career, with seven. Swafford: SEC Freshman of the Year during the 2006-2007 season. Earned AllSEC and AllAmerica honors during sophomore and junior season. Returned from shoulder surgery in 2010 to play in U.S. Open (led dur- SWAFFORD ing first round) Placed 14th at SEC Championship this past season. — Matt Tompkins


June 10, 2011 Issue