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An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Thursday, July 14, 2011

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 118, No. 146 | Athens, Georgia

GIFTED PROGRAM

RUTHERFORD HALL

Private funds prop up Terry College By POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK In a two sentence paragraph, the dean of the Terry College of Business described how the fiscal year 2012 budget cuts will affect the college. “The impact of reductions will be wholly offset,” reads Terry College’s impact of reductions report. Deans were asked to submit an impact of reductions report to the provost detailing what programs will be cut and how the cuts will affect the college. While many schools and colleges submitted lengthy reports listing the elimination of programs and positions, the newest budget reductions will not hit Terry as hard. “The budget cuts for the most recent year are not as severe as the ones we saw two years ago, but there is this continuing trend for reduced state funding,” said Robert Sumichrast, dean of Terry. “We really started planning for budget cuts four years ago. We knew money was going to be tight.” Tim Burgess, senior vice president for finance and administration, said since resources are scarce, schools and colleges must

consider their priorities. For Terry, it’s keeping valuable faculty. “We have to continue to tighten our belt, eliminate anything that we believe is absolutely not critical or necessary, while at the same time hopefully focus on those things that are important such as academic quality, offering classes and keeping the buildings maintained,” Burgess said. Terry is cutting about half a million dollars from its budget, but the college is able to make up for the loss through revenue from teaching additional courses and through proSUMICHRAST fessional programs which help supplement undergraduate programs. And of course, Terry relies heavily on private gifts. “We’ve had just outstanding success with private donations to the college which have been very helpful in keeping us going,” Sumichrast said. Private funds make up a little more than 20 percent of Terry’s budget. Last year, the college received gifts and pledges in

excess of $21 million. But since many private funds are designated for a specific purpose, the college uses about $2 million per year to supplement its budget. “We’ve got great students, great faculty and really loyal, wellplaced alumni,” Sumichrast said. “And all of the constituency groups want to support the college.” But Sumichrast said though the college has managed its cuts well, it’s eliminated several alumni services. The college produced a Terry Magazine but replaced it with an electronic version because printing it became costly. Terry also eliminated a “fairly elaborate” donor recognition dinner it hosted each fall. “We still recognize the donors because we have an event in Atlanta each spring, which actually generates revenue for the college through a fundraiser,” he said. “A lot of what we’ve been able to do is continue to provide the same kind of recognition and services to alumni and the kind of classes to students, but we’ve been able to work more efficiently.” But Terry is not immune to the See CUT, Page 3

SEAN TAYLOR | The Red & Black

Helen Fosgate lived in Rutherford Hall in 1980 as a student and encourages University officials to reconsider the demolition of the historic building.

Alumni try to save historic Rutherford By RAISA HABERSHAM THE RED & BLACK Helen Fosgate remembers watching games on Myers Quad from her room in Rutherford. She remembers the bonds she formed with her roommate and fellow residents, that are still intact today. She has fond memories — memories that could be erased if the Board of Regents approves the University’s proposal to demolish Rutherford. The Board of Regents is set to vote on the measure this August with construction beginning in May 2012. “I think it’s difficult for current residents to understand how Rutherford can engender such affection,” Fosgate said. “But in the ‘70s she was grand.” Fosgate lived in Rutherford for two years until 1980, when she graduated with a degree in animal science. “I chose her because she was a modest-sized dorm and because she was historic and I wanted to live in that setting,” she said. “Also, because I was a science major, I wanted to be on South Campus.” Fosgate now works at the University as editor of UGA Research Magazine. As a result of recent housing overcapacity issues, the University has proposed to demolish Rutherford and build a new dorm with 100 more rooms to bring the

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HALL OF FAME Capacity: 159 students Rutherford was built in 1939 as a part of the New Deal. The dorm was one of the first all-women dormitories on campus. The fireplaces and marble hearths were designed to make women feel at home. Since 2000, the dorm has housed the Franklin Residential College — students studying the humanities, fine arts and performing arts. Source: University Housing total to 260 rooms. Among the proposed changes are temperature control settings in the rooms and increased bath privacy. Gerald Kowalski, executive director of University housing, said Rutherford wasn’t designed for students of the 21st century. “Just by its age, the systems that support the building have extended beyond See DEMOLISH, Page 2

PHOTOS BY ALLISON LOVE | The Red & Black

Senior Mel Baxter is one of 12 orientation leaders. She welcomed incoming students by singing ‘Thank God I’m a Southern Girl’ reworked to say ‘Thank God I’m a Georgia Dawg.’

Orientation leader ‘fired up’ about incoming class By TUCKER GREEN THE RED & BLACK The conference room goes quiet, and Mel Baxter closes her eyes, collecting herself like a diver before the plunge. She knows that between nervous parents, eager students and a crammed schedule, it’ll be her last quiet moment for 16 hours. For Baxter, a senior orientation leader from Leawood, Kan., it’s just another day on the job. Baxter begins her day at 7:30 a.m. in a meeting with the other 11 orientation leaders and her three bosses before heading to the Brumby Hall lobby to greet incoming students and hand them

their room keys for the night. “I will be exhausted when I wake up in the morning,” Baxter said. “But the second the students and parents walk in, it just gets me fired up.” At 8:30 a.m., she leads a group of parents and students to the Tate Center, answering questions along the way. “I’m the only out-of-state OL, so I get to answer all the out-ofstate questions,” she said. At 9 a.m., Baxter and the other orientation leaders run onstage at Tate Grand Hall, chanting “I said it’s great to be a Georgia Bulldog.” They welcome the class of 2015 by singing personally choreographed introductions set to popular

songs, each drawing more and more laughs from the crowd. Baxter sang a rendition of “Thank God I’m a Southern Girl” reworked to say “Thank God I’m a Georgia Dawg.” From there, Baxter walks to the MLC to meet with her small group of students, whom she calls “All-Star 11s” after her orientation leader number. Here, Baxter See DAY, Page 6

GONE FISHING

ON THE WEB

The Georgia bass fishing team placed in national competition. For more on their rank and success, reel over to Page 8.

ÝÛ Interview with famed pianist Chuck Leavell ÝÛ Harry Potter Madness ÝÛ Review of Scandanavian film “In a Better World” ÝÛ Take a world tour with “drink up” featuring beers from across the planet.


NEWS

2 | Thursday, July 14, 2011 | The Red & Black

Oil spill documentary wins regional Emmy By JASON FLYNN THE RED & BLACK University producers of a documentary on the 2010 BP oil spill were rewarded recently with more than footage of underwater black gold. “Black and Blue: Beneath the Gulf Oil Disaster,� is a long-form documentary produced by the University broadcast, video and photography unit. It documents the devastation caused by the Deep Water Horizon oil spill, which followed the explosion of a drilling rig on Apr. 20, 2010. The film received a Southeast Regional Emmy and a 2011 Gabby Merit award from the Georgia Association of Broadcasters at the end of June. The broadcast, video and photography unit is responsible for producing all University promotional videos and for handling television news inquiries, image capture and multimedia. Steve Bell, director of broadcast, video and photography ser-

vices, said the award was made possible by “tremendous effort put in by the staff... and the unique subject matter.� “It’s not often that we receive the opportunity to be a part of such a historic event,� Bell said. “Black and Blue� documents University Marine Sciences Professor Samantha Joye and her research team on the vessel “Walton Smith.� The team studied the “farreaching consequences of the biggest man-made environmental disaster the world has ever known, the Deep Water Horizon Oil Catastrophe,� according to the documentary. The cruise lasted two weeks during which time Bill Evelyn, field producer and videographer, captured the research team at work gathering samples in the Gulf. Evelyn was fortunate enough to document the research team’s discovery of deep water oil plumes, the cause of massive devastation to the Gulf of

Mexico’s ecosystem. Bell said the documentary acted as a “vehicle to get Joye’s findings to the public.� “A lot of its information was not being released early on,� Bell said. “We were even at odds with the White House, when they didn’t want some things released.� Because of its wealth of important information, the documentary received widespread media attention. “It was featured on 65 television stations — from the gulf coast to Texas and North Carolina to Florida,� Bell said. The widespread coverage was extremely important for the broadcast, video and photography unit. “It validates the abilities of the department, which has to compete with commercial operations,� Bell said. Bell said the recognition was also important for the University as a whole. “It’s proof that the University

can produce materials of interest that can inform and educate the public,� he said. “[That] brings credibility to all future University projects.� Others involved in the production of the documentary include Graphic Designer Geoff Gilland, Broadcast Media Marketer Pete Konenkamp, Production Manager Kim Dillard, Uplink Coordinator Andrew Rhiem and Studio Director Mike Barrett. A second documentary, “Atlantis Revealed: Where the Oil Went,� has already been produced by the broadcast, video and photography unit. The film was the recipient of a 2011 Gabby Award from the GAB. Bell said there is not a plan for another long-form documentary. However, there is a possibility of a third installment if the unit has the opportunity to film a third cruise with Joye, featuring the deep sea submersible “Alvin.�

DEMOLISH: Groups mobilize to get word out

SEAN TAYLOR | The Red & Black

Helen Fosgate stands on the balcony of Rutherford Hall, where her husband saw her as a student nearly 20 years ago. Fosgate fondly remembers her time there. ing in the humanities and sciences. Kowalski said though scenarios vary in which a building can be renovated, re-purposed or reconstructed, Rutherford just simply has to come down. “If you think about the changes that have happened for students and what their lifestyle is like in the late 1930s and now, you can understand why we would be wanting to

update that in order to be meeting student needs for the 21st century,� he said. Student complaints about living in Rutherford have contributed to the needed renovation, Kowalski said. “We’ve had some humidity issues that students have expressed some concerns about,� he said. “There have been concerns with plumbing. We’ve had pipes burst

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Woman reports rape near downtown A 20-year-old female reported a rape to the Criminal Investigation Department of the AthensClarke County Police on Friday at 5:19 a.m. An officer spoke to witnesses who saw the suspect downtown. According to the document, the victim left Documents Barcode with the suspect and went to an “unknown location� off Lumpkin Street. After the rape occurred there the suspect drove her back to her house where she called the police. The Criminal Investigation Department requested that the officer take her to the East Station to be interviewed. Detective Harrison Daniel is handling the investigation.

ONLINE

A chase sends two to the ACC jail

¢ From Page 1 their natural life,â€? he said. “Rutherford hall has been a planned renovation project for a number of years.â€? Built in 1939 during the Great Depression, Rutherford along with Mary Lyndon and Soule were constructed using Public Wo r k s Administration funds as a part of the New Deal. Rutherford was one of the first female dorms on campus, something Fosgate said is instrumental in the University’s history. In 2000, Rutherford became a co-ed dorm and began housing Franklin Residential College — an initiative modeled after Great Britain’s Oxford University and Ivy League institutions with the intent to serve groups of students who are major-

CRIME WEEK

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50 __ on; betrays

29 Hound or ham- 39 Meadow

51 Dull in coloring

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5 Remove the lid 21 Spanish hero 6 Harvest

28 High-IQ society 38 Mike or Cicely

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7 Stein or Vereen 25 Moved out of

and thin

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there have also been concerns about electrical system — that is not large enough to hold what students have in terms of devices.� Kowalski said nonetheless, students residing in Rutherford for the fall will have a good experience. “Whenever you identify the need for renovation or demolition of an older building, there’s always going be controversy about what you do,� he said. “It’s important to know that no matter what, students who are assigned to Rutherford Hall for fall 2011 will have a good experience.� There have been efforts to delay the University’s plan. Amy Kissane, director of Athens - Clarke Heritage Foundation said she first found out the University was going to tear down Rutherford in June when the Georgia Historic Preservation Division sent a letter to the University asking them to hold off demolition. Kissane and her staff decided to take matters into their own hands. “We don’t obviously have any jurisdiction to prevent the University from doing this,� she said. “We felt the best was to get the word out and to get as much public awareness about this as possible.� This meant the organization had to mobilize local media and former residents of Rutherford, including sending out copies of the exchanged letters between the University and the GHPD, writing an editorial in the Athens BannerHerald and co-authoring a press release with the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation. The University is required to notify the GHPD before renovating or demolishing a historical building, Kissane said. Though the University has notified the GHPD, it did not respond to the organization’s request for a meeting to discuss the demolition. There is no word so far as to whether or not the University will meet with the organization to discuss the changes. Though Kissane understands the need for an upgrade, she said the University should at least consider the residence

hall’s history before going forward with any changes. “They’re making these decisions not in the history and the architectural context as a whole,� Kissane said. “They didn’t ask that question with Old College because of the history.� Kissane believes part of the reason the University hasn’t taken Rutherford or other historic buildings into consideration more is because they lack a preservation plan for the campus. “They have made a strong commitment for North Campus, but unfortunately they have not given a conservation plan for the rest of campus,� she said. “When you have a building that is 70 years old you’re always going to have issues. If you look at the buildings that they have renovated over the years in North Campus, they have renovated without changing the structure.� Fosgate said even though she sympathizes with the University’s need for on-campus housing, she thinks Rutherford is different from the other dorms. “I’m empathetic with the University’s problem with wanting more kids to live on campus,� Fosgate said. “It enriches their personal and educational experiences. It certainly did for mine. I wish they’d put them somewhere else. This isn’t some Baxter Street high rise, this is something that needs to stay where she is.� Likewise, Kowalski sees Kissane and Fosgate’s point of view. “I think it’s a legitimate perspective and staff and University Housing wouldn’t want to do anything that would adversely affect the historical aesthetic of the University, that’s why part of our process and communication is working with the University architects and upper-level administration to see what are their issues with the project.� Kissane said when it comes down to it, the focus should be on stewardship. “We’re not just talking about the next 10 years, we’re talking about longterm stewardship,� Kissane said. “In absence of the preservation plan, I do not feel that they have taken the role of stewardship, with the exception of North Campus, seriously.�

A University student was arrested by the University Police on charges of underage possession of alcohol, possession of fake ID and obstructing on Friday at 2 a.m. According to the University Police report, Thomas Jackson Davis, 20, and Owen James Brock, 20, ran from officers on Lumpkin Street. The officers followed the males to the Chi Phi fraternity house where Davis was attempting to enter the front door. He started walking toward the officers before he and Brock began running again. They ran south toward the Kappa Alpha parking lot. According to the document, more officers chased the two males and finally apprehended them at the Holiday Inn. The officers observed Brock smelled of alcohol and had bloodshot eyes. Brock provided his driver’s license, which showed him to be underage. He was then placed under arrest for underage possession of alcohol and obstruction of a law enforcement officer. Davis also appeared intoxicated, according to the document. He was arrested on charges of underage possession of alcohol, obstruction of a law enforcement officer and possession of a fake ID. Both were transported to the University Police Department and then to the Clarke County jail. Student takes a break on parking deck wall, arrested for underage possession A University student was arrested by the University Police on a charge of underage possession of alcohol on Saturday at 12:30 a.m. According to the University Police report, an officer observed Clinton Chase Martin, 20, urinating at the North Campus Parking Deck outside wall. He told the officer he was taking a break and using his cell phone. The officer smelled alcohol on his breath and confirmed that Martin was under 21. The officer asked him how many drinks he had consumed and Martin told him “not much.� Martin was arrested on charges of underage possession of alcohol and transported to the University Police Department. He was later transported to the Clarke County Jail. — Compiled by Tunde Ogunsakin

CORRECTIONS The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Polina Marinova (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Wil Petty (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com


NEWS

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 14, 2011 | 3

Univ. grad turns grease to gold Oil converted to biofuels

Corner

KABANA

By EMILY PATRICK THE RED & BLACK Rick Temple buys old grease. Since he graduated from the University this spring, Temple has been working as an intern with Greenlight Biofuels, a company that converts used restaurant grease into biodiesel. Biodiesel is considered an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional diesel fuel. The EPA estimates that it emits 78 percent fewer greenhouse gases than diesel. “It burns cleaner; it reduces our dependence on foreign oil and it reduces the greenhouse emissions that are put out from everyday cars,� Temple said. “There doesn’t need to be any modification to a diesel car’s engine for our biodiesel to run in it.� Temple holds a degree in political science and had originally planned to go to law school in the fall. But after a study abroad trip to New Zealand, he became interested in pursuing a career in renewable energy. “I’ve always been kind of aware of being green and recycling and whatnot, and I think that the New Zealand experience over there really opened my eyes in terms of what they do,� he said. “Over here, people are so mindless about what goes on.� “With Greenlight, I feel like I’m making a difference,� he said. “I feel like our whole company is making a difference in terms of getting restaurants signed up and making an impact.� Temple’s typical work day involves making cold calls to restaurants and explaining the biodiesel business to owners and managers. He estimates that Greenlight has between 20 and 25 accounts in Athens, including Kelly’s Jamaican, Earthfare, Shane’s Rib Shack, Phi Mu, Zeta and SAE. Ryan Myers, one of the owners of Amici Italian Cafe downtown, has used Greenlight Biofuels for several months, and he said he is pleased with the business. He has even recommended it to other restaurant owners. “What made me want to do the switch was just being a little bit more green about it,� he said. “They keep the area back in the back clean. The other company came and just dumped it. There’d be grease all over the place.� Greenlight, which has more than 6,000 accounts in the Southeast, provides free advertising and marketing incentives.

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Alumnus Rick Temple poses by a vegetable oil recycling bin by the Chi Phi fraternity house on Lumpkin Street. Temple interns with Greenlight Biofuels, which collects grease from businesses to make biodiesel. “We have a team of marketing specialists that handles broadcasting what the current accounts are doing with their oil,� Temple said. “It’s a costless way for a restaurant to get more exposure in their community.� But the competition for grease is fierce. Temple said he has heard of companies stealing grease out of rivals’ dumpsters. Companies offer restaurants a rebate that depends on the amount of grease the restaurant produces, but Myers said the money has never been enough to determine who gets his grease. Most grease companies are not making biodiesel. Carolina By-Products and Darling International have accounts in Athens. They use the grease to make products such as animal feed, soap and makeup. “They say they recycle, but really they’re just fattening up chickens,� Temple said. “Technically, they are recycling, but they’re doing more dirty of a practice than what we’re trying to do. We’re just trying to make a cleaner fuel.� Rendering companies have been under heavy FDA regulations since researchers discovered that their feed products

PRODUCTS FROM RECYCLED COOKING OIL UĂŠ Biodiesel — a rise in popularity has led many companies to convert used grease to fuel UĂŠ Animal feed — used restaurant oils are sometimes used as an ingredient UĂŠ Makeup and soap — a common use for recycled oil from restaurants and kitchens is in cosmetic products UĂŠ Composting — used cooking oils can be composted with other organic matter could spread BSE, commonly known as mad-cow disease. Temple’s toughest customer is the University. Right now, campus dining halls sell their grease to a rendering company. “UGA with all the dining halls would be a great fit for Greenlight,â€? Temple said. “Even one dining hall would be crucial. I wish they would just give me some time of day to see if we could just put one on.â€? Daniel Geller is a University research engineer who studies biodiesel and other biofuels. “Unfortunately what

CUT: Terry short on business school faculty, teaching load increased ¢ From Page 1 realities of the budget cuts. When the reductions first began, Terry eliminated several administrative positions, seven director positions and one of the associate dean positions in order to keep more faculty in the classroom. “One of the other things that has happened is that we’ve increased the teaching load on some of our faculty,â€? Sumichrast said. “In the first year of the budget cuts, I had several faculty members volunteer to teach an extra class.â€? Since FY08, Terry’s faculty base has grown from 148 to 153, but the undergraduate enrollment also increased by 327 students. “I don’t think anybody is satisfied with the way that it’s going,â€? Sumichrast said. “You always want to continue to improve and offer more electives and smaller sections. One of the things I’m very concerned about is that there’s a real shortage of good business school faculty.â€? Although many of Terry’s faculty have strong ties to the University, Sumichrast said professors are getting offers from other institutions. “The faculty here haven’t received a raise in the past three years, and at some point, opportunities elsewhere are pretty strong,â€? he said. As for the future? Sumichrast has faith in Terry’s robust alumni support base. “While I am nervous particularly about the lack of raises for faculty and staff over the past three years, I think we’re going to be well-supported by the alumni,â€? he said. “I think over time, UGA and the Terry College will continue to improve even though this is a pretty rough patch that we’re going through.â€?

Tidbits about Terry’s budget

drives where this grease goes is the price,� he said. “Believe it or not, there’s a huge demand for feed.� Geller is working with food services to find a way to convert University grease into biodiesel. “Tolling it — that’s what it’s called when you give it to someone else and they convert it for you — that makes sense, and we could probably make even or save a little bit of money on the back end,� he said. “I think within a year, we might actually make that happen on campus. I think that would be a really good thing for us.�

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UÊPrivate funds make up a little more than 20 percent of Terry’s overall budget UÊLast year, the college brought in about $21 million in gifts and pledges UÊThe college uses about $2 million to supplement the budget UÊAs a result of budget cuts, Terry Magazine is now online only and Terry no longer holds a donor recognition dinner in the fall. UÊTerry has eliminated several administrative positions to avoid faculty layoffs /",½-Ê "/ \ Each week, The Red & Black will focus on one college within the University for a closer look at how the FY12 budget cuts affect its faculty, staff and students. Next week, we will focus on the College of Education.

1 2 5 E . C L AY TO N S T R E E T


4 | Thursday, July 14, 2011 | The Red & Black

Polina Marinova | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Wil Petty | Managing Editor me@randb.com Charles Hicks | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

GOP lacks adept candidate for ’12 E

very time I hear about the 2012 GOP presidential candidates, I can’t help but break out in hives. With high gas prices, an economy still in disarray and unpopular American foreign intervention, President Barack Hussein Obama should be a guaranteed failure come 2012. But it seems all the serious Republican candidates have taken a pass on the next election, and I’ve yet to see someone in the race that I can support. There are nothing but a few Barnum & Bailey circus clowns in the ring. Leading the pack is businessman and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. Most Republicans believe he is the key to winning back the White House. But I’m more inclined to believe that he is secretly the identical twin to Gordon Gekko and this presidential run is all part of a sinister scheme to take over Wall Street. I mean, the guy has flipflopped on every major issue in the past 20 years. Pro-health care one day. Anti-health care the next. And with hair like that, you think he can be trusted? Unfortunately, running in second to the Fonzie look-alike is Sarah Palinon-steroids, Minnesota congresswoman and Tea Party darling Michele Bachmann. Bachmann’s hobbies include running her mouth, burning her Census and labeling people anti-American. She’s just like your average Joe… McCarthy. Not to mention she wants to ban porn. She’s really vying for the male vote. From the same state as Congresswoman Censorship is former Governor Tim Pawlenty. Or as I like to call him, Tin Pawlenty. The man moves like a robot and sounds like a zombie. Watching him on television is as entertaining as picking lint out of my belly button. If you like boring, he’s the candidate for you. Of course, already winning the award for worst presidential campaign ever is Georgia native Newt Gingrich. Gingrich’s résumé includes four years as

JEREMY DAILEY Speaker of the House, 20 years as a U.S. Representative and 68 years as an adulterer. Does anyone else have a problem with the idea that people are lining up to have sex with this guy? I mean, the man looks like a cross between comedian Ben Stein and Newman on Seinfeld. And yet, he even puts Tiger Woods to shame. Also running from Georgia is talk show host Herman Cain, who has never held any elective office. Instead, he brags about his experience working for Burger King and Godfather’s Pizza. Maybe it’s just me, but I can’t recall any point of time that I’ve walked into a fast food restaurant, pointed at the guy behind the counter, and said, “You! I want you to be my next Commander in Chief.” He might want to consider reworking that message. Many tout Cain as the only black American in the GOP arena — or more like the only black man in the party — but that is not true. Former candidate for the Rent is Too Damn High party Jimmy McMillan has switched his allegiance and is also running as a Republican. Man, let’s just hope he doesn’t siphon too many of those Republican minority votes from Cain. The list of Republican nut jobs could go on and on. From Rick “I’m strongly pro-life but I supported my wife’s abortion” Santorum to Ron “I’m the perennial, unelectable candidate but weirdly popular with young dummies” Paul, this batch of candidates is as electable as an Alaskan pitbull with lipstick. But do not despair. I bring good news. Former Grand Wizard of the Klu Klux Klan David Dukes has stated that he is now considering a run. Finally, someone normal in the race. And to think I was worried. — Jeremy Dailey is a first-year law student from Conyers with a degree in political science

Mailbox

E-mail and letters from our readers

Univ. Athletic Association not ‘dumping’ scholarship A June 30 Red & Black editorial reached incorrect conclusions about the funding support for UGA’s One Diversity Scholarship Program. Under no circumstances did the UGA Athletic Association “dump a scholarship” on the UGA Foundation, and future funding for the program has never been in doubt. The Athletic Association provided a temporary source for funding assistance when the original corporate donor was unable to provide it. The new Arch Foundation picked up the funding support the next year when its revenue income was sufficient for this purpose, and will continue this funding as the newly-created UGA Foundation. The student newspa-

per unfortunately jumped to the conclusion that a Regents decision on the president’s deferred compensation put funding for a valuable student scholarship in jeopardy. The Athletic Association gives millions each year for student scholarships and professorship endowments. Regardless of how one feels about the Regents’ action to provide supplemental presidential compensation with non-state funds from the Athletic Association, the fact remains that Athletics is a generous contributor to UGA academics, and certainly did not put the future of an important UGA scholarship program at risk. TOM S. LANDRUM Senior Vice President for External Affairs

New HOPE system aids average D

o you know your high school GPA? Are you sure? What many students may not know is the Georgia Student Finance Commission recalculates GPAs after students graduate to determine their eligibility for HOPE and the new Zell Miller Scholarship. As it happens, their formula for this calculation is backwards and may have negative consequences for the hardest working students. GSFC strips your grades down to a 4.0 scale, regardless of the rigor of your courses. Then it reweighs your grades according to their own formula. This formula is mysterious in two ways. First, weight is only added to AP or IB grades if the student did not make an A in the course. This way, no GPA can be above a 4.0. Second, one point is added to AP and IB grades only if the student did not make an ‘A’ and only if the course was taken during or before the 2005-2006 school year. Just half a point is added if the course was taken in a later year according to an email sent to me by GSFC last week. That means most students don’t have a clue what their HOPE GPA is. This formula matters, because the HOPE GPA will determine who receives the Zell Miller Scholarship

News Editor: Kathryn Ingall Associate News Editor: Sarah Giarratana Variety Editor: Tiffany Stevens Photo Editor: AJ Reynolds Design Editor: Amanda Jones Copy Editor: Lauren Blais Online Editor: Mark Miller Editorial Cartoonist: Sarah Lawrence

and 100 percent of their funding in the fall. I had never heard of this reweighing before last week when I found out that the 4.0 I had when I graduated is actually a 3.65, according to GSFC. This means I will lose 10 percent of my funding in the fall for falling below the 3.7 mark, according to a phone conversation with a man from GSFC on Friday. Needless to say, I was displeased. Even when I realized that the difference is less than $400 a semester, which I can earn easily in two weeks, I was still upset. The HOPE GPA is a slap in the face — a devaluing of the hard work we did in high school. Let’s examine who loses in this reweighing situation. First, students who challenged themselves in high school are at a disadvantage when it comes to reweighing. Why did I spend my time taking hard courses when the easier courses would have served me equally well or better in terms of funding? Second, students who challenged themselves and excelled in

— Emily Patrick is a senior from Atlanta majoring in English

Socially-reliant America requires taxation

A

s the budget battle between President Barack Obama and the Republican Party heats up, many Americans feel lost. On the one hand, our quality of life is diminishing. We could all use a little help to get by in these troubled times. But American distrust of government spending is as strong as ever. We see taxes as a burden and government spending as wasteful and irrelevant to our lives. A co-worker of mine echoed this sentiment to me last week. She thinks taxes are an act of theft and social programs should be abolished. She believes people need to have more personal responsibility. Welfare programs encourage laziness and discourage achievement. I found my co-worker’s line of reasoning dubious to say the least. But many Americans would agree with her. With so many people restless and discontent, taxes and social programs become convenient scapegoats. Personal responsibility becomes the antidote to all our economic woes. The appeal of this rugged individualism is easy to understand. It can be very comforting to think

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

EMILY PATRICK

their AP and IB courses by making ‘A’s have no advantage. Why did I do two hours of math homework every night for two years to earn an ‘A’ in BC Calculus when a ‘B’ would have served me just as well? Clearly, hard work and the drive to excel don’t mean much to the legislators who determined the GPA weighing system for HOPE. The state’s message is clear: academically advanced high school students should not be rewarded. They don’t deserve credit for their work. Down with the advanced. Up with the mediocre. What an interesting message, considering these regulations come from a bunch of state legislators who never had the determination and ingenuity to make a career in national politics. It’s also interesting that the regulations are tacitly enforced by a gaggle of faceless bureaucrats at GSFC who never had the true merit to distinguish themselves from the crowd. In short, the HOPE GPA is a system that awards mediocrity, and that’s no surprise as it was the brainchild of a group who is, frankly, mediocre. We need a system that rewards exceptional students.

Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Sarah Jean Dover Recruitment Editor: Jessica Roberts Staff Writers: Umarah Ali, Jason Axlerod, Ryan Black, Rachel G. Bowers, Chris Brandus, Jason Flynn, Natalie Fort, Tucker Green, Mariana Heredia, Megan Ingalls, Alex Laughlin, Kristen Nipper, Tunde Ogunsakin, Emily Patrick, Nathan Sorensen, Daniel

JONATHAN RICH we are singularly responsible for our own destiny. If poverty is nothing more than the result of laziness, we simply need to get rid of government and let people rely on themselves. However appealing self-reliance may be, it is actually nothing more than a comforting fantasy. And if we look closer, we can see something dark and cynical lurking underneath this illusion. The myth of self-reliance obscures a powerful truth — wealth is a social creation, not an individual one. No individual could prosper without the group. We are not self-reliant — we are socially reliant. An individual’s destiny is inexorably tied to the group as a whole. We don’t grow our own food, pick our own cotton and sew our own clothes, pave our own roads, build our own homes, perfect our own medical technology, harness our own electrical grids or treat our own sewage. We are interdependent, and we benefit from our ability to trade skills and

Our Staff

Suddes, Gordon Syzmanski, Joe Willeford, Holly Young Photographers: Andrea Briscoe, Kristy Densmore, Avery Draut, Alan Liow, Allison Love, Sean Taylor Page Designers: Rachel G. Bowers, JanMichael Cart Videographer: Kitty Capelle

expertise with others. Taxes are a crucial part of social interdependence. They allow us to pool together our common resources for the good of all. No one could earn a living without using taxpayer benefits. My co-worker might not like seeing money taken out of her paycheck each week. But if not for taxes, she wouldn’t even have a paycheck in the first place. As a University employee, her paycheck is funded by Georgia taxpayers. Her income is further supplemented by social security — a government program. Her hospital bills are paid for by the taxpayers through Medicare. The food she eats and prescription drugs she takes are only safe thanks to inspections by the Food and Drug Administration. And she wouldn’t even be able to make it to work each day without driving the roads paved by our tax dollars. Ironically, the people who benefit most from government are also its biggest opponents. What can account for this observation? Selfishness is an obvious answer. It is easy to reap the benefits of government programs without wanting to pay any-

thing in return. But more importantly, many Americans are ignorant of how socially embedded our economy is. If success is nothing more than a reflection of individual merit, then the rich owe nothing to anybody else. And the poor are undeserving of our help, because they simply need to work harder. This view benefits the ruling class at the expense of the rest of us. It keeps the poor poor and the rich rich. It blinds us to the social connectedness we all rely on to make a living. And worse still, self-reliance prevents us from uniting as a group to affect social change. Social movements don’t happen when we imagine ourselves as disparate individuals. Change occurs when we recognize ourselves in others, not when we pretend we exist only for ourselves. My co-worker’s discontent is real. But let’s not misdirect our rage and surrender to the temptation of creating a scapegoat. Taxation is not the problem — our belief in self-reliance is. — Jonathan Rich is a senior from Alpharetta majoring in sociology

Editorial board members include Charles Hicks, Polina Marinova and Wil Petty

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Office Manager: Erin Beasley Cleaning Person: Mary Jones The Red & Black is published Monday through Friday fall and spring semesters and each Thursday summer semester, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a non-profit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


THE WEEK

PICK OF THE WEEK: HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS, PART 2

T

his is the end. After seven books and eight movies, the epic struggle between good and evil in the wizarding world is finally reaching its conclusion. For any person who has grown up with “The Boy Who Lived,” and for anyone lucky enough to get tickets, this will be a magical night not to be missed. The triumph of Harry, Hermione, Ron and all of the other characters we have come to love over bigotry, genocide, hatred and evil is a heartwarming tale that reaches to the depths of justice and compassion. This fantasy contains all of the morals we expect from fiction, but with identifiable characters you can latch on to. By the end of this saga, viewers will feel that mischief has, indeed, been managed. Where: GTC Beechwood 11 Cinemas, Carmike 12 When: Thursday, midnight Price: $9.50 for Beechwood; soldout for Carmike 12 Contact: 706-546-1012 for GTC Beechwood; 706-354-0584 for Carmike

SATURDAY Events & Opportunities What: Zumba After Dark Where: 40 Watt Club When: 7:30 p.m. Price: $10 Verdict: Some exercises are best performed in the dark of a bar, among friends. Down a few and join your fellows in a night of dance. Contact: www.40watt.com What: Pie Contest Where: Athens Farmers’

What: “Silent Light” (2007) Where: Athens-Clarke County Library When: 6:30 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: A man’s past clashes with his faith in this tale about a Mexican Mennonite’s struggle to reconcile his extramarital affair

FRIDAY Events & Opportunities

Courtesy Warner Bros.

The midnight screening of the final Harry Potter film Thursday will be overflowing with costumed Potter fans eager to see the end of movie saga. Market When: 10 a.m. Price: $5 to taste pies Verdict: Put your best slice forward during this pie contest. You might want to eat breakfast first to head off the sugar rush. Contact: www.localpiece.org Music What: Werewolves Where: Flicker Theater & Bar When: 8:30 p.m. Price: $5

Music

Events & Opportunities

What: David Barbe Where: Highwire Lounge When: 8 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Former member of Sugar and Mercyland performs solo with high-energy electric guitar. His tone varies throughout, bringing out genres such as psychedelic and the blues. Contact: www.highwirelounge.com

What: Dart League and Pool Tournament Where: Alibi When: 8 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Good aim matters. Take your cue from this Dart League and Pool Tournament. With a little focus, you might become champion. Contact: 706-549-1010

What: Blood Drive Where: College of Pharmacy When: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Give a pint and save a life during this blood drive at the College of Pharmacy. Contact: 706-546-0681 What: “Farmageddon” (2010) Where: Ciné When: 7 p.m. Price: $10 Verdict: Raw foods and organic milk saves a life during this film about co-ops and private farms that are raided by the government. Contact: www.localplace.org Music What: Sunlight Alchemists Where: Caledonia Lounge When: 9:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY Events & Opportunities What: Talking About Books Where: Athens-Clarke County Library When: 10:30 a.m. Price: Free Verdict: Get lost in a jungle of madness with Joseph Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness.” Contact: 706-613-3650 Music What: Dial Indicators Where: Farm 255 When: 9 p.m.

Designed by JAN-MICHAEL CART

The Red & Black’s event guide to happenings — shows, films and events — in and around Athens from July 14 to July 20. Events & Opportunities

MONDAY

Events & Opportunities

Compiled by TIFFANY STEVENS

THURSDAY

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 14, 2011 | 5

What: Libations and Lyrics Where: Hotel Indigo When: 6:15 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: A meeting for local artists, hosted by The Macon Music Project. Contact: macon. music@gmail.com

with his religion. Contact: 706-613-3650

Music

What: “Pierre Daura” Where: Georgia Museum of Art When: 7 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: The Georgia Museum of Art presents this biography of Daura, an abstract artist who divided his life between Catalonia, France and the United States. Contact: 706-542-4662

What: Major Love Event Where: Farm 255 When: 11 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: With a strange mix of folk and alternative rock, Major Love Event will leave you feeling a little punchdrunk. It might not be love, but this band’s definitely worth a one night stand. Contact: www.farm255.com

Music

What: The Atom Age Where: Caledonia Lounge When: 10 p.m. Price: $5 for 21 and up; $7 for 18 and up Verdict: Fast drum work and guitar work reminiscent of Australia’s Jet shine through in California punk bands howling pieces. Contact: www.caledonialounge. com

What: The Georgia Healers Where: 40 Watt Club When: 8:30 p.m. Price: $5 for 21 and up; $7 for 18 and up Verdict: This Americana and blues band brings together foot-tapping rhythms and grooving lyrics. Contact: www.40watt.com

Verdict: In highpitched, offpitch vocals that recall Neutral Milk Hotel, Werewolves will send you howling for the night after their set. Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com What: Tongue and Groove Where: Gnat’s Landing When: 6:30 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: This acoustic quartet aims to please with high energy covers and originals. Contact: 706-850-5858

Music What: Badman Where: New Earth Music Hall When: 9 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Badman features wailing vocals and western swing for an eclectic mix of eerie sound. Contact: www.newearthmusichall.com

3061 Atlanta Highway, Suite D Athens, GA 30606 (706) 208-7337

What: “Limitless” (2011) Where: Tate Theatre When: 8 p.m. Price: $2 general admission; free for students Verdict: This movie allows drug users to literally expand their minds. If only that worked in the real world. Contact: 706-542-6396

Price: $5 for 21 and up; $7 for 18 and up Verdict: Alchemy is the science of combining various elements. And with the combination of Switchfoot and Alanis Morissette as their influences, Sunlight Alchemists are sure to create an interesting fusion. Contact: www.caledonialounge.com What: Mandolin Orange Where: The Melting Point When: 7 p.m. Price: $5 Verdict: This band’s folk sound mixes with country rock twinges to create an Appalachian mountain music sound. Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

Price: Free Verdict: This jazz group features guitarist Jeremy Roberts and tenor sax player George Davidson, who will play a mix of covers and original improvising. Contact: www.farm255.com What: Mary Sigalas Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar When: 8 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Bringing back the sounds of the 1940s, Mary Sigalas is a blast from the past brought to the modern stage. Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com

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NEWS & VARIETY

6 | Thursday, July 14, 2011 | The Red & Black

Political professor turns comedian

listen up!

Poli Sci class a laughing matter By ALEXIS LEIMA FOR THE RED & BLACK

‘When I Stop Running’ by Totally Fuckin’ Doin’ It I’m not sure what these guys are “totally fuckin’ doin’,� but my best guess would be headlining Vacation Bible School — which doesn’t make a lot of sense considering the band name. The first full-length debut album by Totally Fuckin’ Doin’ It (TFDI), “When I Stop Running,� is a mixture of acoustic songs from three stylized singer-songwriters. It’s apparent that the trio can play guitar. Each member has strong, individual vocal styles. But this listener had a hard time looking past the use of many — too many — major chords right off the bat. The second thing that came to mind was Bob Dylan. In fact, he’s even mentioned on track eight, “Sweet Talkin’ Liar.� “When I Stop Runnin’,� the third track, is more country and rock-inspired and has vocals that are very Dylan with some Tom Petty sprinkled on top. The next track, “Hold On Tight,� sounds exactly like an acoustic Christian song. Dylan continues to prevail through the album until track six, “Ghost,� when Creed devours him and they sing as one. The guitars are catchy though. The eighth track, “Sweet Talkin’ Liar,� flaunts the group’s ability to harmonize. The harmonies are wellbalanced, and once again very Dylan-like. The last three tracks on the album are covers of Tom Petty’s “American Girl,� Bright Eyes’ “Lover I Don’t Have to Love� and Willie Nelson’s “On the Road Again.� TFDI’s take on “Lover I Don’t Have to Love� has a John Mayer meets Jack Johnson feel to it. It’s easy to see how fans of the aforementioned artists might find this album appealing, but it incorporates too many church sing-alongs to ignore. With more chord experimentation and rhythm variation, these guys could have a broader appeal. It will be interesting to hear how their sound has evolved a couple albums down the road. — Holly Young

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The daily grind can often become diseased with drudgery, for University students and Athens residents alike. And for Ed Burmila, laughter is the best medicine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being a professor and doing comedy are very similar, believe it or not,â&#x20AC;? said Burmila, assistant professor of political science at the University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You stand in front of a room full of strangers and you have to find a way to make them interested in what you have to say. Teaching and comedy are both based on the same set of skills â&#x20AC;&#x201D; getting and holding the attention of a skeptical audience.â&#x20AC;? Amusing strangers on stage and teaching them in a classroom could seem like an odd pair of occupations. However, Burmila said laughing about the subject matter can help students learn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a surprising amount of research showing that humor is a very effective teaching tool. It improves studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attention and retention,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I understand that some topics in political science are not exactly enthralling to the average 19-year-old. So I do what I can to make the material more appealing.â&#x20AC;? And his students seem to appreciate the break from humorless material, Burmila said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a dry, sarcastic sense of humor and I tend to apply to it to whatever topic Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about in class,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I started doing [that] so that I would enjoy teaching, but fortunately some students seem to like it too.â&#x20AC;? Not only is comedy useful in captivating his students, it provides an outlet for Burmila to take the edge off of his careerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s usual focus on politics and life in general. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of my material is political,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In fact, I have to remind myself constantly to come up with some jokes that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about politics.â&#x20AC;? The Chicago native said he found new inspiration in some southernersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reactions to seasonal occurences. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The way students treat college football here is hilarious,â&#x20AC;? Burmila said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen anything like it and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still not used to it. And, of course, being a native Chicagoan I

ANDREA BRISCOE | The Red & Black

Ed Burmila, assistant professor of political science, has done standup on the side since his days in college. He has performed political comedy at shows such as AthFestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;LaughFest 2011.â&#x20AC;? laugh a lot about the way people react to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;winterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; down here.â&#x20AC;? The professorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comedic mixture of stand-up and politics continues to evolve from his first routine developed during his college years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bill Hicks is the biggest influence,â&#x20AC;? Burmila said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most comedians who see me perform can spot that right away, because I do a lot of political stuff and most of the humor

comes from sarcasm.â&#x20AC;? With political drama raging from both parties, Burmila said joking about national problems is often the best way to handle any mounting frustration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I find that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to pay constant attention to politics if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a sense of humor about it,â&#x20AC;? Burmila said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t laugh about it, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll eventually go crazy.â&#x20AC;?

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meets 25 students and has each say their name, hometown, major and an interesting fact to break the ice. She said she will have repeated this process with some 400 students once the summer is over. Though some students are hesitant to talk, Baxter engages her group with an infectious energy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I honestly donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where it comes from,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This job just makes me happy.â&#x20AC;? Next, Baxter takes her group to rejoin the other students for an informational â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arch session.â&#x20AC;? With the students busy, Baxter and the other orientation leaders escape to Tate to assist parents and get them ready to head to lunch. At lunch, Baxter sits with a table of parents, chatting about topics as diverse as smoothie preferences and Greek life. Baxter is in a sorority, but cannot reveal her affiliation during orientation. After lunch, Baxter sits in Tate with three other leaders, making herself available to help parents. Despite their packed schedules, the orientation leaders find time to make plans for the weekend, hack each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook pages and â&#x20AC;&#x153;swagjackâ&#x20AC;? one another â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a game of tearing off each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nametags and throwing them out of reach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been really blessed with a lot of really awesome, genuine and incredible people,â&#x20AC;? Baxter said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have so much fun and we are prob-

ALLISON LOVE | The Red & Black

Orientation leader Mel Baxter (right) answers questions on topics such as printing services, living accomodations, classes and Bulldog Bucks. ably so obnoxious when the 12 of us are together.â&#x20AC;? Baxter emphasized how well the orientation leaders work together. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a question that I feel like I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t answer, we can bring in another orientation leader and somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to have an answer or somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be able to relate,â&#x20AC;? she said. Milly Gorman, director of new student orientation, echoed that sentiment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re great,â&#x20AC;? Gorman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always feel really lucky when you see them in their zone. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re such a diverse group. I think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re rock stars.â&#x20AC;? At 4 p.m., Baxter heads to the Tate theater to help answer questions from par-

ents, responding to topics such as printing services, Bulldog Bucks and the differences between the residence halls. The next couple hours are a whirlwind, as Baxter and the other orientation leaders perform educational skits about the first year experience, teach the students how to bark like a Dawg, mingle with them at a tailgate-themed dinner, and offer information sessions. The dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s climax is Orientation Live, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday Night Liveâ&#x20AC;?esque series of skits performed by the orientation leaders for entertainment. The humorous skits touch on themes of parent-child separation, awkward fresh-

man moments, roommate relations and SEC rivalries. At 11 p.m., Baxter is still joking with incoming students and the other orientation leaders, laughing with the kind of joy that only comes from doing something one loves to do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mel is an awesome orientation leader,â&#x20AC;? said Nehemiah Lawson, a rising freshman from Columbus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She made me feel really welcome here at UGA.â&#x20AC;? To Baxter, those words may be the highest compliment of all. For Baxter and the other orientation leaders, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the end of another long day. But for the students theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve introduced to the University, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the beginning.


SPORTS

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 14, 2011 | 7

Coach settling in new job ‘Gym culture’ emphasized By RACHEL G. BOWERS THE RED & BLACK

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

Wil Spencer will compete for a qualifying bid in singles play for the ATP Atlanta Tennis Championships, which begins Monday.

Handful of Bulldogs to compete in Atlanta at ATP tennis event There’s no need to wait until spring to cheer on the stars of Georgia men’s tennis. Former Bulldog players John Isner and Drake Bernstein join rising senior Wil Spencer at the ATP Atlanta Tennis Championships, which starts Monday and runs through July 24 at the Racquet Club of the South in Norcross. Isner and Bernstein are in the singles and doubles main draws, respectively, while Spencer competes this weekend for one of four qualifying bids in singles play. Isner is ranked No. 36 in the world, and comes into the Atlanta Championships with momentum. The 6-foot-9 former All-American claimed his second career ATP World Tour title in Newport, R.I. last week after defeating Olivier Rochus in the final of the Hall of Fame Tennis Championships. Isner topped Rochus 6-3, 7-6(6), not losing a set during the tournament and taking home a winner’s check of $76,500. Isner, who won his first ATP title in Auckland in 2010, was runner-up at last year’s Atlanta Championships, losing to Mardy Fish. Fish, the No. 9 player in the world, returns to Atlanta again this year to defend his title. Bernstein recently graduated from Georgia and finished his senior season No. 76 in the ITA rankings. He was an All-SEC second team selection and was one of only 14 players in Bulldog history to win more than 100 matches (career record of 112-44). Bernstein will pair up with Georgia Tech’s Kevin King into the main draw of the doubles

SUMMERTIME To get ready for the pro action next week, tennis enthusiasts can head to Georgia’s Dan Magill Tennis Complex this weekend to catch the ITA Collegiate Summer Circuit, which provides college (and junior and alumni) players the opportunity to compete in organized events during the offseason. It runs today through Saturday, and members of the Georgia’s men’s and women’s teams will be represented. competition. Spencer competes on Saturday to earn a spot in the 32-man singles draw. He reached as high as No. 12 in ITA singles rankings last season and finished No. 14, earning All-SEC first team honors and attaining AllAmerican status. Also playing in this year’s Atlanta Championships are Lleyton Hewitt, former No. 1 player in the world and U.S. Open and Wimbledon champion, James Blake and Tommy Haas. Nicolas Mahut, the man Isner beat last year at Wimbledon in the longest match in tennis history, is also in the draw. Past winners include Andre Agassi, Andy Roddick, Pete Sampras and John McEnroe.

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(Private Party Merchandise, Under $101) (0-15 words) 3 Consecutive Days..................................................FREE (Merchandise must be priced. One item per hsld per week. Ads must be received from UGA e-mail address only. No walk-ins or standard mail accepted.)

IN NEED OF roommate for 2BR condo within walking distance of campus. 370, South Pope St. Athens, Georgia. 757-754-4673. MATURE M/F TO Share 3BR 2.5BA house near GA Square. Private, peaceful neighborhood. Great floor plan. FP, Spacious deck. Woodland creek. 2-car garage. Pets fine. $400/mo. 706-714-7600. NEED ROOMMATE NOW! 1970 sq ft. 3BR 2.5BA. Has kitchen, living room, and garage. 5 mins from campus. $350/mo. Utilities $100. Great deal! 706-4243057.

ROOMMATE NEEDED: NON-smoker. Furnished 2BR 2BA Lodge of Athens condo (near UGA). Avail 8/1, $425/mo: cable, internet included. Call Kevin 404-840-2715 or kevinscott21@bellsouth.net

$200 CASH PER person at lease signing! S. Milledge Ave Hunter’s Run 2bd/2ba $650 3bd/2ba $800 4bd/4ba $1,000 W/D, alarm system, pets welcome hancockpropertiesinc. com 706-552-3500

— Staff Reports

Lizzy Stemke is itching to get on the volleyball court. It has been somewhat of a whirlwind since the last time the New Orleans native has been in the gym for a volleyball match. “These first five months have been extremely busy with making sure that we’re setting new expectations, setting a gym culture for the way that this program will be run,” Stemke said. “And a lot of that has been getting to know our players and building those relationships.” Since last season, she became a mother and accepted a job without seeing the facilities first hand, meeting the team or getting a feel for the town until after she took the offer. She became a head coach for the first time — for the Georgia volleyball team. She made the 1,000-mile move from Lincoln, Neb., — where she was assistant coach for the volleyball team at the University of Nebraska — to Athens. AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black And now she is just more Sophomore Kathleen Luft and the Georgia than one month away from volleyball team begin the season under first-year the start of the 2011 season. After inheriting a program head coach Lizzy Stemke on Aug. 26 in Athens. that has gone 49-45 overall throughout the last three and had to quickly become mer, Stemke was finally able seasons (24-36 in SEC play), familiar with the program she to enjoy what Athens has to offer, exploring the restauStemke emphasized a “gym took over. Since she was not able to rants, things to do, bands to culture” and said expectacome to Athens prior listen to, all while spending tions for this year’s to accepting the job time with her family. team will be high. (she gave birth the But the first-year head “I think the gym same time on-campus coach and her team are about culture is set on a dayinterviews took place to display the work they have to-day basis, whether and her husband put in this offseason, as the it’s the tempo in the checked it out for the season begins Aug. 26 in the gym, the attitude in family), Stemke was Hotel Indigo Invitational in the gym,” Stemke quickly reminded of Athens. said. “I think that the difficulties of “I think we’ve built a lot there’s a lot of details remaining patient. up in the spring and I guess that go into running a STEMKE “There’s a lot that I’m most excited about just program and trying to we would like to do getting on the court during a build it to the top. We’re gonna expect a big and we have big goals and so season with this group,” commitment level on and off just reminding ourselves that Stemke said. “This team has the court on a day to day it’s gonna take a little bit of invested a lot this spring and basis here and just making patience and time to build I know they’re working hard sure everybody’s on the same the program to where we throughout the summer and page with those expectations want and we wanna do it the we’re just excited to start to right way,” Stemke said. chip away at the process of is a big part of our job.” Stemke hit the ground “Learning to stay patient is building. We’re working at it running upon her arrival to always my biggest chal- every day and we’re excited to see where we’re at come Athens and had to make sure lenge.” At the start of the sum- game time.” her family settled in quickly

Classifieds

1BR APTS W/ 1 MONTH FREE & NO PET FEE! Close to Campus & Downtown from $380-$425 NO SD w/ acceptable credit. That’s only $350-$390 w/ special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com. 706549-2500 2BR 2.5BA townhouse. Perfect roommate floorplan. Inc. W/D in unit. Sleepy Creek off S. Lumpkin $750/mo. 678-488-9762 2BR 2.5BA WOODLAND gated condo. Large rooms, plenty of closets. Large balcony, W/D, all appliances, HW floor, beautiful clubhouse, pool and gym, close campus. $750. Natalie 770-8539187 mesbah.1@osu.edu

2BR 2BA DUPLEX $650. w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $600 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, DW, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500 2BR 2BA ON College Station. Huge apartment, FP, deck, lots of closets, DW, W/D, CHAC. Avail. 7/1 or 8/1. Pets OK. $575/mo. 706-369-2908. 2BR 2BA SUPER cottage. Great area. Close to campus. Lots of parking. Pet friendly. $750/mo. Contact 706-549-7371 or 706-5406304.

3BR 2BA APTS starting at $600 W/D included. 1 month free rent & no security deposit with acceptable credit. Close to campus & downtown! Pets welcome. Owner/agent 706549-2500. www.athensapartments.postlets.com

3BR 2BA DUPLEX $750 W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $700 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, dw, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $450 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 3BR 2BA PET friendly house for rent, large fenced in back yard, new HVAC, stainless steel appliances, 2 car garage in quiet neighborhood. Walking distance to Terrapin Brewery and minutes from downtown and campus. $1050/mo, available August 1st, 2011. athenshomes4rent@gmail.com 5BR 3BA HOUSE for $1750. 4BR 3BA for $1700. 3BR for $1650. 2BR for $1600. Half security deposit secures it.125 Peeks Point.1mi from Athens. 706765-7239.

BRIDGEWATER 2BR & 3BR houses! $850-$1150 per month. Walkin closets & W/D included. Call 706340-1215 about our movein specials. www.athensrealestategroup.com

3BR 2.5BA House near GA Square. Private, peaceful neighborhood. Great floor plan. FP, Spacious deck. Woodland creek. 2-car garage. Pets fine. $1200/mo. 706-714-7600.

GREAT 5BR 3BA house close to campus. Pets ok, CHAC, ceiling fans, DW, W/D, front porch, back porch, 2 living rooms. Avail Aug 1. Short term lease is avail. Call Matt 404-8083190.

CONVENIENT, PET FRIENDLY 4BR 2BA Home 1 Mile From Campus visit: www.184vinest.com Call: 678-207-6754 or 704589-0963

RESORT STYLE AMENITIES! Enormous pool, volleyball/basketball court, putting green, movie theather, gym and more! Very close to campus. Great specials on 2, 3 and 4BR units. Only a few remaining for Fall, so call today! The Summit of Athens 706-5520552 or The Woodlands of Athens 706-552-1550. www.RentAthens.com

HANDYMAN FOR RENTAL properties. Flexible hours. Must have some tools. $10/hr. 706-3692908. LOOKING FOR MATURE college student with strong background in math to help with three children ages 15, 13 and 6. Duties will include tutoring and helping children with homework, taking children to and from appointments and other activities as necessary, babysitting as needed and other miscellaneous errands. A car will be provided when transporting children anywhere, but otherwise, applicant must have their own transportation, car insurance and a clean driving record. A fully furnished garage apartment can be provided if needed. Must have excellent references. Please respond to dillard@aol.com or call 706340-0710.

SAFE, QUIET CONDO tucked away. Convenient eastside location near shopping. Accessible one story brick 2/1.5 with FP, HW floors. Beautiful landscaping. $164,000. 706255-3012 WOODLANDS 3BR 3BA Cottage for rent. $450/mo. Living room, dining area, and 1BR fully furnished. Less than one mi from campus. Gated community. ashleycleary@gmail.com

ANIMAL CARETAKER NEEDED for Pawtropolis. 3-4 shifts/week, must work weekends and have confidence with animals. Email pawtropolis@aol.com for more details.

NEED CASH? NOW Interviewing Exotic Dancers and Lingerie Models. 706-6135424. PART TIME FRONT desk receptionist needed Athens Flight Center at the Athens Ben Epps Airport. Friendly personality a must. Experience in cash register operation, telephones and computers a plus. Flexible scheduling with hours available Monday-Friday 2pm9pm and Saturday & Sunday 9am-3pm/ 3pm-9pm $7.99/hour. Must be avaliable for both weeknight and weekend shifts. Please visit athensclarkecounty.com Human Resources website to download an application and for further information. Deadline for applications is Fri Jul 15. PERSONAL TRAINERS NEEDED. Send resume to deeapf@gmail.com. Flexible hours, competitive pay. Athens Personal Fitness 706-425-9797

THE RED & BLACK is now accepting applications for

Fall Semester Business Interns This is a great opportunity to gain valuable experience in a variety of fields. Sifts are Monday through Friday, 9:00 to 11:00 or 11:00 to 1:00. Visit our website: www.redandblack.com for more information and an application. No Calls or Drop-ins Please.

LOST DOG. ALL black male cocker spaniel. BeBe. Lost on Willow St, College Ave. Sat Jun 25. Limp in left front leg. Please call 706-255-6065.

MEXICALI GRILLE DAY or Night Servers Needed. Apply or call between 3:0010:00 pm at W. Broad St. location or 706-546-9200.

BECOME A BARTENDER! Up to $250/day. No experience necessary. Training courses available. 1-800965-6520 ext 106.

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2BR APTS $550- $650 w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ good credit! Blocks to campus & downtown. W/D included. Only $505-$596 w/ current special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706549-2500

3BR 2.5BA House. Great floor plan. All appliances, W/D. Large yard w/lawn care and trash pickup. Close to campus. Pet friendly. $895/mo. 678910-8008.

ROOMMATE WANTED TO share renovated house off Prince Ave. $350/mo + utilities. Pets ok with deposit. Short biking distance to campus. Call 404-713-0655.

1000 off w/ this ad

$

706-613-0007ÊUÊ"«i˜ÊÓ{ÉÇÊUÊÎäÓäÊi݈˜}̜˜Ê,`°]Ê­>VÀœÃÃÊvÀœ“ʍ>ˆ®

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

Previous puzzle’s solution 2

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Kayak Shuttle 9am-4pm

Shuttle Upstream. Kayak back to BigDogs CALL FOR RESERVATIONS

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8 | Thursday, July 14, 2011 | The Red & Black

FISH IN A BARREL CHASE SIMMEMON Year: senior Major: wildlife biology & fisheries and aquaculture Latest competition: Finished third at the Mercury College B.A.S.S. National Championship SIMMEMON

RANDY TOLBERT Year: senior Major: fisheries and aquaculture Latest competition: Finished third at the Mercury College B.A.S.S. National Championship TOLBERT

SPORTS

Georgia duo catches a big break Takes third with final fish By JACOB DEMMITT THE RED & BLACK Even without the flair of a final buzzer, two University anglers’ third place finish in last weekend’s Mercury College B.A .S.S. National Championship was nothing short of a photo finish. Seniors Randy Tolbert and Chase Simmemon, who represented the University of Georgia Bass Fishing Club, secured their spot on the podium as they reeled in their largest fish of the day with eight

minutes to spare in the three-day tournament. “We were getting pretty worried,” Simmemon said. “But we never did lose hope.” Each of the tournament’s 36 teams were allowed to weigh in their five best catches each day. The winning team would be that with the greatest combined weight. But as time wound down, Simmemon said the Georgia pair found itself with four less-than-impressive fish in the boat. “It was all about timing,” he said. “We had 10 to 15 brush piles marked. We would hit one, if we didn’t get anything, would go to the next one ... [Using equipment],

we could see them down there in the brush piles but there’s certain factors that make them bite at times and not at others. ... For some reason they started biting again [with 30 minutes left].” The team ended the tournament by pulling in three bass including a 4.25 pounder with eight minutes remaining. This landed them in third place with a final day total of 12.94 pounds. Ryan Watkins and Andrew Upshaw of Stephen F. Austin State University in Texas took first place with 15.25 pounds and Auburn’s Shane Powell and Jordan Lee finished second with 13.63 pounds.

“It was disappointing to get that close and be beat by two pounds,” Simmemon said. “One fish could have put us in the lead. ... But we’re happy. It’s always good making a top five finish, especially in that caliber tournament. You’re fishing against the best.” But the Georgia team didn’t always look like the favorites in the tournament. Simmemon said they got off to a rough start, losing two three-pound bass and one six-pounder before reeling in their first catch on the first day of the tournament. “That was real heartbreaking,” he said. “Especially since we didn’t have a fish. We thought that would come back to haunt us. ... Those are key fish in a tournament but those are the kind of fish that get away a lot of times.” At the end of the first day, the team weighed in only three fish, but Simmemon said it was enough to keep them in the running. Texas A&M’s Andy Schafer and Weston Brown were fourth and Virginia Tech’s Wyatt Blevins and Carson Rejzer, who led on the first two days but were hit with a pound-a-minute penalty for being five minutes late to check-in, finished fifth. This top-five finish is the club’s the most recent success as they work to establish a name within the bass fishing community. Last year, the club’s 20 anglers won the 2010 Boat US Collegiate Bass Fishing Championship and took second in the College B.A .S.S. National Championship. Simmemon and Tolbert also won the Southern Collegiate Bass Fishing Series Points Championship that same year. “The club is only about four years old but we’re starting to get recognized,” Simmemon said. “We’ve won a lot of tournaments and I think we’re starting to get the recognition that we deserve.”


July 14, 2011 Issue