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Red&Black The

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Thursday, July 21, 2011

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 118, No. 147 | Athens, Georgia

BAD MEDICINE

Campus mourns shooting victims

Pharmacy students lose a year of HOPE funding due to cuts By POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK For students in the College of Pharmacy, the budget cuts for fiscal year 2012 have a whole different meaning. Beginning in the fall, the HOPE Scholarship will be capped at 127 semester hours, which is the equivalent of about four years of college. However, the pharmacy program is five years. In addition, pharmacy students pay a higher tuition rate than the regular undergraduate student. “For our pharmacy students, it has been devastating this past year,” said Svein Oie, dean of the College of Pharmacy. “They have, on average, lost about a year of eligibility for the HOPE Scholarship.” John Devine, an incoming pharmacy student from

Alpharetta, said the changes to HOPE in the fall will create expenses he had not foreseen. “It’s just starting in our year,” Devine said. “Our hours are going to be cut pretty bad so that’s going to put us out a lot of money that we could be saving. It’s just really unlucky, and I’m just going to have to take out loans earlier than I planned.” Oie said it bothers him that the University is becoming increasingly privatized as a result of budget cuts. With less and less state support, he believes the cost of education is being transferred to the individual student. “Without being able to support the students with scholarships, it means that the students are paying more and more of the total cost of education,” he said. See CUT, Page 3

Grady graduates attacked in Atlanta By ALEX LAUGHLIN THE RED & BLACK

puts in 12 hours hand weeding, setting up irrigation and picking crops. His body is covered in bug bites and he spends most of the day on his hands and knees. Lee is happy to spend his summer like this though and said he wants to learn to farm in a sub-Saharan climate and hopes, after graduation, to teach people in Africa to farm more independently and sustainably for their climate. “I came into college with a public and international affairs major and then I realized that 70 percent of the world’s hunger

The University is mourning the loss of one of its own after two alumni were caught in an Atlanta shooting on July 15. Brittney Fox Watts and Lauren Garcia, both Grady College graduates, were shot in a triple shooting at midday in a parking deck in Midtown Atlanta. Watts died at the scene, but Garcia remains hospitalized, according to an Atlanta JournalConstitution report on Tuesday. The shooting took place around noon in a parking garage at the Proscenium building where Watts worked for inde- GARCIA pendent advertising agency 22squared as a digital planning supervisor. Watts graduated from the University in 2007 with a degree in advertising. Garcia graduated in 2011 with a degree in WATTS public relations. Diane Miller, director of undergraduate services at Grady, said Watts’ and Garcia’s ties to the University bring tragedy closer to home. “Just knowing someone who’s been part of a completely senseless tragedy like that makes you realize the value of life,” she said. Miller also said that at the University, the most affected students are the four undergraduate interns at 22squared. “For them to have worked with Brittney and been that close to the shooting, and have to go back to work this week, I think that’s something that very few of us ever have to go through,” Miller said. She said that even after Friday’s event, students would not be reluctant to take up jobs in the city. “I don’t think our students are going to stop going to big cities just because big cities can be dangerous,” Miller said. Tom Reichert, department head of advertising and public relations at Grady, said strong bonds are formed between students and faculty at the college. “We really feel like we have a

See SUMMER, Page 2

See GRADY, Page 4

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

Students such as pharmacy intern Andrew Darley are losing, on average, a year of HOPE eligibility.

A HARD DAY’S WORK

ANDREA BRISCOE | The Red & Black

Tyler Carmack, a senior economics major, works on former University professor Charles Roland’s Japanese Maple farm in Oconee county. Carmack said he has learned about responsibility after working on the farm.

Students find jobs on farms Interns grow with hands-on experience By ALEX LAUGHLIN THE RED & BLACK

What major classical musician is coming to the University? Page 7

University undergrads typically spend their summers working part-time jobs, taking classes, or slaving away at unpaid internships. But some students have found an unconventional way to spend their summers working on farms. James Lee, a rising senior from Suwanee majoring in horticulture, is working on a farm this summer in Cornish, Maine, through the Maine Organic Farmers & Growers Association. He said the farm grows corn, pumpkins, sunflowers, potatoes, tomatoes, cucumbers, blueberries and strawberries. Lee said it’s hard work—some days he

Players take up for Richt at SEC Media Days By CHRIS D’ANIELLO THE RED & BLACK HOOVER, Ala. – Though no Georgia coach or player has taken the podium at the SEC Media Days yet, talk of the Bulldogs is at no shortage in Hoover. And most of the talk surrounds head coach Mark Richt’s alleged “hot seat” following last year’s 6-7 season. “A lot of the talk we hear is that the seat’s a little hot there in Athens,” said

Index News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 6 Variety ..................... 4 Sports ...................... 8 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 7

sports radio host Stephen Williams of Jackson, Tenn. “It seems like there may be a specific win number for Coach Richt to keep that job down there — maybe nine. From what we’ve heard, people aren’t too happy down there.” Williams does not personally believe Richt deserves to lose his job as head coach in Athens, but he thinks “that’s what people are demanding.” Since winning the Sugar Bowl and

finishing the 2007 season ranked No. 2 in the AP poll, Richt’s regular season records have steadily declined — from 10-3 in 2008 to 8-5 in 2009 to 6-7 last year, Richt’s worst at Georgia. “Everybody knows that Mark Richt is on the hot seat, which to me is crazy,” said Olin Buchanan of Rivals. com. “But you look at the recent history of SEC coaches and, yeah, you

FILE | The Red & Black

Georgia coach Mark Richt looks to cool See SEC, Page 8 off the hot seat with a winning season.

SWEET DREAMS One student is making sure you will be able to count sheep. Page 3

ON THE WEB ÝÛ Crime reports with documents ÝÛ Review of Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears’ new album “Scandalous” ÝÛ Darius Goes West Weekend coverage


NEWS

2 | Thursday, July 21, 2011 | The Red & Black

Rutherford Hall still undergoing review SUMMER:

Farmers ‘a diverse group’

Repairs would cost $3 million By RAISA HABERSHAM THE RED & BLACK Rutherford Hall was a doll in its prime. Home to several women at the University, it hosted soccer games and served as a convenient place for gathering of friends. But today it has become an enclave of mold, dated electrical circuits and extensive water damage — all of which are beyond repair. Students, employees and alumni have expressed concern about the residence hall, a feeling shared by University President Michael Adams. “I’ve heard their concerns and I’m listening to them,� Adams said in a news conference last week. “Philosophically, I’m pretty close to being a fanatic about historical preservation.� The University is asking the Board of Regents to tear down the 160-bed residence hall and replace it with a 260-bed dormitory. Though there have been great issues about Rutherford, a March condition assessment conducted by Armentrout Matheny Thurmond, a local engineering firm, revealed Rutherford had several updates to it, including to its water and electrical systems. The main issue the firm documented was it did not meet American Disabilities Act requirements. The report found Rutherford was in “relatively good condition, given its age.� However, the report doesn’t include maintenance reports from the Physical Plant. In an investigative report conducted by The Red and Black in 2009, Rutherford had several student-reported issues including mold and “nauseating� smells. “I have allergies to mold, mildew and dust, and after sweeping [my] room tried to rid it of all of the above,� one student wrote in a work order request. “Myself, my roommate, my boyfriend, and anyone else who comes into the room begins to suffer from a stuffed up nose, sinus pressure an eventual sinus headaches.� The student continued saying they couldn’t get full night’s rest due to waking up every hour. During the investigation, the number of work orders from August 2008 to April 2009 numbered 183 for three floors. Many of the work orders requested were for mold, A/C unit replacements, and water leakage. Therein lies the question: Why does Rutherford Hall have to die? Historical preservationists and alumni can only speculate why the building was left in such poor condition. Despite the reported update to Rutherford, Adams can attest to

¢ From Page 1

SEAN TAYLOR | The Red & Black

The University is asking the Board of Regents to demolish Rutherford Hall and replace it with a larger dormitory. Students, employees and alumni are petitioning to save the dorm. the complaints he has heard. “I have crawled through the bowels of Rutherford,� he said. “ There are very serious structural issues there. The reports are pretty much unanimous that we would be better served by a new building.� Yet the reports don’t indicate there is much damage to the inner building. “In our opinion the building could be renovated for updated student housing,� the engineering report reads. “But the new design and associated costs would have to be carefully evaluated if it was desired to restore this building to conditions suitable for occupancy and meeting current housing and code standards.� Another question is why Rutherford must be demolished rather than continuing to update the present systems. Tim Burgess, senior vice president of administration and finance, has said it would be fiscally sound to demolish Rutherford as opposed to update the entire building. Renovating Rutherford would cost $3 million, nearly the same price tag of the demolition, but the University

PEARLS BEFORE SWINEÂŽ

BY

would have 100 more beds at its disposal. Though Burgess sees the longterm benefit, Helen Fosgate isn’t buying it. “There’s a lot of deferred maintenance on Rutherford Hall,� she said. “She has been allowed to really go down. It’s just painful to see her now. But personally I’m not buying the line it is better to renovate her than to replace her with a new building with 100 rooms. How is that possible?� Fosgate is a former resident of Rutherford and has expressed concern for the building which shaped her lifelong friendships. Fosgate isn’t the only one suspicious of the University’s decision to demolish the 72-year-old building. Amy Kissane, director of the Athens - Clarke Heritage Foundation, believes this could’ve been avoided had the University simply had a preservation plan. “I just can’t imagine that if they went through that process that they decided to tear it down,� she said. These suspicions are just a few of the reasons why many want to delay the demolition. These suspicions also compelled a group of

STEPHAN PASTIS

University students, employees, and alumni to sign a petition to prevent its demolition. In a release sent to The Red & Black, concerned citizens cited the lack of a comprehensive preservation plan for the University’s historic structures. As of Wednesday evening, the site has 130 signatures. Adams would encourage architects involved with the project to keep in mind issues about scale to preserve the identity of the Myers quad community. “My rule is I won’t put someone else’s child where I wouldn’t put my own child and we’re nearing that point with Rutherford,� he said. People continue to fight to keep Rutherford from being razed, but the fight might already be over. “If this cost of selective demolition and construction for modifications required for adaptive reuse of the building is added in the renovation costs,� the engineering report stated, “it may well prove to be prohibitive and lead to a decision to demolish this facility and construct a new building.�

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is in sub-Saharan Africa, and the best thing I can do there is farm,� Lee said. Lee is one of 53 students participating in the organic farming certificate program. Head of the University’s horticulture department Douglas Bailey is on staff for the organic farming certificate program. “It’s quite a diverse group,� he said. “We have some ecology majors, romance language majors, business majors, history majors, art majors, science education, landscape architecture, dietetics, journalism—you name it.� Bailey said the most common thread among students in the program is that they are all concerned about where their food is coming from, but they do not often go on to work on commercial farms after graduation. “I think in some cases that this is something that they want to do,� Bailey said, “perhaps not as a career but certainly something they’ll want to continue to do in their own future.� Bailey said that what students enjoy most about the program is being outdoors and learning handson processes of growing plants. There are other nonhorticulture majors who work on farms this summer just for the fun of it. Patrick Savelle, an animal and dairy science major from Watkinsville, is working on peach and blueberry farms this summer while also doing research with professors in the horticulture department. “Farming is the oldest profession,� he said. “It’s kind of what civilization is built off of.� Though Savelle does not plan to make a career out of farming, he does value the time he spends on farms. “It teaches you how to work really hard,� Savelle said. “I used to get up at five in the morning every morning before school and go out and feed the animals. Having to do that kind of work builds a little toughness in you.� Tyler Carmack, a rising senior majoring in economics from Savannah, spends his days working on a Japanese Maple Farm for former Agriculture Extension professor Charles Roland. The farm grows Japanese Maple trees for profit, but a side garden also grows crops. Carmack said he started working at the farm with his former roommate because he needed extra money. But over time he has developed a close relationship with Roland. “He’s kind of like another grandfather to me,� Carmack said. “He’s older and he lives by himself, so I go over and I help him out with the things that need to be done that he can’t necessarily do.� As for finding a job after graduating, Carmack believes his experience on the farm has given him skills he could not have found otherwise. “Obviously economics is quite a bit different from growing trees and gardening,� Carmack said. “I really enjoy what I do. I think it’ll really help me in the sense that I’ve learned a greater sense of responsibility.�

CORRECTIONS The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Polina Marinova (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Wil Petty (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com


NEWS

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 21, 2011 | 3

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By EMILY PATRICK THE RED & BLACK Two years ago, Smith Haverty noticed a problem: getting a mattress into his fraternity house was inconvenient. In spring of 2010, he started his own business, University Mattress, to solve that problem. “When I moved into the fraternity house, it was kind of a huge hassle to get a mattress up there. We had to borrow our next door neighbor’s truck and drive it up, and it was just a big pain. I was like, if someone could just have delivered it right here, that would have been so much easier,� he said. Haverty, now a senior finance major, began brainstorming business ideas in 2009 and came up with a model in which he could market the mattresses during the spring, take orders during the summer and personally deliver them at the beginning of the school year. “The big idea behind it was that we would deliver your mattress to your house or your fraternity for free and set it up in your room, and the mattresses themselves are already a little bit discounted, so it’s a good deal: it’s a good way to make money, and it’s genuinely a good deal for students as well,� he said. Haverty does all the ground work for University Mattress himself. He markets the mattresses, takes orders and personally delivers them to ensure the order is filled correctly. “I deliver the mattresses myself. If you order one, I personally take them there. I’ll take it right into the house, set up the box spring, set up the mattress pad. I want to make sure it’s done right,� he said. His business partner, who is also his father, Ben Haverty, assists him with accounting and wholesaler relationships — he owns the Atlanta area furniture chain, Ben’s Brands for Less. “The partnership with my dad’s company will allow for [University Mattress] to be really successful,� Haverty said. “I can add my order on to his monthly order for mattresses, and the back office and accounting part of it’s very well run. It really helps me to get out there and concentrate on selling as many as I can.� The father and son duo enjoy working together on the University Mattress project. “It’s a pleasure to work with my dad. He’s helped me out a lot with certain ideas, being willing to work with me,� Haverty said. “It’s actually been a cool experience to partner and go through this with my dad.� Ben Haverty expects his son’s business to grow this fall.

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Smith Haverty, a senior finance major, began his mattress company in 2009. He stores mattresses in a Gwinnett facility. “I believe Smith is a natural entrepreneur. Smith has a winsome personality,� he said. “A head for numbers, and is not afraid to take risks to solve a problem.� After selling 40 mattresses last fall, Smith began to revise his business strategy based on what he learned. He invested in a website so that his customers can pay for their orders quickly and easily without the inconvenience of mailing checks. He also expanded the business to other campuses with the help of friends and family members who attend other universities. This fall, he will sell mattresses at the University of Virginia and University of North Carolina. “My little brother’s a freshman at UVA, so that was natural,� he said. Haverty has few difficulties balancing his business endeavor with his academic responsibilities. All of the deliveries take place when school is just beginning in August, so his springtime marketing work is the only business activity that conflicts with his class schedule.

“It was a little tough during exams just because I was still going around every afternoon for a while trying to get the mattress word out. But the great thing about this business is that it allows me to still be successful in school because the majority of the work is done the last two weeks, over the summer, and in the first two weeks leading up to school,� he said. Haverty looks forward to expanding University Mattress in the future, even after graduation. He is now studying real estate investment banking as an intern at SunTrust, Robinson Humphries in Atlanta, but he sees University Mattress as a business that he could manage even as he pursues other careers. “It’s something I’m seriously considering pursuing after college,� Haverty said. “The good thing about it is that someone else can run it pretty easily, so it may be the type of thing where I may not keep doing it at Georgia, but I can see it as a career opening at tons and tons of different colleges and kind of managing all of that.�

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CUT: Salary levels rank below average ¢ From Page 1 â&#x20AC;&#x153;To me, that means the opportunity for many students to live the American dream â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to get their education and progress â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is much more limited.â&#x20AC;? Since the budget cuts began, the College of Pharmacy has lost about a million dollars. The college delayed the expansion of its Albany Pharmacy Program â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a program which provides educational opportunities for students throughout Southwest Georgia, according to the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. In response to the FY12 cuts, the college is also reducing its IT support and the amount of funds set aside for new computers and distance learning equipment. As a result, the college now requires students to provide their own computers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the limited funds that we can use for computers, there are fewer computers and more students,â&#x20AC;? Oie said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have students in Augusta and Albany, so we do exams by computers so that everyone can take the exam at the same time. That would require every student to have a laptop, so we can do the exams because we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to have computers for everyone anymore.â&#x20AC;? With dwindling state support, Oie said fundraising is the only way to help alleviate some of the cuts to the college. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As you can see what happened with the computer situation, we expect other things within the college to also deteriorate over the next several years, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to replace them,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only way that we can see right now is we have to do private fundraising. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried very hard not to dump all of that back on the students because I think the escalating tuition they have seen in the last several years is not a good thing for them.â&#x20AC;? However, gifts and endowments only serve as a temporary source of funds. Oie

EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTE: Each week, The Red & Black will focus on one college within the University for a closer look at how the FY12 budget cuts affect its faculty, staff and students. Next week, we will focus on the College of Education. said the college is trying to increase its research dollars to help with salaries. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We continue to compare ourselves to other pharmacy schools throughout the United States,â&#x20AC;? Oie said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where we used to be close to the average, we are now below the average in average salary compensation. And that is the concern for everyone.â&#x20AC;? Oie hopes the University will not undergo further budget cuts, but for now, he is focusing on fundraising and other options to help mitigate the FY12 reductions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are trying very hard to minimize the effect on both faculty and our students because I believe they are the ones that have taken the hardest hit on what has occurred with the budget cuts,â&#x20AC;? he said. Though Devine is losing an average of one year of HOPE funding as a result of the cuts, he emphasized the importance of keeping the scholarship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I lose it, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be more severe than it was last year or the years before,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It sucks because it directly affects the pharmacy school. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just really unfortunate for pharmacy students because we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really know about it last year when we applied. And then the changes happened so suddenly.â&#x20AC;?

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4 | Thursday, July 21, 2011 | The Red & Black

NEWS & VARIETY

Rattlers shed past lineup Changes in band help sound evolve By HOLLY YOUNG THE RED & BLACK With only one founding member remaining, Athens-based band The Rattlers is veering off the path it has been on since forming in December of 2007. Described by vocalist Tracy Carroll as “bluesy Southern rock country” music, the original band arose from an unsuspecting jam session at their former manager’s Christmas party. “It worked so we jammed a couple weeks,” Carroll said. “We got back together in January and after only one practice were invited to open a show.” And as for the name? “I called Matt at 1:30 [a.m.] in a drunken stupor after seeing a sign that said ‘rattler’ and that’s how we got the name,” Carroll said. The band played its first show at Little Kings, and again the following night for local band Rollin’ Home. “The bassist quit after those one and a half shows,” Carroll said. “Kevin [Christian] moved from drums to bass, then Woody [Hughes] joined on drums.” Matt Joiner subsequently joined as

the new drummer, though he later left to pursue his blues trio side project “after seeing Stevie [Ray Vaughn] do it,” Carroll said. “It would do my heart a world of good to see Matt successful,” Carroll said. “He is a phenomenal musician.” Though they had many talented guitar players audition, most were either the wrong style or not available enough. “We weren’t trying to replace Matt, we were trying to replace the guitar player,” Carroll said. “He had a style and sound of his own and we weren’t trying to mimic that.” So they hired Dylan Andrews and Doug Peters. Bassist Ron Crescenti joked that 19-year-old Andrews “just kept hanging out so we just said ‘hell, come join us.’” Andrews, a self-described “raw, dirty, nasty guitar player,” is influenced by metal and blues. The Rattlers’ upcoming show at New Earth on Friday will be the largest Athens venue he’s ever played. “I played bass for my cousin’s southern rock band,” Andrews said. “But we only played stuff like graduation parties and high school reunions.” Carroll said Andrews has found his own tone with The Rattlers. He also said the new addition is making Joiner’s intricate and melodic songs “meatier.” Doug Peters, the other new guitarist, is “a very good soloist and lead guitar

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

Local band The Rattlers will be playing at New Earth Music Hall on Friday. The band remains strong with only one of the original members. player,” Crescenti said. Crescenti described the band’s relationship with drummers as a revolving door—a door which will be closed with the addition of a permanent member when the right one is found. And with each new member bringing their own style, The Rattlers’ sound is evolving. “We used to have a blues-rock Southern sound, but the dirwection I wanted to go in was a little dirtier and a little more down home,” Carroll said. Crescenti said the music is groovier now.

“My style is definitely different from the previous bass player,” he said. “It’s more melodic and it brings a whole new groove. I hold down the heartbeat of the band.” The Rattlers are also making their songs fuller and more passionate through additions such as back-up vocals by singer Suzanne Thomas. Carroll’s ambition is to play the best live shows possible. He said that music is an important part of anyone’s life. “Music is the soundtrack to your life,” he said. “Not a moment goes by when you can’t match it to the perfect song.”

GRADY: Garcia expected to recover ¢ From Page 1

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great connection with current and past students,” he said. “It’s just so sad and so shocking when one of these things happen to basically one of your extended family.” Roswell resident Watts is survived by her husband of three years Brian Watts, parents and three brothers. Family friend and 2008 University graduate Matt Buser remembers Watts as “a genuinely good person” who positively impacted the people she interacted with during her time in Roswell, Athens, and Atlanta. “We were neighbors in Athens and she often drove me to school my sophomore and junior years,” Buser said. “She was that kind of person who would help out a kid younger than her with no hesitation.” Buser also said Watts was someone that everyone should look up to and asks for prayers for her family.

“The way she cared for her friends was so evident and strong,” said Morgan Cogswell, 2009 University graduate and Watt’s sorority sister from Alpha Chi Omega. “She loved people really well and really genuinely.” Garcia, who grew up in Lithia Springs, remains hospitalized, according to AJC reports. A Facebook event called “Thoughts and Prayers for Lauren Garcia,” is filled with thoughtful comments for Garcia and her family as well as updates on her condition. High school alumni posted supportive comments on the page such as, “Lithia Springs High School alumni, parents and friends are praying for you, Lauren.” According to the page, Garcia is recovering and her family expects her home soon. In lieu of flowers, Watts’ family asks that donations be made in her name to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Georgia Organics.


THE WEEK

The Red & Black’s event guide to happenings — shows, films and events — in and around Athens from July 21 to July 27. Contact: 706-353-4378 Music

FRIDAY Events & Opportunities

Events & Opportunities What: Taste Your Tapas Where: Ciné When: 7 p.m. Price: $20 Verdict: Sample and vote on delicious tapas from various restaurants. Contact: www.localplace.org What: Athens Area Shapenote Singers Where: Athens First United Methodist Church When: 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Learn about traditional gospel singing during this night at the Athens First United Methodist Church.

SATURDAY Events & Opportunities

What: Order of the Owl Where: Caledonia Lounge When: 9:30 p.m. Price: $5 for 21 and over; $7 for 18 and over Verdict: Enjoy a night of heavy rock featuring members from Zoroaster and Terminal Doom. Contact: www.caledonialounge.com What: Four Eyes Where: Farm 255 When: 11 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Soft melodies mix with high-energy shredding during this performance. Contact: www.farm255.com

Library When: 4 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Enjoy films made by local young filmmakers during this screening. Contact: 706-613-3650

What: Beer for Hope Percentage Tour Where: Terrapin Beer Co. When: 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Price: $10 Verdict: Support the Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research during this release of the 2011 Reunion Ale at Terrapin. Contact: www.terrapinbeer. com What: Blood Drive Where: Physical Plant When: noon to 5 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Save a life by donating blood during this blood drive held at the Physical Plant. Contact: 706-546-0681 Music

Music

What: Turf War Where: Caledonia Lounge When: 10 p.m. Price: $5 for 21 and over; $7 for 18 and over Verdict: This lo-fi garage band

What: Teen Film Festival Where: Athens-Clarke County

What: Bit Brigade Where: Caledonia Lounge When: 9:30 p.m. Price: $6 for 21 and over; $8 for 18 and over Verdict: Thematic instrumental progressive comes to life in

this bands renditions of video-game toned music. Contact: www.caledonialounge.com

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Music

Events & Opportunities

What: Secret Record Swap Where: 40 Watt Club When: 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Bring your T-shirts, posters and singles and swap them for that piece of music you’ve been looking for. Contact: www.40watt.com

What: Eyes Lips Eyes Where: Farm 255 When: 10 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Repetitive punk instrumentals clash with pop-country vocals in this indie group’s energetic songs. Contact: www.farm255.com

TUESDAY Events & Opportunities What: “Gloomy Sunday” (1999) Where: Tate Student Theatre When: 7 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Join Hillel as they screen this romance set in Budapest during the era surrounding WWII as part of the Athens Jewish Film Festival. Contact: www.athensjff.org Music What: Packway Handle Band Where: Botanical Gardens When: 7 p.m. Price: $15 general; $10 members Verdict: Americana group Packway Handle Band will play their bluegrass and experimental music during this special performance. Contact: 706-542-1244

Eastside

PICK OF THE WEEK: SLOP FEST

Designed by JAN-MICHAEL CART

Compiled by TIFFANY STEVENS

THURSDAY

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 21, 2011 | 5

What: Book Group Where: Athens-Clarke County Library When: 7 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Discuss “The Inheriters” by William Golding. Contact: 706-613-3650 What: “Source Code” (2011) Where: Tate Student Theatre When: 8 p.m.; 10 p.m. Price: $2 general; free for students

Verdict: A soldier wakes in the body of a stranger and tries to find the bomber of a Chicago commuter train. Contact: 706-542-6396 Music What: Googolplexia Where: Go Bar When: 9 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: This fun group describes itself as both pop and anti-pop and features accordian, ukulele and banjo. Contact: www.myspace.com/ gobar

G

rab your safety pins, plaid and hair gel—two days of punk are coming to Athens. Slop Fest will feature numerous local punk bands including Shaved Christ, Mr. Blank of Mr. Blank and the Carnivale of Black Hearts and Ye Olde Sub Shoppe. The festival will include more than 30 other bands and will feature some of the best of punk and alternative rock that North Georgia has to offer. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club When: Friday and Saturday 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Price: $6 per night; $8 for 2-day wristband Contact: www.myspace.com/littlekingsshuffleclub

is similar to The Black Lips, but puts an interesting spin on their sound. Contact: www.caledonialounge.com What: Jane Jane Pollack Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar When: 8:30 p.m. Price: $5 Verdict: Experimental folk group Jane Jane Pollack mixes blues with jam country and carnival undertones. Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com

WIL PETTY | The Red & Black

Slop Fest 2011 will feature bands such as Shaved Christ and other local punk bands from around the state during the two-day event.

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WEDNESDAY Events & Opportunities What: Athens Showgirl Cabaret Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club When: 10 p.m. Price: $3 Verdict: Make the night a drag with this night of drag performances from the Athens Showgirl Cabaret. Contact: www.myspace.com/ littlekingsshuffleclub Music What: Harvey Milk Where: The Melting Point When: 9 p.m. Price: $9 advanced; $12 at door Verdict: This local sludge metal musicians will make for good listening. Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

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6 | Thursday, July 21, 2011 | The Red & Black

Polina Marinova | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Wil Petty | Managing Editor me@randb.com Charles Hicks | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Our Take

Opinions

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

What a disaster. One of the largest press scandals ever has unfolded over the past month and has led to The News of the World — the largest newspaper in the world — ceasing further publication. Rupert Murdoch, the chairman and CEO of News Corporation, closed down the paper in the face of a phone hacking scandal in which reporters allegedly broke into the voicemail boxes of royalty, celebrities and crime victims in order to get the most up-to-date news. We are aware that this tragedy of ethics might have shaken the trust of our readership and would like to explain how we at our newspaper receive and subsequently publish our news. We check the University’s master calendar, receive press releases from campus organizations, have reporters who specifically cover certain areas of interest on campus and accept story ideas from our reporters themselves. There is a large effort made on our behalf to make sure the stories we publish are not merely copies of previously published material that can be found in our archives online. For your sake, we attempt a fresh look at campus events in each paper. But we report in respect to a standard. If we receive photographs of questionable nature, we verify or negate our suspicions before plastering the images to the front page. If we write a story about budget cuts, at least four editors in addition to the reporter are going to verify every last penny is accounted for before it reaches your computer screen. And if we make a mistake, we include a corrections box in every paper we print. You might not like some of the content we publish, but we do our best to make sure we follow a code of ethics reporters have followed for decades — report the facts and don’t lie. The staff of The News of the World was caught lying. They disgraced newsprint. But rest assured, your campus newspaper has checks in place to make sure lies of an egregious nature are not allowed nor tolerated. — Charles Hicks for the editorial board

Mailbox

Email and letters from our readers

Rutherford should not be demolished I am heartbroken to hear of the plans to tear down Rutherford Hall. I lived in Rutherford from 2003 through 2006 and loved it. I strongly disagree with the idea that this dorm isn’t compatible with the life of a 21st century student; the character and charm of this residence hall are not matched by any other dorm on campus. The University will destroy something precious if the administration chooses to bulldoze it. KATHARINE SOLMS BRYAN Alumna, Temple, Texas Spanish

Choose ease over high-end fashion First let me start off by saying, it’s girls like me who can’t stand girls like Stephanie Bolton (“‘Campus beautification’ needed,” July 7). What does she think gives her the right to tell us what we should wear to class? There are many question-raising issues with no actual scientific evidence to back up claims. Many girls were highly offended. For one, you do not base a grad school decision solely on seeing 30 beautiful girls walk past you downtown. Any university in the United States would have girls dressed down going to class so personally I don’t see why this is such a shock to her anonymous guy friend. To her surprised Spanish friend: welcome to America. When comparing any two countries, there

will be several differences, including fashion. We live in the South. It gets hot and the weather is bipolar. Period. Secondly, what professors give impromptu interviews or hire people based off of class attire? Please point me in the direction of the professors who do this because it is highly ridiculous and unlikely. If they wouldn’t warn a student beforehand to dress up for an “interview” then they should be fired. Next, most boys are not going to be concerned about the way we dress to class. Boys know we are going to wear what’s comfortable and easy. Our campus isn’t downtown. Besides, they are going to continue to wear their khakis and T-shirts no matter what outfit girls in their class show up in. This idea of trying to please guys on campus is very old-fashioned (and not in a good way). It’s 2011 — not 1941. Finally, Stephanie can wear all the dresses and nice clothes to class she wants because at the end of the day we go to college for one thing: to get a degree. Looking and dressing nice should be trivial to our main goals and desires. At the end of the day, we won’t change each other’s minds. So with that said, my friends and I will continue to seek pharmacy, medical, PA, and PT schools, wearing our oversized t-shirts and Nike running shorts while you worry about tomorrow’s outfit. Maybe when we’re preparing your prescriptions and tending to your physical needs, you can criticize the scrubs we’re wearing. MALIKAH MOSE Junior, Douglasville Exercise and Sport Science

n Tuesday, I stood in the annex of a church sanctuary, attending the funeral of a girl I’ve never met. Yet, in the previous 48 hours I had listened to family, friends, co-workers, teachers and neighbors recall their best memories of Brittney Fox Watts’ life — a life taken too soon by a senseless act from a young man in a Midtown Atlanta parking garage. In a moment, 26 promising years were gone. When I entered journalism school, we were told that this job isn’t easy, it isn’t glamorous and some days are downright horrible. Professors told us to be prepared to cover death, devastation and destruction. Our job as journalists is to tell the story to the best of our abilities. We’ve got to be tough. When I was chosen as a summer newsroom intern for WSB-TV, I vowed I would be the best journalist I could be, boldly go after stories and of course, be tough.

News Editor: Kathryn Ingall Associate News Editor: Sarah Giarratana Variety Editor: Tiffany Stevens Photo Editor: AJ Reynolds Design Editor: Amanda Jones Copy Editor: Lauren Blais Online Editor: Mark Miller Editorial Cartoonist: Sarah Lawrence Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales

540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

ADDIE HAMPTON But Tuesday, as I stood 10 feet from Watts’ grieving husband, I watched one of her brothers grab his arm — nothing more, nothing less. Yet, it was this small gesture of comfort in a hailstorm of emotions that reminded me Brittney’s life is the common thread that will forever bond them. For a moment, I forgot to be tough and cried. The priest of St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church stood before the standing room only crowd of hundreds, unapologetic as he said, “Days like this shouldn’t happen. We shouldn’t be here mourning death. We should be celebrating a life.” He went on to address the question on everyone’s mind: “Why?” Why do parents have to bury their daughter? Why do high school

sweethearts have to be parted only a few short years into their marriage? Why does a young woman so full of life and promise, who was deeply devoted to family never get to create a family of her own? The priest didn’t have an answer. But he did say there was a purpose for her life. Her brother said, “she lived more in 26 years than some people do in 90.” Pictures of Brittney confirm his statement, showing her happily riding a bicycle, surrounded by smiling friends, and swept up in the arms of the love of her life on their wedding day. These snapshots of her life will not bring her back, but they will preserve her memory. The glowing smile of a girl I never knew is one I’ll never forget. The priest ended today with a few brief words on a hard topic to swallow: forgiveness. He said, “You can tell God [you cannot forgive] today, tomorrow, maybe not next year, but

God will say, ‘give it to me and we’ll do that together.’” Regardless of your ideas of faith and religion, whatever your God may be, perhaps it’s the comfort of knowing you don’t have to go through trials alone that allows someone to move forward and, in time, possibly forgive. As I left Tuesday, walking through a sea of black and silent tears, I realized that covering death may get easier with time, but I don’t believe it will ever stop being painful. I can only hope that the pain I feel will make me more sympathetic to the family that is grieving so they know their loved one’s life is more than just a story I am covering. I hope those who loved Brittney Fox Watts can take comfort in the simple words from the priest: “Brittney, you’re home. We don’t want you to go, but you’re home.” — Addie Hampton is a senior from Woodstock majoring in broadcast news

University needs virtual textbooks I n the fall, my Kindle will make my backpack 15 pounds lighter, but that is not as light as it could be. E-books have been popular since Amazon released the Kindle in 2007. Since then, avid readers have been able to store thousands of books on one device. But after buying my own Kindle two weeks ago, I noticed a problem. Even though the weight of carrying around three or more novels at one time has been lifted from my shoulders, most of my class books are not available for download. Not only that, but were I to download my textbooks, I might be faced with the technology-adverse professor who sees the danger of inattention hidden within electricity. The latter I can understand. Abuse of technology in the classroom is nothing new. I won’t pretend I haven’t checked Facebook on my laptop while a professor’s droning fails to hold my attention. But to not have textbooks offered as e-books is inconvenient for students who may not wish to carry around five heavy science textbooks. It’s also inconvenient for any school that’s trying to stay on top of a technologically-evolving world. Though I still buy printed books despite my new e-book acquisition,

TIFFANY STEVENS

“3,500 books contained in 8.5 ounces is much easier to handle than a bag of 500page theory textbooks. ” digital books are soon going to outstrip sales for printed books. In fact, in some markets, they already have. In May, Amazon sold 105 Kindle books for every 100 printed books (“Amazon’s E-book Outsell Print Books at Amazon,” May 19). And last Christmas, Barnes & Noble sold one million e-books in one day (“Week after holidays, e-book sales outdo print,” Jan. 5). So why is it I can only find a digital version of my textbook when my teachers are either kind enough to assign a well-known novel or in the off chance the University Bookstore decides to make the e-book available? Making e-books available would make reading more efficient. Regardless of whether it’s my imagination, I find I read faster and

more attentively on a Kindle than I do with its printed counterparts. And 3,500 books contained in 8.5 ounces is much easier to handle than a bag of 500-page theory textbooks. Providing e-books might even boost sales within the University Bookstore. If it could offer e-books at prices comparable to other textbook sellers, then not only would it save on the shipping costs of procuring physical copies, but I suspect many students would jump at the chance to click and load instead of rent or own. As a University, we’ve taken a step in the right direction. In April, the Miller Learning Center began offering Kindles for student rental. However, offering four highly in-demand Kindles that can be rented for one month and come preloaded with none of the University’s considerable collection hardly qualifies as the end goal. It’s more of an appeasement. We have the technology to update the way we use books at the University. We’ve had the technology for years. It’s time to make use of it. — Tiffany Stevens is a senior from Macon majoring in magazines and women’s studies and is the Variety Editor for The Red & Black

World Cup important for Japanese morale

T

he Women’s World Cup Final was advertised as a clash between two teams under pressure. For the Japanese women, the game was to be the culmination of their heroic campaign to restore hope and pride within their earthquake-ravaged country. For the American women, this game was their chance to finally step from behind the shadow of the American team who won the same tournament a decade ago. But how were we supposed to root for the Americans? On one side was Japan. Japan had never reached the semi-finals, let alone been crowned champions, and they had far more to worry about. In March, a massive earthquake resulted in a tsunami that wiped out entire Japanese cities. One Japanese defender, Aya Sameshima, used to work at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to earn a living, which was shredded in the disaster. Their players averaged a height of 5’0” and demonstrated the type of kindness and sportsmanship that’s been completely forgotten on today’s world stage. After their victory over Sweden in the semi-finals, the Japanese team held a banner on the field, thanking their “friends around the world” for their support during Japan’s disaster. On the other side was America.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com

Alumnus death hard to handle

Ethically speaking O In the midst of one of the largest press scandals ever, reporters do have ethics

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033

Editorial Assistant: Sarah Jean Dover Recruitment Editor: Jessica Roberts Staff Writers: Umarah Ali, Jason Axlerod, Ryan Black, Rachel G. Bowers, Chris Brandus, Jason Flynn, Natalie Fort, Tucker Green, Raisa Habersham, Mariana Heredia, Megan Ingalls, Alex Laughlin, Kristen Nipper, Tunde Ogunsakin, Emily Patrick, Nathan Sorensen, Daniel Suddes, Gordon Syzmanski, Joe Willeford, Holly Young

Our Staff

PETE MCDONALD “Now is the time to feel good for the Japanese heroes, who despite their devastated country, return home with a sense of hope.” Around the time Sameshima worked at the nuclear plant, many American players such as Alex Morgan and Lauren Cheney were enrolled on soccer scholarships at state universities, driving their daddy’s cars and listening to Ke$ha. We didn’t need to win. And it’s not like we don’t have our trophies. The United States just won the tournament a decade ago. In fact, we’ve won two of the six Women’s World Cups ever played. Only Americans, spoiled with championships and university degrees could be disappointed with Japan’s victory. The Japanese deserved a victory. They wanted it more. They needed it more. Their triumph united Japan once again and said

Photographers: Andrea Briscoe, Kristy Densmore, Avery Draut, Alan Liow, Allison Love, Sean Taylor Page Designers: Rachel G. Bowers, Jan-Michael Cart Videographer: Kitty Capelle

far more about human capability under pressure than an American victory ever could. The only disappointment here is the fact that women’s soccer in America, which often sets the standard for women’s sports worldwide, just took another devastating blow. Our 1999 World Cup championship spurred the launch of the Women’s United Soccer Association in the United States, the world’s first professional women’s soccer league. Top players joined, fans showed up for games, and the sport temporarily gained popularity. But public excitement from the 1999 World Cup fizzled out, and the league shut down after three seasons. No doubt another American World Cup championship would have once again given life to the sport in this country, and thereby the world. But it was not to be. But don’t feel bad for the American team. They’ll get by. They’ll go home to their stable families, train hard and come back in four years for the next World Cup. Now is the time to feel good for the Japanese heroes, who despite their devastated country, return home with a trophy and sense of hope. — Pete McDonald is a senior from Decatur majoring in mixed media arts

Editorial board members include Charles Hicks, Polina Marinova and Wil Petty

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VARIETY

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 21, 2011 | 7

Nuçi’s uses yoga to lift musicians

Cellist headlines performing arts season By ALEXIS LEIMA THE RED & BLACK Attention orchestra enthusiasts — Yo-Yo Ma is coming to town. The internationally-famed cellist is headlining the special event series for the University’s Performing Arts Center 2011-2012 season. Yo-Yo Ma first picked up his cello more than 50 years ago. For the series he’s performing the intimidating “Bach’s Suites for Unaccompanied Cello.” In addition to Yo-Yo Ma, the 2011-2012 season offers several music programs, enabled through the partnership between the Performing Arts Center and the Classic Center. One such series includes Celebrity Evenings, featuring performances by critically-acclaimed author and radio host Garrison Keillor and Irish band The Chieftains. The Chamber Music Festival will focus on the rebirth of chamber music at the University Chapel. The two classical music series offered by the Performing Arts Center, Masterworks and Classics, will spotlight London’s world-renowned Royal Philharmonic Orchestra as well as six other symphony orchestras. Other series presented by the Performing Arts Center include “The Brass Ring,”showcasing a myriad of brass instruments. Following suit with the previous 13 years, the Performing Arts Center will continue to broadcast the season’s concerts on American Public Media’s “Performance Today.” So mark your calendar for Aug. 29 to buy your tickCourtesy Yo-Yo Ma ets for individual events. Famous cellist Yo-Yo Ma will be performing at Though Yo-Yo Ma will not perform until Jan. 11, the the University on Jan. 11, 2012, as part of Performing Arts Center recommends students buy tickets early to ensure a seat at the performance. the Performing Arts Center’s new season.

By JASON FLYNN THE RED & BLACK Nuçi’s Space has been helping musicians with depression and other mental health concerns for more than two decades. The organization has found a new outlet to do so — wait for it — yoga. Nuçi’s Space has joined with Rhett Crowe, a registered yoga teacher in Athens, to offer affordable and helpful yoga classes to musicians. According to the nonprofit’s homepage, “Nuçi’s Space is a nonprofit health and music resource center in Athens, Ga.” The objective of the organization is to prevent suicide by providing obstacle-free treatment for musicians suffering from depression. The organization also aids in assisting those suffering from related disorders and seeks to assist in the emotional, physical and professional well-being of musicians.” “I think this fits well with Nuçi’s mission,” Crowe said. “It gives people an opportunity to reflect and possibly get in better shape.” Crowe said she is closely associated with Nuçi’s Space. “I am a former recipient of their mental health services,” Crowe said. “I was the bass player for Guadalcanal Diary and myself suffered from depression. So as a broke and depressed musician I went to Nuçi’s Space for help.” Later Crowe started yoga classes to help herself out of a low point in her life. “In my early 40s I felt myself shriveling up, like I was becoming those ladies hunched over in the grocery store that can’t reach the top shelf,” Crowe said. She said she found yoga a good way to help her self esteem. “I started yoga to get in better shape and stretch myself out, and came to realize yoga was dramatically helping with my depression.” Crowe supported the

read up!

‘Room’ by Emma Donoghue The world is small. Room is smaller. The 11x11 corkboard-lined shed in which Jack and his mother reside contains all of life’s basic necessities — food, bed, clothes and a place to wash. It’s also the only part of the world Jack has ever known. Emma Donoghue’s “Room” tells the story of a young woman’s seven-year abduction through the eyes of her 5-year-old son. Their

daily lives at the mercy of their captor, “Old Nick,” come alive through Jack’s confused and innocent narrative. “Room” is Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” confined to the space of abuse, and as such raises some interesting questions. In the novel, Ma decides to treat images on TV as “just pretend” and things in Room as the only items in existence. The metaphor can be stretched to how we present reality to not only children, but ourselves. Is a lie, even when used to hide a terrible truth, justified? Ma also decides on revealing the truth to Jack to make him her accomplice in escaping. So with his world turned upside down, he has to trust his only companion and flee the only place he has ever known based only on reassurances that Room is not safe. Donoghue has created harrowing reading. It’s not hard to identify with both characters’ needs, and want to respect Jack’s need to cling to Room at the same time as wanting to push him toward the door. When the two are liberated from

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

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IN NEED OF roommate for 2BR condo within walking distance of campus. 370, South Pope St. Athens, Georgia. 757-754-4673. MATURE M/F TO Share 3BR 2.5BA house near GA Square. Private, peaceful neighborhood. Great floor plan. FP, Spacious deck. Woodland creek. 2-car garage. Pets fine. $400/mo. 706-714-7600. ROOMMATE NEEDED: NON-smoker. Furnished 2BR 2BA Lodge of Athens condo (near UGA). Avail 8/1, $425/mo: cable, internet included. Call Kevin 404-840-2715 or kevinscott21@bellsouth.net

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their prison, the characters are still confined — Jack by the perceptions created by his incarceration, Ma by the suffering she experienced at Old Nick’s hand. And when the shock and anxiety of the last seven years makes Ma suicidal upon their escape, it’s not hard to understand why. But their newfound freedom does not only bring up the pain of their escape. It also brings up questions of how society treats victims of trauma, neglect and abuse. The press constantly clamor for Ma and Jack’s attention. Ma’s family’s insensitively insists on her instant recovery. Jack is unable to recover as quickly as Ma would prefer. The world Ma and Jack have reentered is almost as unfeeling as the one they have escaped, and as Ma spent most of her life in that world, she mimics it perfectly. “Room” is more than a horror novel of abduction. Anyone who wants to understand human nature when hurt and cornered should read this book. Just read it with the door open. — Tiffany Stevens

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6 MIN. FROM downtown Athens. 3 min from TERRAPIN. 3BR 2BA $1000/mo. Huge front yard and fenced back yard. Great for students with pets. 1590 Newton Bridge Rd. 706-202-2260. www.Athenshomerentals.info

SAFE, QUIET CONDO tucked away. Convenient eastside location near shopping. Accessible one story brick 2/1.5 with FP, HW floors. Beautiful landscaping. $164,000. 706255-3012

2BR APTS $550- $650 w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ good credit! Blocks to campus & downtown. W/D included. Only $505-$596 w/ current special. www.ambroseprop- APARTMENTS, CONDOS erties.postlets.com 706- & Houses close to Down549-2500 town/UGA still available for Deeply discounted 3BR 2.5BA House near GA Fall. Square. Private, peaceful rates and great locations! neighborhood. Great floor Call(706)389-1700 or visit plan. FP, Spacious deck. www.RentAthens.com Woodland creek. 2-car APPLEBY MEWS W/ upgarage. Pets fine. grades! 2BR 2.5BA with $1200/mo. 706-714-7600. over 1200 sqft. Walk to campus for just $350/per3BR 2.5BA House. Great son. Only a few left. Call floor plan. All appliances, 706-389-1700 or visit W/D. Large yard w/lawn www.ApplebyMews.com care and trash pickup. ARE YOU LOOKING for a Close to campus. Pet last-minute deal on housing friendly. $895/mo. 678for Fall? Call or visit our 910-8008. website for our latest spe3BR 2BA APTS starting at cials. Many great proper$600 W/D included. 1 ties to choose from! 706month free rent & no se- 389-1700 or curity deposit with accept- www.RentAthens.com able credit. Close to campus & downtown! Pets wel- AWESOME 3BR 2BA, come. Owner/agent 706- close to campus. New 549-2500. www.athen- master BA w/ double sink. HW flrs, fenced sapartments.postlets.com back yd. W/D, DW, 3BR 2BA DUPLEX $750 CHAC. Avail 8/1. W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO $1125/mo. 706-369-2908. PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $700 MATURE STUDENT FOR w/ current special. 2 miles spacious fully furnished from downtown. Unit 1BR 1BA apt. Includes utilicomes with W/D, dw, mi- ties, cable, Wi-Fi. Safe, crowave. Includes sec sys quiet, near UGA. Private enmonitoring, lawn mainte- trance. NS. No pets. Refer706-353-2906. nance, & pest control. SD ences. of $450 fully refundable. Leave message.

2BR 2BA DUPLEX $650. w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 PET FEE! NO SD w/ ac- www.ambroseproperties.ceptable credit! Under $600 postlets.com w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit 3BR 3BA TOWNHOUSE comes with W/D, DW, mi- Woodlands of Athens! crowave. Includes sec sys Best roommate floor plan, monitoring, lawn mainte- huge closets, privacy. Top nance, & pest control. SD place for student living. of $400 fully refundable. ONLY $1000/mo, Lease Owner/Agent starting 8/1 www.ambroseproperties.Jay: 770-361-4773 postlets.com 706-549-2500 rsrona0214@gmail.com

RESORT STYLE AMENITIES! Enormous pool, volleyball/basketball court, putting green, movie theather, gym and more! Very close to campus. Great specials on 2, 3 and 4BR units. Only a few remaining for Fall, so call today! The Summit of Athens 706-5520552 or The Woodlands of Athens 706-552-1550. www.RentAthens.com

WOODLANDS 3BR 3BA Cottage for rent. $450/mo. Living room, dining area, and 1BR fully furnished. Less than one mi from campus. Gated community. ashleycleary@gmail.com

BECOME A BARTENDER! Up to $250/day. No experience necessary. Training courses available. 1-800WHY ARE YOU still driving 965-6520 ext 106. to campus & downtown? Save $ on gas by walk- HANDYMAN FOR ing/biking from one of our RENTAL properties. Fleximany affordable rentals lo- ble hours. Must have some cated next-door to UGA. tools. $10/hr. 706-369Call 706-389-1700 or visit 2908. www.RentAthens.com

Om a Different Note The Nuçi’s Space classes are offered Wednesdays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Family Counseling Services of Athens for $5 with a scholarship from Nuçi’s Space. In addition to the classes at Nuçi’s Space classes can be taken at the Mind Body Institute at Athens Regional, the Athens YMCA, the Total Training Center and the Studio in Athens. Athens establishment through fundraising and organizing for events. She said she later saw an opportunity to help musicians physically and mentally through yoga. “I came to the staff with the idea of yoga classes for musicians,” she said. Crowe said the project at Nuçi’s Space has long been a goal of hers. “It has always been a vision and goal of mine since becoming a teacher to teach classes for Nuçi’s Space.” Crowe said yoga is subject to a number of stereotypes. People may come with unwarranted expectations about the type of people who do yoga and the level of difficulty, she said. “Yoga is not what people think it is,” she said. “If you can breathe, I can find a yoga practice for you.” Crowe emphasizes that the focus of the class is on the mental, rather than the physical. “[Yoga] promotes mindfulness, or paying attention to the habits in your life,” she said. She also said fitness level and body shape was not a barrier for participation. “You don’t have to be in shape,” she said. “It is a tool to learn to deal with your life in a calm and confident manner.”

FUELING AIRPLANES LINE service technician Ben Epps Airport. Aircraft service to include parking, fueling, towing. No experience necessary, will train. Visit athensclarkecounty.com and click on Human Resources for employment application information. Deadline for application is Friday 7/29/11.

THE RED & BLACK is now accepting applications for

Fall Semester Business Interns

MEXICALI GRILLE DAY or Night Servers Needed. Apply or call between 3:0010:00 pm at W. Broad St. location or 706-546-9200.

This is a great opportunity to gain valuable experience in a variety of fields. Sifts are Monday through Friday, 9:00 to 11:00 or 11:00 to 1:00. Visit our website: www.redandblack.com for more information and an application. No Calls or Drop-ins Please.

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

Previous puzzle’s solution 9

2

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Kayak Shuttle 9am-4pm

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8 | Thursday, July 21, 2011 | The Red & Black

SPORTS

Off-season moves change Bulldogs’ look SEC: QB

Murray is a ‘star’

By TUCKER GREEN THE RED & BLACK HOOVER, Ala. – After a rare and disappointing losing season, the Georgia football team knew it would need a productive offseason to bring the program back to prominence. It’s been that and then some, an up-and-down summer filled with player departures, recruiting successes, rules infractions allegations, frustration, hype and hope. In some ways, the team hardly resembles what it looked like at the beginning of May. Throughout the summer, eight prominent players have left the University for a variety of reasons. Both starting running backs from last year are gone. Washaun Ealey asked for release from the team and transferred to Jacksonville State, where he will play immediately and has two years of remaining eligibility. Caleb King was declared academically ineligible and has decided to try his chances in the NFL through the supplemental draft. Their departures leave behind a dilapidated backfield, with 5-star recruit Isaiah Crowell, junior Carlton Thomas, sophomore walk-on Brandon Harton, and redshirt freshman Ken Malcome competing to assume the starting role. Yet Thomas’s chances to move into the starting spot were hurt after he was suspended for the Boise State opener for violating team rules. Some hope arrived, though, when linebacker Richard Samuel announced he would return to running back, the position he played his first two seasons at Georgia. Samuel was redshirted last year after being plagued with injury, but returns to the backfield as the most experienced tailback on the team. Running back wasn’t the only position hit by departures. Offensive linemen Brent Benedict and A.J. Harmon both left for “personal reasons,” linebacker Marcus Dowtin and defensive back Nick Williams both transferred to North Alabama, and wide receiver/quarterback Logan Gray asked for release to continue his career at the University of Colorado. The Bulldogs may be without starting linebacker Jarvis Jones for some time, as well. The NCAA is investigating allegations that he received illegal compensation while member of

¢ From Page 1

FILE PHOTOS | The Red & Black

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray (top) and defensive back Brandon Boykin were named to several preseason watch lists in the past few weeks. an AAU basketball team in Columbus, Georgia. The summer hasn’t been all frustration, though. Georgia players have been

named to a plethora of preseason watch lists, including offensive linemen Ben Jones and Cordy Glenn, defensive back Brandon Boykin, kicker Blair Walsh, punter

Drew Butler, wide receiver Tavarres King, tight end Orson Charles, and quarterback Aaron Murray. Specifically, Aaron Murray has been the subject of widespread excitement. He has been named to the Walter Camp, Davey O’Brien, Maxwell, and College Football Performance Awards watch lists and was voted by the SEC coaches as the preseason first-team quarterback. At the annual Dawg Night camp, Georgia nabbed five highlyrated recruits, including No. 6 overall offensive tackle John Theus and the touted class of 2013 quarterback Brice Ramsey. Defensive coordinator Todd Grantham has expressed excitement about the way his defense is coming along, especially the development of newcomers Ray Drew (DE/OLB) and John Jenkins (DL). For fans who wonder when Georgia will compete again for an SEC championship, that answer — and the fruits of this whirlwind of an offseason — will come into sharp relief once the season kicks off on Sept. 3 against Boise State.

may get a mulligan year, but you aren’t going to get two.” Aside from the hot seat talk, a popular topic in the Southeast and nationally is the expectations for sophomore quarterback Aaron Murray, who ESPN’s Chris Low named as one of the “stars” of the SEC. “Murray is kind of the face of the SEC quarterbacks this year,” said David Kissell of Jackson, Tenn. “You don’t have the Tebow, the Ryan Mallett, the Cam Newton — it’s Aaron Murray. And if he doesn’t prove to be a top SEC quarterback, it could be a big bust for Georgia.” Last year, Murray threw for 3,049 yards, the second most by any freshman in SEC history. Despite his high expectations, Buchanan is not ready to call Murray a star just yet. “I think he’s very, very good,” Buchanan said. “I think he’s the best in the SEC. But I don’t think he’s the type of player Matt Stafford was. I won’t say he can’t be, but we have to see what he can do without A.J. Green. He is the best among a group of average quarterbacks.” Though most people are predicting South Carolina to repeat as SEC East champions, no one is counting the Bulldogs out of the race. “The potential is there for them to be at the top of the SEC East,” Williams said. Buchanan added: “I think the whole SEC East is so unsettled and every team has some issues, even South Carolina. Georgia is a tough call this year. I could see them finishing anywhere from first to fourth [in the East]. It’s going to depend on a lot of new guys, and you’re going to win the SEC with juniors and seniors not freshmen and sophomores.”

July 21, 2011 Issue  

July 21, 2011 Issue of The Red & Black

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