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Certain varieties of African corn could be correlated to HIV/AIDS Page 2

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Thursday, July 1, 2010

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 117, No. 158 | Athens, Georgia

WNEG to remain on the air for summer By PATRICK HOOPER THE RED & BLACK

PHOTOS BY EMILY KAROL | The Red & Black

S Sandy Creek Nature Center is home to beautiful trails and plenty of wildlife. July is National Parks and Recreation month. Celebrate by visiting this, or one of Athens’ other green getaways.

WALK ON THE WILD SIDE By EMILY KAROL THE RED & BLACK Sandy Creek Nature Center (off US 441 North, Commerce Road/Free) With more than 225 acres of woodlands, the Sandy Creek Nature Center provides a respite from the hustle and bustle of downtown Athens. With a diversity of trails of varying distances, Sandy Creek is suitable for a short, shaded stroll or a longer, 4-mile hike on the park’s most popular path — Cook’s trail — which ends at Sandy Creek Park. The trail takes you underneath a canopy of trees and on boardwalks through the beaver swamps and marshes of Sandy Creek. Be on the lookout for wildlife along the trail — including rabbits, turtles and deer.

See WNEG, Page 2

Sandy Creek Park (off US 441, Bob Holman Road/$2 per person) If you’re looking for some outdoor fun, Sandy Creek Park offers an array of activities to keep fit this summer. Offering sand volleyball courts and softball and disc golf fields — it’s a venue for a multitude of sports. Wander down to Lake Chapman and take a refreshing dip or lounge on the sandy beach — a summer hot spot in Athens. If you’re looking for more adventure, you can rent a canoe or kayak to explore the inlets of the

ONLINE Police reports

See PARKS, Page 5

Uni2 forms to oppose Arizona law, consequences By JEN INGLES THE RED & BLACK An organization promoting immigrants’ rights formed in Athens recently in response to anti-immigration sentiment in Georgia and elsewhere in the United States. The group, Uni2 — pronounced “unidos” — meets at the arch every Wednesday from 5:30 to 7 p.m. to illuminate the plight of undocumented immigrants in America — an issue which is, out of necessity, often kept in the shadows. Greg Calderon of Uni2 said the passage of Arizona Immigration Bill SB 1070, which was signed into law by Gov. Jan Brewer in April, inspired local activists to raise awareness of immigrants’ rights so that a similar bill is not introduced here in Georgia. “There is a fear that if the Supreme Court can’t block this stuff, then these

LAURA MCCRANIE | The Red & Black

S Protests will take place every Wednesday evening at the arch until the July 28 Supreme Court verdict. [Southern] states are next on the radar,” he said. The new law in Arizona, which goes into effect July 28, allows state officials and law enforcement officers to inquire into the immigration status of any person and to ask for proof of citizenship

KA-BOOM Fireworks — follies or fantastic displays of patriotism? See what one staff member thinks on page 4

Isolated t-storms. High 86| Low 68

Index

WNEG-TV is set to ride the airwaves for at least a little longer. In a decision reached June 29, the University of Georgia Research Foundation voted to amend the fiscal year 2011 budget to the tune of $340,000. The allotment is projected to keep the University’s flagging station alive for the next few months. $150,000 of that allotment will be dedicated to the repair and replacement of computer equipment. In the following months, WNEG will operate as normal while possibilities are explored for a more long-term solution. UGARF also moved to grant the beleaguered station $49,340 to finish out fiscal year 2010. “The money that is being requested here still falls within the overall total amount that was anticipated by the UGARF board,” said UGARF Executive Director David Lee at a meeting June 29. “This is not a request for addiBURGESS tional monies.” With this latest infusion of funds, the station should last through July, August and September, said Tim Burgess, senior vice president for finance and administration. “We’ll come back some time in August and decide what the full-year budget needs to be.” Neither Burgess nor WNEG General Manager Michael Castengera discussed the details of the options they are considering. Castengera called a meeting June 30 to tell his staff of WNEG’s reprieve. “People are just going about their day trying to do the best job they can,” he said.

based on “reasonable suspicion.” “The law criminalizes people with a dark skin color or strong accent,” Uni2 member Humberto Mendoza said. Mendoza said he sees a growing anti-immigrant sentiment among Georgians and is

Student on the run from ACC police Offender charged on multiple crimes

concerned the state’s future immigration policy may take its cue from Arizona. “Arizona is a kind of laboratory,” he said. Border states such as Arizona often test out immigration laws that may gain popularity and spread to other parts of the country, he explained. Already, Georgia passed legislation making it easier for police to ask for proof of U.S. citizenship. SB 529 requires police to establish the nationality of any person charged with a felony or caught driving under the influence. SB 350 makes driving without a license a felonious offense. For illegal immigrants who cannot obtain a driver’s license, these bills often work in tandem to create an opportunity for deportation. A common argument for tighter restrictions on

He might be a stranger to most University students, but the name Austin Michael Norris is all too familiar to University and AthensClarke County police officers. Norris, a 23-year-old student from Manchester, had a warrant put out for his arrest on May 8 after a string of on-campus incidents connected to him. According to ACC police, he is wanted for felony burglary, theft by NORRIS receiving and criminal trespass. Unfortunately for police, Norris is nowhere to be found. “We have no way of knowing whether he’s still in Athens-Clarke County,” said Hilda Sorrow, a public information assistant for the Athens-Clarke County Police. “We just check known places

See IMMIGRANT, Page 7

See CRIME, Page 3

By GRACE MORRIS THE RED & BLACK

HEY BATTER BATTER

LIGHTS OUT Did you have power problems this week? Find out what might have caused them. www.redandblack.com

What former University baseball player is sharing his experiences with future generations of Bulldogs? Find out on page 8 News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 4

Variety ..................... 5 The Week ................ 6

Sports ..................... 8 Crossword ............... 2

Sudoku .................... 5


NEWS

2 | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | The Red & Black

Businesses cope with summer Research findings

link corn with HIV

By ROBERT INSKIP FOR THE RED & BLACK Summer — the season when classes are more relaxed, studying in Europe is common and fewer students are in Athens to frequent their favorite downtown establishments. “Most businesses are affected quite a bit,” said Ricky Vaughn of the Mayflower Restaurant. “Not only are the Georgia students gone, but also a lot of local students are gone, as well. So it’s a pretty big impact.” Shivam Kumar, a sophomore from Atlanta, said his eating habits have changed in the summer, even though he chose to stay in Athens. “I end up spending less time at restaurants in the summer because places close earlier and I tend to eat later at night,” he said. “So I make food at home more often, because everybody else is already closed.” It is clear, however, that not all downtown Athens eateries are affected in the same way nor to the same extent over the summer. Some say that many of their “regulars” are in the Classic City all year round. “We are fortunate enough to have a pretty steady following to begin with,” said Leticia Guest of Five Star Day Café. “A couple times that we do notice an increase during the school year are brunch and football weekends.” Ann Byerley, who works nearby at The Taco Stand,

By SARAH JEAN DOVER THE RED & BLACK

NEHEMIE LUCIEN | The Red & Black

S The summer months mean fewer students in Athens, so many downtown restaurants are experiencing slower business than usual. expressed a similar opinion about the restaurant’s summer business. “Our business is still pretty consistent during the day,” she said. “We have a lot of regulars that come in then. At night, it gets a little slower.”

WNEG: Most 2010 revenue spent on salaries ¢From Page 1 “Anything and everything is being looked at,” Burgess said, ensuring that the station and its handlers were considering a “gamut of options.” Burgess and Castengera aren’t ready to discard anything as out of hand right now, exploring every possibility. WNEG certainly needs it. The news comes on the heels of a long line of economic problems brought about by everything from

construction delays to theft. WNEG has battled money problems with operating expenses of $1.8 million in FY 2010 — a sharp contrast to its projected annual revenue of $800,000. Most of that revenue was exhausted by $786,000 in staff salaries. The station has burned through the bulk of its $5 million grant, which was intended to sustain the station for five years. The grant was given in 2008. The weak economy did little to soothe the situa-

tion. “Like everybody else, you think the economy is going to turn around,” said Tom Jackson, vice president of public affairs. The station was originally pitched as an equity investment. “Right now, our investment is not performing as expected,” Jackson said. Burgess and Jackson highlighted WNEG’s twofold purpose. “It was designed as a laboratory for students,” Jackson said. In addition to serving

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

BY

STEPHAN PASTIS

as an educational tool for up-and-coming journalists, WNEG was conceived as a means of promoting the University. WNEG tells the story of how the University makes a difference, he said. In the march toward August, UGARF will continue to pore over its options, reaching out to both in-house and out-ofUniversity consultants for the sake of arriving at the most viable solution, Burgess said. “This is kind of an open approach,” he said.

A staple food that keeps many poverty-stricken countries alive could also be killing them. The progression of HIV has now been shown to be related to two toxins within corn: aflatoxin and fumonisin, both of which are in much of the corn consumed in Africa. Jonathan Williams of the University’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences– Griffin Campus, is leading the study, which published a research paper in May. Williams is a native of South Africa. “This is the strongest correlation between food and a disease globally,” Williams said. Jessica Grubb, a spring 2010 graduate in biological science from CAES, has been working with Williams since September 2008. “I was really lucky to get that job,” said Grubb, who initially interviewed for an information technology position after transferring to the Griffin campus in August 2008. Grubb said the project began as “general research, then evolved into the corn– HIV project” after she and Williams compiled data on corn and its two toxins. Last October, Williams and Grubb presented the findings in Bangkok, Thailand, at the International Congress of Nutrition, an event hosting several of the world’s leading nutritional scientists. Williams has been studying the effects of toxins in corn for the past 10 years, but did not find the parallel relationship between corn and HIV until 18 months ago. “It was inspiration and luck,” Williams said of his discovery. “A lot of the corn in Africa, we wouldn’t be able to sell [in the U.S.], but they eat it because

that’s all they have.” These toxins potentially could be in corn grown in the U.S.; however, good farming practices reduce toxin levels. “Using simple technologies, the toxins can be removed,” Williams said, avoiding 1,000,000 infections per year, and leaving “huge amounts of lives and misery changed.” “Factors, such as male circumcision, other sexually transmitted diseases, faith, and partner concurrency have been further studied and proven important through detailed study, models, or clinical trials,” stated the research paper in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published by Williams and his team. “Food and nutritional factors have not received that same attention from a transmission perspective, but micronutrients in particular have been studied for their role in the progression of HIV.” “HIV infection combined with high concentrations of the aflatoxin-albumin adduct biomarker have been associated with a decreased potential for antibody responses, decreased immune cytotoxic activity and decreased numbers of regulatory T cells, which may result in hyperactivation of the immune system. Thus, dietary sources of aflatoxin are a potential factor in the HIV epidemic.” Although the discovery was made at the University, other universities and colleges — including the University’s College of Public Health Sciences, University of AlabamaBirmingham’s College of Public Health, the University of Ghana, Georgia Southern’s JiannPing Hsu College of Public Health and Texas A&M’s College of Veterinary Medicine — assisted Williams in his work.

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NEWS

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | 3

Furloughs unlikely but possible By DALLAS DUNCAN THE RED & BLACK Money in the University System of Georgia is tight these days, but, so far, University faculty members will not have to suffer unpaid holidays in response to the budget constraints. “Our budget does not currently plan for an implementation of any furlough days,� said Tim Burgess, senior vice president for finance and administration. “There’s no operational reason for us to do furloughs.� Although no furlough days are on the calendar as yet, University employees are cautioned not to get their hopes up. “Our faculty contracts allow us to do up to 10 days if needed,� said John

Millsaps, spokesman for the Board of Regents. “At this point in time, given the fiscal year 2011 budget that will start [July 1], we don’t have anything in the budget for furlough days scheduled.� Millsaps said the six fiscal year 2010 furlough days came after Gov. Sonny Perdue mandated all state agencies — including the USG — take them. “Campuses, as they had to implement reductions, they had a lot of flexibility in the way they’d do that,� Millsaps said, adding some USG universities opted to add additional furlough days on top of the six required ones in order to further reduce spending. Millsaps said universities needed to keep their options open and not throw furlough days com-

ONLINE Police reports

University Police to underage drinker: ‘Urine’ trouble The high price of pee

Campus. Troxell said his wallet, containing $58 in bills and various credit cards, was stolen during the ordeal. Troxell turned down medical attention of any sort and reportedly showed no signs of injury. He was transported to the University Police Department for furthering questioning. Citing discrepancies in his account, University Police have since charged Troxell with the false reporting of a crime.

Kathleen Anne Bugnitz, 20, was arrested and charged with underage possession or consumption of alcohol on June 26, according to a University Police report. A taxi driver called the police on Bugnitz after she reportedly urinated in his vehicle and refused to pay a $90 punitive fee for doing so. On the other hand, Bugnitz had already paid her fare in full. An officer arrived on the Driver gets “F� in sobriety scene at 1:45 a.m. test When the responding officer approached An officer pulled Michael Bugnitz, she was speaking David Kleban, 23, over on on her cell phone to a June 25 at the intersection friend. of Carlton Street and After the officer asked Sanford Drive for running her to hang up the phone, a red light in the officer’s Bugnitz attempted to field of vision. hand the phone over to The officer reportedly officer so the offinoted signs of alcocer might speak hol on Kleban’s perwith the person on son, such as glassy, the other end of bloodshot eyes and a the line. The officer moderate odor assodeclined. ciated with alcoholic Over the course beverages. of questioning According to the Bugnitz, the officer University Police noted moisture on report, Kleban her dress “in the BUGNITZ denied he had conarea you would sumed any alcohol expect it to be if that evening. He then someone urinated while in submitted to a field sobria seat.� ety test. The reports states Kleban showed many Bugnitz did not realize she signs of intoxication such was drunk. as using his arms to balBugnitz eventually con- ance during tests of coorsented to pay the driver dination and his eyes failthe $90 fee. In doing so, it ing to follow an object in a came to light that she pos- smooth motion. sessed two IDs, one of Kleban was placed which was a fake Tennessee under arrest for DUI, faildriver’s license identifying ure to obey a traffic control her as Marie Catherine device and having an open Bugnitz. container in a vehicle. Bugnitz initially claimed Kleban refused a her real name was Marie, Breathalyzer test and was but she relented upon the transported to UGA PD officer’s discovery of her and eventually the Athensreal ID, which indicated Clarke County Jail. she was underage. His car was turned over After trying and failing to the person of his to identify her place of resi- request. dence, Bugnitz was placed under arrest. She was not Air conditioning crime charged with possession of a fake ID. University employee Stacey Jewell reported a On-campus beating, robtheft of five air conditionbery report false ing units from Mell Hall on June 24. Gregory Raymond The theft most likely Troxell, 21, and Stephen occurred between the Alle Stringfellow flagged hours of 9 a.m. June 23 down an officer on June 24 and 9:30 a.m. June 24, as at 1:42 a.m. according to a stated in a University University Police report. Police report. Troxell stated he was The units come to a attacked from behind by total value of $2,300. The an unseen assailant near officer gave Jewell a case the Chapel on North reference number.

pletely out of the window yet for fiscal year 2011. Burgess said if the University does choose to use furlough days, faculty notification will depend on who makes the decision and when it is made. He said last year, all employees who made more than $23,360 per year were required to take furlough days. Because there is no plan in place requiring furlough days, Burgess said he was unsure if the University would follow these same guidelines should fiscal year 2011 furlough days be requested. The most likely conditions for such a request would fall on the budget, Burgess said, saving the University millions of dollars, if the results from fiscal year 2010 are any indi-

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cation. Last year, the six furlough days saved the University $1.5 million each, and even more for the state. “The six days for the last fiscal year saved the system $42 million total,� Millsaps said. Burgess said he had received feedback from faculty members — some thanked administration for not putting furlough days on the calendar, but most said nothing. Millsaps said everything happening budget-wise in Georgia negatively affects the salary structure of state employees, including those at USG institutions. “It’s a very difficult time for all,� he said. “Obviously no one’s happy about salary freezes and furloughs, but that’s the situation we’re in.�

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and hope we run into him.� However, evading authorities may get Norris in more trouble than he’s already in. “It all depends on circumstances and previous crime history,� University Police Lt. Eric Dellinger said. “But from my experience, the judge usually impresses more severe consequences just to convey the seriousness of the situation to the offender.� An unusual set of incidents began in April, when University student Stephen Bocarro of Marietta reported a burglary of $13 from his Myers Hall dorm room. Though Norris was not listed as a suspect in the police report, the University police daily logs list him as the offender. A similar theft occurred at Russell Hall on April 24 — shorts worth $40 were stolen from student Justin Anthony Desandre. Again, Norris was not listed on the police report, but is listed as an offender in the incident. The next night, Caitlin McKibben, a Creswell Hall resident assistant from Bremen, reported that she had seen an unknown man in the building. According to University Police reports, he matched the description of “a suspicious person that residents had been complaining about recently.� Shortly after police arrived, Norris happened to walk through the Creswell lobby, and according to the report, was identified by McKibben as the unknown man. Norris was barred from University dorms for 90 days and arrested for possession of two fake IDs. One was an “altered and fraudulent version� of a Creswell student ID, and the other was a valid Georgia driver’s license that did not belong to Norris. Several days later, on May 7, Norris discovered just how serious this barring order was. “He came in [Oglethorpe House] following someone, but they didn’t claim him, so I called security and told them,� the desk clerk on duty said. “I knew who he was, because there were a couple people working with me that day who had mentioned him.� University Police were unable to locate Norris that night, but following an investigation, put out a warrant for his arrest on charges of criminal trespass despite an active barring notice. He was seen talking on a cell phone outside O-House May 8. According to another University Police report, Norris froze and sprinted away when a police officer approached him and asked him to put down the phone. Police reports state Norris jumped off a 30-foot embankment into a creek and escaped into the woods. His hat was found and taken in as evidence. The May 8 incident was the last time Norris was identified in any police incidents, and attempts to contact him as of press time were unsuccessful. The warrant for his arrest still stands.

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4 | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | The Red & Black

Dallas Duncan | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Daniel Burnett | Managing Editor me@randb.com Joe Williams | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Our Take

Opinions

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

UGAMail follies While many of us probably do not care and/or are blissfully ignorant about the changes our e-mail server has undergone, the members of the editorial board are, quite frankly, frightened. I find myself with a frightening case of apathy as I wonder, what the hell? Should I even care? These were the growing clouds of disinterest bubbling up inside me until another board member pointed out that the new UGAMail may not be forwarding e-mails to our adorned Gmail accounts. The horror. We find the new e-mail server to be lacking in the aesthetic department. Our new e-mail server just doesn’t hold a candle to our beloved Gmail accounts! The majority of us agree that we probably won’t even use the new UGAMail, and honestly, we find it a bit tricky to work with. Perhaps it is just me, but doesn’t such a ruckus clue us in on something a little bigger than our current e-mail forwarding problems, like maybe our inability to adjust to subtle change? I don’t want to underscore the technological glitches our new e-mail server has displayed, but it must be noted that sometimes a little apathy goes a long (and enjoyable) way when it comes to e-mail in the middle of summer. —Haley Temple for the editorial board

Let’s take a shot to being in college

T

he next time you’re out on the town or winding down at a house party, raise a glass to me. To yourself. To that guy sitting next to you. Years have been spent getting us to this point, learning how to cut corners and not get into too much trouble. We are students of the University of Georgia. I’m not going to pretend we’re an Ivy League school, but we do have standards — if you screw up or fall down one too many times, you get ejected. That is, if you can get in at all. America is a melting pot of peoples. College is a melting pot of awesome. It’s really too bad not everyone feels that way. Last week, Elizabeth Hanna preached against the assault on decency and the meaninglessness of revelry that is perpetrated on every campus. That sounds like a recipe for a great Saturday night, if you ask me. Honestly, the column reminds me of my own Puritanical phase, when I ranted and raved against time-honored traditions of fun and sex. Looking back, I realize I only thought those things because I wasn’t having any. Don’t get me wrong. I’m no ladies’ man. I have about as much game as a leper suffering from explosive diarrhea. When I walk into a room, you’ll hear the sound of applause. Oh, no, wait. That’s just every woman subconsciously slapping her legs together. Then I got over it. If you don’t like something, drop it like a bad habit and move on. That’s what Hanna did when she left the pocket of shallow greed that was UGA. But then she came back. Apparently, everywhere is just as bad as Athens. If that’s the case, I am ecstatic. I will be graduating into a world just like the one I’m in right now. College is the first time we are really socially mobile. Before now, we’ve been moving in the same circles with people from the same backgrounds. There’s nothing wrong

PATRICK HOOPER with that, but people are the spice of life. If you’re not trying everything on the sample platter, it’s going to be a dull meal. That analogy doesn’t work. But it doesn’t have to. I am having fun even as I make a fantastic fool of myself. I wouldn’t have it any other way. I have more regrets than Tiger Woods has mistresses, but those regrets are a part of me. Every moment of glorious idiocy has contributed to the person I am today. So I won’t drown in regrets and heap scorn on people who are having fun. They’re living and breathing and not letting the past drag them down. Miss Hanna seems to think it shallow to live in the moment, that love will set us free. Those things are not mutually exclusive. If you spend enough time around people and make enough of the good memories with them, they will become the people you love. Then you’re picking them up, helping them out, sharing their hobbies. It’s not just about you anymore. It’s about the fun you have with that other person. I’ve been designated driver plenty of nights. I get to laugh myself blue at terrible tequila choices, but then I turn around and drive people home. I get to have my fun and do my good deed of the day. Sure, let’s volunteer and donate. Let’s be selfless. But we don’t have to lock ourselves into saint mode every hour of every day. The pope hat is huge. Your neck will get tired Sometimes, it’s okay to be dumb and young with your friends. So have that drink and wear something slutty next weekend. You deserve it. —Patrick Hooper is a senior from Marietta majoring in magazines

News Editor: Thomas Hooper Associate News Editor: Beth Pollak Sports Editor: Ryan Black Variety Editor: Anne Connaughton Photo Editor: Wes Blankenship Design Editor: Haley Temple Chief Copy Editor: Lisa Michals Copy Editor: Elaine Kelch

opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

Fireworks trick us into patriotism I

’ve never been particularly patriotic or necessarily fond of my country, so this time of year is always somewhat lackluster for me. As a child I was tricked by the bright lights that permeated the night sky on the Fourth of July — you’re a kid, what can you do but stare up at them and scream? There was also the allure of parade floats and candy, which is of course fun, but with the detriment of waking up early, no child can really say they were ever really satisfied . This whole celebration of our independence seems to be a sort of propaganda technique to promote unity within a dividing nation and remind us of the futility of war and the pain that can comes from it. The explosions in the sky remind us of the bombs that could be dropped on our heads . A complete and total annihilation by nukes seems like a fitting end. However, this isn’t the Cold War, so we should be fine — but if not, at least the cockroaches and Twinkies should be. To me, openly allowing children access to fire and explosions seems a little dangerous — though I suppose it is a good way to entice them into the love for one’s country that so many may show. Actually, there was a time back in my youth when I found fireworks particularly fascinating.

AURYN BARUCH On one such occasion, in the process of lighting a pyramid firework that I assumed would launch into the sky, my leg erupted in flames instead. Maybe the firework itself didn’t light me on fire, but it did start spinning and shooting sparks everywhere, which caused me to back into a citronella candle. You know how fire safety is stressed in repetition our whole lives? Well, when you’re actually on fire, you completely forget all of that. It wasn’t a very bad burn and I really shouldn’t be the one to complain, but it did melt

my nylon shorts to my leg, which smelled pretty foul. It may seem like I’m now advocating the safe use of fireworks, but I’m really not. The whole point of fireworks is the flame and danger. Athens offers two fireworks shows that I know of on July 4. The field display in Bishop Park, which sees a unified gathering of people in a peaceful and serene environment, and at the Georgia Square Mall — I won’t even comment upon the logistics of that situation. Bishop’s display is far superior, but the one benefit of the mall is that you can watch the pyrotechnics lighting the fireworks These displays can be of an adequate entertainment value to some, but if I’m celebrating the free-

ing of my nation from tyranny, I want something more — explosions! This is where the one redeeming quality of this holiday comes into play, freedom from the police to have mortar battles. All other fireworks pale in comparison to the mortar, whose bright colors and loud noises truly make me giddy with joy. A simple tube with a bomb dropped into it that launches freedom into the sky — simply astonishing. The best part is when one removes the tube from that equation. Hand-lofted mortars, tossed between friend and foe and resulting in well timed theatrical style dodges — what more could one ask for on such a day? Danger may seem to be an issue here, but what is danger really? If you can just give up that fear of dying you’ve been holding onto, and get over the fact that the burns to your corneas might prove debilitating, I feel that you and I can make this treacherously onerous holiday one of memory. So, to those of you who feel your livelihood slipping away, maybe this is the holiday season to grab a pack of matches and book it into the streets with a box of mortars in tow. — Auryn Baruch is a junior from Athens majoring in film studies and telecommunications

Blockbuster hits feature cliché actresses I have a bit of a Twilight problem. At the risk of sounding like an overeager tween — always a risky proposition when discussing the dreaminess of Taylor Lautner — let me explain just why I harbor my secret affection. The books-movies-and-all franchise may deal in overheated romantic tropes and clichés, but it’s an enviably slick pop product, integrating disparate genres and tones without a seam. (That crazy Rosemary’s Babymeets-The O.C. birth scene near the end of book four? J’adore.) However, as Eclipse premieres, I’m reminded of my biggest issue with Stephenie Meyers’ brainchild— it has a bit of a girl problem. The estimably dewy Bella Swan may be the stories’ protagonist, but she’s a sketchily-defined character, a loose collection of adjectives running the gamut from clumsy to mediocre, who bases unhealthilylarge chunks of her life around men. She’s got a loving father and good looks, but far too often she’s simply toted from place to place, a slack passenger in her very own truck no less, mooning over that pale kid who doesn’t want to see her naked. Guess what? In this first summer of the new decade, Ms. Swan is but one of many, head of a whole vanguard of wishy-washy gals. Katherine Heigl — spunky, feisty, comic Katherine Heigl — heads up the usual suspects. Four years after breaking-out in

Mailbox E-mail and letters from our readers

Red & Black used poor word choice I would really like to see more professional wording than “BOOBIES,” “BOOTY” and “BOOZE” on the front of this newspaper. This disturbs me as an adult, as a woman, and as a parent. Consider taking a different approach to your audience. We are generally a smart bunch of readers

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033

Online Editor: William Brown Editorial Cartoonist: Bill Richards Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Staff Writers: Auryn Baruch, Mitch Blomert, Kelsey Byrd, Sarah Jean Dover, Lisa Glaser, Brittney Holmes, Jen Ingles, Grace Morris, CC Nolan, Crissinda Ponder, Zack Taylor, Allison Williard

ADAM CARLSON

Judd Apatow’s Knocked Up, girlfriend seems hell-bent on starring in one disaster after another. Last year, in the aptly-titled The Ugly Truth, she couldn’t even muster much spark while trapped in a pair of vibrating panties. Now, with the aid of wavy-haired Nikon salesman Ashton Kutcher, she’s outdone even that with her latest, Killers. Lest it be said that the season lacked for surprises, though, Sarah Jessica Parker and company followed close on Heigl’s heels, making their own case for the title of Shrews of the Summer. Once glittering and incisivelyfeminine heroines over on HBO, the gang’s latest, Sex and the City 2, is nothing so much as a two-and-ahalf hour how-to for ruining your job, your friendships and your marriage. ‘Is this because I’m a bitch wife who nags you?’ Carrie once wonders. Well — if the shoe fits. The big-budget cinema landscape is littered with other examples: Kick-Ass, Letters to Juliet, Knight and Day…some good, most bad, but none can find a way to competently handle both genders without simplifying one of them. The women may range from the

who are interested in your news but we do not need to be lured to read your newspaper by lewdness. I understand that these items are generally on the mind of the majority of your audience but why not expand our minds and not contribute to the baseness that already exists? You have a wonderful platform to do some good in this community. Please take this responsibility with care and maturity. Thank you. HEIDI METRAKOUDESHEWETT Academic advisor Arts & Science

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dim-witted to the frazzled to the optimistically oblivious, but not one of them is interesting, compelling or new. But what’s this? Angelina Jolie may be our soonarriving savior — her spy thriller Salt, which has the actress as both Bourne-in-heels and woman-onthe-run, opens in just three weeks. Here’s a funny thing about the movie, though. The script flipped genders for Jolie, but not everything made the jump. While the original called for some narrative hubbub about our hero saving his wife from the evildoers, the same cannot be said for what’s actually been filmed. In making the transition, everyone involved thought having Jolie rescue her hubby would prove “emasculating,” so they nixed the sequence. As one of my film professors occasionally asks, “Is that feminism?” If Evelyn Salt is cool enough to traipse around Washington, D.C., why isn’t she worthy of saving her man? And why can’t Katherine Heigl pick a movie, just one, that isn’t toxically reductive? And why can’t Bella Swan, just once, demand to drive herself around? Where, oh where, have all the good women gone?

— Adam Carlson is a sophomore from Dallas majoring in magazines

Leaked oil isn’t like spilled milk I’ve seen a lot of dumb things written in The Red and Black over the years, but I’m not sure I’ve seen anything dumber than Christopher Smith’s comparison of the Gulf disaster to a child spilling something. That’s like comparing 9/11 to a kid knocking over a coffee cup with a paper airplane. It’s stupid and inappropriate. And he doesn’t like the “scolding”? Unreal. What we ought to do

with BP is this — make them pay for what they’ve done until the problem is solved. Take every last penny from the corporation. If they dodge into bankruptcy, seize all corporate assets and sell them. Then seize all private assets of the top 20 BP executives. Then put them to work shoveling oily sand on the Gulf, dawn to dusk, for minimum wage, until either the spill is cleaned or they’re carried off in a cardboard box. SAM O’DELL Grad student, Athens Science education

Editorial board members include Wes Blankenship, Dallas Duncan, Crissinda Ponder, Haley Temple, Joe Williams

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Publisher: Harry Montevideo Office Manager: Erin Beasley Cleaning Person: Mary Jones The Red & Black is published Monday through Friday fall and spring semesters and each Thursday summer semester, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a non-profit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


VARIETY

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | 5

now showing

listen up! Out of My Life Woman/ Who Knows” — listeners should pay attention to how ferociously Trucks lays into his guitar as his solo climaxes. Also notable are the straight-ahead blues of “Key to the Highway,” the lilting soul/gospel of “I Know,” and a modern, electrified face-lift of the jazz standard “Afro Blue.” Cuts from the album “Already Free” are represented in ample supply as well. “Don’t Miss Me” is breezy and swinging, while “Get What You Deserve” is an exuberant, classic-blues-styled rocker and “Days is Almost Gone” is a smoky ballad filled with Trucks’ signature slide-guitar wail. Trucks also pays homage to his music idols, and “Roadsongs” features a silky-smooth cover of Bob Marley’s “Rastaman Chant” and a swaggering, soulful rendition of Derek & the Dominoes’ “Anyday.”

“Roadsongs” by The Derek Trucks Band “Roadsongs,” in essence, offers a glimpse of virtuosic guitar player Derek Trucks and his band’s latest tour in support of 2009’s “Already Free.” It features 100-plus minutes of electric live material recorded in Chicago — and what’s more, it may very well be the last record fans will get from this outfit for quite some time. Earlier this year, the Derek Trucks Band announced a hiatus lasting a minimum of one year. In the meantime, Trucks and his wife, guitarist Susan Tedeschi, will focus on their mutual musical project, the Derek Trucks & Susan Tedeschi Soul Stew Revival. It’s a relief, then, that

the band is finishing strong. “Roadsongs” is one of the most invigorating snapshots of Trucks’ stunning guitar prowess and multi-generic eclecticism ever put to record. The song selection itself is well-rounded and encompasses everything that makes Trucks such a singular musician. Along with Trucks’ ever-present lead guitar work, the group draws upon influences from Southern rock, jazz, soul and world music. The group jumps from style to style rapidly yet manages to retain a remarkable consistency. Every track shines in its own right, but one particularly noteworthy cut is the stinging Southern rock of “Get

VERDICT: His bestknown work may be with the Allman Brothers Band, but nowhere does Trucks sound more at home and in his skin than on stage with his own band. “Roadsongs” is a spectacular reminder of his near-unrivaled penchant for musical improvisation that is equal parts sophisticated, emotional and flat-out fun. — John Barrett

If you’ve grown up, you’ve probably grown past the comic stylings of “Grown Ups.” Adam Sandler films have been on a slow decline over the past few years. Sometimes they try too hard to be serious. Other times they try too hard to be funny, which inevitably they aren’t. “Grown Ups” is mostly the latter. The film focuses on five close friends who lost their basketball coach. This causes them to reunite after years of absence. This all seems reasonable for a beginning to a film, but it leads to no greater point. They have reunited, so what? There’s no real issue presented in the film, no strife. This film has such a lack of plot that it almost seems like a sketch comedy show, with less comedy. There are several points in the film that are legitimately laughter-inducing, all of the slapstick variety, but each of these situations is presented on a string of inconsistencies that form no greater whole. Each scene just seems like another setup for a random gag, with the notable exception of the ending. It seems rather forced though, as if while the audience was traipsing along the pathway to the end of this film, some turmoil was accumulating of which they were unaware. Some complaints about the camerawork have been mentioned in

PARKS: Many options for varied interests ¢From Page 1

Athens Creative Theater.

lake. There are also horse trails, if you prefer a terrestrial exploration of Sandy Creek — $2 per horse per day. If you have a canine counterpart, don’t miss out on the dog park, and if you’re looking to have a cookout, there are plenty of covered picnic areas to host an event.

Ben Burton Park (off of Oglethorpe Avenue, Mitchell Bridge Road/ Free) If the stress of work or school is weighing down on you, Ben Burton offers the needed respite to relax and think through the stress. Flowing into the Oconee River, Ben Burton is a small stream lined with flat rocks that beckon you to take a seat. Occasionally, you might catch a kayak or canoe floating down the river, as Ben Burton is an ideal place to push off or end a trip. If you prefer to pace with your thoughts, there is a well-maintained trail

North Oconee Greenway (Free) Stretching from Sandy Creek Nature Center to downtown Athens, the North Oconee Greenway follows the North Oconee River with more than 60 acres of green space and 3.5 miles of concrete paths. Whether you’re on foot or on bike, the Greenway provides the perfect path for exercise, wildlife observation and even daily travel. If you need a break along the way, benches are poised at picturesque places along the river. There are also a few small parks along the Greenway, providing shade from the summer sun and places to relax and enjoy the view of the river. A spattering of grills complete these green spaces, providing the perfect atmosphere to host an afternoon picnic. Bear Hollow (off of Milledge Avenue, Gran Ellen Drive/Free) Nestled in the middle of a neighborhood, this animal rescue nature center offers an ideal venue to view more exotic wildlife that you might not catch a glimpse of on the trails. An easy stroll through this park and you’re likely to see the white-topped bald eagle perched on its branch and an alligator soaking up some rays. Presentations and special events are common and open to all ages. The newest and arguably most popular exhibit is the bear cubs, attracting many with their adorable antics. Memorial Park (off of Milledge Avenue, Gran Ellen Drive/Free) Adjacent to Bear Hollow, Memorial Park offers a relaxing atmosphere of shaded trails, covered picnic tables and benches overlooking the pond. The easy, wellmarked trails are perfect for a short stroll during lunch, ending at the lake for a bite. Be on the lookout for turtles — they are in abundance and usually hang out near the bridge. If fishing is your fancy, the pond is well-stocked and easily accessible. If you have your dog in tow, there is an expansive dog park for them to play at. There is also a pool, basketball courts and the

curving through shaded hardwoods, ideal for an afternoon stroll. However, Ben Burton is also accessible for those wanting to entertain. With a clear, open space along the river and a few shaded picnic tables, you can have a cookout, play Frisbee or just enjoy the sunshine. The State Botanical Garden of Georgia (off of Milledge Avenue/Free) There is no place more beautiful and diverse than The State Botanical Garden of Georgia here in Athens. Laden with a variety of gardens both inside and out and brimming with exotic and native flowers and plants, the Botanical

Garden is the perfect place to bring your camera and zoom in on the beauty of plant life. Strolling through the plots of herbs, native flora and international gardens, make your way to the day chapel nestled on the border of the hardwood forest to view the naturalistic beauty of the wooden structure. Go further into the woods and you will find an expanse of trails ranging in distance. The orange and white trails offer a nice view of the Oconee River with a few spots on rocks and fallen trees to take a refreshing dip. The Botanical Garden also provides educational and special events.

Lutheran

Non-Denom.

Non-Denom.

Presbyterian

Christus Victor Lutheran Church and Student Center

Campus View Church of Christ

Georgia Christian Student Center (GCSC)

First Presbyterian Church of Athens

Sunday Bible Study: 9-10 a.m. Morning Assembly: 10-11:15 a.m. Evening Small Groups Ministries Youth, Family, Campus & Hispanic www.campusviewchurch.org 1360 S. Lumpkin Street 706-353-1556

Family Time Gathering, Wed. 7:30-8:45 A time of spiritual conversation, praise and worship www.gcsc4jesus.org 1360 S. Lumpkin Street 706-549-2827

Sunday Worship Services 8:45 and 11:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9:45 a.m. www.firstpresathens.org 185 E. Hancock Avenue 706-543-4338

Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday School/Bible Study 9:15 a.m. www.christusvictor.net 1010 South Lumpkin Street 706-543-3801

To advertise your worship services, call: 706-433-3011

“Grown Ups” other reviews, as it is almost akin to “Cloverfield” in some of the handheld movements, but it really isn’t distracting from the film and is more of a poor decision on the director or cinematographer’s part. What actually is distracting is anything else in the theatre. Keeping focused on this film is a chore. With its lack of plot it comes off quite boring, so when those jokes that

UGA

actually are funny come into play they are easily overlooked or even taken out of context. VERDICT: There really is no good reason to go see this movie. If you’re a fan of the Sandler crew, then the familiar faces will be there, but it would take a true diehard fan to sit through this and come out happy. — Auryn Baruch


6 | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | The Red & Black

LAURA MCCRANIE | The Red & Black

THE WEEK

THE WEEK

The Red & Black’s event guide to happenings — news, variety and sports — in and around Athens from July 1-7.

PICK OF THE WEEK: ACC TENNIS CENTER OPEN HOUSE THURSDAY The ACC Tennis Center Public Information Open House is being held for members of the community to have a chance to make comments on the proposed tennis center at Bishop Park. The community is in uproar about tearing up Bishop Park to build twice as many tennis courts there and will have the opportunity to voice concerns at this meeting. ACC has four potential sites picked out for the tennis center to go, including Bishop Park, Satterfield Park, Southeast Clarke Park and the YWCO property. Bishop Park is the best location according to Leisure Services, however, because they would be spending less money to expand the current tennis courts as opposed to building completely new facilities at other sites. It also is a potential site because ACC already owns the land and they would not have to change the layout much. Opponents against making the tennis center at Bishop Park include the Athens Farmers Market which meets there every Saturday morning and the locals who have many concerns about the center. The Athens Farmers Market attracts a couple thousand people each Saturday to the community-based open market, with local farmers, artisans and food vendors selling their wares at low prices. If the tennis center would be built, it would displace the farmers market to an unknown location. The local community is also worried about the noise and light pollution that might be produced from the center. Overflow parking would also be an issue if there were to be a tournament at Bishop Park since parking is so limited. The meeting promises to be a good example of how the ACC Leisure Services and local community see each side, and how each wants the issue to be resolved. If you are looking to get more involved in the community, this would be a great way to do it. When: July 7, 7:30 p.m. Where: Athens-Clarke County Planning Department Auditorium at 120 West Dougherty St. Price: Free Contact: (706) 613-3625

What: Blue Sky Anniversary Party and Cask Where: Blue Sky When: 8 p.m. Price: TBD Verdict: Blue Sky’s first birthday! Contact: www.blueskyathens.com What: The Art of the Steal Where: CinÊ BarcafÊ When: 6:30 p.m.

Compiled by KELSEY BYRD Designed by HALEY TEMPLE

FRIDAY

Price: $65 Verdict: Dinner and a Movie night hosted by the Collectors of the Georgia Museum of Art. A viewing of Don Argott’s documentary. Contact: (706) 542-0437 What: The Solstice Sisters Where: DePalma’s Italian CafÊ on Timothy Road When: 6-8:30 p.m.

SATURDAY What: Adoption Day Where: Pet Supplies Plus When: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Price: Free to look, adoption prices may apply Verdict: Feeling like giving a adorable pet a new home? Local animal shelters bring their animals out for people to adopt. Contact: (706) 353-0650 What: “Get to Know Your Parks� Tour Where: Various ACC parks When: 9 and 11:30 a.m.

Price: Free Contact: (706) 552-1237 What: Timi Conley for “Live After Five� Where: Hotel Indigo When: 6-8 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Conley plays feature tracks from his solo record, entitled “Nerd Sexy.� Contact: www.athensdowntownhotel.com

What: Red, White and Blue Poolside Bash Where: Polo Club of Athens When: TBD Price: TBD Contact: www.lastcallathens.com What: Athens, Guff, Tealvox, Thunderchief Where: 40 Watt Club When: 9 p.m. Price: $6 Verdict: Come see rock bands from around Athens featuring a young group that plays classic rock, a punk quartet, an indie rock set and a West Coast punk sound. Contact: www.40watt.com

Price: $1 Verdict: Departing from Lay Park, this week’s tour “Come Out and Play� celebrates the green space and park trails. Call to reserve your space. Contact: (706) 613-3580 What: Figure Photography Open Studio Where: Fringe Collective Artistic Studios When: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Price: $30 Verdict: Teaching skills for photographing figures in a studio environment, lighting equipment included. Contact: (706) 540-2727

MEXICALI GRILLE *Patio Dining Weather Is Here! *Great Cheese Dip *Voted Best Margarita in Athens COLLEGE STATION (next to Kroger) www.mexicaligrilleathens.com

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION 1 Bedroom Apartments Hillside 1BR/1BA w/ W/D $550 w/o $475   Hall 1BR/1BA $465  1BR/1 BA $490 All units have water included in rent!

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South Hampton Village

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2 & 3 BR: $385-$400 per BR

2 & 3 BR: $300-$375 per BR

4 and 5 BRs: $275-$300 per BR

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St. Andrews

4 BR $200 per BR

Picture Yourself Here! Take an online tour of these communities and get special coupons on our new and improved website!

www.CarriageHouseAthens.com

What: Star Spangled Classic Where: Bishop Park When: 6 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Dunking booths, face painting, inflatables, live music, BBQ and hot dogs for your Fourth of July entertainment, followed by fireworks at 9:30. No pets, smoking, alcohol or grills, please. Contact: (706) 613-3589

MONDAY What: Jazz Jam Session Where: CinĂŠ BarcafĂŠ When: 6 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Sonny Got Blue host this weekly jam session. Contact: www.athenscine. com What: Raw Ass Temple Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar When: 8:30 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Derek Almstead and Heather McIntosh Contact: www.myspace.com/ flickerbar What: Ping Pong Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar When: 4-8 p.m. Price: Free

TUESDAY

155 International Drive Athens, GA 30605

In the height of luxury...

SUNDAY

What: Qurious, Thick Paint, Zona Mexicana Where: Farm 255 When: 11 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Spacy soundscapes meets a combination of math-rock and basementparty hardcore. Contact: www.farm255.com What: American Cheeseburger, Damnesia, Mutilation Rites Where: Go Bar When: 10 p.m. Price: TBD Verdict: Aggressive oldschool thrash rock make for a loud hardcore evening of entertaining.

WEDNESDAY What: Canine Cocktail Hour Where: Hotel Indigo When: 5-7 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: Bring your dog every Wednesday to Phi Bar & Bistro Courtyard for drink and food specials! Contact: www.athensdowntownhotel.com What: GMOA Summer Film Series Where: Lamar Dodd School of Art When: 7 p.m. Price: Free Verdict: “Avant-Garde Short Films of the 20th Century� includes the screening of seven films directed by various artists. Contact: www.uga.edu/ gamuseum


NEWS & VARIETY

The Red & Black | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | 7

Lyrics change with experience

Avant-Garde movies relate to classes Films shown through July

By ZACK TAYLOR THE RED AND BLACK Fireworks are not the only thing going on this July 4 — musician Shannon Whitworth will be performing in Athens that very same day. Whitworth’s performance is a part of the Classic City Fourth Of July American Music Festival presented by The Melting Point. It’s a two-day festival that focuses on folk, bluegrass and Americana styles of music. The festival is also presented in conjunction with headliners, the Packway Handle Band. Josh Erwin, a member of the band, had some high praise for Whitworth and her abilities as a musician. “She is a talented banjo player, guitar player and songwriter,� Erwin said. “If you have the opportunity to watch and listen to her perform, you should absolutely make it a point to do so.� Erwin has seen Whitworth perform with many other talented musicians but says Whitworth has the ability to stand out. “[Whitworth]’s voice is the overwhelming aspect that has always been the most appealing to me about her as a performer,� Erwin said. Erwin isn’t the only person to offer such high praise of Whitworth. Megan Gregory, a musician from Elizabethton, Tenn., also had her share of praise to give. “Anyone who gets to sit in the same room with Shannon Whitworth’s voice will be taken on a trip of the senses,� Gregory said. “She knows how to softly carry and then hold the audience with her songs.� Though many of her peers are confident in Whitworth’s musical abilities, what she isn’t as confident about is defining her style. “Original, indie, folk-ish, country-ish, I don’t know,� Whitworth said. “I don’t even know what genre we would classify it as.� Whitworth released her first solo album, “No Expectations,� in 2007 and, according to Whitworth, it’s time for another. Her new album will be titled “Water Bound.� Whitworth believes it is important for a musician to keep on evolving with every new album released. “I think that’s what makes it almost interesting for the musician,� Whitworth said. “No artist or musician wants to put out the same record over and over again.� Much of the music she writes is about or inspired by her life and the things around her.

By CRISSINDA PONDER THE RED & BLACK

Photo courtesy Shannon Whitworth

SShannon Whitworth’s style may be ambiguous, but her talent is not. She will be performing at the Classic City American Music Festival.

SHANNON WHITWORTH When: July 3 and 4, 2 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: Two-Day pass $25, general admission $15 “Every year I grow and with it, so do my words,� Whitworth said. “As we get older, things we want to write about change.� She is most excited about one particular thing on the album. “This is the first time I co-wrote on a couple songs on an album,� Whitworth said. “It’s been great. I never knew I would enjoy writing with other people so much.� Whitworth’s upcoming show in Athens will not only be her first show here in the Classic City — but it will take place on a very special date. “We are looking forward to celebrating the holiday with all our friends in Athens,� Whitworth said.

FILM SERIES What: The Georgia Museum of Art’s Summer Film Series: Avant-Garde Short Films of the 20th Century When: July 7, 14, 21 at 7 p.m. Where: Lamar Dodd Room S151 Cost: Free

What’s black, white and viewed in Lamar Dodd? It’s the Georgia Museum of Art’s summer film series. “All of the films are innovative for their time,� said Janice Simon, associate art professor in the Lamar Dodd School of Art. “They have innovative film, shot and story techniques.� This year’s showcase, “Avant-Garde Short Films of the 20th Century,� marks the third time the museum has partnered with Simon for the summer series. On July 7, Simon is presenting a set of seven short films made in the ’20s and ’30s by American and European filmmakers, such as Paul Strand and Man Ray. One is only 6 minutes long. “I had to decide [what films to show] both in terms of style and in terms of time,� Simon said. The following week Simon will present “The Man with a Movie Camera,� a Russian film directed by Dziga Vertov that directly relates to her modern photography class. “I’m really thrilled that the students will be coming to see it,� Simon said. “Because of the length I can never show it in class.�

“The Seventh Seal� is one of director Ingmar Bergman’s famous early works and has English subtitles for the Swedish and Latin dialogue. It is the only one that is not silent. The movie is set in the Middle Ages, but was filmed after World War II as a metaphor for the atomic and hydrogen bombs. “This is his most expressionistic and most symbolic film,� Simon said. “It is set during the plague and shows how the fear of uncertain death is there, and it’s something that could even be irrational and wipe everyone out.� Simon said these films speak volumes about the art of filmmaking. “I think that all these films are the beginning of techniques and points of view that carry on today or that great filmmakers look back to,� Simon said.

IMMIGRANT: Rights group reaches out to Athens’ Hispanic population ¢From Page 1 immigration and for deportation is that they take jobs away from American workers. Uni2 organizers, however, argue that U.S. citizens would not be willing to work for the meager wages undocumented workers are paid. Activist Noe Solis, also of Uni2, said Americans are unaware of the ways they benefit from the labor of illegal immigrants. For example, without cheap

migrant labor, many foods would cost much more at the grocery store. “They have good salads, good vegetables, good fruits in their kitchens, but they don’t look at where they come from,� he said. U.S. economic policy often deepens the poverty of working people in developing nations, causing them to take desperate measures to survive. “People don’t want to leave their homeland,� Calderon said. “They don’t leave their

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for renovated house off of Prince Ave behind ARH. $350/mo + 1/3 utilities Pets ok with deposit. Call Will 404-713 0655

! LOCATION. 3BR 2BA. Complete refurb. Near Foley Field. No driving. HW floors, yard, storage, FP, W/D, CHAC, insulation, off street parking. Ask $1290. 706-424-1370.

FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED in private family home. Snapfinger Villas area near UGA & Athens Tech. $325/mo includes utilities, cable, and internet. Call Kay 706-6145238.

$1400 - HUGE 4 or 5BR 4BA Apt. walking distance to campus & downtown. 1 month free rent. 2 large LRs. Large utility rm. huge deck, W/D, DW. That’s only $280 per person. Approx 2500 sqft. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500

MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to share condo. Private Br/ Ba. In the popular Summit gated community. $475/mo plus 1/2 utilities. Non-smoker no pets. Call 404-642-0535 ROOMMATE NEEDED NS. Furnished 2BR 2BA Lodge of Athens condo (near UGA). Avail 8/1, $425/mo: cable, internet included. Call Kevin 770346-0431 or kevinscott21@bellsouth.net

$1650 - 4 or 5BR Windsor Place Condo 1 LEFT COMPLETELY REMODELED (5pts. area). That’s only $330 per person. All new flooring. cabinets, granite countertops, plumb & elect fixtures, appliances & HVAC. Looks brand new. 4 HUGE BRs, 3BA 2 LRs. lg. utility room. huge deck and pool. Downstairs LR can be an additional BR. Approx.2500 Sqft. MUST SEE! Prelease for fall 2010. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500

families because they want to; they’re forced to. Having NAFTA [the North American Free Trade Agreement] over there makes people have to come here and try to find work because there’s none over there.� Mendoza said many people trek through the desert for five to 10 days to cross the border, putting their lives on the line in order to find work in the United States. “Most of them, they die there,� he said.

Uni2 frames the struggles undocumented immigrants face as a human rights issue because immigrants’ access to education, health care and basic necessities are severely restricted in the U.S. and in their home nations. Part of Uni2’s mission is to make clear to the nonLatino public why people come here illegally and what role the United States plays in this. Uni2 also works directly with the Latino immigrant community — those with

citizenship and without — in Athens-Clarke County. The Latino populations of both Georgia and AthensClarke County are growing, at 8 and 9 percent, respectively, as of 2008. “We try to educate them about certain issues,� Mendoza said. “And one of the issues is to learn English. We need volunteers to work with.� Calderon said Spanishspeaking students who want to volunteer with the group would be a boon to Uni2, as would artists and

anyone who may have grant-writing experience. Calderon said the group will have music at their demonstration on July 28, the date SB 1070 is slated to go into effect, with the hope that the Supreme Court will block the legislation. “We’re meeting there, and we’re doing rallies every Wednesday until July 28,� he said. “And if July 28 comes around and the Supreme Court blocks it, then time to party in the streets.�

Classifieds

$760/ MO HOUSE For Rent. Brick ranch, 2BR 2BA. Large yard, near campus. Pets ok. Available now or Fall. Call John 404-3681741. john.chandler@legplatt.com

1 APT FOR rent near Milledge Ave, on bus line. UTILITIES INCLUDED. Remodeled with new appliances. W/D on premise. $495-$525/mo. 706-4240770. 1BR APT WITH carport. Partially furnished. Includes some utilities. Near campus. $410/mo. Call John 404-368-1741 or john.chandler@lakeplatt.com. 1BR APTS W/ 1 MONTH FREE & NO PET FEE! Close to Campus & Downtown from $380-$425 NO SD w/ acceptable credit. That’s only $350-$390 w/ special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com. 706549-2500 2BR 1BA HOUSE in Madison, GA. All appliances included. Detached studio with cable, phone, heat and air. Professionally landscaped yard and fenced in back yard. $750/mo. Pets welcome with a $350 pet deposit. Please call 678-898-9182. 2BR 2BA CONDO for rent. $100 bonus! Off S. Lumpkin, 1 mile from campus. Carpet and tile one year old, new paint, fireplace, storage area, W/D. Pets welcome. $725/mo. Owner/agent Michele 404-281-6273 sc10211975@gmail.com 2BR 2BA DUPLEX $650. w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $600 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, DW, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500 4BR 3BA TOWNHOUSE $850/mo. HUGE floorplan! W/D, alarm system, pets welcome. Eastside, Deer Park. www.hancockpropertiesinc.com 706-552-3500.

2BR APTS $550- $650 w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ good credit! Blocks to campus & downtown. W/D included. Only $505-$596 w/ current special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706549-2500

3BR 2BA APTS $600$650 W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ good credit! Blocks to campus & downtown. W/D included. Only $550-$596 w/ current special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500 3BR 2BA DUPLEX $750 W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $700 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, dw, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $450 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com APPLEBY MEWS 252 Special @ $650/mo. 2BR 2BA. Lg LR/DR & bdrms patio, parking, pool, close to campus. 706-546-0600. CONDO FOR RENT 2BR 2BA on the river. Available now. $700/mo. Call Bob 706-248-1380

SMALL COTTAGE IN wooded area 4 miles from campus. 2BR 2BA, FP, CHAC, large kitchen, back deck and side deck, appliances included. No pets. $600/mo. Contact Fran 404-683-9470.

JULY SPECIAL REDUCED RENTS

S. MILLEDGE HUNTER’S RUN 2BR/2BA WAS $720 NOW $700 3BR/2BA WAS $900 NOW $750 4BR/4BA WAS $1280 NOW $1100

FIRST MONTHS RENT INCLUDES DEPOSIT!

SPECIAL! ONE MO. free 1BR 1BA, Cobb Hill Apts. Lg rooms/walk in closet. Walk to everything. $500/mo. 706-546-0600.

W/D, ALARM SYSTEM, HUGE YARDS! 706-552-3500 hancockpropertiesinc.com PRE-LEASING FOR Fall, from $725-$850/mo. 2BR 2.5BA townhouse style condos. 1/2 off 1st month with signed lease. Located off Old Epps Bridge. Many newly renovated with hardwood floors, new carpets, stainless steel appliances, & granite floors in kitchen/baths. Large green spaces. 706-2029905 or athensarearentals@gmail.com

WOODLANDS TOWNHOUSE FOR rent. 3BR 3BA. $1200/mo. Please call 770-366-9067 or email manreet_singh@yahoo.com

SUBLEASE AT EXCHANGE apt complex. Rent varies depending on apt size. Incentive for leasetaker. Please contact vallison@uga.edu or call 678-431-9789.

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FOR RENT: 4BR 2BA brick home. New paint & carpet. Carport. FP. Priv. Surrounded by trees. Winterville area. $995/mo 706-338-3722

LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION! FTX APARTMENTS, 2BR 1.5BA, $680/mo. 1 block to campus and UGA bus line, pets ok, ready Aug 2010, only one left. Call Stacy at 706-296-1863

LIFE SKILLS COORDINATOR wanted to work part-time with hearing impaired, intellectually impaired adult, very, very pleasing personality. 9 to 12 hours weekly over 3-4 days. $10/hr starting in Aug. Willing to get CPR & First Aid Certification; also to complete background check form. Responsible for attending volunteer job with her 1 morning per week, practice self-care and exercise activities, errands, community events & recreation. Prefer Social Work or Special Education major. Will need transportation or use The Lift services. Send letter of interest/resume to pamelarider26@gmail.com

Arrested? Bond, James Bond, Inc.

FEW HOMES STILL remaining for Fall! 3 and 4 bedroom brick homes. Close to campus, pet friendly. Starting at $275/BR. Dekle Realty 706-548-0580. www.deklerealty.com

GREAT EASTSIDE LOCATION! Charming 3BR 2.5BA split level home. Available Aug 1st! HW flrs, alarm, fireplace, office, den, deck. $1275/mo. + deposit. Call 770-596-6234

DENTAL OFFICE, MON Fri year round. PT. Min. GPA 3.5, $10/hr. Pre-Dental student preferred. Fax resume to 706-546-1715.

PROOF OF THE Pudding catering, is now serving the SkySuites, Champions Club and SkyClub at Sanford Stadium. We are currently recruiting experienced, energetic, hospitality associates who thrive within a team environment and can commit to ALL six home football games. If you fit this description, are looking for an exciting seasonal part time job, this is it. Positions include: Captains, Suite Attendants, Runners, Stewards, Sous Chefs, Cooks, Warehouse/Receiving Supervisor. Please contact Alaina Williams Director of Operations at hire@proofpudding.com

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The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

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SPORTS

8 | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | The Red & Black

Old Bulldog teaches new tricks By RYAN BLACK THE RED & BLACK Former University baseball player Jasha Balcom may not be in professional baseball anymore, but it is possible in the near future you may see a player he groomed playing in the MLB. Balcom founded HittersBox Baseball Inc. a little over a year ago. “I just decided to start my own baseball training company because I got tired of working my 9-to-5 job and I just wasn’t happy,� Balcom said. “When I founded the company, I was still contracting lessons at other facilities, and so I decided I needed to start my own place. I

came over here to Competitive Edge Sports [facility], because this is where I used to train when I played for the Cubs, partnered with them to get space ... and here we are.� Growing up in Dublin, Balcom said baseball had “always been a passion� for him, and though he loved his hometown, he saw that to reach his goal of becoming a MLB player, he would have to widen his perspective. “I wanted to be a major league baseball player, and I wanted to do it so bad that I worked hard every day to get out of Dublin,� Balcom said. “I always wanted to go to college and then become a professional. I grew up

wanting to go to Georgia, and assistant coach [David] Perno was the first coach to ever recruit me.� Balcom eventually made it to the University, but not before a two-year layover at the College of Charleston, where he was named a Freshman All-America in 2001. He transferred to Georgia in 2002 after completing his sophomore year. “Jasha had great talent and gave us a good lefthanded bat with some sneaky pop for [the] long ball,� Perno, now the head coach, said. “He was very athletic and could play all three outfield spots. He always was in a good mood with a

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smile on his face. He was a great teammate and a wonderful kid to coach.� Balcom remembered one moment in his Georgia career above all else — getting to play in the first game Georgia and Georgia Tech contested at Turner Field in 2003. The game was a 10-3 Georgia victory, with Balcom playing a key role. He went 2-for-4 with two doubles, two runs scored and three runs batted in. Balcom came to the plate with a tie game and bases loaded — every childhood player’s dream. “It was 3-3, I came up, and it was a 3-1 count,� he said. “The crowd was on their feet, and I cleared the bases with a double, and you could hear all the Dogs ‘barking’ in the stadium. It was just an incredible moment. I got interviewed on national television after the game, so that was probably the coolest experience I ever had.� After his time at Georgia ended, Balcom was picked by the Chicago Cubs in the 33rd round (973rd overall pick) of the 2003 MLB Draft. Balcom played for the Cubs’ Arizona League rookie affiliate in 2003, and another Cubs affiliate, the

Photo courtesy Quinton Davis

S University alum Jasha Balcom works on teaching proper hitting technique with a young player. Boise Hawks, in 2004. In his final season with the Cubs organization, he was assigned to the Peoria Chiefs in 2005 before deciding to retire. Though he never made it to the major leagues, Balcom said he enjoyed his time in the lower levels of professional baseball. “It wasn’t easy being away from home, and all the long bus rides you had,� he said. “But you look back on it, and you’re young, and you’re getting to do something you love. I mean, I would have played for free just to get the opportunity to play every day.� He briefly unretired in 2007 to play one season with the independent Georgia Peanuts, but after

no MLB teams showed interest, he retired from baseball for good. Balcom still wanted a way to stay around the sport, so he started teaching lessons with 10th Inning Baseball Academy, Chipper Jones’ baseball and softball training facility in Suwanee, for two years before he started HittersBox. Now that he’s become a baseball instructor, Balcom couldn’t be happier. “I wanted to be able to do baseball and become a business owner,� he said. “I wanted to be a business owner in the community ... [and] being able to give back to the community and working with kids. That’s the thing I enjoy waking up every day doing.�

U.S. proves worth in World Cup

A

nd just like that, it was over. No more crowded pubs. No more vuvuzelas buzzing away in the audience. No more goal celebrations via Facebook status update. No more World Cup soccer for another four years. At least for the United States. Ghana beat the U.S. Men’s National Soccer Team 2-1 in extra time in the Round of 16 on June 26, ending their run in the 2010 World Cup. It marked the second straight time that Ghana eliminated the United

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MITCH BLOMERT States from the world’s most prominent sporting event, after sending the Americans packing in 2006. Eerily, that match also ended 2-1. It was like dÊjà vu. Same teams. Same score. Same country going home empty-handed and disappointed. With such a similar ending, American soccer fans should be feeling like they did in 2006, right?

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Not quite. Although U.S. Soccer Federation president Sunil Gulati said the Americans “did not meet his expectations� at this year’s World Cup, there’s still good reason for fans to celebrate the team’s performance. The United States was a force against its Group C opponents — England, Slovenia and Algeria. It not only won its group for the first time since 1930, but its four goals were the most in Group C. Now, compare that to the team’s performance in 2006. Playing in Group E with eventual champion Italy, Czech Republic and far-too-familiar opponent Ghana, the Americans finished dead-last in the group, surrendering six goals while only scoring two. What a difference four years can make. Whenever the Americans needed a goal, it came. They rallied from early deficits to tie England and Slovenia, then secured their trip to the Round of 16 by defeating Algeria, with Landon Donovan scoring the game-winner with three minutes left to play. Donovan struck again versus Ghana, saving the team with a penalty kick to tie the match and force extra time. And while the extra time result against Ghana was an unfavorable one, the effect it had on the country is undeniable. The TV ratings say it all — 19.4 million people tuned in for the match on ABC, a World Cup record for American television. And, as more Americans are learning, the United States is held to a higher standard when it comes to international athletics. Consider the Olympics, winter or summer. If the United States isn’t near the top of the medal table time and again, it’s considered an underachievement by Americans themselves and by other countries. So, when the World Cup comes around, the spotlight inevitably falls on the U.S. Men’s National Team. Are the Americans as much of a force in soccer as they are in other worldwide sports, such as swimming, basketball or track and field? Or, are they still struggling to field a worldclass soccer team? And if they aren’t world-class, is it right to criticize them for not being as influential in soccer as their fellow countrymen are in their respective sports? Unfortunately, those questions can’t be answered for another four years. Until then, let’s celebrate what the U.S. Men’s National Team has accomplished in the four years since the last World Cup, and anticipate an even better outcome in 2014. It’s time to tuck away the red, white and blue vuvuzelas for now. But keep them around — in four years, they will be buzzing again.


July 1, 2010 Issue