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Red&Black The

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An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

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Vol. 118, No. 95 | Athens, Georgia

Gov. Deal announces plan for HOPE scholarship By KATHRYN INGALL THE RED & BLACK

HOPE CUTS

Check for updates online

Georgia students will find out today how much HOPE they’ll have for next year. Gov. Nathan Deal is scheduled to announce his plan for the HOPE scholarship this morning. “We really want to see a prioritization of public research institutions in the state,” said Student Government Association President Josh Delaney. “Another thing I really hope is that if they cut anything, they’ll make equal cuts to pre-K, private school grants and technical colleges.”

Tim Connell, president of the Georgia Student Finance Commission, said more than 250,000 Georgia students received HOPE scholarships or grants in the 2010 fiscal year. The Atlanta JournalConstitution reported Thursday the unannounced plan would separate HOPE from rising tuition and decrease scholarship payments to 90 percent. Delaney said an additional

source of funding could be bringing in revenue from the proposed Sunday alcohol sales legislation. Delaney and student government representatives from other Georgia universities have contacted lawmakers with suggestions on behalf of students. “Right now, we’re just doing our best to make sure leaders in the House and Senate and in higher education understand what’s most important to students,” Delaney said. “Until something is voted on, we’ll still be as active as possible.” Allie McCullen, a senior and member of the University’s chap-

ter of Students for Higher Public Education, said she would be in favor of placing a $66,000 income cap on the HOPE scholarship. McCullen said she’s concerned about the long-term effects of cuts to higher education. “There seems to be a trend that Georgia governors keep cutting money from higher education,” McCullen said. “If that continues, we’re going to continue to see a rise in tuition and fees. When we don’t apply the HOPE scholarship to tuition, we’re automatically excluding students who need tuition subsidized.”

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Engineering program will grow by fall 2012

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Tennessee 77, Georgia 44

Lady Dogs lose big on road

By DALLAS DUNCAN THE RED & BLACK

Brandon Byers, a junior at Greenbrier High School in Evans, said his top The foundation for a schools are Georgia Tech school of engineering has or Auburn, both of which been at the University for have engineering programs decades. It’s time to get that meet his career goals. the ball rolling. “I think these are very “We are hiring faculty at popular engineering this time,” University degrees that I know of,” he President Michael said in an interview Adams said at the in January. “I would University Cabinet consider [attending meeting Thursday. the University], but Three new engiI would probably neering majors — wonder about scholcivil, electrical and arship opportunimechanical — ties or if there’d be approved by the qualified teachers.” Board of Regents in Melissa Verrill, a October, will supplesenior environmenment the existing SHAW tal engineering majors at the major from University in fall 2012. Fayetteville, said she was “It didn’t surprise us at in favor of the new majors. all that UGA wanted to “It’s a very applicable expand its program,” Wade science,” she said. “As Shaw, Mercer University opposed to learning School of Engineering chemistry and going on to dean, said. “We sort of get your post-doc and this, anticipated this, so it’s a that and the other, you go ‘when’ Georgia was going out in the field and learn by to make that move.” application.” The new majors have The new majors have gotten varying degrees of feedback. See ENGINEER, Page 3

By RYAN BLACK THE RED & BLACK Monday night against No. 4 Tennessee was a rough one for the No. 22 Georgia women’s basketball team by any statistical measure. People could look at the Lady Bulldogs’ (20-7, 10-4) shooting percentage — 25.8 percent, a season-low. Or that Tennessee’s reserves outscored Georgia’s bench 26-12. But at the end of the day, only one stat really mattered — the final score, 77-44, doubling up Georgia’s previous worst loss of the season, a 69-53 defeat to Georgia Tech on Dec. 5. “ Yo u ’ v e got to give Tennessee a lot of credit,” Georgia head coach A n d y Landers said in his post-game LANDERS radio interv i e w . “They’re very big and very talented and their zone really spread us out.” The Lady Volunteers (26-2, 14-0) won the opening tip and scored on their first possession with a Meighan Simmons 3-pointer. And it only got worse for Georgia from there, as it had more turnovers (8) than field goals (7), leading to a 40-21 deficit at halftime. It didn’t get any better for the Lady Bulldogs in the second half, as the Lady Volunteers went on an 11-0 run out of the locker room to extend their advantage to 51-21 and effectively put the game away. “I felt if we could come out in the second half and get [Tennessee’s lead] down to 10, we could manage it,” Landers said. “But it didn’t work that way.” Jasmine James was the lone Lady Bulldog in double-figures with 11, while Meredith Mitchell was held scoreless on 0-of-9 shooting. Senior forward Porsha Phillips also struggled, scoring only six points while battling foul trouble.

PROPOSED CUTS

SARA CALDWELL | The Red & Black

S Tom Fell (above) dresses as the movie character Rocky at home basketball games but was ‘sold out’ Saturday.

FREEDOM FIGHTER Rocky routine halted against Vanderbilt The University student known for his “Rocky run” at Georgia men’s basketball games didn’t make his trademark climb up the Stegeman Coliseum steps against Vanderbilt last Wednesday — and a giant gecko may be the reason why. Tom Fell, a senior broadcast news major from Charleston, S.C., was unable to make his signature run reminiscent of the classic “Rocky” films when the University Athletic Association’s marketing and promotions department sold his usual timeout spot to auto insurance company Geico. “I understand that people want to sponsor things, but I just felt it was kind of a cheap shot,” Fell said. “Like, ‘Hey, we appreciate it, but Geico is a little more important. We don’t really care about the team or just having a good overall atmosphere.’” For the past four seasons, Fell has worn a pair of shorts, a headband and boxing gloves to the Bulldogs’ home games, running to the top of the coliseum during the second half as a way to energize the crowd. But Fell was given a change of plans before last See ROCKY, Page 6

partly cloudy. High 70| Low 40

LASER SHARP Monday’s crime notebook is hard to top, but turn to page 2 for your daily dose of crime.

Where’s Mikey? President Adams has a meeting with the Board of Visitors. Uhhh, OK. Welcome, visitors! We hope you pick up a Red & Black!

Index

News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 4

FILE | The Red & Black

S Quarterback Aaron Murray sprained his ankle in a pick-up soccer game Saturday on campus.

By MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK

Murray sprains ankle By ZACH DILLARD THE RED & BLACK Georgia starting quarterback Aaron Murray suffered an ankle injury over the weekend, but it is one the team does not expect to limit him during spring practice. Murray injured the ankle during a pickup soccer game Saturday on the University campus, according to a release by Georgia Sports Communications. Following a statement by University associate

SPORTS ANALYSIS

See ANKLE, Page 6

IT’S A BARBE WORLD No, that’s not a typo. Turn to page 5 for the story on this musician. Variety ..................... 5 Sports ...................... 6

POVERTY PROBLEM See what students think about Athens-Clarke County’s new rank. Page 2 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 5


NEWS

2 | Tuesday, February 22, 2011 | The Red & Black

Unused MAN ON THE STREET: gear Poorest County worries student

The University may be finishing out its reign as the Princeton Review’s No. 1 party school, but Athens-Clarke County has a distinctively ominous new ranking. Athens-Clarke County is now home to the highest poverty rate in the United States for a county with more than

100,000 people, according to recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The Red & Black wanted to know what students thought about the county’s new status.

SAVANNA SAV VANNA SWEENEY EENE EENEY

freshman public rela relations major from Atlanta “I think it’s tragic that the county is so poor because so many affluent people live here and could make such a difference.”

ALEC ASBRIDGE junior economics and management major from Hood River, Ore.

“I think it’s interesting with all the school activities. With the amount of money that should be brought into the community, you’d think it would be better than that.”

NGANDA GAT GA EI freshman genetics major from Nairobi, Kenya

“I think it’s awful. Students drive around in some of the most expensive cars in the world, and we live in one of the poorest counties in the nation. No one seems to care.”

— Charles Hicks

MONIQUE ROLLOCKS

junior marketing major from Alpharetta “Honestly it’s something that a lot of people fail to realize. We need to be more conscious of the people who live in Athens. It’s about giving back to our community through community service.”

BRAEDEN FIELDS

sophomore Spanish and journalism major from Suwanee “I hate the juxtaposition of the differ different classes of wealth. You don’t see it anywhere like you see it in Athens.”

GEOFF FF NOLAN NOLAN

sophomore interna international affairs and Spanish major from Covington “I think it’s really sad. UGA is the flagship school of the state. I think it’s ironic that a center of higher education is surrounded by a poorer area.”

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

BY

STEPHAN PASTIS

Access will come later By MARIANA HEREDIA THE RED & BLACK While students struggle to film UGA NewSource on tape, 10 high-definition cameras sit in the room next door — unused. Senior John Newsome, a production manager at UGA NewSource, said the unused cameras are part of the negotiations between the University and Georgia Public Broadcasting over University-owned WNEG, now known as WUGA-TV. Studio space and other computer programs are also part of the agreement. “We can’t use any of the equipment. It’s next door, and we feel like we can’t. Everything is being held until the agreement is done, which I understand,” he said. Newsome said what he doesn’t understand is the lack of communication between the upper management of WUGA-TV and the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication’s faculty and students. “You can’t even talk to professors. They don’t know what’s going on either,” he said. “As the shots are being called from the top, there’s no line of communication from them to us.” However, Jimmy Sanders, the station manager at WUGA-TV, said this is not the case. “We’re in communica-

ALLY WHITE | The Red & Black

S WNEG discontinued its news branch in January as part of the station’s switch to GPB. tion with the journalism school every day, and we have a plan with the Grady College that involves the use of cameras and the facilities of the TV station by Grady students,” Sanders said. The plan was for students to gain access to the station’s equipment once the license transfer was completed, Sanders said. He said he did not know when that would occur. “We don’t know when the transfer of the license will be completed. There is no specific date at this time,” he said. “The reason is that there’s a lot to be done in terms of creating a lot of elements for the new TV station.” At Thursday’s University Cabinet Meeting, Senior Vice President for External Affairs Tom Landrum said the University hopes the license will be officially transferred by May 1. Sanders said students

Glory Bound: A Voyage Through the Underground Railroad Reed Hall Glory Bound is a simulation of the Underground Railroad experience where participants are taken on a “tour” with stops like those slaves would experience on the Underground Railroad. There will be refreshments served at this event. This is a part of the 50th Anniversary of Desegregation Celebration.

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did have some access to the facility. “The students were in the facility today. They were doing a class in the TV station this morning,” he said. Senior Jason Hafford, also a production manager for NewSource, said he is more optimistic about the situation with WUGA-TV. “I feel like because everything is so new, they haven’t reached out to students to tell us what to expect,” he said. “I think they will, just not yet.” Hafford also said he expected Grady students to get more opportunities from the switch. “I hope it just gives us more opportunities to get students’ faces out there. We have this great space that we should really be able to utilize,” he said. “I hope it brings more opportunities for students. Especially for seniors about to graduate.”

ONLINE

Documents

CRIME NOTEBOOK Laser light shines through an officer’s vehicle A green laser light went through the windows of an officer’s patrol vehicle Friday night, according to a University Police report. An officer was driving into the West Campus Parking Deck when he “noticed what appeared to be a green laser light striking the back window of my patrol vehicle and shining through the front windshield,” according to the report. The light appeared to have come from the upper levels of Oglethorpe House. A follow-up investigation was done after the incident, but no one was identified, said University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson. He said there have been more reports of laser lights directed toward vehicles lately with two to three reports in the past few weeks. Williamson said laser lights can blind a driver, and if someone is caught using a laser light in an improper way that could harm others, they can be charged criminally. He said misusing laser lights is a “big deal.” “Someone messes with someone driving a car. Those things can blind,” he said. — Compiled by Adina Solomon

CORRECTIONS The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Mimi Ensley (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Rachel G. Bowers (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com


NEWS

The Red & Black | Tuesday, February 22, 2011 | 3

ENGINEER: New majors will have size limits Tuesday ¢From Page 1

UNDERGRAD DEGREE PROGRAM ENROLLMENT

raised questions about the University’s focus on engineering, including whether or not a school of engineering could be in the works. “I don’t remember where I read it, but somewhere I heard that Yale didn’t become a top-three school until it added a school of engineering,� Verrill said. “So I could see UGA getting one as a sort of morale booster.�

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering UĂŠÂŁĂ“Â™ĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒ Bachelor of Science in Biological Engineering UĂŠnĂŽĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒ

A school of engineering? “There is no proposal for a school of engineering. This is not what the Board of Regents approved,� said Dale Threadgill, head of the biological and agricultural engineering department. However, he said there could be an opportunity for one in the future. “I think if we looked long-term, something along the lines of a school of engineering would develop,� Threadgill said. “You’d want to look at the growth and contemplate if that’s what will be appropriate.� According to the personnel and budget requirements for the new majors, “a total of 500 students are projected to be enrolled in these three degree programs in the fall semester of 2015.� The University expects to have 80 students enrolled as civil engineering majors in fall 2012, with a total of 190 by fall 2015. Both electrical and mechanical engineering are estimated to begin with 85 students in fall 2013, leading to 155 in each program by fall 2015. “It’ll be a slow growth model with the first class of civil engineering coming in. So yes, there will be limits placed on majors,� University Provost Jere Morehead said at the University Cabinet meeting. The limits are necessary to keep a standard student-to-teacher ratio. Shaw said Mercer has 450 undergraduate students, but added that the student-to-teacher ratio differs by age group. “Our freshmen ratio is 20-1. Then when they get into sophomore and junior years, it’s 15-1, then seniors it’s even smaller,� he said. “Overall, it’s 18-1.� There are already more than 300 students enrolled in the University’s engineering majors at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Threadgill said there is a 17-1 student-to-teacher ratio at the University now, but that may change because of the new majors. “It depends on how many students come,� he said. “There’s no number I can give you, it just develops as you grow.� Shaw said in order to hire engineering professors a university must pay well and pay competitively. “You’re looking at about $150,000 to keep the full professor,� he said. “A brand-new Ph.D. is $75,000 plus 40 percent.� The personnel and budget requirements list four tenure-track professors and two instructors as “cumulative personnel� beginning in fiscal year 12, with 16.5 tenure track, 6 instructors, 6 staff members and 7.5 graduate assistants by FY16. The “recurring funds,� which are salaries, benefits and operating expenses needed in FY12 are $695,000, and go up to $3,180,000 by FY16. Onetime funds for equipment, renovations and faculty startup go from nothing in FY12 to $2,850,000 by FY16. Faculty, however, are just one aspect to having a successful engineering school, Shaw said. A school of engineering requires “one of the most

Biochemical Engineering UĂŠĂŽÂŁĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠ

ÂœÂ“ÂŤĂ•ĂŒiÀÊ-ĂžĂƒĂŒiÂ“ĂƒĂŠ Engineering UĂŠĂŽĂŽĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒ Environmental Engineering UĂŠnnĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠ

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

S The Driftmier Engineering Center houses the Institute of the Faculty of Engineering.

ONLINE

full version of this story expensive buildings to build,� laboratory equipment and continually updated technology. On the plus side, the University may already be well-equipped to handle a school of engineering — meaning much of the cost to initiate an undertaking is relatively nothing. Institute of the Faculty of Engineering There are two entities for engineering students at the University — the Institute of the Faculty of Engineering, which is home to biochemical, environmental and computer systems engineering for undergraduates, and the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, for undergraduate agricultural and biological engineering. Both the institute and the department in CAES are led by Threadgill. And what’s the difference between the two? The institute is “a university-wide academic unit� with more than 100 faculty members that is “organized to capture the convergence of scientific and engineering disciplines,� according to its website. What makes the department and the institute dif different is where the funding comes from, Threadgill said. He said for the department, he reports to CAES Dean Scott Angle, but for the institute, to the Provost. Civil, electrical and mechanical engineering will fall under the jurisdiction of the institute. Though Threadgill said an institute can offer degrees, Shaw said he was not sure there was a precedent for this to be the basis of an engineering school. “I don’t know that that’s common,� he said. “I don’t think I’ve seen it done that way. I wouldn’t think you would want that for a longterm school, but maybe to grow a program.� Being in an institute versus being in a college department can be confusing, but Verrill said she no longer thinks about it. “I didn’t know I was in the Faculty of Engineering until I was told. There was no difference in my curriculum or in the way I was treated until someone put it point blank for me,� she said. “It’s only this title. I feel like I’m part of the engineering program at UGA.� A different approach Civil,

electrical

and

mechanical engineering will follow the curricula theme already set in the institute, as demonstrated by the variety of faculty backgrounds. “[The new majors] will be very multidisciplinary,� Threadgill said. “The degrees will be intended to expose students to multidisciplinary learning.� The multidisciplinary approach to teaching engineering sets the University apart from schools such as Georgia Tech and the University of Maryland, which have top-rated engineering programs. “There’s certain classes that every engineer has to take in order to be prepared for the FE, which is the exam you have to take to become a practicing e n g i n e e r- i n - t r a i n i n g, � Verrill said. “Aside from those classes, everyone takes classes that emphasize in your major.� Because of this, the University’s core curricula for its existing majors are similar to those at Georgia Tech and Maryland. Threadgill said having these curricula helped in having the three new majors approved. “One of the things that softened our numbers, we already have many of the core courses for engineering majors,� he said. University engineering students must take varying levels of calculus, lab sciences as well as general engineering classes such as statics, electrical circuits and fluid mechanics. Where the curricula dif differ is the emphasis. Environmental engineering majors such as Verrill take courses covering topics as diverse as sustainability, ecology, natural resources and toxicology. Agricultural engineers emphasizing in electrical and electronic systems instead take linear systems, electronics and biomedical imaging. Can the University house the multidisciplinary approach for eight engineering majors? Threadgill said yes. “There’s ample instruction facilities. There are lots of classrooms around campus,� he said. Students already involved in engineering have a home, negating another portion of the money typically required to start an engineering school — the Driftmier Engineering Center. In addition to Driftmier, there are laboratories and facilities owned by the University all over the state. What it means for Georgia “I think that in the short run, it would hurt us,� Shaw said. “But for our

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students, any from Georgia having another opportunity would be good, and in the long-term there’s more opportunities for engineering in the state, which is also good.� Byers shared similar sentiments. “I think that it will probably be easier to get into than Georgia Tech, but will take away students from Georgia Tech,� he said. Officials from Georgia Tech would not comment on the new majors or the possibility of the University adding a school of engineering to its repertoire. Threadgill said the new majors will not require increased tuition, though Verrill said she would be willing to pay more to be an engineering major if it meant increased access to facilities and programs. Though University officials seemed adamant that there is no proposal in the works for a school of engineering, the issue isn’t out of the woodwork yet. “We’re sort of watching this from a distance,� Shaw said. “I don’t know that anybody’s quite sure what UGA has in mind.�

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4 | Tuesday, February 22, 2011 | The Red & Black

Mimi Ensley | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Rachel G. Bowers | Managing Editor me@randb.com Courtney Holbrook | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Our Take

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

Selling students The Athletic Association asked a fan to pass out gift cards at an athletic event

Student fans are just the best. They paint themselves head to toe for their teams. They spell out inappropriate phrases on their chests (‘Circumcise ’em’ at the 2009 football game against South Carolina). They scream at the top of their lungs to distract the opposing team, berate referees after they make “bad calls,” and make up an electric part of crowds at football and basketball games. But they shouldn’t be sold out by the Athletic Association so it can rake in a few extra dollars. However, that is exactly what is being done to the beloved Rocky character — Tom Fell — who has been dressing up in a boxing outfit and making appearances at Georgia basketball games for four years. The Athletic Association’s Marketing and Promotion department told the senior he would have to run through the student section, passing out Geico gift cards, and box the Geico mascot if he wanted to do his “Rocky run.” This all came after Geico sponsored the same timeout Fell had been doing his “Rocky runs” in for the last four seasons. Awesome. Fell was given an ultimatum and when he said no, his fan-favorite segment was taken away so a Geico gecko can pester everyone in the stands. Great strategy to promote and market your teams and get butts in seats — annoy fans. What do you do with an insurance gift card anyhow? Are you gonna make Peanut Butter boy — Drake Scott — smear only Skippy’s crunchy peanut butter on himself? Or make fans exclusively use Crayola face paint? If someone walks in wearing Adidas sneakers, are you gonna kick them out? Let student fans be student fans. Don’t make them sell out for your benefit. — Rachel G. Bowers for the editorial board

Mailbox

E-mail and letters from our readers

Get involved in elections On behalf of the Student Government Association of the University, I would like to personally invite you to participate in this year’s SGA elections process. As many now know, things are going to be a bit different this year with regard to the elections. One executive ticket has been formed to campaign for the offices of President, Vice President, and Treasurer, and this ticket has joined with a group of senate candidates to form a party called “The Link.” Even though the executive ticket is running unopposed, there are a number of independent candidates running for senate seats, and, therefore, your vote is still vital in determining the next senators for the 2011-2012 administration. My primary concern is that students will use this rare occurrence as an excuse to challenge the legitimacy of SGA and the way its elections are conducted. As Chairman of the Elections Committee, I can assure you that such assertions are unfounded. Several weeks ago, all students were sent an e-mail by the Archnews listserv detailing the dates, times and locations of two informational elections meetings and two mandatory candidate seminars that I, myself, hosted. Students were contacted through the Student Government’s Association Facebook events, Twitter accounts and various e-mail contact lists. Finally, the organization

conducted events such as spending a day within Tate Plaza attempting to engage student interest and provide more information. With campaigning set to begin in less than two weeks, I wanted to provide further details on how you can get involved in the process. The executive ticket candidates will host a Town Hall meeting on Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the Memorial Hall Ballroom. This is where they will officially state their platform and take questions from anyone in attendance. I highly encourage you to attend this Town Hall meeting. I realize that there are always concerns regarding the work of SGA, but each student has the opportunity to determine which individuals will represent their concerns to the leaders and administration of both our University and this state. The sole purpose of the organization is to advocate for our rights as students and ensure that our voices are heard. Therefore, instead of complaining to your friends and classmates about a proposed smoking ban on campus, changes to the HOPE Scholarship, etc., please come tell us how you feel at the Town Hall meeting on Wednesday. I assure you it will be much more productive for both sides. CLAY KNOWLES Attorney general Elections Committee Chairman Student Government Association

Health care bill: a problem of politics Left: universal care

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onservatives have trumpeted that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has been ruled unconstitutional. The rulings argued that by mandating all Americans purchase health insurance, Congress exceeded its power under the Commerce Clause of the Constitution. The federal government cannot force individuals to purchase a “commodity in the private market.” Of course, what conservatives fail to mention is that two federal judges have also upheld the constitutionality of the law. Personally, I’m less interested in the interpretation of the Commerce Clause than I am in the rulings’ language. Describing health care as a “commodity” makes no sense. And redefining it as a “privilege,” as Jeremy Dailey has, makes less than no sense. Most Americans would feel uncomfortable leaving their health to the whims of supply and demand. Unlike other consumer products, such as cars or cell phones, health care is a deeply moral issue. If you suffer from a major illness or injury, you might die. If you’re not treated, your physical freedom will be restricted — you can’t work or live a happy life. Your life and liberty depend on your health. That is why health care is not a commodity to be enjoyed by the privileged few — it is a basic human right. Despite conservative outrage, health care’s status as a privileged commodity remains intact under President Barack Obama’s reform law. Real reform requires more than mandating coverage from private insurance companies. Real reform will happen when we refuse to allow corporations to profit from sickness and death. A single-payer health system would ensure universal coverage by abolishing the for-profit system once and for all. Single-payer works by expanding Medicare to cover the entire population, not just senior citizens. Private insurance companies would be eliminated. All medical expenses would be paid for by the government. Single-payer works better than private

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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JONATHAN RICH insurance because health care is best administered under a democratic government. Private insurance companies are unsuited to run our health care system. A corporation’s only legal obligation is to secure a profit for its shareholders. Corporations do not exist to protect our life and liberty — only to pursue their own self-interest. But government answers to a higher calling than the profit motive. Our government was established “of, by, and for the people” and exists to “promote the general welfare.” The health care debate comes down to a simple question: do you want your health treated as a commodity by a corporation, or do you want it respected as a right by democratic government? I know Dailey doesn’t care about facts and statistics, but a glance at the evidence indicates single-payer works and our for profit system doesn’t. Per capita, the United States spends more on health care than any other nation in the world. And yet we rank 36th in life expectancy, and 33rd for infant mortality. We still have more than 46 million people without access to health insurance, according to the United Nations. In a study of 19 developed nations, America had the highest rate of deaths that should not have occurred with the presence of effective health care, according to the Health Affairs Journal. In America, helping sick people is not the bottom line — profit is. Maybe Dailey should have spent more time looking at the evidence. If he had, he would have realized America has only one real choice — a single-payer system of universal health care. Our lives are not for sale. Despite what Dailey and the conservatives assert, our health is not a commodity or a privilege. It is our fundamental right as human beings. — Jonathan Rich is a sophomore from Alpharetta majoring in sociology

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hecks and balances are a pain, aren’t they? You really have to feel bad for President Barack Obama. He spent over a year of his presidency trying to cram an unwanted health care bill down Americans’ throats. And less than a year later, one man has potentially torn it to shreds. U.S. District Court Judge Robert Vinson ruled the individual mandate in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional. He concluded “the entire Act must be declared void.” Well praise the Lord and pass the butter! There is still some common sense in American government. Obamacare was passed using the Commerce Clause within Article I, Section VIII of the Constitution. For those who know little about Constitutional law, this is basically every liberal’s go-to guy for anything and everything that questionably oversteps their power. Jonathan Rich will try to tell you otherwise, but it is only because his brain is being crushed by the weight of those magnificent dreadlocks. The clause states Congress shall have the power “to regulate Commerce with foreign nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes.” The original intent of the Commerce Clause was to prevent states from imposing tariffs and taxes on one another, thereby becoming isolationists. But 223 years and a few Supreme Court decisions later, liberal activists have determined the Commerce Clause can now be used to regulate everything under the sun. The government’s ability to oversee health care was born. Those on both sides like to argue “facts” and “statistics” concerning whether or not the health care law will be beneficial to the American people. Honestly, I don’t care. I don’t believe anyone — no matter their alma mater or IQ — has a clue about the potential future effect. Do you think President Franklin D. Roosevelt would have pushed for Social Security if he knew what a disaster it would become? Regardless of the data, Congress does not have the power to mandate that individuals must purchase health care or else pay a penalty. The argument should have

JEREMY DAILEY stopped there. But Obama and the Democrats chose to ignore our founding document in order to pursue their own agenda. Rich argues for a single-payer health system that would expand Medicare to everyone and says “private insurance companies would be eliminated…” I mean, are we reading a column in The Red & Black or an excerpt from “The Communist Manifesto”? Yes, I agree. Let’s just go ahead and eliminate all the evil capitalist competition in America so we can thrive like the Soviet Union. Oh wait. Like Obama, Rich is brushing the Constitution aside. Congress has no authority to abolish private insurance companies, and the idea is preposterous. He also argues “health care is best administered under a democratic government.” That makes me giggle. How can anyone make such an erratic statement when Medicare, aside from Social Security, is the most inefficient government-run program in the country? Not to mention, Medicare is already heading down the road to bankruptcy. Given the opportunity, I’m sure all Americans would be willing to trade their private insurance companies for such a successful bureaucracy. Despite what Rich and the like-minded liberals may tell you, it all comes down to the fact that health care is not a right. It is a privilege. And it should be a privilege we attempt to share with as many American citizens as possible. But Rich’s single-payer idea is floating somewhere out there in fantasy land. But unless newly appointed Justice Elena Kagan recuses herself, the Supreme Court will most likely uphold the law and your beloved individual mandate will be saved. Until then, Obamacare will continue to hang in the balance. Personally, I’d rather watch it die than see them cut the rope. — Jeremy Dailey is a senior from Conyers majoring in political science

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The Red & Black | Tuesday, February 22, 2011 | 5

Musician ‘fortunate’ to be a part of Athens culture Music business director reflects By ADAM CARLSON THE RED & BLACK You cannot have just one conversation with David Barbe. Begin talking about his early days as a journalism student, and the topic quickly turns to his time as a college musician and frontman for band Mercyland. Spend a few minutes discussing the rise, success and dissolution of Mercyland and, inevitably, the name John Keane comes up. And a detour into Barbe’s history with Keane leads to many places at once: the story of his start and continuing work as a prominent local producer, which led to his work with Nuçi Phillips; which led to a role in the founding of local musicians’ center Nuçi’s Space. Years later, all of that led to his position leading the University’s music business program; and on and on. Around spins the circle that is Barbe’s career, and at the center: Athens. “He’s so entrenched with the Athens music community,” said Linda Phillips, the founder of Nuçi’s Space, with whom Barbe has worked closely over the years. Thirty years ago, however, just as the B-52s and R.E.M. were blowing up, he didn’t come for the music. He came because his mother had. And he came for Grady. “Between the family connection and living in Atlanta and wanting to go to the J-school, it was a perfect fit,” Barbe said. And then there was a moment — a first. Barbe’s first show downtown was a Little Tigers performance. And it brought a revelation of sorts. “I was instantly blown away,” he said. An amateur himself, Barbe soon contemplated turning professional, at least part time, with

Courtesy Sugar

S A force in the Athens music scene, David Barbe (far right, alongside the members of Sugar) is the director of the music business program and runs Chase Park Transduction. the founding of Mercyland. It all started with the gift of a drum set when he was 4 and continued through his learning the guitar via ukulele at age 12. “And I just gradually went through it,” Barbe said, following in the footsteps of his own musician father. From there, the path of his career rapidly accelerated, forking repeatedly. Mercyland got big enough for Barbe to set aside his recentlyearned telecommunications degree. “It was the fall of ’85 and I just had a few quarters to go and I started playing in Mercyland and that was the first time I realized that I could do something real with this,” he said. And then the band broke up. Barbe then performed alongside Bob Mould (Hüsker Dü) and Malcolm Travis (Human Sexual Response) in the rock band Sugar, which performed its first show on Feb. 20, 1992 at the

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

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be key to the center’s mission of support and outreach. And when the warehouse that would house the center was being renovated, it was Barbe who advised Phillips on the best way to preserve and enhance the acoustics. Ask him about the specific affect Nuçi’s Space has had and there’s no pause at all. “It’s brought the music community together in a way that no other place ever has,” Barbe said. “And it has truly saved lives.” His part at Nuçi’s Space has formed a template for the years that followed, with his connection- and experience-rich past informing his work now. “I’ve always been enamored with the Athens music community,” Barbe said. Over the years, his production work has ranged widely including with the Drive-By Truckers at his studio, Chase Park Transduction. Throughout, Barbe has maintained only a few guidelines.

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AMAZING RENOVATED 5BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. from campus. 2 LRs, 2 kitchens, big BRs, huge deck, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $2000/mo. 706-369-2908. CAROUSEL VILLAGE APARTMENTS. Quiet, affordable one bedrooms. UGA Bus Line. Furnished/ unfurnished. Special Prelease for Fall before 4/31/11. 1907 S Milledge Ave A-9. 706-548-1132. www.carouselvillage.net

CLOSE TO CAMPUS and downtown. 4BR 3BA house. W/D, DW, CHAC. Deck off back. $850/mo. 706-549-2500. CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN 4BR 3.5BA houses. Kitchen and laundry room appliances, spacious bedrooms, wood floors and carpeted bedrooms, pets welcome. $1200-1700/mo. Call 706-540-1257. COTTAGE HOUSING AVAILABLE. 2-5 bedrooms, private baths. Blackmon Shoals Development. Call 866-213-0577. leasing@greenleafmgmt.com DUPLEX, 2BR 1BA ALL NEW ENERGY EFFICIENT. Oconee country schools. $550/mo. plus deposit. Contact J Paul 706-207-7154 or 706-2555511. FALL PRELEASES. BEST rentals in Athens! 1-5BR houses, apts, condos, In the heart of UGA/Dwntn/5pts. Avail Aug! Call 706-369-2908 for more info.

5BR 3BA HOUSE. 1/2 mi. from campus, zoned for students. 2 LRs, 2 decks, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $2000/mo. Call Matt 404-808-3190 ADORABLE 3BR 2BA, close to campus. New master BA w/ double sink. HW flrs, fenced back yd. W/D, DW, CHAC. Avail 8/1. $1250/mo. 706-369-2908.

40 Watt. After moderate success and a hit on the UK Singles Chart, Barbe left the band in 1996 to give more attention to his solo career. Then, on Thanksgiving Day in 1996, his friend and fellow musician Nuçi Phillips killed himself. Ask Barbe about the specific affect the death had on him and he pauses for a moment, his branching history stopped. “It made me rethink everything in my life,” he said. And then Phillips’ mother, Linda, called. “When I came up with the idea to do this space, David was really the only person I knew in Athens and he was perfect for what I was looking for,” Phillips said. Barbe’s role as the pragmatist was clear from the start. He knew people. He had connections and he understood music. He was able to put Phillips in contact with some of the mental health professionals that would

GREAT 4BR 4BA house. 1/2 mi from campus. Front porch, back deck, nice yd, DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets ok. Avail 8/1. Special! $1500/mo. 706-369-2908.

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LOVELY NEW HOUSE. 4BR 3BA. Half mile to campus. Big rooms, hardwood floors. DW, W/D, CHAC, pets okay. Avail. 8/1. $1750/mo. Call 706369-2908

SPECIALS on S. Milledge Ave! Pre-leasing for summer and fall Hunter’s Run 2br/2ba $720 3br/2ba $800 4br/4ba $1200 W/D, alarm system, pets welcome hancockpropertiesinc.com 706-552-3500

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MOBILE HOMES FOR sale new and used 8K to 29K. 2 miles from campus busline, pools, basketball, quiet. Resale SVCS on site. 770-502-4500. Highland Greens MHP. NEW COLLEGE COMMUNITY! Walking distance to Downtown! Eight 5BR 5BA and two 3BR 3BA! All houses have balconies, rear decks, HW, granite, and more. 706-340-1215 or www.athensrealestategroup.com

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CLASSIFIEDS DISCLAIMER The Red & Black does not verify, investigate, or endorse any classified ad. Readers are urged to use caution when responding to an ad.

WOODLANDS GATED COMMUNITY 3BR 3BA house. KIT, LR. All appliances. Large pool and community center. $1200/mo plus utilities. 770-862-4922.

NOW PRE-LEASING for Fall 2011. 4BR 2BA properties available very close to campus. Summer lease available. 706-296-9546. www.cityblock.biz

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NOW PRE-LEASING for Fall! Houses, condos & townhomes 1 to 5 bedrooms. Five Points, Downtown & Eastside. Great locations at unbeatable rates. Aaron 706-207-2957.

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PRELEASING NOW FOR Fall 2011! 1, 2, 3 & 4BR houses in downtown area! All appliances, lg BRs. 706-713-0626. www.newagepropertiesathens.com

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SPACIOUS HOME PERFECT for students. 5BR 3BA, large family room with eat-in kitchen. Approximately 5 minutes from campus. $1700/mo. 770-3145302.

The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

“I prefer to work with artists that are continuing to grow their creativity and expand their vision, and who can allow me to be involved in the creative process,” he said. “Above and beyond anything else, I have to feel an emotional connection to the music.” University student Cory Jasin worked with Barbe last fall when his producer Doug Boehm recommended Chase Park Transduction. During the five-day recording session, Barbe assisted as engineer, offering experience and knowledge as needed, Jasin said. Occasionally, he stepped from behind the mixing board and in front of the microphone. “He’s an awesome bassist,” Jasin said. After the announcement in August that he’d be heading up Terry’s music business program, Barbe has filled another niche in the community. “If that is the role I can fill in order to best serve the community, then I feel pretty lucky to be able to be somewhat of a conduit for the plethora of talented people that are here,” Barbe said. “This has been such a great place to call home for the last almost 30 years. I have been fortunate to be able to be so involved with so much.” His approach to teaching has evolved over the last seven months, but offering hands-on education has remained fundamental. It’s also one of the best parts of the program, at least according junior Stacia Andrews. “I learned a lot because different things went wrong,” she said of her time helping organize “Nuçi’s Space Jam” last fall. “The hardest thing to get in the music industry is experience,” Barbe said. Beyond his teaching, producing and community work, Barbe said there are many things he hasn’t done, and more still he’d like to do. Slowing down would be like dying. “In any creative pursuit,” Barbe said, “stasis is death.”

DENTAL OFFICE: PT M-F, year-round. Min GPA 3.5. $10/hr, sophomore or junior preferred. Fax resume to 706-546-1715. EARN UP TO $100! UGA researchers seeking participants for an fMRI study. Must be 18 or above with a BMI of 30 or higher. Please e-mail ugafmri@gmail.com or call 706-542-3827 EARN UP TO $100! UGA researchers seeking participants for an fMRI study. Must be 18 or above and induce vomiting, use laxatives, and binge eat at least four times a month. Please email ugafmri@gmail.com or call 706-542-3827 GWINNETT COUNTY PARKS & Recreation. Seeking Lifeguards, Asst. Pool Managers, & Pool Managers. Training Available. 770-237-5652. lifeguard@gwinnettcounty.com

PART TIME WORKER needed for small landscaping company. Must have truck. Starting pay $8/ hr please call 706-742-8081 PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! SAVE MONEY! Maine camp needs fun loving counselors to teach All land, adventure & water sports. Great summer! Call 888-844-8080, apply: www.campcedar.com STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM PAID Survey Takers Needed In Athens. 100% FREE To Join. Click On Surveys.

LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISTS AND NATIONAL SPEAKERS will host “Building an Effective Climate Change Coalition for Athens.” 7 p.m. Tuesday, February 22. UGA’s Ecology Auditorium. 706202-7802. richrusk@charter.net.

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6 | Tuesday, February 22, 2011 | The Red & Black

SPORTS

ROCKY: Student gets ‘sold out’ to Geico ¢From Page 1 Wednesday’s game, saying that promotions and marketing informed him before the game that he had been “sold out.” “I could’ve sworn I didn’t hear him correctly, so I said ‘Oh, the game’s a sellout’ kind of excited, like they were going to do something special with the run,” Fell said. “And he said, ‘Oh, no, not all. You’ve been sold out.’ He said, ‘We sold you out to Geico.’” Fell was asked to run through the student section, rather than his usual route at the opposite end of the court, handing out Geico gift cards on the way up, then boxing the Geico

mascot — a giant gecko — during the timeout. Fell rejected the promotion offer, and did not get to perform his usual run despite being told they would run it at a later time in the game. “I asked what timeout they were moving it to, and they said ‘We don’t know,’” Fell said. “But then the game ends, and I could see clearly where these people’s allegiances lie — with Geico, some massive nonlocal corporate car insurance company who is one of the most advertised companies out there.” Emily Deitz, director of promotions for the Athletic Association, said that Fell wasn’t guaranteed another

chance to run. “I didn’t tell him he would get one, I said we would try to work it back in if there was time,” Deitz said. “It’s not something we did with him every game, being ‘Rocky.’ It’s an opportunity where if the game presents it, we run it. If not, we don’t do it.” Deitz said the “Rocky run” only occurs when Georgia is playing a closely-matched contest, not when the Bulldogs are up by “15 or 20” points. “I was still pretty confident — especially as the game got closer and closer — that they would play it, or at least play something to get fans excited,” Fell said. “But that was a close

game up until the very end.” The partnership with Geico was a one-game deal, and Fell will be allowed to perform the “Rocky run” in future games if the situation calls for it, according to athletic director Greg McGarity. “It’s all straightened up now,” McGarity said. “There was some discussion on it, and I think there are some things that we think as a staff are sacred, and [Rocky] I think draws a lot of interest and excitement. It’s something we need to pretty much count for every game.” Fell said he will continue the routine as long as marketing allows.

FRANCES MICKLOW | The Red & Black

S Tom Fell, a senior at the University, performs his ‘Rocky run,’ which has become a signature of home basketball games the last four years.

ANKLE: QB back in time for spring ball ¢From Page 1 athletic director Claude Felton that Murray had suffered “some sort of leg, ankle, foot injury”, the rising redshirt sophomore was evaluated by team physicians. Murray underwent an MRI and had X-rays taken on his ankle Monday afternoon, with Georgia director of sports medicine Ron Courson confirming that it was a sprain. The severity of the sprain was not released by team officials, but Courson said Murray will perform rehabilitation exercises under the team’s supervision and is expected to participate in the Bulldogs’ spring practice. Georgia’s spring practice is scheduled to begin on March 10. Sophomore Hutson Mason and freshman Christian LeMay sit behind Murray on the depth chart.

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February 22, 2011  

February 22, 2011

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