Page 1

Red&Black The

One concert, four bands and a dedicated camp create a melody of confidence for young girls. Page 3.

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 117, No. 106 | Athens, Georgia

University on the lookout for online pirates By RACHEL BUNN The Red & Black

decided to end all new lawsuits against University students, yet student information and IP addresses are still collected by EITS. “Any time we’re aware of illegal use of University hardware, it is incumbent on us to act,” said Tom Jackson, vice president of public affairs. “We don’t want University facilities used to break

Although the Recording Industry Association of America is no longer keeping track of students violating copyright infringement laws, the University’s Enterprise Information Technology Systems still is. In August 2008, the RIAA

Tough opponents to challenge Georgia Swim & dive to compete

SWIMMING & DIVING SEC CHAMPIONSHIPS

By DAVID MITCHELL The Red & Black

When: Today-Sat. Where: Gabrielsen Natatorium in Ramsey Tickets: Prelims $5 for stu-

The Georgia swimming and diving teams will be in a familiar position when the 2010 Southeastern Conference Championships kick off today at the Gabrielsen Natatorium. Heading into the fourday event, the Lady Bulldogs are ranked No. 1 in the country and have not suffered a loss in conference competition. Although labeled as a potential favorite to take home the conference crown, the women will be competing against five other teams ranked in the nation’s top-25, and head coach Jack Bauerle is taking nothing for granted. “Last year our women’s team was ranked second in the nation and finished third at the conference championships,” Bauerle said. “This competition is a little bit different than the dual-meets so I’m not sure you can just look at it

dents, finals $10 for students

More Information: Prelims at

10 a.m. every day, and finals are at 6 p.m. every day

on paper and really be able to see how it will play out.” Associate head coach Harvey Humphries agreed with Bauerle, saying that being the favorite isn’t always the best place to be. “It’s a tough thing being the favorite,” Humphries said. “It just means that our swimmers have to stay extra focused.” Although the men have not been labeled as favorites for the event, they are coming off of their best stretch of the season, having won three straight against conference opponents, two of which were ranked inside the top-25.

the law.” The University does not monitor student’s Web use. However, when students use peer-to-peer software, every time new material appears in a shareable folder, an “advertisement” is sent to the software’s network. Copyright owners monitor these networks and advertisements, searching for copyright violations.

“The copyright owners will send a notice to the Internet Service Provider, which in your case is the University of Georgia, and state there has been a violation of the copyright act,” the Office of Judicial Programs’ Web site states. “They will ask the ISP to stop the violation.”

Tom Jackson, vice president of public affairs, said piracy is taken very seriously by University officials.

See EITS, Page 2

primo pie B

read, cheese and tomato sauce: the three ingredients that started the pizza commercial war. Domino’s has a new recipe, Papa John’s apparently has better ingredients, which means a better pizza. We here at The Red & Black decided to put those claims to the test. After the fighting escalated to legal lectures of “puffery” on our sacred screens, the madness had to end. We ordered medium cheese pizzas from six of Athens’ most popular delivery pizza joints and waged our own taste-testing battle. We rated all of the competing pies on the most important aspects of the perfect pizza: crust, sauce, cheese and speed of delivery. These individual pizza parts were rated on a scale of one to eight, and those scores averaged together to find the perfect all-around pizza. One proud pie rose to the challenge and emerged the highest-scoring pizza in every category. So, put the Papa on mute, we found Athens’ very own pie in the sky.

Photo by Katherine Poss

THE WINNER:

See SEC, Page 8

Cheese: 5.75 Sauce: 6 Crust: 6.3 Cost: $15.81 Time: 4.59 miles in 51 minutes Verdict: “They had a $15 minimum, so I had to get some garlic knots too.”

THE CONTENDERS:

EMILY KAROL | The Red & Black

▲ Donna Wood, owner of Stage Door Vintage, displays a unique mixture of vintage and hand-made accessories, clothing and furniture.

Cheese: 4.2 Crust: 5.1 Sauce: 4 Cost: $13.00 Time: .03 miles in 21 minutes Verdict: “Was it worth the money? Dominope.”

Cheese: 4.3 Crust: 5.7 Sauce: 4.9 Cost: $11.24 Time: 1.1 miles in 33 minutes Verdict: “They covered their mistakes with Parmesan cheese”

Stage Door Vintage promises authenticity

Cheese: 5.3 Crust: 4.75 Sauce: 4.75 Cost: $11.49 Time: .04 miles in 19 minutes Verdict: “The best cheap pizza; you can always count on Papa”

By Michael Whitworth The Red & Black From celebrities to sororities, Donna Wood knows vintage clothing appeals to a wide range of individuals, especially in chic towns like Athens. Her store location may be new, but Wood — owner of Stage Door Vintage — is certainly well-known in both the local Athens community and by out-of-towners alike for having top-notch vintage accessories and apparel. “One of my claims to fame is that on the cover of the ‘Bang and Blame’ single by REM, they have one of my lamps and one of my ash trays that Michael Stipe bought from me,” Wood said.

Cheese: 4.6 Crust: 4.75 Sauce: 4.6 Cost: $10.50 Time: .06 miles in 22 minutes Verdict: “This cheese tastes like plastic.”

Cheese: 3.8 Crust: 3.6 Sauce: 3.75 Cost: $14.43 Time: 1.7 miles in 35 minutes Verdict: “Reminiscent of a birthday party at a skating rink.”

See SHOP, Page 6

ON THE WEB Follow novice homebrewer and writer Zack Taylor as he sips his “Noble Beard Beer” for the first time.

partly cloudy. High 46| Low 27

Index

BIOSHOCK-ING GAME!

BALANCING LIFE AND RELIGION

The sequel to the 2007 game of the year has finally been released. Did it live up to its shocking predecessor? Page 6. News......................... 2 Opinions................... 4

Variety......................5 Sports....................... 7

Learn how one group is planning to help students keep their faith while living in Athens. Page 2. Crossword................2 Sudoku..................... 7


NEWS

2 | Wednesday, February 17, 2010 | The Red & Black

Tongue troubles taunt students Course to aid non-natives By PAIGE VARNER THE RED & BLACK

Photo Illustration by Emily Karol

S Students illegally sharing files over a University Internet connection may find themselves in trouble with the University Judiciary.

EITS: Barring lawsuits, students’ private information is protected ¢From Page 1 EITS then matches the IP address to the MyID owner. They then inform the student and the Office of Judicial Programs about the violation and ask the student to stop the distribution of the material. Brian Rivers, director of security, network operations and infrastructure, told The Red & Black EITS collects and monitors the University Internet connections to check for abuse to the server, such as malware and hackers, not to monitor students. “The University respects the privacy of our students, and it has never been the policy of the University to turn in names of students to the RIAA or copyright holders. However, in the case that a lawsuit is filed and information is subpoenaed from the University, the University is legally bound to supply this information to the courts,” Rivers said. The commitment to student privacy has recently been questioned. On Feb. 1, Dorin Dehelean, a former Internet technology security analyst at EITS, was arrested after a student told police he attempted to extort her for copyright infringement. D ehelean had access to student names and IP addresses, and University police said last week they believe more students may be victims of Dehelean’s scam. Rivers said although the process of monitoring copyright infringement is one of the most highly scrutinized IT processes, EITS is taking extra steps to

protect student records. “We are implementing job rotation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act process and working to ensure students understand that no UGA employee should ever ask them for money in connection with the DMCA process,” Rivers said. Since the RIAA quit pursuing suits, students are no longer in danger of losing any money to the association because of copyright infringement. The Office of Judicial Programs can still punish students who violate copyrights. “The University is legally required to take steps to remove the infringing material from our network when we receive the notices, and that’s why we pass these on to the users,” Rivers said. According to the Office of Judicial Programs’ Web site, student punishment can vary from case to case. First time violators usually get a warning. Second time violators could lose their campus computer privileges. The University can take away a student’s computing privileges because of the DMCA, which states service providers, such as the University, are legally required to prosecute the offending party. Though copyright infringement is a serious issue, Jackson said the University has no plans to block any Web sites. “We don’t believe in censorship; we believe in self-regulation,” Jackson said. “We don’t censor the Internet. That’s something they do in China.”

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44 Commonplace 46 Father 47 Animate 49 Fire engine warnings 51 Assemble a jury 54 Lavish party 55 Trade 56 Certain to get good results 60 Catch sight of 61 Hairless 63 Was in power 64 “Or __!”; words of a threat 65 Very eager 66 Invited 67 __-do-well;

idler 68 Part of the ear 69 Like a dripping faucet DOWN 1 Female horse 2 Perched atop 3 Fountain order 4 Shaking 5 Crouched 6 Salesman’s pitch 7 Freezing 8 Everyone 9 Adjusts one’s alarm clock 10 Sweet wine 11 Pakistan’s

12 13 21 23 25 26 27 28

official religion Find a new purpose for Lawn tool Speeder’s nemesis Require Taurus or Prius Acquires Behold Prefix for

29 32 34 35 36 38

40

body or freeze 43 Started Non45 conformist Helper 48 Skinny 50 Lather 51 Make a mess in a 52 microwave High53 powered sur- 54

gical beam Trigonometric term Word for word Spoken Decline Playwright Henrik __ Furniture wood Plain writing Softy,

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Accents are famous for making people swoon. However, when the honeyvoiced Casanovas aren’t whispering sweet nothings, accents can also set up communication roadblocks. To minimize the negative effects of having an accent, the University’s Center for Continuing Education is offering a class, Accent Reduction: Clear Speech for NonNative English Speakers, starting Tuesday. Denise Logan, department head of Professional and Personal Development at the Georgia Center, said the course was requested by students in the advanced English for Speakers of Other Languages courses available through the Georgia Center. “We did some preliminary research and couldn’t find a course [like this] on campus that was taught on a regular basis,” Logan said.

The course’s goal is not to rid international students of their accents but to raise awareness of their speech habits in order to communicate effectively in social and professional situations, the instructor, Betsy Craig, said. “At job interviews, people make judgments based on the severity of accents,” she said. Craig, an English department instructor, received her doctorate in linguistics from the University in 2008 and has taught ESOL courses in Venezuela, Chile and Paraguay. “There’s a rhythm of American English that’s different from Romance and Asian languages,” Craig said. “For instance, a lot of other languages don’t have the ‘schwa’ sound.” The “schwa” sound is the highly common vowel sound in unstressed syllables, such as the “uh” sound in “harmony” or “synthesis.” Craig said pronunciation is very physical, and she intends to focus on students’ mispronunciations. “The ‘L’ and ‘R’ are problematic for Japanese and

ACCENT REDUCTION When: Tuesdays and Thursdays, Feb. 23-April 27 Time: 6-7:30 p.m., 16 sessions; total of 24 hours More Information: 706.542.3537, http://www.georgiacenter.uga.edu/ppd/courses/ languages.phtml Price: $225 Chinese students,” she said. “The problem is, there’s nothing in their native language exactly equivalent.” Other communication hindrances for non-native English speakers are articles and prepositions in English grammar. “They leave ‘a,’ ‘an’ and ‘the’ out,” Craig said. “And English has highly idiomatic prepositions.” For instance, Craig said, translating English prepositions directly to Spanish isn’t always accurate. Craig said the goal is for non-native English speakers to become self-editors and improve the clarity of their English. And Craig said there is bound to be a humorous slip-up or two. “There’s the joke: ‘I like flied lice,’” Craig said. “It makes for some funny, interesting conversations.”

Religious lifestyle difficult for some By SARA CALDWELL THE RED & BLACK Finding a balance between religion and daily life can be a challenge, but one University group is striving to provide some solutions. Tonight, the University’s Muslim Student Association will host an informational discussion on how to handle everyday life while still maintaining religion. The discussion is titled “Balancing Deen and Dunya,” or balancing religion and the world. “The discussion is for students to share the kinds of problems they face in their day to day lives,” said Madiha Memon, president of the MSA. Saqib Chaudhry, a junior from Lawrenceville, is a practicing Muslim who will be running portions of the discussion. Chaudhry said he understands how modernization can affect an individual’s ability to practice a religious life. “We don’t see people carry out religious activities,” Chaudhry said. “It’s the envi-

ronment that we live in.” And he said living a Muslim lifestyle is becoming more and more difficult. Memon said she hopes the event will be influential. She’s personally seen the benefits of the small group discussions her organization holds every week. “The discussions make me understand, so more people will hopefully understand [after the discussion],” Memon said. The association plans two events each month, one discussing a religious topic, Memon said. However, tonight’s discussion is not only for students of Muslim faith. Nitesh Patel, a junior from Stone Mountain, practices Hinduism, but he said he still plans to attend the discussion. “I have a job and many extra-curricular activities, but religion takes up some time,” Patel said. “[The discussion] will teach better time management and raise awareness of the principles to follow.” The event will be in room 150 of the Miller Learning Center at 7 tonight.


NEWS & VARIETY

The Red & Black | Wednesday, February 17, 2010 | 3

Musician rocks for local camp By ANNE CONNAUGHTON THE RED & BLACK Each year the Grady Ambassadors are given the option to organize an event for a local charity. After a major fundraising event fell through for Girls Rock, the Grady Ambassadors came forward to fill the void, according to the founder and director of Girls Rock Athens, Calley Payne. Girls Rock Camp Athens is a summer camp program that seeks to aid in female empowerment through music. A benefit concert, Rock it Out, will be held at the 40 Watt tonight to raise money to help empower young girls through music. “It was a great place for us to step in,” said Lizzy Nephews, a Grady Ambassador. “With the Grady name we knew we could get support on campus.” Money raised at the benefit concert will go toward camp operations, financial aid and partial scholarships for girls who need a program like this but can’t afford it. “In a week at camp, girls learn an instrument they may have never touched before,” Payne said. Then the girls form bands, write an original song and perform. There are also body image workshops to encourage healthy self-esteem and an all-female staff to mentor confidence and pride. Payne founded the Athens camp after working for the Atlanta camp in its first year of oper-

Research program expanded By RACHEL BUNN THE RED & BLACK A new campus partnership will provide University students with research courses and gateway seminars aimed directly at engineering students. The program is designed for students to take more hands-on research courses, instead of lecture classes, which tend to be less interactive. The Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities and the Faculty of Engineering plan to launch a pilot program for this new research opportunity in the fall, with the fullfledged program beginning in fall 2011. “We’ll be working to share the best practices we use in CURO and utilize the resources in other programs,” said Pam Kleiber, director of CURO. CURO, housed in the Honors Program, hopes to offer more opportunities to students through the partnership. “We’re very excited about this new program,” said Dale Threadgill, biological and agricultural engin e e r i n g department head. “It will provide avenues for engineering students to KLEIBER work with the best faculty on research.” Kleiber said partnering with other schools and programs can help grow the research program without having to hire any new staff or take funds away from existing initiatives and opportunities. Kleiber said CURO chose to partner with the Faculty of Engineering because the department is growing and has supported CURO in the past. Threadgill said many members of the Faculty of Engineering were already involved in CURO, and faculty members were excited about seeing the program expand. “I’ve already received e-mails from faculty members who want to be involved in the planning committee,” Threadgill said. “We have many faculty members who have been interested in starting an undergraduate research program for a while.”

CORRECTIONS The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Chelsea Cook (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Daniel Burnett (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com

ROCK IT OUT What: A concert benefitting girls rock featuring Allison Weiss, The Orkids, the Incendiaries and Creepy. When: 9 tonight Where: 40 Watt Price: $5 in advance, $7 at the door ation. She felt that Athens — known for its music — was ideal for a similar program. There were existing co-ed camps, but the structure of Girls Rock is different and makes girls more comfortable. Allison Weiss, who is headlining the Rock it Out concert, is a friend of Payne’s and has always been interested in helping out in some way. “I have a personal feeling that young girls are not encouraged to learn to play music,” Weiss said. “It’s like, what do we get the girls for Christmas? Barbies. A boy? A guitar. I think programs like this could change that.” When the Grady Ambassadors were looking for bands to perform, they wanted names people would recognize and bands that would support the cause, Nephews said. “Allison is perfect name for it,” Nephews said, “Her life is music.” Weiss enjoys playing benefits for causes she supports and believes in. “Sometimes causes need a little help from musicians to spread the word,” she said.

JIM DIFFLY | The Red & Black

S Singer/songwriter Allison Weiss poses with a keyboard in downtown Athens on January 6, 2009. Weiss and her band perform at the 40 Watt Club in Athens tonight.


4 | Wednesday, February 17, 2010 | The Red & Black

Chelsea Cook | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Daniel Burnett | Managing Editor me@randb.com Yasmin Yonis | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

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E-mail and letters from our readers

Hard to organize civil discussion with PETA A Challenge to PETA Extremists: Mr. Friedrich’s Monday opinion column reveals PETA’s blatant disregard to organize civil discussions on animal rights. It is no wonder why his invitation to University researchers was unanimously rejected. PETA as an organization refuses to acknowledge the obvious flaws in attacking “animal-experimentation.” That is why I am giving this open challenge to Mr. Friedrich and any member of the PETA organization. If you get cancer, stand firm as a PETA supporter and reject any chemotherapy your doctor offers you. If your liver fails, do not waiver, decline having your name placed on a waiting list for a replacement. If you ever have a heart attack, make sure your family knows you do not want any cardiovascular medications. All of these drugs and procedures could not have been developed without science’s dependence on the animal model of experimentation. If PETA doesn’t believe in medicine developed using animals, then PETA should reject it. It is impossible to discuss how to improve the welfare of animals (something the scientific community already strives to do) with an organization that feeds off misinformation and extremism. This is a simple point that Mr. Friedrich conveniently overlooked. JERRY JACKSON Senior, Atlanta Cellular biology

Exchange of ideas needed both ways I don’t know if Mr. Friedrich has ever known this, but it is certainly not civil to litter a supposed invitation to debate with insults and comments belittling the other side. Has it ever occurred to him that perhaps referring to his opponents as “animal exploiters” and claiming that their positions are “so transparently indefensible,” he shows that he himself is unwilling to engage in honest debate? Here’s one hint, Mr. Friedrich: this “free exchange of ideas” has to go both ways, otherwise you are just preaching, not debating. And that’s another reason why perhaps your opposition (of which I’m proud to be a part) has refused to engage in debate. Any time that a socalled “animal rights” activist has a voice, it will undoubtedly and without fail include the emotionladen bit on the “reality” of the topic of the day, be it animals used for food, entertainment, or whatever be the topic of the day. Well, sir, here’s some reality for you, so long as we are on the tones of insult and ridicule: your organization has little to no power over what goes on in this country, be it your supposedly civil PETA, or your militant arm, the Animal Liberation Front (oh, yeah, they’re related). Your opposition to the no-kill policy and euthanasia of perfectly good animals is honestly quite inhumane and a little hypocritical. And after your

organization urged the University to replace our beloved Uga with an animatronic mascot last fall, I wonder if the general opinion of the campus toward PETA is anything but one of derision and disgust. Here is something to consider: we are not children, and we understand that animals have to die, so we can have meat. The way you react to this information is not my business. I personally will respect someone who refuses to eat meat because of this (though I will vehemently disagree with their choice). It is when they start forcing this choice on others from their high horse that all that respect goes away. You will not get anywhere by calling out challenges and abuses; you do not command nearly enough influence and authority for that to work. Consider that respect will likely go a longer way toward your cause than any amount of naked celebrities or shrieking protesters. BASIL SYED Freshman, Alpharetta Finance

Newspaper needs to cover runner In last week’s issue of Sports Illustrated, Torrin Lawrence was listed in the “Faces in the Crowd” section of the magazine, a section which seeks to recognize great accomplishments by often overlooked athletes. Since that issue, Torrin has succeeded in running the fifth fastest indoor 400meter time of all time. That’s right, walking among us here at UGA, in our classes, sleeping in our dorms, and wearing red and black, we have one of the fastest human beings to ever walk the earth, and he barely makes the back page on most Monday mornings. Let’s move this Bulldog to the front page for a change and help make him more than a face in the crowd. BEJAN ABTAHI Senior, Nashville, Tenn Economics

Pictures of snow nice experience Snow Day! Beautiful photos of campus (Arch!) and others. Thank you for sharing with parents who couldn’t be there to enjoy the fun (and snow angels) with their students. The pictures were really great to see. LINDA SCHMIDT Parent Sandy Springs

LETTERS POLICY Letters must include name, year in school, hometown, phone number, major or job title or other appropriate identification. Letters are edited for spelling or grammar and are subject to editing for length, style and libelous material. All letters will be published — either in print or online.

Accusations should not ruin careers M y first time in John Soloski’s Intro to Print Journalism class lasted only three weeks. I heard his speech about his lawsuit against the University, took a few of his infamous news quizzes and saw the cutest picture of his American bulldog stretched out on a bed. Then, I missed a few classes because I literally could not get up from my own bed. I eventually disappeared from the 300-person lecture hall altogether. It was the fall of 2007 and the first semester of my sophomore year, and I was already exhausted from the college lifestyle. I had taken more hours than I could handle the previous year and was accepted to the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication one year earlier than my graduation date required. Granted, all of this work did nothing for my health, and I made the decision to take the semester off. My mother sent out frantic e-mails to all of my professors asking if they could please give me a W on my transcript instead of a WF. I can’t recall anything the other professors said except that they all gave me W’s. However, I do remember Professor Soloski’s reply. He said, “I am sorry to hear this about your daughter. Alas, her problem is too common,” and mentioned that he served on the psychiatry department’s advisory board at Emory University.

News Editor: Carey O’Neil Associate News Editor: Mimi Ensley Sports Editor: Rachel G. Bowers Variety Editor: Courtney Smith Photo Editor: Katherine Poss Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editor: Beth Pollak Recruitment Editor: Brittany Binowski Editorial Cartoonist: Bill Richards Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Casey Bridgeman Senior Reporter: Carolyn Crist

Soloski also told my mother that “because this is still very early in the semester, I strongly recommend that you attempt to have her entire registration canceled. That way she will receive no grades at all. Let me know if there is anything I can do.” I was surprised that one of my professors would take the time to give out detailed advice for a student who he did not know. I knew then that he had a wealth of knowledge about federal and University regulations and in areas other than journalism. When I returned in the spring of 2008, I listened to his lawsuit spiel again, and like Kaleb Frady, I went home and did some research. Since then, I followed the case until the lawsuit came to a close, and Soloski won. It is ridiculous to me that one person can go from being a dean to teaching an introductory course because of sexual harassment allegations — allegations with not much to them. During my senior year in high school, I had an influential, intelligent AP English teacher: Ed Youngblood. One day there was a sign on Youngblood’s door informing us that class was canceled. Then, bit by bit, we heard that he had resigned. A parent

— Jessica Burghaus is a senior from Snellville majoring in magazines

PETA too ‘outrageous’ to be debate worthy

I

n PETA’s Vice President Bruce Friedrich’s opinion column Monday, Feb. 15 titled a “Lack of debate from PETA opposition,” Mr. Friedrich states that he is personally offended by the denial of UGA’s animal scientists and researchers to debate him over the merits of his claims. He claims that their “new-found timidity” relates to positions that are “so transparently indefensible.” I disagree. I salute the faculty for declining the invitation to vegan “wrestlemania.” If this debate were a true academic discussion, Mr. Friedrich would not have be invited. Mr. Friedrich’s assertion that his opposition “has stopped showing up” may relate to his organization’s arguments that have become increasingly irrational and confrontational. President Obama did not acknowledge the attack of his swatting a fly on camera, why should esteemed researchers expose themselves to his attacks? PETA and its employees are known for its outrageous statements. PETA founder Ingrid Newkirk has said, “When it comes to pain, love, joy, loneliness, and fear, a rat is a pig is a dog is a boy,” according to the PETA Web site. The facts are another story. No other sector of animal agriculture is regulated and inspected for animal handling practices as thoroughly as meat processing facilities. Animal handling in these facilities has never been better. Processing facilities across the

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

JESSICA BURGHAUS

had complained to the Gwinnett County Board of Education because her 17-year-old daughter found the R-rated movie he showed, “Elizabeth,” to be too sexual in nature. Because Youngblood had not sent out the school’s R-rated movie permission slips, the school forced his resignation. Many of his former students and I held a protest against the decision and scored a hearing with the Gwinnett County school board, but the attempts never produced any results. Youngblood lost his job ... and his reputation. I’m not essentially blaming the University (Dear UGA, please let me graduate) or my high school for their actions, but I am blaming public school sexual harassment policies in general. There has to be some filter, and though I know that where the line should be drawn is hazy, I still feel there needs to be some provision that doesn’t cause severe damage to a person’s career and reputation for trivial matters, such as permission slips or comments that have not yet been proven true. I might be missing something, but I’m just really tired of losing teachers or hearing about a professor who waited five years before winning a sexual harassment lawsuit.

News Writers: Rachel Bunn, Ryan Burle, Sara Caldwell, Julia Carpenter, Jacob Demmitt, Dallas Duncan, Briana Gerdeman, Raisa Habersham, Ashley Hieb, Brittney Holmes, Jennifer Johnson, Alison Loughman, Jacob Lovell, Polina Marinova, Stephanie Moodie, An Ngyuen, Diana Perez, Michael Prochaska, Caitlyn Searles, Adina Solomon, Tiffany Stevens, Paige Varner, Katie Weise Sports Writers: Benjamin Bussard, Chris D’Aniello, Zach Dillard, Michael Fitzpatrick, Drew Kann, David Mitchell, Nathan Sorenson Variety Writers: Katie Andrew, Becky Atkinson, John Barrett, Harper Bridgers, Adam Carlson, Melissa Cohen, Anne Connaughton, Kathleen Dailey, Matt Evans, Anna Krakovski, Sophie Loghman, Cyndyl McCutcheon,

WARD BLACK nation are subject to the federal Humane Slaughter Act of 1958. Federal inspectors are present in meat plants at all times and are fully empowered to take action against a plant for Humane Slaughter Act violations. In addition to the processing facilities, research over the last 20 years has shown notable improvements in animal handling based on data collected by animal welfare expert Dr. Temple Grandin. Livestock producers take as many precautions to protect their animals as possible. Confinement allows livestock producers to protect the animals from predators and to provide care and treatment to animals when needed. In indoor systems, livestock and poultry can be protected from weather events such as rain, strong winds, heat, snow or sleet. Modern indoor confinement systems also provide a cleaner and healthier environment for the animals since the floor surface can be adequately cleaned. A key point that Mr. Friedrich and his organization fails to address is the innovation of the American farmer. On average, the American farmer produces enough food to feed approximately 144 people worldwide, compared to 19 people in 1940, according to the

Our Staff Rachael Mirabella, Crissinda Ponder, Tyrone Rivers, Wynn Sammons, Ashley Strickland, Zack Taylor, Katie Valentine, Eva Vasquez, Nicholas Welsh, Michael Whitworth, Joe Williams Chief Photographer: Wes Blankenship Photographers: Frannie Fabian, Lindsay Grogan, Michael Harris, Emily Karol, Jon Kim, Dorothy Kozlowski, Blake Lipthratt, Lauren Moot, Sarah Pelham, Lily Price, Jackie Reedy, Daniel Shirey, Ashley Strickland, Jon-Michael Sullivan, Molly Weir Page Designers: Courtney Clark, Jessica Clark, Brittany Guthrie, Jennifer Guyre, Amanda Jones, Ann Kabakova, Thomas Nesmith, Robbie Ottley, Darline Oyemakinwa

Agricultural Farm Bureau. Approximately 85 percent of U.S. grazing lands are unsuitable for crop production, and grazing animals on this land more than doubles the area that can be used to produce nutritious food for people around the world. Agriculture is the backbone of the American economy. Twenty percent of the American workforce is employed in the food, fiber and natural resource industries. Ninety-eight percent of all U.S. farms are owned by individuals, family partnerships or family corporations. Americans spend approximately 10 percent of their disposable income on food, the lowest percentage of its kind in the world. Agriculture’s importance to our nation was emphasized in 1862 when President Abraham Lincoln signed the Morrill Act. This act was passed to create land-grant colleges in every state with the primary purpose of conducting agricultural research and the training of those who will enter the field. The research conducted at our university not only helps to solve problems for our state and nation, but discovers new solutions for producers and consumers worldwide. America produces the world’s safest, most affordable, most abundant food supply, and I am proud to be a part of the industry that feeds and clothes the world. —Ward Black is a graduate student from Commerce in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Editorial board members include Daniel Burnett, Chelsea Cook, Dallas Duncan, Michael Fitzpatrick, Raisa Habersham, Patrick Hooper, Nathan Sorensen, and Yasmin Yonis.

ADVERTISING: 706-433-3001 Advertising Director: Natalie McClure Student Advertising Manager: Matt Gonglach Territory Managers: Anna Lewenthal, Catherine Merritt, Daniel Pugh Account Executives: Katherine Blackstad, Alia Chernnet, Stacey Joseph, Chris Merville, Taylor Rawlins, Jennifer Rooks Sales Associate: Kristy Hansen, Lauren Jones Classified Manager: Amanda Goforth Classified Representatives: Lindsay Lock, Jessie Phelps Ad Assistants: Emily Johns, Thomas Pulliam Circulation Manager: Blake Molina

Ad Creative Assistant: Chase Dudley Production Manager: Sam Pittard Production Staff: Josh Barnett, Dru Fickling, Priscilla Kathe, Elaine Kelch Receptionist: Amanda Goforth Office Manager: Erin Beasley Assistant Office Manager: Megan Yue Cleaning Person: Mary Jones Publisher: Harry Montevideo The Red & Black is published Monday through Friday fall and spring semesters and each Thursday summer semester, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a nonprofit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


VARIETY “WOMEN DIRECTORS, WOMEN OF THE WORLD” Film Showing Schedule What: “Rain” When: Thursday 7:30 p.m. Where: Ciné, 234 West Hancock Ave. Price: $9 general, $5 students What: “Poto Mitan,” When: Friday 7 p.m. Where: in Tate II Room 481 Price: Free What: “Scene not Heard” When: Friday, Feb. 26th 7 p.m. Where: African American Cultural Center Price: Free What: “Daughters of the Dust” When: Thursday, March 4th Where: Tate II Room 481 Price: Free

Film festival honors women By CRISSINDA PONDER THE RED & BLACK Seeing points of connection with those that are different from you is one of the messages that the Institute of African American Studies hopes to convey in their annual film festivals. This year, however, they are taking a different angle on the idea of unity. Co-sponsored with the Institute of Women’s Studies and Ciné, the 4th Annual African Diaspora Film Festival’s theme is “Women Directors, Women in the World.” “We decided that we wanted to raise awareness of women as directors and protagonists,” said Dr. Lesley Feracho, associate professor in Romance Languages and African American Studies. The film festival features two films from the Caribbean – the Bahamas and Haiti – and two films from the U.S. The film “Rain” will be kicking off the festival. It is one of the first indigenously produced feature films from the Bahamas. “Poto Mitan,” the Haitian documentary, looks at globalization and its impact through the stories and voices of five Haitian women workers. Feracho believes that the documentary is timely with the republic’s current situation. “We FERACHO thought that this would be a great way to educate people about Haiti and women in Haiti and especially their strategies of survival and solidarity,” Feracho said. “I think that the idea of women’s voices and community is the common thread in all four films.” Ashley David, graduate assistant for the Institute of African American Studies said that the films are moving and thought provoking. “These particular films are really fabulous because they tell stories that we don’t hear that often,” David said. “They’re not just stories coming from women directors, but the gaze and perspective centers around the lives of women.” Feracho notes the significance of students engaging in the film festival. “I think it’s always important for students to have a larger vision of the different communities globally,” Feracho said. David believes that it’s important for students to see these films because they won’t be found in the theaters. “This is a way to engage in a global conversation about films and stories of the African Diaspora and stories that might be new to you,” David said. “It’s a way to show what you care about, you kind of vote with your presence.”

The Red & Black | Wednesday, February 17, 2010 | 5

We Landed On The Moon! plays Athens By JOE WILLIAMS THE RED & BLACK What does the legendary orange 1969 Dodge Charger “The General Lee” and Johnny Knoxville have in common with indie rock? For Louisiana rockers We Landed on the Moon!, a lot. “I was actually singing regularly during the time that the Dukes of Hazzard were filming in Baton Rouge,” said lead singer Melissa Ecclesand. “[Director] Jay Chandrasekhar would come to my shows every week, and I would talk to him and he said, ‘where’s a CD, give me a CD. I’m doing a movie, and I’ll put you on the soundtrack.’” Though the situation ended up falling through (Willie Nelson was brought on board), this was the defining moment that kicked the band into action. “He got me thinking, ‘you know I have been singing this long, and I have nothing to show for it,’” Ecclesand said. “It was very random, but it’s not very often you hear somebody say ‘Hey, give me one of your songs and I’ll put it in a movie.’” Two albums and a whirlwind of press later, We Landed on the Moon! will conquer the Caledonia Lounge this Wednesday with close friends Elsinore from Champaign, Ill. Known for their powerful female vocals and experimental pop-rock feel, We Landed on the Moon! had the opportunity to play for the 2009 CMJ Music Marathon in New York City, which was originally introduced as a way for music professionals to hear up-and-coming musicians.

WE LANDED ON THE MOON! When: 10 tonight Where: Caledonia Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18-20)

“Our CMJ show was awesome, we had a great crowd,” Ecclesand said. “We actually had a lot of people who are from Louisiana and live in New York, so we had a lot of people out there, friends and everything.” On tour to promote their newest album, “This Will Be One for the Books,” the band hopes to put a solid foot forward in their quest to break onto the mainstream music scene, entwining their already developed sound with newfound confidence and fierce, heart fluttering vocals. “This album is pretty much just everybody giving 110 percent,” Ecclesand said. “So far we’ve gotten some great feedback on it, but it’s still extremely new. Most people have not heard it.” “This Will Be One for the Books” is available to stream on their Web site or to purchase via flashdrive at their shows. Even though touring can bring with it difficulties (blizzards in Maryland, constant wear and tear, etc.), Ecclesand hopes her lyrical message can resonate beyond the stage. “I just want people to feel a relief, that’s the biggest thing.” Ecclesand said. “Because some of my songs are angrier, and some of my songs are just fun and happy. It’s my way of releasing those feelings, and I hope that some people listen to it and get that same relief.”

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SAlmost making the Dukes of Hazzard soundtrack, We Landed On The Moon! will make its mark on Athens when they debut their new album.

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VARIETY & SPORTS

6 | Wednesday, February 17, 2010 | The Red & Black

Bye week filled with practice, down time for men’s tennis By LISA GLASER THE RED & BLACK Each day on the calendar is booked, dates scrawled in with times and places of matches. The season is an exercise in endurance. It is a war of attrition. No rest until the NCAA Championships, held in Athens this May. This year is no different than any before, where an offweekend comes but once a spring semester for the Georgia men’s tennis team. And the Bulldogs now have that singular off-weekend and will not compete again until Sat. Feb. 27 when they face East Tennessee State at home. “I’m just resting my mind and resting my body, after a tough weekend in Virginia,� said senior Nate Schnugg. “This being my senior year, I know what kind of toll the second half of the season can have on your body.� For this team, a break comes sooner in the season than usual, though. The holiday does not exactly mark halfway through the semester, but rather cuts into only the beginning of the season. “It’s going to be a struggle to really push through the rest of the season when we’re not going to have an off-weekend. So, it’s going to be real important that this week we take advantage of the time that we do have off,� said senior Alex Hill. “Once the matches start up again, they don’t stop.� The team gets a few vacation days before returning to train Thursday, when

it will refocus attention on the rest of the packed schedule and a laundry list of opponents. The Bulldogs will face a catalogue of teams that includes the defending national champions — the University of Southern California and No. 2 Ohio State. To prepare for those matches, the players will return to basics and perfect their strokes and overall games technically over the next week and a half. “It’s very important to have a week or two during the season to work on things during practice that you can’t work on when you have matches the next day or coming up in the next couple of days,� Schnugg said. “Competition tends to change your game a little bit. You need to get back in practice and work on the things that [help you] to do things right, instead of just doing things to win your match.� While the practice routine changes, the players take advantage of their few afternoons off the tennis courts. Schnugg hopes to catch up on both sleep and studying, while Hill looks forward to some quality time with his teammates. A game of paintball is on the agenda for today, as well as other team bonding activities for the rest of the week. “I’m going to try to spend as much time with the guys as I can. We kind of want to hang out outside of tennis and make sure that we stay close as a team,� Hill said. “That’s what I want to do — hang out with my friends and the guys on the team.�

JACKIE REEDY | The Red & Black

S Senior Alex Hill and his teammates on the Georgia men’s tennis team began a 20-day break between matches this week. Hill said he will fill the break by practicing and hanging out with friends and his teammates.

now playing!

Bioshock 2 Following the immensely popular 2007 game of the year, “BioShock 2� has a tremendous pedigree to live up to, and it delivers. “BioShock 2� returns players to Rapture, the underwater utopiaturned-wasteland, to witness the chaos that has taken place in the 10 years since the events of its predecessor. In “BioShock 2,� players take the role of an original Big Daddy, one of the first of Rapture’s silent, hulking guardians. Within Rapture, the Big Daddies are protectors to the Little Sisters, a group of brainwashed

young girls who carry the genetic substance used to enhance your abilities. Each tool in the Big Daddy’s arsenal is effectively an updated version of the original “BioShock� weapons. However, unique new upgrades and ammo types put a fresh spin on familiar weaponry. “BioShock 2� returns all but one plasmid, a genetic enhancement that provides special powers, from the original game. To complement these powers, players may equip a number of gene tonics, which will enhance individual combat or physical abilities. Most of these powers and abilities are familiar from the first game, however each of these plasmids have been tweaked to include additional functionality when upgraded. These new additions expand on the already addictive combat mechanics found in “BioShock.� The original powers were fun to use, and their upgraded forms give the player an even deeper, more satisfying game play experience. One of the most appealing factors of the original “BioShock� was its unique setting and story. It returns 10 years later, presenting a storyline that is overall less compelling but nonetheless brilliantly executed. Many elements from both games are explained or expanded in

new ways as the story guides the player along. Where “BioShock� presented the Little Sisters of Rapture as a means to an end, “BioShock 2� creates a much more unique relationship, where players themselves become the protectors of the little ones. New to the sequel, “BioShock 2� includes a competitive online multiplayer feature. Employing a matchmaking system similar to “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare,� players earn points by competing online, which unlock further upgrades and abilities. Combat is original, fast-paced, and fun, with matches taking the form of traditional game types, such as free-for-all and team deathmatch. The system combines the appeal of a skill-based shooter with the unique “BioShock� experience. By harnessing these unique abilities and developing an individual style, players are sure to enjoy the “BioShock� multiplayer experience. Verdict: While new additions expand the combat and game play mechanics of the first game, “BioShock 2� presents a story that, while fantastic in its own right, is less compelling than its predecessor. — William Moore

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SHOP: Owner selects true vintage products ¢From Page 1 One of her first locations was next to the 40 Watt Club on Washington Street, where she got her start with clothes her mom had given her and items she had acquired over time. “I’ve been around doing this for fifteen years or so, and this is my sixth store,â€? Wood said. Over the years, for one reason or another, Wood has had to move locations quite often. She hopes her newest location, above Espresso Royal on Broad Street, is where she can hang her hat for some time to come. She is hopeful that the new location will serve her well and that Athens will continue to show demand for authentic vintage clothing. Wood said most of her store is true vintage, with garments actually from the time period which they resemble, not just overlywashed Gap hand-medowns. “I used to focus on ’70s style and older, but now the kids want ’80s as well, so I’ve been expanding my collection,â€? she said. Part of Wood’s collection includes a vintage ring from the 1800’s, several pairs of real Ray-Ban Wayfarers from the ’60s, and many other trinkets and accessories that each tell a unique story. “I’ve been to a lot of vintage stores across America, some in other countries. I like this store because it has an authentic air to it that you don’t typically find in the South,â€? said Jordan Biasetti, a senior from Marietta majoring in Magazines. Stage Door Vintage is certainly no Goodwill when it comes to cost; however, the items are not pretentiously priced and

Wood guarantees their authenticity. “I can see clothes on people walking down the street that I know I’ve sold them because I try to only sell one-of-a-kind garments. No one else has them,� she said. What’s more is Wood truly values the local Athens community ethos and wants to make sure the store is an inclusive, community-centered hangout. “I’ll be showing Disney movies on the weekends for the families of Athens with children,� she said. “And I’ll have a lounge area, with live music, for some art exhibit openings I’ll be holding here — all coming up in the next month or so.� She even supports local designers by allowing them to rent out space in her store, so that they can have a place to display and distribute their clothing lines. Bacon Neckwear — one of these local clients — makes custom neckwear in the style of vintage chic and has been featured in several fashion magazines and webzines. Both Stage Door Vintage and Bacon Neckwear were included in a recent feature on DailyCandy.com, and Wood will be featured in the upcoming issue of Athens’s Blvd Magazine for the spring. Stage Door is now having a winter sale that will most likely run for several more weeks, in hopes of familiarizing customers with the store and make it a welcoming environment. “I haven’t really had a grand opening yet; I’m easing into the new location,� Wood said. “But I wanted to have this sale before I do because I’m getting in new items every day; I don’t have places to put them all.�

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SPORTS

The Red & Black | Wednesday, February 17, 2010 | 7

Senior provides a ‘big emotional lift’ for Gym Dogs By MICHAEL FITZPATRICK THE RED & BLACK It wasn’t supposed to be this hard. Not in her senior year. She wasn’t supposed to be relegated to the sidelines save for her signature event — the balance beam — because of a nagging hip injury. But such was life for senior Gym Dog Grace Taylor through her team’s first five meets. The seventime All-American — three on the beam, two on the uneven bars, one on the floor exercise — was nearly reduced from a major contributor to a full-time cheerleader. “It definitely weighed on me a lot,â€? Taylor said, “and my poor fiancĂŠ thought I was in depression or something. I was not in a happy place.â€? Even when she was competing, something was clearly awry. She scored a career-low 9.15 on floor Jan. 7 against Stanford and had an abysmal balance beam routine Jan. 29 against Auburn when she fell twice and had the first sub-9.0 score in her illustrious career. Adding to her misery was that she felt powerless to stop her team’s downward tailspin in the midst of a three-meet losing streak. “It’s very hard to not be doing well as team and be doing well individually at the same time because there have been times when we lost as a team, and I did really well individually and that hurts really bad, but when you

do poorly as a team and poorly individually, then it’s like, ‘Oh my goodness, I’m not giving all I can and my team is suffering.’ And that was a very low point, this season, in my college career and in my life.� Competing on the uneven bars was almost completely out-of-thequestion, and she began wondering whether her career as a three-event gymnast was over. “I had kind of given up hope — never vocally — of competing in bars because as the season progressed I felt that maybe I wasn’t going to be able to get in the lineup and maybe I’m done,� Taylor said. But that all changed Friday against then-No. 3 Arkansas. Taylor was back in her customary three events, earning a 9.8 in her first bars performance of the season, and 9.9’s on the beam and floor and she felt as if a weight had been lifted. “It was amazing,� she said. “I couldn’t stop smiling all weekend. It was something that has brought me so much joy and landing [my dismount] on bars was like the biggest thing ever because it kind of felt like an Abraham moment ... But just to get in the lineup, and yeah, it wasn’t the best routine, was just the coolest thing ever and I truly realized that I had taken it for granted the past three years.� More importantly than the return of Grace Taylor the gymnast was the return of Grace Taylor the person. “There’s something

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

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about her and her gymnastics that just can’t be replaced,� freshman Christa Tanella said. “Just what she brings to our team is irreplaceable. Having her back is really one of the key elements that really makes us the strong team that we are. Without Grace there was a little less Georgia Gym Dog in our gymnastics.� Injuries are commonplace in gymnastics, as shins and ankles and hips are pounded into submission day after day. But Taylor’s injury, a inflammation in her hip was mainly caused by overstretching — “Who would’ve thought I was overstretching my hip?� Taylor said, — and caused her a tremendous amount of pain. Her uneven bars routine had to be watered down so much that even if she hit it perfectly, the routine’s start value would have been so low. Head coach Jay Clark said he never would have considered putting her in a meet. “It was hard on her,� Clark said. “I think it was harder on her than anybody else. We have kids that can get out there and get it done, our team is bigger than any one person, and Grace knows that betWES BLANKENSHIP | The Red & Black ter than anyone ... There S After working through an inflammation in her hip, three-time Allwas a time when it seemed American Grace Taylor has returned to her former athletic greatness. pretty bleak and we weren’t sure if we were ever gonna Now, in the most impor- a multi-All-American and But more than that, it proget there. But to her credit, she has been able to keep tant time of the season, the with the experience she vides an assurance that fighting and I think we No. 7 Gym Dogs have has is huge for us,� Clark when you have seniors at have a winning plan to added an All-American to said. “Grace’s spirit and key spots in your lineup, keep her healthy. I think an already stellar beam her persona is such a big and you know they are she has a renewed enthusi- lineup, ranked No. 3 nation- part of what we have done going to get the job done, the past three years, and it there is a calm confidence asm now that she has got- ally. “To have a senior who is was a big emotional lift. about our team.� ten that taste of it.�

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1st Day/Skip days.....................................................$9.00 3 Consecutive Days.................................................$25.00 5 Consecutive Days.................................................$35.00 10 Consecutive Days...............................................$65.00

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CLASSIFICATIONS 10. Roommates 20. Housing 25. Subleases 30. For Sale 35. Computers 40. Wanted 45. Seeking Job 50. Auto 60. Services

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ROOM FOR RENT w/private bath in The Summit gated communinity. Great ammenities! $475/mo + 1/2 utilities. Male preferred, non smoker, no pets. 404642-0535

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1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 5 BR. Awesome Walk and Bike to downtown and campus Houses Pre-leasing for Fall! Many historical houses with old world charm, modern amenities. Porches, yards. Pet friendly. $350-$1800 mo. These go fast! Email for list: luckydawg96@hotmail.com 1BR 1BA LYNNROCK Apts. $490 with DW, water included. Block from campus off Baxter St. Text “lynnrock� to 41513 Joiner Management 706-353-6868 www.joinermanagement.com 1BR APTS CLOSE to campus, downtown and shopping. Starting at $380. ONE MONTH FREE ON SELECT UNITS! Pets Welcome! 706-549-2500 2, 3 & 4 BR newly built houses close to campus & downtown! W/D, large BRs, pets ok, 706-713-0626 2, 3, & 4 BR HOUSES CLOSE TO CAMPUS STARTING AT $800. W/D INCLUDED. ZONED MULTI-FAMILY AND PET FRIENDLY 706-549-2500.

2BR 2BA DUPLEX. One month free rent and no security deposit with acceptable credit! 2 miles from the arch, W/D, DW, Microwave, ceiling fans, pest control, and free security system. Large yard, no pet fee. $650/mo. Security deposit of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 2BR 2BA ON College Station. Huge apartment, FP, deck, lots of closets, DW, W/D, CHAC. Avail. now. Pets OK. $575/mo. 706-369-2908. 2BR APTS STARTING at $550. ONE MONTH FREE! Close to campus, downtown and shopping. W/D included in unit. Pets Welcome! 706-549-2500. 3BR 1BA HOUSE. Quiet family n’hood. HWflrs. Separate garage/ workshop. Huge fenced dog pen. Avail. 8/1. $750/mo. Call 706-369-2908. 3BR 2BA DUPLEX One month free rent and no security deposit with acceptable credit. 2 miles from the Arch, W/D, DW, Microwave, ceiling fans, & alarm system. Large yard, no pet fee, $750. S/D $600 fully refundable. Owner/ Agent 706-549-2500 3BR 2BA NICE house eastside, quiet neighborhood, W/D, pets ok. $1000/mo., 706-713-0626 3BR 3BA COTTAGE in The Woodlands. $300 Early Signing Bonus! LOW Rent $1350! Privately owned, great amenities, inhome security, W/D, no pets. Email anita@tau-usa.com now! 3BR FLAT CONDO in gated community. The Woodlands of Athens. Very large rooms. 3BA, W/D, all appliances, patio with grass yard. $445/BR. Call Jimmy 404-886-2687. jp@masterpiecearms.com 4BR 4BA TOWNHOUSES CLOSE TO CAMPUS. 2 LARGE LRS, LARGE UTILITY ROOM, W/D, DW, GARBAGE DISPOSAL, LARGE DECK, ALARM SYSTEM. 2500 SQFT. $1500/MO. 706-549-2500. 5BR 3BA HOUSE. Zoned for students and close to campus. W/D, DW, CHAC, front/back porches, den, $1900/mo. avail Aug 1st. Call Matt 404-808-3190.

AMAZING RENOVATED 5BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. from campus. 2 LRs, 2 kitchens, big BRs, huge deck, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $2100/mo. 706-369-2908.

AMAZING RENTAL OPPORTUNITY Close to it all! $900/mo! 3 left! New 3/2 Spacious Homes 10 minutes from Campus. Located off Jefferson River Road. Call 678-499-1036 stephanie@bowenhomes.com

BARNETT RIDGE FLATSEastside $625. Lots of room for the price. W/D, DW included. Text “Barnett� to 41513. www.joinermanagement.com Joiner Management 706-353-6868 CEDAR BLUFFS EASTSIDE location. 2BR 2.5BA and 2BR 2BA flats $670. W/D, DW included. Text “Cedar� to 41513. Joiner Management 706-3536868 www.joinermanagement.com CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN Three 4BR 3.5BA houses. Kitchen and laundry room appliances, spacious bedrooms, wood floors and carpeted bedrooms, pets welcome. $1100-1300/mo. Call 706-540-1257

NOW PRE-LEASING for Fall! 1 to 4 bedroom houses. $350-$1,500. Close to downtown and Pet Friendly. These lease up fast! www.deklerealty.com 706-548-0580

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FALL PRELEASES. BEST rentals in Athens! 1-5BR houses, apts, condos, In the heart of UGA/Dwntn/5pts. Avail Aug! Call 706-369-2908 for more info. GIGANTIC 5BR 3BA condo. End of Lumpkin St. 2500 sq. ft. 2 LRs, huge laundry rm., DR, FP, big deck. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1500/mo. 706-3692908.

WOODLANDS OF ATHENS 4BR 4BA Cottage for rent beginning August. Large bonus room. Large private porch. Near clubhouse, pool. $475/BR/mo. 404-4022535

SUBLEASING APARTMENT, NOW through July. Price $325. Private BR & BA. Common kitchen and living area. 3 male roommates. City bus route. Riverwalk. 770-655-1197. josh1c@uga.edu

LEASING FOR SUMMER/ fall. LUMPKIN SQ TOWNHOUSE 2BR 2.5BA. On UGA bus line, 5 min walk to campus. $950/mo. 706202-4572 NEW HOUSES DOWNTOWN and 5 Points. Available for Fall. 1 to 4BR. Private baths. Upgrades galore. Great locations. Reserve yours today! Aaron 706-207-2957 NOW PRE-LEASING 4BR 2BA townhome. Close to campus, in 5 pts next to memorial park. W/D, DW, ice maker, back patio and much more. 706-296-9546 www.cityblock.biz

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Previous puzzle’s solution 2 5

9 4

7 8

5 7

4 9

1 2

3

6 1

8 6

3 9

1 6

6 3

2 4

7 8

8 1

4 7

5 2

9 5

4 7

8 1

5 2

6 5

9 3

3 6

7 8

1 4

2 9

1 2

3 7

4 5

7 1

5 4

9 3

2 9

8 6

6 8

6 3

5 9

2 6

1 2

8 5

4 8

9 1

7

3 4

8 1

7 8

9 4

3 6

2 7

6 9

5

4 3

1 2

9 8

6 3

8 7

4 9

3 6

5 4

1 2

2 5

7 1

7 4

4 2

3 9

8 3

1

2 5

6

9 8

5 7

5 6

2 5

1

9 8

6 2

7

8 4

3 9

4 3

The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

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SPORTS

8 | Wednesday, February 17, 2010 | The Red & Black

Bench to help Dogs with road woes By NICK PARKER THE RED & BLACK

road is just a sign of immaturity. We just have to grow and be able to realize on the At home, Georgia has road there is no one but the looked like a top-25 team five people on the floor and with a 10-3 record, three the people on our sidelines. top-25 wins and a That’s all we have, team worthy of a trip and that’s all who we to the NCAA have to count on. So Tournament. I think once we’re On the road, able to really put Georgia still hasn’t that in our heads cracked the win coland focus on that, umn this season. you’ll start seeing If only the different results.” Bulldogs could ever The electricity of get over that hump the home crowd can WARE on the road. often incite the “When we’re at home squad, buryhome we’re playing with ing the visitor with a crowdenergy, enthusiasm and fueled spurt. really just out there playing It’s a feeling Georgia for one another, just playing knows all too well. tough,” guard Dustin Ware In three SEC road games, said. “It seems lately on the Georgia led late but suc-

GEORGIA VS. TENNESSEE When: Tonight at 8 Where: Knoxville, Tenn. More Information: The contest will air on the SEC Network cumbed down the stretch. The Bulldogs even lost their grip on a 13-point lead in just 90 seconds in a loss at Mississippi State. The Bulldogs’ mindset on the road has been a chief concern for head coach Mark Fox since taking the job last April. Recently, Georgia’s road woes have been increasingly pronounced, with back-toback double-digit road loss-

es at Florida and Auburn. But the bench has grown with the improved play of guard Vincent Williams and forward Jeremy Price. The wear and tear on the starters has decreased, limiting some of the fatigue that has harmed Georgia down the stretch. Fox said the team had “some guys looking pretty ragged,” as forwards Trey Thompkins and Travis Leslie and guards Dustin Ware and Ricky McPhee all average more than 31 minutes in conference play. “I think it’s probably a little bit fair to say that we don’t have a lot of confidence on the road. I think that some of our tough road losses, when we’ve had the lead, fatigue was a huge factor,” Fox said. “We were just worn down a little bit ... It’s still five on five, whether you’re home or away, but we just have to play better basketball.” It’s an answer mystifying Georgia players as well. “It’s frustrating. I mean, we just got to overcome this and we got to be better prepared on the road. We just got to come out and be more aggressive and just have better starts on the road,” McPhee said. “I really don’t have an answer for this, we just have to play harder on the road and be more aggressive and come off to a better start.” Georgia has almost no positive memories of playing on the road in recent memory. They haven’t walked out a winner in an opponent’s gym since March 4, 2009 at Kentucky’s Rupp Arena. And that was one of only two victories on the road last season. Georgia will hit the road again, looking for a win against No. 18 Tennessee — a team Georgia beat soundly in Stegeman Coliseum just three weeks ago. “Our team is maturing slowly, but on the road we’re having to learn a lot of lessons the hard way,” Fox said. “As long as we learn them I guess that’s the important thing, but we need to have the right mental preparation. We need to manage our bodies and our minds and be mentally attached when the ball goes up on Wednesday night.”

LAURIE MOOT | The Red & Black

S The Georgia women’s swim team sits at No. 1 entering the SEC meet, while the unranked men will face top-10 teams.

SEC: Men must swim ‘lights out’ to get win ¢From Page 1 “The guys are really excited about the competition,” Bauerle said. “Right now they’ve got great team chemistry and are working really hard to be one of those top teams.” Sophomore Michael Arnold expressed the same mindset going into the event. “I think we can be right in the thick of things this week,” Arnold said. “We’ve all been ready to race for the past week, and I think tomorrow night will get us started on the right foot.” Georgia’s stiffest competition for both the men and women will come from rivals Auburn and Florida, both sporting men’s and women’s teams ranked in the top10. The Auburn men will be trying for their fourteenth consecutive conference title. “Auburn is always someone that you have to be wary of,” Humphries said. “They have a great tradition of winning conference titles, so they’re always a threat.” While Arnold admitted the difficulty the team will face to win the championship, he said the team feels up to the challenge. “We’ll have to swim absolutely lights out [to win a championship],” Arnold said. “But we’ve had a great year up to this point and that would make this season one for the record books.”

February 17, 2010 Issue  

February 17, 2010 Issue of The Red & Black

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