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A independent student new An e spaper serv ew r ing the Univ rv i ersity of Georgi iv g a community gi ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Tuesday Tuesda uesday, December 7, 2010

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Vol. 118, No. 65 | At A hens, Georgia

N mbers show Nu o ow Unive v rsity ve t ty lacks dive v rsity ve t ty Min Mi inori r ti ri t es e sti t ll gr ti gro rowin ing in ng By RACHEL BUNN THE RED & BLACK

GRAND SLAM

DINA ZOLAN | The Red & Black

Gerald Robinson played six singles matches for the Tennessee T State men’s men’ tennis team.

Baske k tball care ke r er ov re ove verr rri rides tennis talent By MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK The net hasn’t always been tied to the rim in Gerald Robinson’s athletic career. career Not that long ago, it sat right in front of him on a different kind of court — the tennis court. Though the junior guard has enjoyed the early stages of the Georgia men’s basketball season as one of the team’s leading scorers, he hasn’t forgotten about his days as a collegiate multi-sport athlete. While he was at Tennessee State, he balanced his

time between basketball and tennis. Robinson was a member of the Tigers’ men’s tennis team during the 2008-09 season, despite having not played organized tennis in years. “I was actually at the tennis court, dribbling tennis balls like it was a basketball,” Robinson said. “So sometimes I’d get out there and hit, and have a little fun with it.” Those dribbles and serves, originally intended for nothing more than recreation, would eventually See TENNIS, Page P 9

INSIDE: Basketball previews on page 9

University of Georgia junior Lauren K. Mains is used to standing out. At about six feet tall, she towers over her fellow students as they crouch over books, preparing for finals. But Mains stands out for more than her height — at the crowded tables of the Jittery Joe’s in the Miller Learning Center, Center she is the only black student. “I’ve been the only black student in several of my classes — probably the maj a ority, aj y ” she said. “I’m y, really surprised when I see another black student. I’m like, ‘Yay ‘Yay.’ ay.’ But I may not know them. It’s really good when I have a friend in my class, that’s any student, whether they’re black or white, it’s good to have someone you can relate to, someone you know. know I guess I’ve gotten used to it.” For Mains, this is nothing new. new Though she is part of a minority at the University, y Mains is not y, surprised when she finds herself to be the only black face in a classroom.

“I lived overseas in Saudi Arabia, so I went to a small private school, and there were other black students, but after Sept. 11, I was the only girl in the seventh grade,” she said. “I was the only black student. So, I’m just used to it. It wasn’t a culture shock or anything.” By the numbers Looking at the raw numbers, the University seems to be lagging behind in diversity. diversity According to the 2009 UGA Fact Book almost 77 percent of the University population identifi f es as fi white, though only 65 percent of the population of the state of Georgia identified itself as white in the 2009 census. About 8 percent of the University population identifi f es as black comfi pared with a little more than 30 percent of the state of Georgia population, according to the 2009 UGA Fact Book and 2009 census respectively. respectively However the number of However, University students identifying as black has grown. Between 1999 and 2009, the number of black University students has See POPULATION, POPULA P Page 3

Univ ive iv versity t re ty r ceiv ive iv ves A on gr Agre reen eff ffo ff fort rs By KATIE KA V VALENTINE THE RED & BLACK With the recent installment of the Green Fee and the Office of Sustainability, Sustainability it seems there has been widespread success with campus green efforts. Now the University has the grades to prove it. Now, The Sustainable Endowments Institute gave the University a grade of A- on its annual College Sustainability Report Card. The Report Card grades more than 300 colleges and universities across North America on their sustainable practices in nine categories, including transportation, student involvement and green building. The University improved in every category which brought its ranking up from last year’s grade of ry, a C. Kevin Kirsche, director of sustainability, sustainability said he thinks much of the grade increase has to do with the Office of Sustainability’s presence at the University. University “W have been able to make an impact and change “We some of the ways that we operate on campus, so work of and through the office has resulted in higher grades in various categories,” he said. The Sustainable Endowments Institute gathers information for its Report Card by sending surveys to the students and administration of participating See GREEN, Page P 4

Squidmas celebrates start r of holiday rt as ay By PA PATRICK ATRICK HOOPER THE RED & BLACK It’s beginning to look a lot like Squidmas. For those not in the know, know Squidmas is now in its third year as Doctor Squid teams year, with the Warm W F Fuzzies and Flesh and Blood to bring Athens an early holiday concert extravaganza to the 40 W Watt tonight. “Reading Day eve is the best time for something like this,” said Larry Cardinal, Doctor Squid’s lead singer and a senior real estate major from Dallas.

MERRY TUNES When: Tonight at 9:30 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Cost: $5 for 21+, $7 for under 21 Cardinal and company see Squidmas as a way to kick off the holiday season and give students a last hurrah before shutting themselves away in their study cocoons. Drummer Jason Moody, Moody a marketing and sports management double major from Lawrenceville, said tacky Christmas clothes are encouraged, if not expected, whether

sunny ny. ny y. Hig Hi igh gh 42| Low 21

See how Hugh Hodgson is blurring musical lines for f a music fes f tival. Page 5

Index

MIRIAM CAMP | The Red & Black

SWith an emphasis on having fun, the Warm W Fuzzies play See SQUID, Page P 7 alongside Doctor Squid tonight for the third annual Squidmas.

GRAY AREA

Where’s Mikey? President Adams will be inspired by the lights of New York City while attending the Football Hall of Fame reception and dinner. At least those players are winners.

that means wearing a Santa hat or the world’s gaudiest Christmas sweater. sweater The concert will also have a charitable bent, as the EP — on sale at the 40 Watt W and containing holiday tracks contributed by all three bands — will generate proceeds for the Girls Rock Camp of Athens, a charity suggested by Flesh and Blood guitarist and vocalist Jessie Marston. “There’s no reason for Squidmas to exist, but it does,” said alumnus Jason Harwell, guitarist and singer of

News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 6

JURASSIC PARK What does new research on dinosaurs reveal? Page 4 V Variety ..................... 5 Sports ...................... 9

TIGER SWIPED? See which SEC school for f mer Dogs’ quarterback Zach Mettenberger committed to. Page 10 Crossword............... 2 Sudok .................... 9 Sudoku


NEWS

2 | Tuesday, December 7, 2010 | The Red & Black

CRIME NOTEBOOK Student kicks water fountain, arrested A University student was arrested Saturday after he “kick[ed] a water fountain off the wall” in Morris Hall, according to a University Police report. Andrew Lankford, 18, was arrested and charged with underage possession of alcohol and criminal trespass at 3:46 a.m. after police responded to a fire alarm. Upon arrival, a complainant told police he had seen Lankford kick a first-floor water fountain, according to the report. Lankford later told police he kicked it

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Police Documents because he was “upset because he had lost his cell phone and wallet,” according to the report. Lankford also told police he had a “medium sized whiskey drink” earlier that evening. He was placed under arrest and transported to Clarke County Jail. Student arrested after urinating in front of officer A University student was arrested after mistak-

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ing a bush for the bathroom early Sunday morning. Mitchell Moon was arrested and charged with underage possession of alcohol on Sunday at 1:58 a.m. After witnessing Moon urinating in the bushes, the officer reportedly noticed a strong odor of alcohol coming from his breath. A check of Moon’s license showed he was under the age of 21. He was then placed under arrest and transported to Clarke County Jail. — Compiled by Jacob Demmitt and Adina Solomon BY

STEPHAN PASTIS

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

S The new Special Collections Library will house rare manuscripts and moving image archives. The library is expected to open in fall 2011.

Library to enhance interaction By JULIA CARPENTER THE RED & BLACK

THE DAILY PUZZLE

Previous puzzle’s solution ACROSS 1 Rib or tibia 5 Equestrian 10 Too smooth 14 Prayer closing 15 Sudden and severe 16 Italy’s currency before the Euro 17 Good buy 18 Love godgo without 64 Study of dess much purnatl. or intl. 19 In the dispose finance tance 20 Infuriated 41 Baggage 65 Bench porter board 22 Street without an exit 43 Charged 66 Nose, in atom humor 24 Scoundrel 44 Remain 67 Cozy 25 Smelly unsettled rooms 26 Nerd 29 Derek and 45 Weirdo 46 Wildebeest DOWN Diddley 1 Command30 Left-hand 47 Like sea11 Magazine water ed side ledger title 48 Make 2 Foretelling entry 12 Persia, unclear sign 34 Armed today 50 Naughty 3 At hand conflicts 51 Lowered in 4 Intertwines 13 Minstrel 35 E-mail poet value 5 Talked laugh 21 Talk on 54 Slender wildly 36 Troubleand on plant part 6 __ tea maker 23 Helped 7 Final bill 37 “Much __ 58 Above 59 Consumers 8 Piano piec- 25 Doubling About over 61 Frilly trimes Nothing” 26 Sneezy or ming 9 Adjust a 38 Like sweetDoc clock ened yams 62 Refer to 40 __ about; 63 Motherless 10 Make joy- 27 Egret or be on the calf ous flamingo

28 Wear away 39 Debtor’s 29 __ voyage note 31 Holey 42 Hit film for breakfast Liza nosh Minnelli 32 Defeatist’s 44 Rowed phrase 46 Baby held 33 Stuffed by his bear sponsor at 35 Distance Baptism across a 47 __ pool Francisco 36 Guys 49 Arguments 38 Sweet des- 50 Assail serts 51 MDs, for

short 52 “See no __...” 53 Greek letter 54 Threesome 55 Marathon 56 Religious art 57 Part of the eye 60 Sense of self

Bill Potter said he believes researching with the University libraries’ special collections should be an interactive student experience. And with construction of the new Special Collections Library slated for completion next fall, he said he hopes to give University students the opportunity to work closely with these materials. As associate provost for operation of the University libraries, Potter has awaited the opening of the new library since construction began in January. “These are really fantastic collections, and we don’t really have the space to let students use them, and the new building will give us that space,” he said. “Of course, they need to be preserved, but more importantly, they need to be used.” The new building will house three special collections libraries: the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies and the Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collections. In the past, these rare manuscripts and print and moving image archives were housed in the Main Library in cramped and subpar conditions, but the new building will provide better storage facilities for the fragile materials. “Our current storage isn’t that optimum for preserving film and video, so the new storage is going to be a real boon to us,” said Ruta Abolins, director of the Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection. “The new storage will be temperature and humidity controlled.”

More than 50,000 square feet of the building will be available for general collection and study space for students. “There are reading rooms, where we actually have a system where you come to the reading room and we bring the materials to you,” Potter said. “We have classrooms, where you schedule a class to use the materials.” Potter said he believes students will benefit most from classroom use of the special collections. “Say a faculty member’s teaching a course in 20th century history,” he said. “We could come and use the materials from Senator Russell’s collection, and that really makes the past come alive to actually see these materials.” Abolins said she believes the new library will make students aware of the special collections’ academic value. “They’re going to start getting a better idea of what’s available to them for study,” she said. “It’s all primary resource material, so I think that could be really exciting for students.” Jean Cleveland, director of media relations for the University Library, said the new building will benefit Georgians from outside the Athens area as well. The library’s increased accessibility, in its location off Hull Street, will allow more visitors to view the special collections. “Because it’s more accessible, we hope to increase our programming so that we can provide people in Athens and across the state more exposure to our special collections,” she said. “They’re just a great cache of materials relating to Georgia history, and most people, I don’t think, have any idea that the University of Georgia has this wealth of information here.”

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The Red & Black | Tuesday, December 7, 2010 | 3

POPULATION: Programs hope to increase number of applicants ¢From Page 1 grown by 900 students. In that same period of time, the number of white University students has decreased by 100, according to UGA Fact Books. The University is not alone in the diversity gap. At the University of South Carolina, nearly 16 percent of the student population is black, though a little more than 28 percent of the state’s population identifies as black. At the University of Tennessee and the University of Florida, the universities’ population of students who identify as black differs from the state population by about nine and eight percentage points respectively. University demographer Doug Bachtel said black students choose not to attend schools such as the University because of a historical view of southern universities. “There was a time when black students weren’t welcome anywhere — that dies hard,” Bachtel said. Horace Ward became the first black student to apply for admission to the University on Sept. 29, 1950, and spent three years battling for his right to education, regardless of the color of his skin, after being denied entry. On Jan. 9, 1961, Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter became the first two black students to successfully enroll at the University, ending more than 176 years of segregation. Their enrollment was a landmark achievement in the desegregation of higher education in the South, the end to more than a decadelong fight to desegregate the University. Since 1961, the number of black students steadily increased, but a judge’s ruling seemed to threaten the progress the University had made until that point. In 2001, Johnson v. Board of Regents of the University of Georgia ruled the University’s affirmative action plan was unconstitutional. Since the ruling, the population of black stu-

dents at the University has increased from 1,791 students in 2001 to 2,681 students in 2009. In February 2010, the University System of Georgia reported the minority population of the University had increased 70 percent over the past decade. “One of the things is UGA is a very different place than it was two decades ago,” said Deborah Gonzalez, director of diversity and inclusion in the Office of Institutional Diversity. “That is a very positive point to highlight. Alums who may not have felt welcome 20 years ago now have children here who have found campus to be a very different place.”

2009 UNIVERSITY POPULATION BY RACE

White 26,764 Asian 2,820 Black/ AfricanAmerican 2,681 Not Reported 1,343

A typical student? When asked, most students had a similar description of what “a typical University student” is. “I’d say typically a 6-foot tall white male, blond, North Face [jacket], bookbag. Female — leggings with Nike shorts, maybe an oversized jacket. The female would have brown hair, maybe blonde,” said Jesse Hocking, sophomore film studies major from Athens. “Fairly intelligent, I guess. Mostly white. I guess upper-middle class,” said Susanna Paetzhold, a junior advertising major from Atlanta. It comes as no surprise that white is mentioned — in the sea of faces gathered at Jittery Joe’s in the Miller Learning Center on an afternoon in December, only three students sitting in the area were not white. “When I think about a typical UGA student, the majority of students are of course white. I think of frat boys and sorority girls, who live on Milledge,” Mains said. “And I guess that’s very stereotypical because it is a very diverse population, but because it’s so diluted, I guess, that’s not the first thing I think of when I think of UGA students, although they do exist. And I’m one of them. But even when I tell people that I go to UGA, that I’m a part of

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Hispanic 1,027

Hawaiian/Pacific Islander 5 American Indian 77

Source: 2009 UGA Fact Book

this community, they’re like, ‘What?’ and really amazed because it is so rare I guess.” Bachtel said the state of Georgia has the fourth highest population of people who identify as black in the nation and the University also has a large total population, which he said skewed the population comparison numbers. “We have a small percentage of African Americans, but a high number, because our enrollment is so large,” Bachtel said. As Mains was looking at colleges in high school, she said she initially wanted to attend a Historically Black College and University, but for financial reasons ended up at the University. For Mains, any historical or societal assumptions about the University had no influence on her decision — she came for the academic environment. “I knew some kids from my high school, maybe like two students who graduated before me who came here, so I figured there were gonna be black people here but I was willing to meet all different kinds of people. So I wasn’t dis-

couraged that there weren’t going to be many black students, but now that I am here, I know there are a lot,” Mains said. “It’s not really in numbers, but within the black community, all the black students know each other. I feel like we’re a small black college within the predominantly white institution.” At Riverdale High School, where Mains graduated, she said most students attend smaller community colleges, and don’t see larger institutions like the University as achievable goals for financial or societal reasons. Bachtel said black students have many different reasons for choosing not to attend the University and it would be hard to point to a single solution. “There just isn’t one answer — it’s too complex a question,” Bachtel said. “There’s a zillion reasons why — it doesn’t make it right.” Progression In the past several years, the University has enacted programs to help increase campus diversity.

“We’re trying to break down the stereotypes [high] schools have about UGA,” said Des Potier, associate director of diversity recruitment and access. Potier is the head of the Road to UGA Initiative, a program aimed at recruiting students from underrepresented high schools. As part of the program, the admissions office spends an entire day at a high school, teaching the students about the college application process as well as about the University. “We were trying to think outside the box to recruit the best students in the state regardless of race or ethnic background,” Potier said. Right now, the program focuses on underrepresented schools in metro Atlanta, but Potier said it plans to expand to throughout the state. Though the program was established only a little more than two years ago, Potier said it has already achieved results. “It’s a really innovative program, and you’d be hard pressed to find any other program like it,” Potier said. “Schools that used to send 10 applications have jumped to 60 applications after doing the program.” Potier said there are many different groups on campus invested in the program. High school alumni who attend the University volunteer to come to the events and help students from their high schools to connect with the University. “For us to be able to take what we have and bring it to them — it goes a long way,” Potier said. “It moves you — it’s not just reading an application.” The University also has programs in place for students once they enroll at the University. The Office of Institutional Diversity, which was founded in 2002, provides support for minority students at the University. Gonzalez said the goal was not only to encourage diverse students to attend the University, but also to have

a support system in place once they arrive here. “The main focus is that students are able to learn what they need to learn,” Gonzalez said. “There are a number of diversity resources available on campus for all students — disability, LGBT, the student center. There’s the multicultural students and programs, the institute for women’s studies and faculty themselves.” Both Gonzalez and Potier said misconceptions and misunderstandings about the University lead many students to not give the University a chance. “The assumption is that students know where to go,” Gonzalez said. “It’s been an issue of they need to know where can they get that information. A lot of students find it through groups they join, but how do they find that organization to begin with?” Potier said when he came to the University he heard from many people the Admissions Office needed to improve its outreach to high schools with underrepresented populations. At Mains’ high school, colleges and universities from different areas would come to recruit students. However, no PWIs — pre dominantly white institutions — were in attendance. Mains said the act of physically presenting students with the University as an option could make a big difference for the recruitment of minority students. “I think that the black student population at UGA needs to go out, back to their hometowns and the very urban communities and encourage the students,” Mains said. “Because when they see a black UGA student or an ethnic UGA student, see it materialize, they see ‘Oh these students aren’t just sorority girls or fraternity boys, but they’re people like me who come from humble beginnings, or not exactly the best schooling or communities, but they’re doing really well in college.’ It becomes a realistic opportunity for themselves.”

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NEWS

Fraternity set for move to Milledge

Evolution patterns part of Univ. study By JEN INGLES THE RED & BLACK

By ADINA SOLOMON THE RED & BLACK After months of meetings, Chi Phi plans to finally build its new fraternity house at the intersection of South Milledge Avenue and Rutherford Street. Construction at 925 South Milledge Ave. is slated to begin around February or March and take about a year and a half to finish, said Jon Williams, president and landscape architect at Williams & Associates and official spokesman for Chi Phi’s house. Williams & Associates made the plans for the fraternity’s new house. The house plans had been tabled twice before by the Athens-Clarke County Historic Preservation Commission because the commission felt some of the house’s characteristics didn’t fit in with the historical area of Milledge Avenue. Williams said he knew if his firm kept working, the commission would approve them. “You address the comments — you get some more comments,” Williams said. “I didn’t

Courtesy Williams & Associates

S Williams & Associates produced plans for the new Chi Phi house. The new house will be built in the same style and on the same property as the Arnocroft House. expect to get approved the first go around with them.” The three-story Chi Phi house will be made of brick, feature a two-story front porch and have the same style as the Arnocroft House, which is on the same property, he said. In order to gain the commission’s approval, Williams made several changes to the original house plans. Williams said he also paid attention to the neighboring houses. “We made it more similar to the character of the area,” Williams said. Jonathan Jones, owner of Athens Mortgage Resources, Inc., has his business down the street from what will be Chi Phi’s house. Jones said he isn’t

against Chi Phi moving in. “As long as it fits the historical integrity of the street,” he said. “I wouldn’t mind if there was another fraternity or sorority on the street.” Ali Strunk, a sophomore from Marietta who lives on Milledge Avenue, said she is happy about Chi Phi relocating to the area. “I think it’s great,” she said. “There’s plenty of buildings on Milledge that aren’t historical. As long as they have some standards, I think it’ll be fine.” When asked how Chi Phi feels about moving, Williams said they’re eager. “I think they’re excited about the new location and being on Milledge Avenue with the other fraternities and sororities,” he said.

The Dean of the University’s Odum School of Ecology is part of a team of scientists who have grabbed headlines across the globe recently. John Gittleman, Patrick Stephens, a postdoctoral student in the Odum School, and other researchers have concluded that evolutionary changes in a species’ size follow a pattern, and that the extinction of dinosaurs created an opportunity for large mammals to appear. Much of the media coverage of their research has focused on evidence that the demise of the dinosaurs cleared the way for large prehistoric mammals such as the woolly mammoth. But Gittleman said this is not the most important aspect of their findings. “Body size is very important,” Gittleman said. “There appears to be real consistency in how that fundamental characteristic evolves. It isn’t random.” Size can significantly affect the fate of a species because it influences various aspects of life. Patterns in evolutionary change in body size based on things such as the availability of resources and diet had been observed in animals in North and

South America, Gittleman said, but the hypothesis had not been adequately tested. The scientists compiled data on the body size of all mammals living on the planet today and in the fossil record, and can now say definitively there is a pattern. “Increase in size follows a tight statistical model,” Gittleman said. The rate at which prehistoric mammals grew in size from one generation to the next was similar across orders — even for mammals living on different continents. Also similar across orders and across the globe was the maximum size attainable. “You see the pattern in a somewhat gradual and linear way, that is what was so startling,” he said. The team was led by scientists from the University of New Mexico who recruited paleontologists, evolutionary biologists and macroecologists from all over the world to work on this project. Gittleman was asked to participate because the team wanted to work from an evolutionary perspective. Gittleman’s work focuses on large-scale problems in evolution and the environment. “This has been wonderful collaborative enterprise,” he said of his work with the team in Santa Fe.

GREEN: Environmental groups push campus to higher grades ¢From Page 1 universities. It also uses public online resources, such as colleges’ websites and news sources, to gather data. Susan Paykin, director of communications at the Sustainable Endowments Institute, said this year was the first year an A- was not the highest overall grade on the Report Card. Seven grades of A were awarded to schools this year. “In the past, we thought an A was sort of a perfect score and no school thus far is going to be perfect,” Paykin said. “Schools are definitely making huge

GREEN REPORT CARD Administration Climate Change & Energy Food & Recycling Green Building Student Involvement Transportation Endowment Transparency Investment Priorities Shareholder Engagement

A B B A A A B A -Overall AFrom www.greenreportcard.org

strides and we’ve had to adjust our own policies to accommodate the new and

exciting programs these schools have.” This year, the University received an A in five out of the nine graded categories. “Student Involvement” improved from a C to an A from last year to this year, and Emily Karol, co-president of the University’s Go Green Alliance and photographer at The Red & Black, said she has noticed the improvement on campus. “When I was a freshman, there weren’t that many students that were actively engaging in initiatives and campaigns in the environmental and sustainability sectors,” she said. “This year, we have new environmental groups such as UGArden, which is focusing on food and is actively pursuing a campaign around food for the campus. I just think we got a lot more attention, and people were a lot more motivated this year.” One category the University received a B in was energy and climate change, a category Kirsche said the Office of Sustainability is working to improve. Kirsche said the office is working on several projects in this category, including compiling a greenhouse gas emissions inventory for the University. Karol said campus group Students for Environmental Action recently submitted a proposal to replace the University’s coal-fired steam plant. “I think a B is still pretty good, but I think the fact that we still have a coalfired anything on campus probably brings down the grade a little bit,” she said. With its grade of A-, the University is now recognized by the Sustainable Endowments Institute as an Overall College Sustainability Leader, a title given to 52 schools with grades of A- or better. Kirsche said he appreciates the recognition the University has received for its work in sustainability. “It’s motivation to continue to lead because there’s still a lot to be done,” he said. “We want to continue to innovate and to improve and to really be a leader in the area of campus sustainability, and to be a resource for others if we can.”


NEWS & VARIETY

The Red & Black | Tuesday, December 7, 2010 | 5

MAN ON THE STREET: No More Disney Princesses? Since releasing Snow White more than 70 years ago, the Walt Disney Company has made almost every little girl want to become a princess. But on Nov. 23, the Los Angeles Times reported the company has recently stated Tangled — a movie about Rapunzel released Nov. 24 — will be its last film about a princess for the foreseeable future. However, according to Disney’s Facebook page, the company has no plans to discontinue the golden crowns and pink dresses that made it famous. The Red & Black took to the streets to find out what students thought about Disney’s princess movies possibly disappearing. Will there be a crown shaped hole in the hearts of students? Or will students celebrate the banishment of the fair maidens? —Adina Solomon

JESSIE POWELL JENNA FINLAND| The Red & Black

S Combining ‘venue rock and concert abstraction,’ the New Music Festival features students from Hugh Hodgson performing original work.

Music festival blurs genre lines By ADAM CARLSON THE RED & BLACK It’s about to get loud. The New Music Festival, sponsored by the Student Composers’ Association, is bringing pop-rock to the student world and experimentation to the masses. “The main idea behind this festival is Athens obviously has a very rich musical tradition,” said Ashley Floyd, a graduate student in music education and one of the organizers of the event. “And we are obviously trying to stake our claim to that tradition.” Begun just months ago as another in the continuing line of concerts organized by SCA, the event grew larger — and noisier — after a little self-evaluation. “Our main purpose, just from a composer’s pointof-view, is to just reach out to an audience we know is out there but just doesn’t know where this stuff is,” Floyd said. Realizing that self-promotion had become an issue, SCA decided to branch — and hopefully reach — out. “The idea for this small concert then became, ‘Well let’s bridge this gap,’” Floyd said. Spearheading the movement was student Adrian Foster, a composition major. Now the group will be integrating two opposites: venue rock and concert abstraction — wildly different, but essentially similar in their desire to attract and engage an audience. “There’s a lot of that happening in a university setting as well,” Floyd said, adding that many people may not realize the level of interesting musicality among University music students. Throughout the day, both will play at Hugh Hodgson, which will provide its own specific atmosphere to the music. “There’s something to be said for when an audience has to sit down in a concert hall,” Floyd said. “They take on a different persona.” At night, the remaining

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performers will take to Caledonia, whose own past embrace of more edgy music has made them very welcoming to the Festival, Floyd said. “They were really open to it right away,” he said. Among the student composers, three bands — Groove Tangent, Geister Katzen and The Instrumentals — will play, with their melodic accessibility providing variety and counter-weight. Indeed, each band was chosen not just for its connection to SCA, but also for its “aesthetically pleasing” sensibilities, Floyd said. “They’re showing a different side of ‘composing,’” he said. And among the poprock stylings, more experimental, individualist work will be performed — like Floyd’s own, all-improvised piece. “We really are ranging the gamut,” he said. That variety and inclusion has become the central, connecting theme of the Festival; indeed, it’s

MUSIC FESTIVAL When: Today at 3:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson (The Dancz Center for New Music), Caledonia Lounge Price: Free

one of the main reasons SCA hopes the event will continue on in the future — and continue growing and evolving. “We don’t necessarily have our big vision yet,” Floyd said. Now, at least, the group hopes there is sufficient difference between each performance — not only to allow student composers to reach out to interested, but unaware, music-lovers downtown, or to help dispel stereotypes about the cloistered music student, but also just to show those in attendance: it’s always been about the work. “We’re not necessarily about genre,” Floyd said. “Instead, we’re just about writing music.”

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freshman psychology major from Lawrenceville “Every little girl wants to be a princess. Boys say they don’t want to watch them, but they know what we’re talking about, so it’s for everyone.”

MEGANNE BUTLER senior Spanish major from Cumming “It kind of makes me sad because the Disney princess movies are the classic ones and some of my favorites and I feel like everyone’s favorites, and I think they can apply to both boys and girls.”

THOMAS BAUER

RYAN DUNCAN

junior English major from Atlanta

public administration graduate student from Dewitt, Ark.

“I’m going to miss the princess elements of movies. I think they added an element of magical realism to children’s stories. I’m kind of sad that political correctness in the movie industry in general is taking away from that kind of magical element.”

“Why not continue to make them? I also feel like they can in turn by making princess movies, maybe make movies that are more conducive to boys.”


6 | Tuesday, December 7, 2010 | The Red & Black

Carey O’Neil | Managing Editor me@randb.com Courtney Holbrook | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Sexual assault a universal horror W hen I’m nervous or uncomfortable, a strange smile turns into gulping, inappropriate laughs. Oh, what’s that? You’re confronting me about lying to you? Hold on, I have to go scream-laugh into this pillow over here. We all have our defense mechanisms, our little quirks that help us survive difficult situations. Eventually though, we must accept and address our problems directly, if not for our own health, then for the health of the person who is watching us laugh hysterically into a pillow. Now is the time for our community to collectively shed its defense mechanisms, the harmful ways of coping with subjects that make us nervous or scared. The conversation surrounding sexual assault and rape in our community is diseased with unhealthy reactions. Discussion is shied away from, if not completely avoided. When a dialogue does open, questions such as what a woman wore, what she drank or what her personal sexual history was, always seem to come up. However, over half of all rape victims in the U.S. knew their attacker, according to U.S. women’s studies’ historian, Estelle B. Freedman in “No Turning Back: the History of Feminism and the Future of Women.” This helps shed some light on the invalid assessment these questions strive to make. Still, those topics of clothing and alcohol usually distract us from the real problem: every year, every semester, women are sexually assaulted and raped in Athens. The police filed 44 reports of rape in Clarke County last year, according to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation’s crime statistics. So, let’s be clear. When someone says, “Well, she was wearing that revealing outfit,” or “She was being unsafe, drinking too much,” or “She’s so promiscuous and forward anyway, so who knows,” they are implying the survivor of sexual assault somehow provoked the attack. They imply a woman had control in the situation — a misguided conclusion, since rape is about taking control, not sex, and leaves victims feeling powerless. They may never say a woman deserved it or was asking

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LISA GLASER

for it, because that is politically incorrect. But we sure know the euphemisms for that opinion. Perhaps it’s because we want to have a reason, an excuse, for something so horrifying. If we pretend victims of sexual assault somehow precipitated their attack, then we can pretend we are invulnerable. “I’ll never act like that or wear that, so I’ll never have to deal with this.” But we are all involved — men and women. By using victim-blaming rhetoric, we discourage victims of sexual assault from reporting the crime, from pressing charges and from seeking help. In the United States, less than 10 percent of all rapes are reported to the police, according to Freedman. We create a culture of shame that silences women and allows sexual assault to continue. We excuse the actions of rapists by turning our attention toward the victim rather than the perpetrator. Instead, we must think critically, speak accordingly, act with empathy and just do better. We must demand more from ourselves and our friends, male and female. We must take ownership of this frightening campus issue. Sexual assault is not just a women’s issue, but one that threatens basic human rights. Show your support on Facebook by joining the “Victim Blaming Awareness” group and attending its kick-off event, “I’m a playa, but I don’t play the blame game,” today in Tate Plaza. If you know someone who has been sexually assaulted or raped, help alleviate their fears of scrutiny. Encourage them to go to the police and seek professional help. If you are a survivor, there are resources to help you in the community, including The North Georgia Cottage and the Sexual Assault Center of Northeast Georgia. It’s not your fault. You have the right to keep living and endure — no matter what anyone says. — Lisa Glaser is a junior from Athens majoring in broadcast news

We must arrest Wikileaks’ founder A

s a journalist, I am almost required to believe in the primacy of the First Amendment, that freedom of the press is a keystone of our democracy. So, The New York Times’ continuing coverage of the release of some 250,000 American diplomatic messages excites me — on a deeply nerdy level. The previous documents released by Wikileaks concerning the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan chiefly served to confirm beliefs already widely held by experts. In much the same way, the latest documents represent a diplomatic embarrassment — but little else. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton may have more work this week than last, but no one is surprised that U.S. diplomats think the flamboyant Italian prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi, likes to party. Upon receipt of the documents, the Times carefully reviewed and considered their affect. After consultation with the Defense Department, the Times redacted some parts of the documents which were sensitive to national security. At The Red & Black, we face a similar challenge on a daily basis, though on a much smaller scale. In crime reporting, we follow the lead of most other news organizations by publishing the names of those who allegedly perpetrate crimes. In many cases, we do not publish the names of the victims, even though those names are matter of public record. Wikileaks’ founder Julian Assange served as the middleman in the affair, allegedly receiving the documents from an Army private, Bradley Manning, and passing them along to the Times and several European papers. But he didn’t leave the decision to publish up to those organizations. He published the documents without redactions on his website. By doing so, Assange caused severe harm to national interests. More importantly, he may have threatened the lives of previously secret American sympathizers in places such as Iraq and Afghanistan.

Note to self: walking towards or attempting to “ice-skate” the area around the fountain on North Campus while it’s frozen solid is not a good idea. To every hot girl on campus: Will you please stop staring at your cell phone for a few seconds so I can talk to you? Attention to all white victims of reverse racism: America will only truly be a post-racial society when the question of whether our society is post-racial is unnecessary. Who decided it’s a good idea to do construction in the Science Library during the week of finals? Stop complaining about being fat when you’re eating cereal. It’s cereal. Go eat salad if you’re upset. To men in short-shorts — I don’t want to see that. Believe it or not, the Bible says “help thy neighbor,” not “people who need welfare are lazy.”

Here’s where I disagree most starkly with Assange’s methods. Freedom of information is exceptionally important to a healthy democratic society. I’m proud that even though the U.S. government makes mistakes, we continue to be among the world’s leaders in press freedoms. But with the development of the Internet has come the idea that all information should be free — regardless of legal, political or moral reasoning to the contrary. Not only does this belief fly in the face of hundreds of years of precedent, but in its purest form would harm modern society. A front-page profile of Assange in the Times told how many of Wikileaks’ former volunteers split with him over the issue of full disclosure. And while there’s plenty of room for disparaging Assange’s character and motivations, I’ll leave that to the observations of the Times reporters. I’m more interested in the fact that Assange broke the law. The golden precedent for all press censorship cases in the U.S. is the 1971 Supreme Court decision New York Times Co. v. United States. The Court overturned an injunction which had briefly stopped the publication of the Vietnam-era secret Pentagon Papers in the Times. They ruled the publication of those documents did not represent a “grave and irreparable danger.” Therefore, the Times, the other papers and probably the organization Wikileaks cannot be prevented from publishing the documents, particularly after the redaction of sensitive passages. Assange’s is a different case, and prosecuting him could have dangerous free speech implications. But unlike whistleblowers such as Manning and the Times, whose intent is to educate the public,

— Robbie Ottley is a sophomore from Marietta majoring in history and political science and is a sports writer and page designer for The Red & Black

E-mail and letters from our readers

Christianity discussion creates political divide Like Devon Young (“Don’t pervert the lessons of Christ,” Dec. 6), I too have met a variety of Christians, from the charitable to the misanthropic. But to call one “true” and the other “false” is more difficult to do than Young believes. To label the homophobic, warloving Christians she describes as “ignorant, arrogant, misinformed, intolerant and simple-minded” is quite fair. But we cannot forget that prophets in the Bible repeatedly commit atrocities and that gays are explicitly condemned in both Testaments. Yes, much of the Biblical genocide occurs in the Old Testament,

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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Assange’s actions show him to be clearly anti-American. This affects how his case should be considered. The leak in the Pentagon Papers case, Daniel Ellsberg, did face charges, though they were thrown out when a judge ruled the evidence against him had been obtained through improper means. In a similar way, could Assange face charges? “Absolutely, and I think they’re trying to,” said Kent Middleton, head of Grady’s Department of Journalism and a professor specializing in media law. “The case could be made that he violated our 1917 Espionage Act, and specifically he would appear to have willfully disseminated confidential and secret information, wrongfully acquired.” No, the cables’ revelation that American diplomats believe China thinks it can control the Web isn’t the same as painting a new target for terrorists. But the cables remain secret for a reason: to allow Americans to advance our nation’s foreign policy interests as best as possible. President Wilson may have called for “open covenants, openly arrived at,” but the principles of politics mean that full transparency can never be attained. Any government that tries to abide by the principle of absolute transparency will be unable to accomplish anything. The Times should be applauded for continuing a proud tradition of truth, especially since such transparency plays a major role in keeping the U.S. government from plotting secret Third World coups. But Assange knowingly violated the law of the United States. We don’t have to treat the two-bit muckraker like he’s Osama bin Laden, and we don’t have to send the Army after him. Nevertheless, the United States should issue a warrant for Julian Assange’s arrest.

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but it’s just as divine (and thus canonic) as the New Testament. Young’s “false” Christians may not support many of Jesus’ ideas (welfare, etc.), but they are just as devout as the Christians of Jubilee. What we should be pondering is how a supposedly God-inspired holy text could be so contradictory not only to our modern-day morality, but also within itself. ALAN REESE Senior, Savannah Music performance and Music theory Devon Young is right to criticize those who use the Christian pulpit to preach a message of intolerance and self-promotion (“Don’t pervert the lessons of Christ,” Dec. 6) — the Gospel is, and always will be, about love and sacrifice. Some of

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the conclusions she draws concern me, however. To claim that “war supporters” and “most fiscal conservatives” are not real Christians, she indicts as heretics millions of Americans who believe, for example, that warfighting can be just when used to depose the wicked and free their subjects; that social welfare can be better administered by localities (the church, certainly!) and is not the proper role of the state; that capitalism is good, having brought material security to countless millions. In making these assumptions, she confuses her own statist political preferences for obligatory Christian practice. MATTHEW BLAKE SEITZ Freshman, Coppell, Texas Political science

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SQUID: Bands unite for charitable EP ¢From Page 1

“Never Let Me Go” So poised it’s sedentary, “Never Let Me Go” is, like the sad and wonderful Kazuo Ishiguro novel it’s based on, a drama structured around fissures of disorientation. But, unlike with Ishiguro — whose prose is so reflectively conscientious it shimmers — the meticulousness of Mark Romanek’s adaptation reads like a bland copy. There’s something performative at the center of this story about British schoolchildren, bred to schooladults, who’ve been raised (nay, created) for the purpose of donating their organs to “real people.” If it sounds like second-hand sci-fi, it’s because, well, it kind of is. But that’s because Alex Garland (who wrote Danny Boyle’s space thriller “Sunshine”) has only adapted the mechanics of the plot, not the soul. Carey Mulligan, Keira Knightley and Andrew Garfield star, spinning in love-sick triangulations: Does their love matter? Do they? What’s the point of living if your life isn’t, y’know, all that alive? Romanek, shooting with sharp-eyed prettiness, dares to ask these questions. Unfortunately, all he finds has been found before. Yet I’m struck — not with sadness, but the revelation that the most resonant thing about “Never Let Me Go” is how hollow it is. —Adam Carlson

The Red & Black | Tuesday, December 7, 2010 | 7

the Warm Fuzzies. “We kind of enjoy things that are offbeat, things that don’t take themselves too seriously. Squidmas epitomizes that.” Indeed, Doctor Squid takes its name from the band’s mulling over how the world would react to Dr. Phil turning into a squid. “Would people still take him seriously as a squid with a Southern accent?” Moody said. Harwell said he doesn’t intend to wear a Santa hat for the show, but he did promise he will reach deep in to his wardrobe for something appropriately lame. The Warm Fuzzies came aboard after Harwell had lunch with Doctor Squid’s lead guitarist Mark Spurlock, who invited them to the gig for the fun, carefree sound that lent itself to the band’s name. “When we started the band, the only thing we set forward was that it had to be fun,” Harwell said, eschewing the notion of treating the band like a job, which had the potential to suck the fun out of the endeavor. The band’s latest project — an ambitious plan to release one song a month in 2011— arose from a desire to put the band’s talents to use. Besides making music, every member has a graphic design background and will be designing covers for each monthly release. “We considered calling it ‘The Singles Club,’ but that would be confusing,” Harwell said. “We’d have a lot of cougars prowling around.” Drummer Davey Staton said the group is also working a spring release that will take the form of an EP or a full-length album, depending on how the recording process goes. He said the group already has eight or nine songs put toward that effort.

Flesh and Blood’s Marston shares the same tongue-in-cheek attitude that typifies the other two bands. Even the band’s handle came from a joke on Marston and bassist Erica Strout’s part. Drummer Erika Rickson had rejected every potential band name laid out before her, so the two concocted a title she wouldn’t possibly accept. But then she did, so the band rolled with it. “We like it in the context of how it sounds foreboding,” she said. “At the same time, it’s not a morbid name. It’s just flesh and blood.” The name also captures a sense of the band’s diversity, which has given rise to at least one song Marston classifies as “dance metal,” combining catchy tunes and heavy riffs. “We can dance, but we can break your nose, too,” Marston said. This year’s Squidmas will be her second, having previously performed with the band Romanenko. Rickson also made the move from Romanenko to Flesh and Blood with

FILE | The Red & Black

S Doctor Squid, whose name originated from a conversation about Dr. Phil turning into a squid, encourages all to dress up for the performance. Marston, while the rest of the band is new to the holiday Squidmas experience. She said she is especially looking forward to this year’s Squidmas, as the 2nd Annual Squidmas was very nearly torpedoed by a number of nasty surprises, — including a last minute change in venue. The scheduling conflict arose when Tasty World, formally on Broad Street, decided to replace Squidmas with another

act, a move the venue made without consulting Doctor Squid or the other bands. The event was forced to move, and the 40 Watt agreed to host the show two days later. However, Marston said it worked out for the best. “Last year, it didn’t really feel like a show,” she said. “It felt like a party. A lot of that had to do with the atmosphere of the 40 Watt.” With the 40 Watt firmly

in hand, Marston said the bands have had much more time to plot their Christmas cheer. Marston said Flesh and Blood’s Squidmas plans already include fresh, homemade cookies and fake antlers. “Rickson is the one who wants us to wear horns and Santa hats and things,” Marston said. “I’m sure I’ll wind up in something. I already plan on wearing a majestic sweater.”


8 | Tuesday, December 7, 2010 | The Red & Black


SPORTS

The Red & Black | Tuesday, December 7, 2010 | 9

Lady Dogs look to fix defensive woes By RYAN BLACK THE RED & BLACK The Georgia women’s basketball team faces an opponent tonight that may be exactly what it needs to get back on the right track after losing to Georgia Tech Sunday. The Mercer Lady Bears come to Athens sporting a 1-6 record on the season. The two teams also share a common opponent — Georgia Southern. The Lady Bulldogs beat the Lady Golden Eagles in its season opener 58-43 on Nov. 14 in Stegeman Coliseum. Mercer did not find the same success two days later against Georgia Southern, falling to the Lady Golden Eagles 71-52 in Statesboro. Lady Bulldogs (6-2) head coach Andy Landers said he feels the biggest issue the team needs to solve is on the defensive end of the court. “We’re really not determined enough defensively on the perimeter — I’m shocked,” he said after the Georgia Tech loss. “I’m really shocked we gave up what we gave up on the perimeter.” Senior forward Porsha Phillips echoed Landers’ sentiments, stressing the importance of being on the same page as her teammates. “We weren’t communicating well defensively,” she said. “We didn’t communicate and we gave them a lot of shots and easy buckets.” But Landers said he knows

HOME SWEET HOME

What: Lady Dogs vs. Mercer When: Tonight at 7 Where: Stegeman Coliseum Price: Free for students More information: The game is not scheduled to air on TV

By MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK

DINA ZOLAN | The Red & Black

S Porsha Phillips and the Lady Dogs return to Stegeman Coliseum to face Mercer tonight, looking to bounce back from a loss to rival Georgia Tech. with all of our players. “You need to get better at this tomorrow and the next day and the next day until you’re better.” To further emphasize his point about the team’s needed improvement, Landers said the old adage that a team is “only as strong as its

weakest link.”. “Before we can ever really put this chain together, we need make sure all the links are strong,” he said. “...Once each person is able to do the things their teammates expect them to do, the team will function the way it is supposed to.”

TENNIS: Robinson helps father out in time of need ¢From Page 1

endeavors behind to fully commit to basketball. “We were really busy with basketball score him a spot on the team. Robinson had just finished a suc- in high school. Kind of like at the colcessful sophomore basketball campaign lege level,” Robinson said. “Not a lot of for Tennessee State, scoring a team- people on our team had too much time high 17.8 points per game to earn All- to play any other sports. I thought Ohio Valley Conference Second-Team about running track and playing tennis honors. He led the Tigers in every major but I just really didn’t have much time statistical category, and surpassed 1,000 for it.” When Robinson gripped a career points during the season. racket for the first time for Meanwhile, the Tennessee Tennessee State, he faced colleState men’s tennis team faced giate-level competition without the conflict of ineligible players, any strategy — just the drive to and head coach Gerald Robinson win. Sr., Robinson’s father, had roster “I wasn’t trying to earn my spots to fill. way into the U.S. Open or anyHaving played in tennis thing like that,” Robinson said. leagues in his native Nashville, “My main thing was just getting Tenn., when he was young, to the ball and hitting it over Robinson Jr., was brought in to ROBINSON the net. There wasn’t really play on the team. much structure to it or too “They had a few people who had some problems late in the semester much method to my madness.” Then Robinson did something coming into the season, so it was kind unthinkable for an inexperienced athof a last-minute thing,” Robinson said. While being as athletic as any other lete competing at the Division-I level — player on the court, Robinson lacked he won. Playing the final singles match of the something his teammates had plenty of day, Robinson defeated Alabama A&M’s — formal training. His only experience in organized ten- Anthony Pickard 5-2 on Apr. 2, 2009 — nis was youth camps and tournaments his only collegiate win, and one of only when he was young. In high school, six individual Tennessee State wins the Robinson left all his other athletic entire season.

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When: Tonight at 7 Where: Atlanta More Information: The contest will air on ESPN2

Dogs look for back-to-back wins over Tech

After playing four of their last five games on the road — with two losses in that stretch — the Lady Bulldogs return home to face a 1-6 Mercer squad.

improvement comes with experience, and that is something Georgia lacks — Phillips and junior Meredith Mitchell are the only upperclassmen on the team. “We’ve got to get better,” he said. “Those two freshman guards [Khaalidah Miller and Ronika Ransford] — I love them — but they hurt us [against Georgia Tech]. I love them, and they’re going to be very good players, but they’re just not ready yet, and they’ve just go to keep working on things. And right now, we’ve kept it really simple

GEORGIA VS. GEORGIA TECH

HERE’S TO YOU, MR. ROBINSON The Tennessee State transfer has averaged 15.4 points per game, 5.2 assists per game, 2.6 rebounds per game and has shot 49 percent from the floor for the Bulldogs. “It was real shocking,” Robinson said. “I was like, ‘Man, I’m winning. I got to get this win.’ I’m a real competitive guy and I have a real competitive spirit. No matter what it was, I was out there trying to get a win.” Robinson has brought that mentality to Georgia, where he is second on the team in scoring with 15.4 points per game. He has hit double figures in every game this season — the only Bulldog to do so this year. Perhaps Georgia can partially thank the Tennessee State men’s tennis team for that drive to win, regardless of where — and what sport — it came from. “I definitely learned a lot things and realized what I have to bring as a transfer to Georgia,” Robinson said. “I knew what I had to bring.”

There is more on the line than just state bragging rights when the Georgia men’s basketball team heads to Atlanta for tonight’s contest with Georgia Tech. A win would give the Bulldogs (5-2) two in a row against the Yellow Jackets (4-3) for the first time since 2002. A win would open up new opportunities for in-state dominance of a sport that historically falls second to its North Avenue rivals. “They know each other,” head coach Mark Fox said. “This is a rivalry that’s reputation extends beyond this state’s boundaries. It’s a very healthy rivalry in all sports. I think that’s really good for athletics.” Tonight’s game features 16 Atlanta-area natives between the two teams, many of whom faced each other in high school games before committing to one of the everbattling universities. As a result, the annual courtside version of Clean OldFashioned Hate has taken the state-wide and oft-heated citywide rivalry to a personal level. So personal, that some of the opponents once wore the same uniforms. When senior Jeremy Price committed to LESLIE Georgia out of Columbia High School in Decatur four years ago, Georgia Tech senior Lance Storrs went the other way, choosing the Yellow Jackets. Junior guard Travis Leslie followed Price to Athens to join the Bulldogs, meaning that three former high school teammates will reunite on the court tonight — but not all in red and black. “I’m kind of cool with all their players,” Leslie said. “So if we get to win I can talk a lot of trash.” From a recruiting perspective, the game serves significant importance to swaying the decisions of elite in-state prospects. Atlanta has become a hotbed of sought-after recruits, boasting five nationally-ranked players within metro Atlanta in the Class of 2011. “If we go in and get the ‘W’ it would be good for our recruiting,” forward Chris Barnes said. “A lot of guys from Atlanta, they look at Georgia Tech being the better school because they always had a better program. But our program is on the rise now, and if they see us winning the game, they’ll be like ‘Oh, Georgia has made a turnaround.’” This year’s matchup comes with a significantly different tone than that of last season. In January, Georgia upset the No. 20 Georgia Tech team 73-66. This season, Georgia Tech enters the game looking to snap a two-game skid. It dropped an 80-76 squeaker to No. 10 Syracuse at the Legends Tournament in Atlantic City, then fell victim to a 20-point blowout against Northwestern on Nov. 30. “Tech has lost some great guys to the NBA and has to rebuild their team on the fly,” Fox said. “I like their talent, and I like how he [Georgia Tech head coach Paul Hewitt] is using their talent.”

Classifieds

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GRAND OPENING- CELL PHONE REPAIR on Saturday UGA vs. GT 11/27/10. 165 E Clayton St. WIN A FREE Apple iPad, A Pair of Oakley or Cosa Del Mar Sunglasses or $100 in Cell Phone Accessories to be given away on Super Bowl Sunday. One entry for stopping by the store to register & one additional entry for each gently used cell phone donated or traded for another phone or cell phone accessories. 706-281-1000

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FEW HOMES STILL remaining for Fall! 3 and 4 bedroom brick homes. Close to campus, pet friendly. Starting at $250/BR. Dekle Realty 706-548-0580. www.deklerealty.com NOW PRE-LEASING for fall 2011. 2 to 7 bedroom properties available, all close to campus. CityBlock Properties. 706296-9546. www.cityblock.biz

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Previous puzzle’s solution 5

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The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

5 7

6 5

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3 9

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Happiness tastes like booze. 256 E. Clayton St

706-549-0166

Mon-Sat Noon-2AM


SPORTS

10 | Tuesday, December 7, 2010 | The Red & Black

College football buried beneath financial kickbacks W

e sports fans have known for a long time that college football has gone green and become a money-driven industry. It is now clear that greed is exploding out of control and ruining amateur sports for fans that once appreciated it for the competition. On one hand, we have head coaches and administrators cashing big paychecks outside of their already ridiculously high contracts — Georgia’s Mark Richt with his Ford truck commercials, Oregon’s Chip Kelly with his $4.3 million in bonuses and future contract guarantees — while players and fans endure endless scandal. On the other, we have allegations that Auburn quarterback Cam Newton’s father attempted to auction his commitment for a sum of $180,000. And though the NCAA gave no indication that its decision to allow Newton to retain his eligibility was about money, any discerning fan must wonder whether the decision was at least in part driven by the desire for a

DAVID

MITCHELL

more high-profile team in the national title game. I must have missed something. Isn’t football supposed to be about — football? The fact is, this sport hasn’t really been about football for a long time. It’s about TV contracts, bowl payouts and whatever else can increase the bottom line. If that means ignoring its own bylaws to allow the eligibility of the top-athlete on the country’s top-team, then so be it. You’re a top-notch team with a smaller national market? Tough luck. Whatever makes the most money. Personally, I’m getting sick of it. If I want to watch old men and women quibble over politics, I’ll flip it to C-SPAN. It’s time for a change. It’s time we started focusing

on the competition again. College football is loved for the rivalries and the underdogs, the tailgating and the upsets. It’s loved for the classic matchups as well as the new. We love it so much that we are willing to spend ungodly amounts of money to participate in the events. In return, we are repaid with scandal over some of the nation’s top players and annual controversy over the BCS. Of course, saying that each season is an expensive undertaking is like saying A.J. Green may have a future in football. But there is a point when public service becomes excessive greed. We passed that point a while ago. If we ever want this sport to provide the entertaining competition on the field without the baggage off, those with the power in this sport need to take off their green spectacles and focus on what this sport should really be about — football.

WES BLANKENSHIP | The Red & Black

S Head coach Mark Richt’s salary, valued at more than — David Mitchell is a sports $3 million per year, is evidence of just how dedicated writer for The Red & Black athletic programs are to finding success on the gridiron.

Coming to Campus for the second time:

SPORTS NOTEBOOK

Dismissed Dogs’ QB commits to LSU By NICK PARKER THE RED & BLACK

In conjunction with UGA Housing g

Wednesday, January 12th, 11-3pm 0 The Grand Hall in Tate II, 5th floor 0 Entertainment and Food provided 0 Chance to win door prizes! 0 No need to drive all over Athens – save time and see all of your off-campus options at once! 0 Over 50 Exhibitors to visit: UGA Housing, apartments, property managers, campus services 0 RSVP to our Facebook event to win a chance at one of our prizes before the Fair

Find your new Dawg House! mation from the following event spo r o f n i g nsors leasin and m g n i r u t ore: a Fe Whistlebury Waterford Place Whistlebury Walk

When Georgia heads to Baton Rouge to face LSU in 2013, a familiar face will be donning the purple and gold — former Georgia quarterback Zach Mettenberger. Mettenberger, now a quarterback at Butler Community College in Butler, Kan., committed to LSU over offers from Alabama, Texas A&M, Arkansas and Arizona after throwing for 2,678 yards and 32 touchdowns this season for Butler. Mettenberger and his Butler teammates recently won the junior college national championship. He was the talk of the G-Day game for Georgia last spring, but was kicked off the team following a METTENBERGER guilty plea on two misdemeanor counts of sexual battery on a female. From there, he explored transferring to another Division I school but wound up at Butler, where he became one of the most highly sought after junior college prospects in the country. The Watkinsville native went to nearby Oconee County High School and was seen on the Georgia sidelines against Georgia Tech two weeks ago as a spectator. His mother, Tammy, is a long-time administrative assistant in the Georgia football office. Mettenberger will enroll at LSU in January and will compete right away for the starting quarterback job with seniors Jordan Jefferson and Jarrett Lee. He will have three years remaining eligibility with the Tigers. Houston named to All-SEC first team Georgia outside linebacker Justin Houston was named to the Associated Press All-Southeastern Conference first team Monday after finishing second in the SEC in sacks and tackles for loss. Wide receiver A.J. Green, left tackle Clint Boling, place kicker Blair Walsh and linebacker Akeem Dent were all named second team AllSEC. Georgia-Eastern Kentucky game time changed

MANAGEMENT

BEECHWOOD

PINES

The Georgia vs. Eastern Kentucky basketball game has been moved up an hour from a 2:00 p.m. tipoff to a 1:00 p.m. tipoff on Dec. 31. The switch was made to avoid conflict with the Georgia football team’s participation in the Autozone Liberty Bowl at 3:30.


December 7, 2010 Issue