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An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Friday, December 3, 2010

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Vol. 118, No. 63 | Athens, Georgia

Engineering program to begin in 2012 By TIFFANY STEVENS THE RED & BLACK University officials announced plans Thursday to induct the first class majoring in civil engineering by fall semester of 2012. Plans for a civil engineering program follow the Board of Regents decision last month to allow the University to begin enrolling engineering students in civil, mechanical and electrical/electronic engineering programs. The new undergraduate degrees will join existing engineering programs such as ones focusing on biological

and agricultural engineering. University President Michael Adams said the University plans for all three programs to be in operation by 2014. “The provost has laid out a program where we would begin one in 2012, one in 2013 and one in 2014, and I believe [civil engineering] will be the first of those, so we will have to begin to develop curriculum pretty soon,� he said. Officials said initial plans for the programs project a cost of $3 million a year. The University also plans to hire “a combination of four to five tenure-track profes-

ENGINEERING BREAK DOWN ‡ 7KUHH SURJUDPV DUH SODQQHG LQ FLYLO engineering, mechanical engineering and electrical/electronic engineering.

sors� during the next 18 months, University Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Jere Morehead said. “This will go very slowly. We’re not planning to ramp this up in one or two years,� he said. “We’re going to spend the next five years very slowly growing the program so that we can manage it within our resources.� Adams said the University also plans to add Masters and Ph.D. degrees in engineering, but does not know when that process

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See ENGINEERING, Page 5

ONLINE

Police Documents

Stolen laptops recovered in Illinois By TIFFANY STEVENS THE RED & BLACK University Police are investigating a man who was found to be in possession of stolen University laptop computers after he was caught breaking into a building at Southern Illinois University Carbondale on Nov. 24, authorities said. Ronald Blake Hill, 70, was apprehended on SIUC’s campus two days after University officials reported the laptops stolen from Caldwell Hall. A search of Hill’s motel room led to the discovery of a set of keys from another university and the stolen laptops. University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson said police believe Hill relied on the open nature of college campuses to steal computers owned by the universities. The computers were reported stolen on Nov. 22 after officials noticed the public entrance door of a room in Caldwell Hall was damaged. Williamson said someone may have held the door open WILLIAMSON for Hill. “There was forced entry on the inside door, but not on the outside door. But that’s not uncommon, especially here in the South,� he said. Williamson said police are investigating other computer thefts to see if any connections exist between those cases and Hill. “Most laptop computers we see stolen are stolen from individuals. It’s very rare that they’re stolen from the institution,� he said. “Nobody said that [Hill] took the computers. They were found in his possession. We’re still investigating that, and looking into whether or not he initially took them.�

SEAN FRANCIS TAYLOR | The Red & Black

S Boggs Hall residents gather in a dorm room to watch TV. Residents said that theirs was the best residence hall because there is a sense of community among the majority of the dormitory’s inhabitants.

NIGHTS IN ATHENS

DORMS AFTER DARK Campus halls create community for residents By POLINA MARINOVA and RACHEL BUNN THE RED & BLACK Editor’s note: What is a night in Athens like? The Red & Black took to the streets to find out, recording the sights and sounds of an Athens evening. We conclude with reports from Tuesday night in the dorms. What is better than spending a night studying for finals, going downtown or Snellebrating? For Boggs Hall residents, it was the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show. On the male-only second floor, it wasn’t only “the guys.� Everyone — including girls and the R.A. — gathered to watch the show. “Tonight, we all watched the Victoria’s Secret fashion show,� said Purvardh Bodiwala, the second floor R.A. “We played Call of Duty right before watching the Victoria’s Secret show.�

For Bodiwala, hanging out with the residents is not a rare occurrence. “I try to hang out with the residents as much as possible. I like my residents. They’re a bunch of good people,� he said. Bodiwala has become more than just an adviser to discipline wild freshmen — he’s become a friend. “We’re really close,� said Mark Wendolowski, a freshman biochemistry major. “He’s not one of those R.A.s you never see.� As they sat all over the room after the show, there was never a moment of silence. Laughter, random calls of how “Boggs is better� and multiple conversations filled the tiny space. “We are like a family at Boggs. We’ve really gotten to know each other,� said Alex Karchev, a freshman pre-business major. “We’re all diverse, so everyone brings something See DORM, Page 2

Prom night a ‘blast’ for Special athletes By SARAH GIARRATANA THE RED & BLACK

LAURA FEDER | The Red & Black

S Volunteer Lauren Hogan escorts James Hasley at the fourth annual Special Olympics prom Thursday night.

sunny and bright. High 59| Low 35

EXIT SHOW Art students wave farewell with a final showing of their best artwork. Page 7

Where’s Mikey? President Adams must have a big derrière, since he’s planning on putting it in two seats at once — both at the basketball game and the holiday concert.

If University Special Olympics volunteers and parents could define joy by a sound, it would probably be the music and celebration coming from the Special Olympics Prom Thursday night. For the past four years, the University’s chapter of Special Olympics has hosted a prom night for young adults in middle and high school with mental disabilities. “It’s for the kids and adults with special needs and it’s for kids and adults to get together and feel appreciated,� Special

Index

News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 4

Olympics at UGA event coordinator Rebecca Surles said. “It’s just to have an end of the year party for them and we have dancing, food, music and it’s a chance for the parents and volunteers to gather at the end of the year.� This year’s prom, “A Night with the Stars,� hosted University athletes from the football, baseball and ladies golf teams. Guests included football player Sanders Commings and baseball player Eric Swegman who took turns escorting Special Olympics Athletes down a red carpet. “This is our fourth annual prom and the kids look forward to this event all year,� Special Olympics

HOUSE PARTY Basketball returns home from a rough four-game road trip. Page 7 Variety ..................... 6 Sports ...................... 8

at UGA President Sissy Weldon said. “What I like to see is the University students coming together to support these kids and for one night it’s all about them, dancing with them, making sure that they have a blast.� The University’s Special Olympics volunteers spend all year helping with adapted physical education classes, social events and the Special Olympics area and state games. “I’ve always had an interest in working with special populations,� Special Olympics at UGA executive board member Haley See DANCE, Page 5

TOY LAND How can you make a child smile this Christmas season? Page 2 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 7


NEWS

2 | Friday, December 3, 2010 | The Red & Black

Greek groups give back through toy drive project TOY DRIVE

By MARY WALKER THE RED & BLACK

SEAN FRANCIS TAYLOR | The Red & Black

S Residents of Boggs Hall said they enjoy hanging out together. On Tuesday night, the group watched the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show.

DORM: Some stay in to study ¢ From Page 1 different to the table.” In the center of the room was a literal table signed by friends, residents and visitors. The dorm is more than just a place to sleep at night — it’s a community. “I like hanging out with the guys because they’re not dramatic like girls,” said Caitlin Jones, another Boggs resident. In the lobby of Creswell, the atmosphere was less carefree. “I have way too much work to do. I’m not going out finals week,” said freshman Ben Grassmyer. Freshman Catherine Harris said she normally doesn’t spend her nights hanging out in the dorm. “Most nights, I just go to Snelling,” said Harris, a communication sciences and disorders major. “I’m not really in the dorms at night. I’m usually doing something else.” Since finals are around the corner, there were many groups of students getting a head start studying. Front desk worker Jerrian Clifton said Creswell’s atmosphere is not usually like this. Clifton said between 7 p.m. and 12 a.m. he sees a lot of activity in the lobby. “People are still going out. I bet people will still go out on finals week,” said

Clifton, a junior accounting major. “I can’t afford to go out with these finals I got.” Outside of Myers, rain was pouring but that wasn’t going to stop the fun. There was a group of four girls sliding through the Myers Quad mud. “I was studying for an econ exam, and this was my study break,” said McKenzie Figueiredo, a sophomore pre-journalism major. Figueiredo said it was her roommate’s idea to go “mudding.” “I just like playing in the rain because it makes me feel like a kid again,” said Alex Lundy, a sophomore anthropology major. “I’m freezing, it’s like 39 degrees right now.” For these Mary Lyndon Hall residents, nights are never typical. “Once we had a three-legged race,” said Kailyn Maynard, a freshman health promotion and education major. “Once we carried out our mattresses out in the hallways to protest the heat.” They call themselves “New Age Hippies” and are making the most out of their time in the dorms. Though no night is typical, they have their favorite activities. “We Snellebrate on an average 10 times a night,” Maynard said. “We enjoy late-night breakfasts and walks along the quad.”

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

BY

STEPHAN PASTIS

There is nothing like seeing the smiles on childrens’ faces as they unwrap Christmas presents. The Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils have partnered up to organize a toy drive to benefit the Boys & Girls Club of Athens. They hope to make Christmas special for underprivileged children in the Athens community. However, this is not the first time Greek students have gotten involved in off-campus volunteer activities. “I work closely with the Boys & Girls club of the Athens area,” said Warren Hawkins, vice president of administration for Sigma Chi. “The director approached me about assisting with a toy drive.” The Boys & Girls Club of Athens provides a safe and positive environment

When: Through Dec. 17 Where: Various sorority and fraternity houses including Alpha Omicron Pi, Sigma Chi and Kappa Delta for children ages 6 to 18. Children have the opportunity to participate in a variety of activities. Fraternities and sororities around campus have sought out monetary donations and have drop-boxes for toys. “IFC and Panhellenic have used our resources and contacts to help with the collection,” Hawkins said. “Committee members have encouraged chapters and students around campus to donate money or toys to the drive.” The two organizations set the goal of donating $5,000 worth of toys to the Boys & Girls Club. The different chapters

have already raised $4,200 in addition to collecting more than 100 toys. “The drive has been extremely successful, Hawkins said. “Everyone got very involved and we met our goal quicker than expected.” Though the goal is met, Hawkins said he thinks there will be many more donations to come. Participating chapters can buy discounted toys at Wal-Mart. Many fraternities and sororities are also working on encouraging other student organizations to participate in the drive and donate more toys. Hawkins said each child is guaranteed to receive a toy. “We are going to bring all the toys and the children to the Boys & Girls Club’s Fifth Avenue location,” Hawkins said. “There will be music and food and each child will receive a toy or two.”

CRIME NOTEBOOK Stolen computer found near Physical Plant A laptop reported stolen on Nov. 3 was recovered Wednesday near the Physical Plant building, according to a University Police report. The silver Apple laptop was under a magnolia tree leaning against the fence. The reporting party told police the computer appeared to have been placed there because that location was difficult to reach, according to the report. The computer was turned over for processing and will be returned to the owner, according to the report. Computer theft reported in Miller Learning Center, other items reported missing as well A University student reported the theft of more than $1,000 worth of personal items while in the Miller Learning Center Wednesday, according to a

ONLINE Police Documents University Police report. The student reported several missing items including her Northface Recon bookbag, green Samsung phone, white Apple Macbook laptop and red Vera Bradley wallet, according to the police report. The laptop was valued at $1,100 and the cell phone was valued at $40, according to the report. She also reported her driver’s license, debit card and cash taken from the third floor of the Miller Learning Center, according to the report. The items went missing around 1:45 p.m., according to the report. The total value of the items is $1,224. — Compiled by Tiffany Stevens

THE DAILY PUZZLE

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ACROSS Previous puzzle’s solution Counts calories Cut the edges of Fine spray Blacksmith’s block Distinctive atmosphere Part of a foot Panorama __ over; faint 42 Flower part 66 Country Shadowbox 44 Eskimo estate Became home 67 Open-__; tough alert Give confi- 46 __ cream cone 68 Morays and dence to congers Like 2, 4 and 47 Bleacher levels 69 Go inside of 6 49 Gave a perm One DOWN embraced by 51 Makes plump 1 __ off; leave a new family 54 Facts & figquickly U.S. ures 2 Peruvian President __ 55 Apprehend Indian Jackson 56 Yo-Yo Ma 3 At any time Fashion and others 4 Kindling Gentleman 5 Arm coverOne dictated 60 Source of dietary fiber ings to 6 __ aback; Funny bone 61 Notion surprised Drawer han- 63 Sir __ Newton 7 Had regrets dle, often 64 Bridal veil 8 Anger Miniature material 9 Sickness Road division 65 Small brook 10 Write a word

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using incor- 27 rect letters Opinion; comment 28 Frighten __-ring cir29 cus; wild 32 event Salamanders 34 Only Ring-shaped 35 island 36 Invites

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Aesop

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53 Vestige 54 Bargains 56 Prisoner’s cage 57 __ and pepper 58 Story 59 Skin mark 62 Perish

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AAEC ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ADPR ADPR ADSC ANTH ANTH ANTH ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARHI ARTS ASTR ASTR BCMB BCMB BCMB BCMB BCMB BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL

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JRLC KINS LEGL LEGL MARK MARK MARK MARK MARK MARK MARK MARS MARS MGMT MIBO MIBO MIST MSIT MUSI MUSI MUSI NMIX PBIO PBIO PHIL PHIL PHIL PHIL PHYS PHYS PHYS

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POLS POUL PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC REAL RELI RELI RELI RELI RMIN SOCI SOCI SPCM SPCM SPED STAT STAT TELE THEA TXMI

1101 1010 1101 2101 2980 3230 3980 4200 4220 4000 1001 1002 1003 1006 4000 1101 2470 1010 2300 2000 2000 3000 3010 2000 2000

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NEWS

The Red & Black | Friday, December 3, 2010 | 3

SGA looks for more Station seeks funding partner smoking ban input Decision made By POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK Smoking continues to be a hot issue on campus, but SGA needs more input before proposing a ban. SGA hopes to submit a proposal on the smoking ban issue to the administration by January. “We are continuing our work on smoking issues around campus,” said SGA vice president Stephen Thompson. “I think we are nearing an end and will hopefully have a proposal to submit to the administration by the beginning of next semester.” Prior to drafting the proposal, Thompson said SGA plans to send out a more detailed survey regarding smoking on campus to students, faculty and staff. A forum to further discuss the issue is also in the works. “We are continuing to get more student input, faculty input and staff input on this issue so that we have a better and more clear idea of where the whole campus stands on this issue,” he said. In addition, Thompson expressed his enthusiasm for the incoming Dean of Students Bill McDonald. McDonald’ officially begins his position starting on Jan.1. “We are very happy to have Bill McDonald come to campus,” Thompson said. “I am ecstatic to have him come to campus and to talk to him.” University Council approved to change the name of the Department of Speech THOMPSON Communication to the Department of Communication Studies. The council also approved two new institutes — the Bioenergy Systems Research Institute and the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research on Education and Human Development. Thompson said the education institute was “really controversial” in the curriculum committee. “There was a lot of discussion as to why it was actually necessary, but they had a good point,” he said. “They said they could pool a lot of their funding, and it would make it a lot easier to exchange ideas and work together.” From a student perspective, Thompson said the Bioenergy Systems Research Institute would have more research opportunities for students. “In terms of undergraduates, I think the Bioenergy Systems [institute] will have a lot of student involvement,” he said. “In terms of Education and Human Development, I don’t see much at all outside of graduate students. But for Bioenergy Systems, there are a lot of students that I know personally who already do a lot of research in that area, so I think that will be very beneficial.”

CORRECTIONS The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we

by end of year

By POLINA MARINOVA THE RED & BLACK WNEG’s financial issues may be solved by the end of December. The University plans to reach a decision about WNEG’s proposed partnership with Georgia Public Broadcasting by the end of the calendar year. But for now, the station is still operating on unexpended funds allocated by the University Research Foundation. “The station has not entirely expended all of its funds,” said Tom Landrum, senior vice president for external affairs. “We continue to explore our options and pursue the Georgia Public Broadcasting option, and if we need to use additional funds, they won’t be state funds.” If WNEG utilizes all of its allocated money, the University will begin using private funds to support the station. The funds will come from the Arch Foundation — a private, nonprofit corporation that allocates donations for student scholarships, distinguished faculty, research programs and new facili-

ties. WNEG is still using money from the final $182,606 that the University Research Foundation allocated for the station in September from the initial $5.8 million budget allocation in 2008. “We think that if [the money] doesn’t take us through the end of the year, it’ll come very close,” Landrum said. Despite its financial troubles over the last year, John Newsome, a production manager for UGA NewSource and University senior, said he’s not so worried about the station’s future. “In terms of private funding, I think there are different resources the University can pool to keep it afloat,” LANDRUM Newsome said. “The University has made it clear that this is a priority.” Landrum said the negotiations with GPB are promising. “We are, and we’ll continue, to do due diligence so that we make the right decision — whether it’s this option or whether it’s some other option,” he said. “The goal is to, in some way, make sure that we have

the ability to offer opportunities for our students.” When asked if students would continue to work at the station if WNEG partners with GPB, Landrum said “there will always be some opportunity for students to be involved in either this station or some version of it in the future.” Newsome said it’s necessary for students to be able to continue working with the station because the reason the University purchased WNEG was to allow students to work with professionals. “If it doesn’t involve students, I don’t think it’ll be very valuable,” Newsome said. “At that point, it would just be taking up space.” Newsome said the station is worth maintaining. “All indications point to its staying around,” Newsome said. “I think everyone was hesitant at the beginning about how much money it’s going to cost, but it’s better for us to just pay that money now in the short-term, and hope that when the economy turns around we can find other alternatives to keep it funded.” Landrum said he didn’t want to go into too much detail about other options right now. The possible partnership with GPB is a priority.

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4 | Friday, December 3, 2010 | The Red & Black

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A wrap-up of the week’s ups and downs

Upcoming finals OK, bring on the Red Eyes, Shots in the Dark and Crackaccinos — finals are nearly here. And we’re not happy about it. Obviously it comes with the territory of being in college, but the number of sleepless nights that are going to accumulate among students will be through the roof. We can’t wait to curl up and sleep for days when finals conclude. Let’s get it. Wikileaks After media speculation and Hilary’s damnation, the new Wikileaks documents have been released. What politicians warned would destroy national security was revealed to be a mass of diplomatic screw-ups and international name-calling. The editorial board relishes the new information. This is for journalists and American citizens everywhere. Julian Assange may be not be much of a role model, but transparency is always appreciated. Editor resignation The Red & Black covers stories that athletic directors, drunken freshmen and, this week, the paper itself would rather not see. The editorial board is embarrassed with former Editor in Chief Daniel Burnett’s immature behavior in the president’s box and the coverage of the incident. Readers deserve better from their student leaders, and The Red & Black aims to deliver better from here on out. New carpet in Tate Only 18 months since the facility opened, the carpets on the fifth floor of the Tate Student Center will be replaced to the tune of $100,000 from a reserve fund made up of last year’s student activity fees. The administration claimed that the replacement is necessary due to the “unpredicted volume” of visitors in Tate. It’s curious they didn’t foresee that the expansion would result in a high volume of visitors, but more upsetting is that students are being asked to pay for the replacement. Students already paid for Tate 2, and through our $160 annual facilities fee students we will still be paying for Tate until about 2055. Hanukkah Spin that dreidel guys, the holiday of lights is back. Whether it’s latkes or sufganiyot, get ready to enjoy delicious food and Jewish joy. Enjoy the family time and make sure to see the 32-foot-tall menorah in New York City. Who knows? It may even be the editorial board’s favorite celebration — what other holiday lasts for eight days? Lost World Cup The editorial board understands that giving the 2022 World Cup to a country the size of Connecticut with a population lower than Houston’s will help expand the sport in the Middle East, but one number sticks out when comparing Qatar’s bid to the United States’ bid: 67,000. With a capacity of 67,000, Indianapolis’ Lucas Oil Stadium is the smallest venue in the US’ bid, but it’s bigger than all but one of Qatar’s proposed stadiums. Really, FIFA? Good luck getting people excited about watching a World Cup in 130-degree heat 12 years from now. — Rachel Bowers, Courtney Holbrook, Carey O’Neil and Robbie Ottley for the editorial board Quote of the week: “Here at 8es bar, we’re going Cougar hunting...Why Cougars? They’re actually hard to get. The 21-year-olds, if you get enough shots, they’re too easy. But if you get a cougar, she’s married; she might have like, five kids; she’s kind of a challenge. Love the challenge.” — from Zach Davidson, a University alumnus, in “Downtown: hour-by-hour,” Nov. 29

Apps disconnect real relationships T

is the season... for sex? Forget the holidays of sharing homemade cookies by the fire — this year, every kiss begins with apps. The annual present exchange is an excellent opportunity to show you understand your partner’s interests, but I’m not sure electronics, especially iPhones, are the way. You spend all year around electronics — writing papers, e-mailing professors — so why during the longest break of the semester would you want them to creep in? I don’t own an iPhone, and if I received one this holiday, I’d feel a little cheated. How personal is receiving a little rectangle of pixels and circuit boards? While cell phones themselves are generic, no-thought required gifts, a new line of apps you can download before wrapping will jingle your bells. Nothing screams understanding of your partner’s needs like the penis enlargement app released this week, which uses hypnotherapy while your man sleeps — resulting in a larger North Pole. Size not a problem? What about a decrease in desire due to the cold

News Editor: Mimi Ensley Associate News Editor: Rachel Bunn Sports Editor: Zach Dillard Variety Editor: Joe Williams Photo Editor: Meghan Pittman Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editors: Elaine Kelch, Beth Pollak, Jessica Roberts Online Editor: Will Brown Online Copy Editors: Lauren Cronon, Taylor Moss Editorial Cartoonists: Julie Bailey, Phillip Henry, Sarah Quinn, Bill Richards

weather? Jakub Koter’s “Sex Drive” app ($1.99) uses binaural beats, two tones of different frequencies, heard by each party through a single set of headphones to increase your lust. Just mind the cord while you deck the halls. If your shared interest is already Blitzen but you’re looking for some extra holiday spice, try MountainDev’s “Truth or Dare,” ($1.99) an app that lets you star in your own porno choreographed just the way you like it. Ever wonder how you and your partner measure up? Chris Alvares’s app “Passion” ($0.99) rates your motions and volume levels to determine your sleigh ride’s prowess. For those couples separated over the break, MyPleasure’s “MyVibe” app (free), will keep your lady buzzin’ on those lonely, winter nights. Now, I’ve held — yes, just held —

— Samantha Shelton is a senior from Auburn majoring in newspapers

Change needed in affirmative action policy

A

ffirmative action. It’s a sensitive topic most white Americans refuse to touch. However, the idiom “Bite your tongue,” never quite caught on with me, and I feel someone ought to say it. Why does affirmative action still exist? Isn’t this just another inherent form of discrimination? Affirmative action was originally created to promote equal opportunity in America. I think any reasonable person can agree this was a necessary step to establishing equality. However, this policy is no longer accomplishing its main objective. I would argue it is working unfairly to oppress those that just happen to be born in the majority. For example, I’m in the middle of applying to law school. On every application, I am forced to state my race and gender. In this case, being a white male is not at all beneficial. I might as well say, “Don’t pick me!”

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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SAMANTHA SHELTON

my (guy) friend’s iPhone who downloaded this app as a joke. As it turns out, the best things in life are not free, at least when it comes to toys. Although I don’t expect all students to actually give these apps as presents, I suspect electronics will appear under some students’ trees this year. But as Robert Carnes mentioned in his column (“Cell phone a poor zombie deterrent,” Dec. 1), cell phones are disconnecting people from face-to-face communication. This season they’re potentially reducing heartfelt gift giving or a quiet, old-fashioned night in. Instead of heading to the nearest Best Buy for your holiday shopping or structuring your break away from school with electronics, why not try something more personal? Making a homemade necklace or building a gingerbread house is more intimate than digital toys... no matter how exhilarating the apps.

Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Sarah Jean Dover Recruitment Editor: Sara Caldwell Senior Reporter: Dallas Duncan Staff Writers: Sereen Ali, AJ Archer, Jason Axelrod, John Barrett, Ryan Black, Mitch Blomert, Rachel G. Bowers, Kelsey Byrd, Anne Connaughton, Adam Carlson, Julia Carpenter, Melissa Cohen, Lindsey Cook, Kelly Corbett, Daniel Curran, Christopher D’Aniello, Jacob Demmitt, Chris DeSantis, Sarah Jean Dover F. Tyler Elrod, Michael Fitzpatrick, Briana Gerdeman, Sarah Giarratana, Emily Grant, Anisha Hedge, Mariana Heredia, Drew Hooks, T. Patrick Hooper, Billy Hulsey, Kathryn Ingall, Jen Ingles, Shawn Jarrard, Edward Kim, Heather Kinney, Alex Laughlin, Darcy Lenz, Polina Marinova,

JEREMY DAILEY In the United Kingdom, their policy equivalent to affirmative action is even called positive discrimination. That’s an oxymoron if I’ve ever heard of one. Now, for those of you who think I’m a racist, just stay with me. Maybe after I’m done ticking you off, you’ll agree. Everyone loves to quote the Martin Luther King, Jr. speech, “I Have a Dream.” Among the most famous excerpts is his hope that his children “Will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” Affirmative action, as it stands today, goes against this and everything else King believed in. It judges us on everything but the content of our character. This policy also undermines the successes of many in the minority who

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Jamie McDonough, Meredith McKay, Kathryn Mercer, David Mitchell, Deanna Mitchell, Stephanie Moodie, Cody Nichelson, Tunde Ogunsakin, Nick Parker, Michael Prochaska, Aspen Smith, Adina Solomon, Nathan Sorensen, Tiffany Stevens, Zack Taylor, Amber Thomas, Katie Valentine, Paige Varner, Eva Vasquez, Mary Walker, Erinn Waldo, Katherine Weise Chief Photographer: Wes Blankenship Photographers: Charles-Ryan Barber, Miriam Camp, Lexi Deagen, Emily Karol, Meagan Kelley, Nehemie Lucien, Natasha Peat, AJ Reynolds, Julianne Upchurch, Jenna Walker, Dina Zolan Page Designers: Rachel G. Bowers, Amanda Jones, Ana Kabakova, Christopher Miller, Robbie Ottley, Charlee Russell, Adam Wynn

could reach their goals without this unnecessary handicap. Just in this past election, Tim Scott, an African-American, beat out Strom Thurmond’s son in a Republican Congressional primary and eventually won the general election in a predominantly white district in the historical slave state of South Carolina. If that does not prove a break in racial barriers, I don’t know what does. So do I believe there should be any established government advantages at all? Absolutely. But rather than using race, gender, ethnicity and religion as the standards for affirmative action, the policy should instead focus on benefitting those in lower socioeconomic classes. King desired to fulfill the creed Thomas Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.” This country has not

yet accomplished this. No matter the race — red, yellow, black or white — there are those born with a burden on their back and a steep mountain to climb. From the rural south to the urban ghettos, those in lower socioeconomic classes generally receive poor education and little opportunity. These are the people that should be given additional assistance to pursue their aspirations. I know what you’re thinking. Yes, I am a southern white boy who referenced “the oppressed majority,” used the term “ghetto” and quoted an MLK speech. But it is time everyone in this country worked towards pursuing true equality. Revising the objectives of affirmative action is a positive step towards reaching this goal. Let the criticism begin. — Jeremy Dailey is a senior from Conyers majoring in political science

Editorial board members include Robert Carnes, Courtney Holbrook, Carey O’Neil, Meghan Pittman, Megan Thornton and Joe Williams.

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NEWS

The Red & Black | Friday, December 3, 2010 | 5

Most foreign students come from China Leads India and Korea By KATHRYN INGALL THE RED & BLACK China is now the No. 1 place of origin for international students studying at the University and across the nation. “I think that’s pretty much going to stay the same,” said Robin Catmur, director of the office of international affairs and education. This year, an Institute of International Education report showed China had surpassed India for the first time in the number of students it sent to the study in the United States with 18 percent of international students coming from China. According to the 2009 University Fact Book, of the more than 2,000 international students at the University, 366 are Chinese. This lead was followed closely by South Korea with 354 students and India with 314 students. The most popular areas of study for all international students are biological studies followed by computer and information sciences, Catmur said. At the University, the majority of Chinese international students are enrolled in master’s or doctorate programs at 76 percent. Georgia Study, a nonprofit organization, hopes to attract more international students to Georgia. “For a couple of years, the U.S. Department of Commerce has encouraged states to form consortia and pool their resources,” said Jason Wynn, co-chair of Georgia Study. Wynn said the organization does not have specific plans to attract students from China, but indirect measures such as putting a website in Mandarin or Cantonese can make studying in the U.S. more attractive to students. The presence of Chinese students on campus can be felt throughout University classrooms. “There are so many students taking Chinese and learning the language. In one course or another

they may have a Chinese T.A.,” said Ling Rao, a graduate student who teaches Chinese language courses. Rao is also vice-president of the Chinese Student Union, a group which helps students feel more at home by hosting celebrations for Chinese holidays, such as a dance party for Chinese New Year. “Probably the biggest challenge is the language barrier and the cultural differences. When we first came over it was hard for us to communicate. We were very anxious about talking to Americans. Also, I heard from some students that they couldn’t understand their professors in class,” Rao said. Tony Chen, a geography doctoral candidate from Hunan, China, said language was also his biggest challenge while studying at the University. “The language issue is one of the top issues. I’m still learning English and still trying to adapt to this environment,” Chen said. Another challenge is the difference between American and Chinese food. “Firstly, the challenge is the food,” said Kai Qi, a doctoral student studying physics. He said he enjoys pizza and chili , but his favorite dish from his home is kao yang rou, or roasted lamb. International students who do not own a car or have a U.S. driver’s license also find it difficult to get around campus. “Many students don’t have cars and we have to figure out a way by taking Athens transit or asking friends for a ride,” Rao said. However, the new challenges are not restricted solely to campus. Getting used to the culture is something international students face off campus as well. Though there are differences between Chinese and American cultural practices, Qi sees it as a learning experience. “Because we come from a country where there is no religion and there is no god, I think first you feel a little bit uncomfortable, but you should get to know them and accept and get along,” Qi said.

LAURA FEDER | The Red & Black

S Attendees boogie down at the Special Olympics prom event Thursday night. This year’s theme was ‘A Night with the Stars’ and athletes escorted guests down a special red carpet walk.

DANCE: Prom-goers express themselves ¢ From Page 1 Jackson said. “Their hearts are so pure and they are so happy, they are my outlet, because no matter how bad my day has gone I can come hang out with them and they are so cheerful.” Jackson, who dressed as Lady Gaga for the prom, encourages other students to get involved with Special

Olympics because the group is always recruiting. Parents of students attending the dance seemed as thrilled with the dance as with the organization hosting it, especially David and Vanessa Heath, who brought their daughter Heather to the event for the past three years. “It’s great for the kids to go out and have fun just

like everybody else does,” David Heath said. “The thing I like the most is that all these young people get together and do this for these kids and I love it. It’s amazing and is just great.” All prom guests enjoyed catered food and music and the volunteers provided a dance in which every guest could express themselves, but no one felt dif-

ferent, Weldon said. “After this event every year, I get numerous calls and e-mails, parents in tears, telling us how excited they are that we still do this every year,” Weldon said. “Just thanking us so much, telling us that their child felt like a princess for the night or their son had more fun than he’s had in years.”

ENGINEERING: Grad programs may be in the works ¢ From Page 1 will be started. “We felt like it was important to get the initial programs established,” he said. “But like every research university, we will ultimately seek Ph.D.s in these areas. It will be a general engineering degree, and the student will focus on an area.” Morehead said the University does not foresee having to make too many infrastructure changes to accommodate the new majors in the school of engineering. He said only one course would have to be added to the existing engineering programs on campus in preparation for the proposed civil engineering curriculum. “One thing you have to keep in mind is we’re already teaching the first two years of engineering with our current programs,” Morehead said. “The first two years that

we admit the new class of civil engineers will not require us to do anything differently. The only reason we’ll have to add a few more faculty members is because we’ll have more students as a result of the new programs.” Adams said he felt new areas of land acquired by the University and the utilization of existing buildings would create enough space for the initial growth

of the campus Engineering School. “We think with the movement of some of the people to the Navy School... and with what has been the historic under-utilization of Driftmier [Engineering Center]... that we’ll be able to make some adjustments and do what we told the Regents we’d be able to do, which is manage that program internally for the first five

years,” he said. He said the school will be competitive, and it will admit between 500 and 800 students. “And I think we will meet a state need,” Adams said. “How it’s going to grow over the next 15 or 20 years remains to be seen. Some other people will probably make those decisions. But we’re going to do exactly what we’ve told the regents we’ll do.”


VARIETY

6 | Friday, December 3, 2010 | The Red & Black

Alumna publishes second book, prepares for third in spring By ELAINE KELCH THE RED & BLACK Jackson Pearce may never meet all of her goals, but that doesn’t stop the University alumna from considering herself a success. Pearce, a 2007 graduate who majored in English and minored in Philosophy, has published two books since her time in Athens: 2009’s “As You Wish” and 2010’s “Sisters Red.” A third book, “Sweetly,” is set to be released in Spring 2011. “My goal was to get a book published and that would equal success,” Pearce said. When that happened, “then the goal was to get another published, then to hit The New York Times’ best-seller list.” Although that may not have happened — yet — Pearce is happily entertained by raising the bar for herself each time she accomplishes one of her goals. “The moment you hit one goal there’s another one,” Pearce said. “I’m not satisfied, but I’m happy.” Pearce has always wanted to write, a skill that is more or less the result of a life-long passion for reading.

BOOK SIGNING When: Tonight at 7 Where: Borders More Information: Jackson Pearce will sign copies of her books and give a free reading. Additional lecture: Pearce will discuss the process of publishing a book from an author’s perspective today from 3-5 p.m. in room 261 of Park Hall. According to Pearce’s HarperTeen biography — an imprint of publishing house HarperCollins that put out “As You Wish” — she “began writing when she got angry that the school librarian couldn’t tell her of a book that contained a smart girl, horses, baby animals and magic. Her solution was to write the book herself when she was twelve.” Today, Pearce does seemingly the same thing; she writes what makes her happy. “The genre I write in is the genre I like to read,” Pearce said. That genre is young adult, or YA, novels — a genre familiar to University students and alumni such as Pearce who admire J.K. Rowling’s mega-popular magical series “Harry

Potter,” or Suzanne Collins’ “The Hunger Games” trilogy, Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Speak,” or the vampire-werewolf hit “Twilight” by Stephenie Meyer. “[For YA books] the drama is often said to be trivial and silly,” Pearce said. “But everything is a really big deal, it’s 1,000 times stronger, when [young adults] experience something for the first time. YA books are for anyone who has ever been a teenager, who’s succeeded, failed, loved or lost a friend.” That universalism in audience and theme is the driving force behind Pearce’s writing, but the path to publication for “As You Wish” was almost as dramatic as the topics she writes on. Pearce began her undergraduate education at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville before transferring to the University after only one year. “Athens is a cool, funky town and I was drawn to the marching band — though I ended up not doing it for very long,” Pearce said. “[What] I didn’t realize was how different English programs could be.”

Even with the change, Pearce’s aspirations to publish weren’t deterred. “I spent my fourth year cleaning up my first manuscript to make it submission ready,” Pearce said. “I sent it in at the beginning of my fifth year and everyone rejected it.” In response, Pearce began working on another book, completing it and submitting it during her last semester. “I got an agent in June and sold it in the fall,” Pearce said. Both “As You Wish” and “Sisters Red” have received very good critical success, earning starred reviews in the School Library Journal and inclusion in school and college curricula. For University students whose hopes mirror Pearce’s own during her time in Athens, she has a bit of advice to give: “It’s important to remember that when you receive a rejection it’s not saying that you’re a worthless artist, what it is saying is that you may be a bad business decision right now,” Pearce said. “[You need to] separate business from pleasure, books do have prices on them and the publishing industry is set up to weed out people

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S A 2007 alumna, Jackson Pearce will be lecturing today at Park Hall before signing copies of her book “Sisters Red” at Borders. that don’t want it enough.” But if the want is there, and one’s skill is equal, success isn’t out of the question.

“You must be stronger than the business,” Pearce said. “Write for the love of it and not because it pays your bills.”


VARIETY & SPORTS

The Red & Black | Friday, December 3, 2010 | 7

Star forward makes home debut By MITCH BLOMERT THE RED & BLACK Stegeman Coliseum is a welcome sight for the Georgia men’s basketball team after suffering its first two losses of the season during a four-game road trip. The Bulldogs will return home for the first time since Nov. 16 with another early-season challenge waiting for them in a hot University of AlabamaBirmingham team. “We’re really excited to be home,” Georgia head coach Mark Fox said. “We haven’t been for what seems like forever.” The Bulldogs went 2-2 on the road, but if there’s any place the Bulldogs (4-2) know how to win it’s at home, where a supportive crowd propelled them to two close victories to open the season against Mississippi Valley State and Colorado. But UAB isn’t Mississippi Valley State or Colorado. The Blazers (6-1) are currently on a four-game winning streak, including a 70-65 victory over SEC hopeful Arkansas last Friday. “We’re excited to be back in front of our fans, they were a big part of our last home win. We’re going to need their help tomorrow because we’re playing a good team,” Fox said. The Bulldogs will counter UAB’s hot streak with the home debut of forward Trey Thompkins, who averaged 14.7 points per game in his three outings

By ADAM CARLSON THE RED & BLACK

FILE | The Red & Black

S Georgia men’s basketball returns to the friendly confines of Stegeman Coliseum after losing two out of three games in the Old Spice Classic. during the Old Spice Classic. The tournament was his first appearance of the year after missing three games with an ankle sprain. Thompkins, the team’s leading scorer last season, experienced swelling in his ankle during the tournament, but is ready to play despite being less than 100 percent healthy. “I definitely feel like I’m getting back to my old self,” Thompkins said. “I’m getting there. My teammates are working with me and that’s the most important thing.” Though Thompkins’ numbers are still not quite up to par with his averages

By RYAN BLACK THE RED & BLACK When it comes to Georgia’s match up with Georgia Tech in women’s basketball, it is a rivalry in name only. The Lady Bulldogs have dominated the Lady Yellow Jackets on the court, winning 27 of their 30 alltime meetings. Despite the overwhelming lead Georgia has over Georgia Tech headto-head, Lady Bulldogs head coach Andy Landers said that does not mean the game is any less heated every year. “It’s [an] enjoyable game and meaningful for our fans and our players,” he said. “We have obviously dominated it for a long time, but those three that we lost we don’t feel real good about. So we’re ready to do our best when we go over there.” Sunday will mark the first time the Lady Bulldogs (6-1) head “over there” to Atlanta since 2008, when the Lady Yellow Jackets won by 15 points, 67-52. Senior Porsha Phillips is one of the only players still on Georgia’s roster who was with the team when

GEORGIA VS. UAB When: Tonight at 7 Where: Stegeman Coliseum Price: $2 student, $15 regular admission More Information: The game will air on Fox Sports South from a year ago, Fox doesn’t expect him — or his teammates — to be playing to their full potential until the team has adjusted to his return to the starting lineup. “Getting him in the flow and comfortable is one thing,” Fox said. “Getting his teammates comfortable with him out there is

LADY DOGS VS. GEORGIA TECH When: Sunday at 2 p.m. Where: Atlanta More Information: The game will air on CSS it lost to Tech two years ago. “I don’t think [the underclassmen] know how big of a deal this game is,” she said. “I’m going to let them know that. Tech is a great team, and I think we just need to get together and make sure we’re focused for Sunday.” And for another Lady Bulldog, this game will mean a little more than most. Freshman guard Khaalidah Miller is “looking forward” to returning to her hometown, where she starred at Douglass High School. Though her family has been at every game thus far this season, Miller said she knows there will be a lot more familiar faces in the crowd on Sunday. “I know for a fact there are going

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Students put forth best art for exit show

whole other, because for the last month they’ve had different roles than they’ve had to have with him. So the timing of that was far from ideal, but there’s not a whole lot we can do about it, and I do know that our team is glad to be back together and finally healthy.” Georgia found scoring in new places while Thompkins was out, with Travis Leslie entering tonight’s game with a team-high 17.3 points and 8.7 rebounds per game. “Right now we’ve got everybody back, Trey’s back, and hopefully everything can just go our way from now on,” Leslie said.

Lady Dogs dominate Georgia Tech ‘rivalry’

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to be a lot of people there supporting me, because I’ve been getting calls all week,” she said. “I’m trying not to think about it, but I am definitely nervous because it will be the first time any of my friends have seen me play outside of high school. I’m a little shaky about it, but I’ll get through it.” Georgia Tech was actually in Miller’s “top five” colleges she was considering last year when she was being recruited, even taking an official visit to the campus, but said she had made up her mind to attend Georgia even before she visited Georgia Tech. “I felt like Georgia was a better place for me, and I bonded better with the team as well as the coaches,” Miller said. Speaking of the Georgia coaches, they are busy game-planning against what they know to be a tough Lady Yellow Jacket squad. “They have great athleticism and great quickness,” Landers said. “They are committed to defending and going hard and playing full court defense. That in itself is a challenge.”

After years of coffee shop-set exhibitions and classroom-bound exercises, the University’s art students are readying for one final public display. “The exit show is supposed to be the culmination of your entire education in a studio art program,” said Jeff Gess, who is exiting in photography. “The final required course of each studio art major is an ‘exit’ course, in which you are supposed to create a body of work to be exhibited with your classmates.” Thus, graduating students in the University’s art programs have been preparing the proper showcases for their work. “It is important for an artist to be able to create a cohesive body of work,” said Rachel Cook, who is exiting in printmaking. “So while many studios are more assignment-oriented, we are given this opportunity to bring our ideas together as a representation of what we have learned and how we choose to channel that knowledge in our work.” In many ways, it hasn’t just been a semester of preparing for this cumulative representation. It’s been years-long: the culmination of all their time thus far working with and learning about artistic media. “The exit shows are the most heavily attended shows the school puts on. Hundreds of people come to see the art, and for most of us it will be the biggest audience we’ve had for our work,” Gess said. “So there is definitely reason to be both excited and intimidated. All of the students have been to exit shows for classes ahead of them, so there’s no delusions about how it can go.” Additionally, participating artists are required to organize nearly every aspect of their exit showing — but not without good reason. “We must coordinate materials, studio time, as well as promotional material,” Cook said. “It is like a preparatory show for the professional artist, so students are responsible for all aspects of the show, from personal work to the reception tables.” The continued effort involved, across weeks and months, has also provided some perspective on the requirements of professional art-making: that is, of making and marketing yourself to the world. “I think it can be a good reality check for all of us,” Gess said. Still, it was always the art that mattered most. “The process of planning and preparing are the most difficult part of an exit show,” Cook said. “In the first month I made drawings. I would draw at least six hours a day outside of class. I was pretty sick of it within two weeks.” Across the varying works and media represented in the exit show, this artistic persistence seems to be a unifying trait. “Everyone has gone through a lot to get their work ready,” Gess said. “And a lot of the time goes into the details that you don’t notice if they’re done well.” More, the students’ drive has led to wildly different presentations — including works on gender, celebrity culture, Cook’s own exploration of the power of storytelling and Gess’ retrospective on Athens. As the exit shows are usually the biggest shows of the year, each student artist is also afforded the opportunity to have eyes see their work — not in coffee-shop corners, but up-close. With the possibility of a captive audience, there’s also the chance to connect. “It’s a pretty ideal situation for an artist to just get to make what you want and have an audience of hundreds see it in person,” Gess said. “Most of us won’t get that again for a while.” And with this semester’s final, cumulative show, those participating hope that there are as many available connections as possible. “It is best that the Exit Show is the last semester, but life isn’t always neat,” said Georgia Strange, a professor of art and the director of Lamar Dodd. “The intensity and momentum of the Exit Show propels students to the next stage of their life.”

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The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

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SPORTS

8 | Friday, December 3, 2010 | The Red & Black

Richt reshuffles strength staff Dogs’ swimmer

acclimates quickly

By NICK PARKER THE RED & BLACK Georgia football’s strength and conditioning staff will feature familiar faces in unfamiliar positions starting in 2011. Beginning Jan. 1, strength and conditioning program director Dave Van Halanger will step in as administrative assistant to head coach Mark Richt, according to a news release from Georgia Sports Communications. Joe Tereshinski, who is the strength and conditioning assistant and video coordinator, will step in as the director of the program. A former center for the Bulldogs, Tereshinski has been part of the Georgia football coaching staff since 1982 when he joined as the assistant offensive line, special teams and strength coach under Vince Dooley. “Joe has had a hand in Georgia’s strength and conditioning program for nearly 30 years,” Richt said in the news release. “I’m excited about what he can bring to our program in this capacity and the direction he’ll set as we move forward.” In his new capacity as administrative assistant, Van Halanger will “oversee and/or work with programs that will include character education, a new mentor program, former student-athlete development and community service initiatives.” Van Halanger came to Athens with Richt in 2001 after directing Florida State’s strength and conditioning program for 18 years under legendary head coach Bobby Bowden. “Dave has made immeasurable contributions to our

By ROBBIE OTTLEY THE RED & BLACK

MEGAN PITTMAN | The Red & Black

S Mark Richt made Joe Tereshinski director of Georgia’s strength and conditioning program. football program and been a major factor in our 96 victories over the last 10 years,” Richt said. “This role for Dave will allow us to tap into many of his strengths that will be of great benefit to Georgia, to me and most of all to our student-athletes in a very unique way. He will be outstanding in working with and motivating our young people in these many areas that will bring strong guidance to them in their daily lives.”

Coming to Campus for the second time:

SWIMMING NOTEBOOK

Jack Bauerle remembegun to help out the bers the first time he met Bulldogs. Margalis won freshman Melanie three individual races Margalis. The Georgia against Florida late last swimming head coach was month and notched anothrecruiting her older brother two individual victories er, Robert, who would earlier this month in the graduate from team’s meet against Georgia in 2005. In Georgia Tech and the living room of Emory. She also the family’s home swam as a part of in Clearwater, Fla., two winning medley was then 8-year-old relays at both Melanie. meets, and her 400 “[She] was just individual medley sitting there, widetime is already the eyed,” Bauerle said. fifth-fastest in “I remember school history. MARGALIS Robert telling me For her various she was gonna be a individual accomgood one even when she plishments, Margalis was was about 10 years old.” awarded the National Her brother’s prediction Collegiate Swimmer of the turned out to be true. Ten Week earlier this month years down the road, and received a similar Margalis has already honor from the SEC. “I was surprised, but I was just happy that I represented the team,” Margalis said. Bauerle doesn’t shy away from Margalis’ accomplishments, but he said it hasn’t done much to affect her or the team. “I don’t pay much attention to it … it’s nice to be honored, but the bottom line is she helped the team win,” Bauerle said. “I mentioned it one time to the team meeting, and that was it.” Though her older sister Stephanie swam at South Carolina, Margalis’ decision to come to Athens was an easy one thanks to the family connection and the relationships she had developed at Georgia. The transition to a collegiate style of competition has still been a departure from what Margalis was used to in Clearwater, though. “Training is a lot different,” Margalis said. “I’m not used to lifting weights like we do here, [but] it’s definitely made me a lot stronger, which has helped.” Margalis also faces a higher quality of competition among her teammates than she did in high school. Bauerle said he has already seen better competition leading to better performances from Margalis. “All of a sudden it’s taken her up a notch,” Bauerle said. “I like the way she is as an athlete. It’s kinda like she says little and swims great.”

In conjunction with UGA Housing g

Wednesday, January 12th, 11-3pm 0 The Grand Hall in Tate II, 5th floor 0 Entertainment and Food provided 0 Chance to win door prizes! 0 No need to drive all over Athens – save time and see all of your off-campus options at once! 0 Over 50 Exhibitors to visit: UGA Housing, apartments, property managers, campus services 0 RSVP to our Facebook event to win a chance at one of our prizes before the Fair

Georgia Invitational begins today

Find your new Dawg House! mation from the following event spo r o f n i g nsors leasin and m g n i r u t ore: a Fe Whistlebury Waterford Place Whistlebury Walk

MANAGEMENT

BEECHWOOD

PINES

The Bulldogs (No. 12 men, No. 2 women) conclude their fall season with a three-day invitational tournament featuring teams from around the nation making the trek to Athens. Among the top ranked teams swimming in Gabrielsen Natatorium this weekend are Virginia (No. 11 men, No. 9 women), Auburn (No. 7 men, No. 10 women) and Minnesota (No. 13 men, No. 14 women). With finals on consecutive days from Friday to Sunday, the rigorous nature of the meet is intended to help the Bulldogs prepare for similarly strenuous meets later in the season. “It’s really gonna be a heckuva meet,” Bauerle said. “The idea of this meet is to swim a threeday meet in preparation for an SEC championship and an NCAA championship. The only way to prepare is to do it because three-day meets are much more difficult than a oneday duel meet.” The Georgia Invitational will be the Bulldogs’ first competition since the men’s and women’s teams both defeated Georgia Tech and Emory on Nov. 3. Bauerle noted that he has never lost to Georgia Tech as an athlete or a coach, and pointed out that the month’s window without competition gave his swimmers the opportunity to refocus their training. Bauerle’s swimmers are looking forward to returning to the pool after the last month’s hiatus and testing their skills in a different environment than they’ve faced so far this season. “It might get a little more serious since we have [preliminary races] and finals instead of just one swim,” Margalis said. “I just wanna help the team.”


December 3, 2010 Issue