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An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

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Vol. 118, No. 120 | Athens, Georgia

BLAZING A TRAIL

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

S Johnny Bravo, a Cartoon Network character who premiered in the ’90s, was found spray painted on Hill Hall.

Graffiti rampant on campus By ADINA SOLOMON THE RED & BLACK AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

that happen. You can’t foresee them, but people around you, they’re understanding of it and they’ll want to make things happen. Obviously they weren’t going to make me sit there forever.” The DRC also works to improve accessibility for students with disabilities through construction projects. When someone reports a physical barrier, University disability specialist David Anderson said he works alongside physical plant and grounds department representatives to assess the situation. Depending on the urgency, the problem could be fixed in as little as a month. “Fortunately, we have a great group of professionals here at UGA,” Anderson wrote in an email to The Red & Black. “Physical Plant, University Architects

Rugrats, Spongebob Squarepants and Johnny Bravo don’t usually cost $6,000. But that is the estimated damage caused by graffiti of the Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network cartoon characters found on University property, according to University Police reports. Thirteen reports of criminal trespass were on the University’s police logs Police Documents Monday. All of the paintings were sprayed between Friday and Monday. “It’s a high number of incidents compared to what we’ve seen with past incidents,” said University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson. The Red & Black first reported graffiti of cartoon characters Thursday. In addition to cartoon characters, “Frodo lives” was also written twice on campus at Family Housing and Lipscomb Hall. The Red & Black first reported multiple graffiti of “Frodo lives” March 22. When asked if he thinks the rash of cartoon character graffiti was done by a group or an individual, Williamson declined to comment. “I’m not going to make any speculation

See CENTER, Page 3

See TAGS, Page 2

S Sophomore Allison Moder says the Disability Resource Center has worked with her to improve accessibility on campus in many ways, even going so far as moving a train so she could leave an area.

Disability center smooths student’s path By JACOB DEMMITT THE RED & BLACK For Allison Moder, campus is a maze. A bump in the sidewalk is an obstacle, a yellow curb is a detour and every staircase — a dead end. Using a wheelchair, the sophomore public relations major diagnosed with muscular dystrophy said she relies heavily on ramps and elevators as she navigates her way through the often complicated world of handicap accessible pathways. A car parks on the sidewalk, a train idles outside the statistics building and an unusually shaggy rug sits on a friend’s dorm room floor — little things others fail to notice but Moder must always plan around. But even as tricky as things can

become, she said life on campus wouldn’t be possible without the University’s Disability Resource Center. “They’ve made it possible, which is saying a lot,” Moder said. “They’ve allowed me to have the same enriched experience that every other student has had . . . Basically, anything a student needs, within reason, they will make it happen. The purpose of the DRC is not to give you an extra shove; it’s to get you on an even playing field.” For Moder, this has meant shaving down bumpy sidewalks, moving classes to more accessible buildings, providing transportation vans and, on one occasion, moving a train that was blocking the only accessible exit from a building. “So now I can say I’ve moved trains,” Moder said with a smile. “Things like

ONLINE

Former Lady Dog Junior pitcher transitions to new college receives ‘special’ honor By ROBBIE OTTLEY THE RED & BLACK

By RYAN BLACK THE RED & BLACK

feel very special, but I don’t think you can get more special than this one. Teresa Edwards is no You’re talking about stranger to Halls of Fame. [James] Naismith here. The former Georgia Between Naismith and women’s basketball great myself, it created the joy of belongs to seven different my life — this game. So it ones, to be exact. doesn’t get any better than She was an inaugural this ... I think it’s the most member of Georgia’s prestigious honor I all-sports Circle of can ever imagine.” Honor in 1995. Edwards is one She joined the of 10 inductees for ranks of both the the Class of 2011, U.S. Olympic Hall of which was Fame and the announced Monday Women’s Basketball in Houston along Hall of Fame in with the NCAA 2009. men’s Final Four. But after Monday, She said she a new hall — the EDWARDS knows only two of Naismith Memorial the other people she Basketball Hall of Fame in is being enshrined with — Springfield, Mass. — will fellow player Chris Mullin be reserving a spot for and Stanford women’s Edwards. head coach Tara And she left no room to Vanderveer — but that did doubt how much this not worry her. honor meant to her. “This is where you get “This is it,” she said dur- to know people,” she said. ing a teleconference with “This is where the stories reporters Monday. “This is unfold and a new life the best it gets. You know, all of the [Halls of Fame] See FAME, Page 5

windy. High 62| Low 37

HOPE RALLY It’s the issue everybody’s talking about. Flip to page 2 to follow the discussion.

Where’s Mikey? President Adams has a meeting with his senior staff at 9 a.m. Then, he has another meeting. Mikey sure does like to meet with folks ...

During his recruitment at Cardinal Newman High School in West Palm Beach, Fla., four years ago, junior Craig Gullickson knew he was going to Clemson to pitch for Kevin O’Sullivan. That changed just before he arrived in South Carolina. “[O’Sullivan was] all I talked to through the recruiting process,” Gullickson said. “[Then] like two weeks before coming to Clemson he took the coaching job at Florida.” O’Sullivan left Clemson, where he had been associate head coach, after accepting the head coaching job at Florida in June 2007. Jack Leggett remained head coach for the Tigers, and Gullickson still matriculated at Clemson, but the relationship he FRANCES MICKLOW | The Red & Black had been expecting had disapS Craig Gullickson is one of eight transfers on the Georgia peared. “Being a high school kid and baseball team. He struggled in his initial start, but has since being young and talking to him the gained greater footing on the mound for the Diamond Dogs. whole time … that was who I had a lot of trust in,” Gullickson said. eight on Georgia’s roster — who man Jonathan Hester, who arrived “Going in there and not knowing at spend time at multiple institutions in Athens this fall after two years at Middle Georgia Junior College in all the pitching coach, Coach of higher education. Rather than Gullickson’s transi- Cochran. Moving from the Macon Leggett really at all [was] a weird tion from one D-I school to another, environs to the Foley Field stage situation right off the bat.” Gullickson left Clemson for it’s more common to enter D-I after represented a difference of orders of Georgia, where he’s been the spending time at a junior college. magnitude for Hester. “[It’s] definitely [a] bigger stage Diamond Dogs’ regular Sunday The seven other Diamond Dogs who starter this season. He became one have transferred to Georgia followed compared to juco,” Hester said. of many Division I baseball players this route. Among them is junior first baseSee TRANSFER, Page 5 around the country — and one of

Index

News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 4

GO BAREFOOT Your toes can change the world. Look online to find out how. Variety ..................... 3 Sports ...................... 5

SUPER SCULPTING Styrofoam becomes sculpture for one artist’s work. See page 3. Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 5


NEWS

2 | Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | The Red & Black

Group wants HOPE revised

CRIME NOTEBOOK Student arrested after urinating on his roommate’s belongings

By TIFFANY STEVENS THE RED & BLACK Excess reserve revenue in the Lottery for Education account could fund a grandfather clause for returning college students receiving the HOPE Scholarship, according to Georgia representatives. Five democratic state senators and representatives visited the University Monday during a statewide tour to rally students and citizens against recently passed HOPE revisions. The officials encouraged students to contact Gov. Nathan Deal and press for a grandfather clause covering college students. State Sen. Jason Carter (D- Decatur) said the estimated excess revenue amount, $240 million, was more than sufficient to cover the cost of a grandfather clause. “We have the opportunity today to ensure that for every single current HOPE scholar, that person can keep the HOPE Scholarship for the rest of their time in school. That is money that is currently in the bank,” he said. “The

ONLINE

AJ REYNOLDS | The Red & Black

S The Special Committee to Restore HOPE kicked off a state-wide listening tour at the University. State legislators came to discuss the HOPE changes and listen to student concerns. Governor’s estimate for how much it would cost to grandfather in all of the current HOPE recipients — the Governor’s office believes it would cost $180 million.” Carter also said the clause could be added to the recently passed HOPE bill without the need for additional legislation. During a meeting with students in the Miller Learning Center immediately following the rally, representatives discussed

alternatives to the existing HOPE bill. One alternative involves a $140,000 income cap on families receiving HOPE and a Zell Miller Scholarship that would pay tuition, books and fees for the top 3 percent of all Georgia high school students. That proposed plan would allow 94 percent of students covered by HOPE in previous years to retain a full scholarship. Sen. Robert Brown (D-Macon) said the representatives were pushing

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for the changes because they believed low-income students would suffer disproportionately from the changes that have passed. “We’re concerned that the changes mean that HOPE will help the students who need it least and hurt the students who need it most,” Brown said. Rep. Stacey Evans (D-Smyrna) said the passed Zell Miller Scholarship, which requires high school students to graduate with a 3.7 GPA and a 1200 SAT score, does not set a fair standard for students living in rural and inner city areas. “It’s not the GPA part of [the requirements] that bothers me so much, it’s the SAT score,” she said. “I believe that hard work will get you to a higher GPA, but I don’t believe

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that harder work will get you to a [higher] SAT. It’s unfair to tell you and tell me, who had a 3.8 GPA and barely a 1000 SAT score in high school, that we are not the best and brightest and we are not the ones who deserve to have this scholarship.” Other suggestions proposed during the meeting included a grace period which would allow students to accrue the money necessary to pay for HOPE cuts and a cap which would divide a family’s income by the number of children in that family. The representatives also encouraged students to continue rallying for changes to HOPE so that future revisions could be made to the existing bill. “I really think that next year, if we hear from enough people, we could be back at the table,” Carter said. “I really think that what we need to do is churn this discussion and make sure people know that we’re watching.”

Downtown Athens Open Daily See All Our Mocs & Boots on

THE DAILY PUZZLE

Previous puzzle’s solution

1 Michelle, to Malia & Sasha 4 Receded 9 One of the Three Bears 13 Blue-pencil 15 Without companions 16 Rotten to the 39 Fibs

61 Thrill

17 Musical sound

40 Go astray

62 Strong wind

18 Transmits

41 Eats nothing

63 Jot down

19 Small brook

42 Dis-continue

64 Evil spirit

20 In __; all pre-

43 Sneaky

65 Raced

core

DOWN

45 Longshoreman,

pared 22 In a lazy way

1 Encountered

often

2 Stench

23 Opposite of hot 46 Groove 24 Sense of self-

47 No longer living 48 Invisible ema-

esteem 26 __ unlikely; not apt to happen 29 Example; ideal

3 Belonging to yours truly 4 Without difficul-

nation 51 Enrolling one-

ty 5 Merge

self

34 Bay or cove

56 Door handle

6 Fibula or rib

35 Truths

57 Public upris-

7 Rear-__; crash-

36 Luau garland

es into the

ings

37 Precious

58 Well-organized

38 Michelin prod-

60 TV’s “American

ucts

back of

28 Angry stare

ender

41 __ shot; annual 50 Underground

10 Enthusiastic

29 Bash

injection, for

11 Capsule

30 Highest cards

many

12 Supporter

31 Homer classic

42 Outer garment

14 Instructor

32 Honking birds

44 Like land fit for 53 Rich soil

21 Blockhead

33 Tightwad

25 Helium or oxy- 35 Trout or turbot gen

8 Dinner courses 26 Conceals 9 Sentence

__”

27 Still; lifeless

growing crops 45 Reduce

38 In rags

47 “Same for me!”

39 __ the way;

48 Related

pioneering

49 Unfasten

plant part 52 Longest river

54 Not far away 55 Big celebration

digit number

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¢ From Page 1 now,” he said. The graffiti was found at locations such as Myers Hall, Morris Hall, Creswell Hall and many of the freshman dorms in the Hill Community. Williamson said the graffiti is costing the University unnecessary money to clean the buildings. “We don’t need to spend it anytime, but especially during times like these,” he said. In a report of a Rugrats character sprayed at Myers Hall, the officer “checked the immediate area for trash cans that might have contained cans of spray paint that were disposed of and none were found.” Williamson said police “don’t normally commit a lot of resources” to finding the offender, but he declined to speak specifically about the police protocol for Monday’s graffiti reports. Most of the people who reported the 13 incidents were University housing staff, though Williamson said anyone who spots more graffiti should let police know. “We’ve had a number of people call,” Williamson said. “We’re going to catch this person or persons by community involvement.”

Monday’s photo caption with the story “Dogs sweep first weekend series in two years” is incorrect. The man in the photo should be labeled as Brett DeLoach. The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you see an error, and we will do our best to correct it.

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A University student was charged with possession of fake ID, family violence, underage possession or consumption of alcohol and criminal trespass Thursday night, according to a University Police report. An officer was dispatched to Lipscomb Hall in reference to a report of Connor James Thorn, 19, urinating on his roommate’s belongings. The roommate told the officer that Thorn came into the room at about 1:30 Documents a.m. and broke their TV. He said Thorn then woke up at about 4:10 a.m. and “proceeded to urinate on [the roommate’s] shoes and binders that were lying beside the bed,” according to the report. When the officer walked into their room, “there was a large puddle of urine evident,” according to the document. The officer reportedly smelled the odor of alcohol on Thorn’s breath. After the officer found out Thorn was 19, Thorn was arrested and a fake ID was found in his wallet. Thorn was taken to Athens-Clarke County Jail.

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NEWS & VARIETY

The Red & Black | Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | 3

Tuesday

Sculptor influenced by culture

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Styrofoam and polyurethane are Folkert de Jong’s materials of choice. The sculptor from Amsterdam chose the two to explore the idea of perception in the world. He will lecture today about his background and evolution as an artist. “I think by introducing this into an art complex, I want to focus on how we perceive the world around us,� de Jong said. In his first trip to Athens, de Jong will show slides of his work from 2001 to present. Though the artist grew up in the Netherlands, de Jong has been influenced by American culture, particularly cartoons and commercials. “I think it’s interesting to look at the history of the United States in relation to Europe,� he said. “How did it all begin in the United States, and what kind of historical events took place? How can we look at the United States as a model for global awareness?� Though American culture is an influence for de Jong, the sculptor prefers to have more of a global and cultural basis on his work. To de Jong, there is a clear difference artistically between the United States and Europe. As of late, de Jong has been busy in the art world. Last week, a new exhibition, “Operation Harmony,� debuted in New York City, and de Jong will have art displayed at the “The Shape of Things to Come� event in London. “I think artistically European painters are more focused on the local whereas the Americans are more focused on the global,� he said. Overall, de Jong likes to focus on human nature, and it is often portrayed in a rather haunting way.

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When Frank Brown was young, he traded PokĂŠmon on his Game Boy Color. Now, he trades stocks. Brown, a junior from Greensboro, N.C., is enrolled in a Terry class that allows finance students to obtain real market experience by managing $160,000 donated by University alumni. Competition for a spot in the 30-person class is fierce, with 80 to 100 applicants every year. However, because of the opportunity, students remain hopeful and apply year after year. Many students managing the Terry Student Managed Investment Fund, such as SMIF President Harsh Patel, graduate with top-level finance jobs. Patel, a senior from Canton, will work as an investment-banking analyst at SunTrust Robinson Humphrey after his spring graduation. He said his interviewers for the position concentrated on his experience with SMIF and the class helped him land the job. “We are doing this with real money,â€? Patel said. “We are talking to them about

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S Dutch artist Folkert de Jong, who creates sculptures with Styrofoam and polyurethane, is intrigued by human nature. “Mostly it’s about reading books, what’s on TV, what’s in the movies and about human nature,� de Jong said. “How is it that human history repeats itself time after time? Why is human nature so destructive?� De Jong also sees a role of technology and mass communications in the art world, but most important is the role art has on society. “I think art tends to be a very powerful reflection of society,� he

VISITING ARTIST Who: Folkert de Jong When: Today at 5:30 Where: S151 Lamar Dodd School of Art said. “There must be something spiritual emerging from art, and each individual can do something to reshape our reality in life.�

Terry students manage stock portfolio By LINDSEY COOK THE RED & BLACK

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stocks they know and they can connect what we have learned in the classroom to how we apply it to real companies.� Paul Windsor, a senior from Birmingham, Ala., said he’s been in the class for the last two years because of the experience and skills it gives him. The class splits students into seven sections — health care, financials, energy and utilities, industrials, consumer discretionary, consumer staples and technology. Each class session, students present stocks they think would be good to buy or stocks they want to sell. After counterarguments, the group votes on the action. The goal is to beat the market. Students of SMIF say they like studying the stock market because there is always something different, which is why they usually check the stocks multiple times a day on their phones, computers, laptops or in the newspaper to see how their stocks are doing. “Yes, it’s taking over my life, but it’s what I love to do,� Patel said. Windsor said he checks the stock market five to 10 times per day, both because

of the class, for which he is the portfolio manager, and because of his own personal stock portfolio. Both Windsor and Brown have personal stock portfolios and say they were interested in stocks from a young age. After his father gave him a small pamphlet on stock investing at age 10, Windsor studied it meticulously. “I found something I was really passionate about and jumped into it,� Windsor said. Brown’s interest for the stock market escalated during his senior year of high school when he entered a virtual portfolio contest. The winner won an expensive steak dinner at one of the best restaurants in Greensboro, N.C. “I really wanted that steak dinner,� Brown said. Brown watched his virtual portfolio value rocket from $120,000 to $650,000. His group won the steak dinner. The finance majors encourage any interested students to apply for SMIF and begin learning about stocks via virtual portfolios and by reading the news. “There’s plenty of virtual portfolios on the Web for free,� Windsor said. “Just

CENTER: University expands campus accessibility to meet student needs ¢ From Page 1 and the Grounds Department look at the logistics involved in projects. Athens is a historic city, which can present interesting dilemmas in terms of accessibility.â€? Anderson said the biggest obstacle for the DRC is working with the University’s hilly campus. When Moder could not attend a class on the top floor of the LeConte, the DRC quickly changed the location. “So I just could not go to class that day, but they changed it for the next week,â€? Moder said. “It’s a give and take. I need to be understanding if it’s not in the ideal situation, but they’ll definitely work with you.â€? Although some of the accessibility projects can become quite complicated, Moder said the DRC usually finds a way to make it work. “There are a lot of logistics involved. Sometimes it works out perfectly, like when they just built this ramp this year,â€? she said of a new ramp leading into the Myers Quad. “It’s tucked away. It’s not an eyesore. I think it’s actually pretty well done.â€? However, Moder said there are more projects she would like to see completed at the University. With her mind set on capturing the typical picture under the chapel bell, she

remembers the disappointment she felt when she realized that wouldn’t be possible. “I wanted to go take pictures but couldn’t get up there,� she said. “It’s a tradition on campus that everyone should have access to. I love the traditions this campus holds and the fact that I wasn’t able to get up to one — there’s something wrong with that.� But this barrier isn’t expected to exist for long. After Moder reported the problem, Anderson told The Red & Black he expects a solution to be worked out sometime this year. Other fixes — including one to the Founders Garden — might have to wait a while longer on the back burner. But Moder seems to understand. “There’s so many different variables in the equation,� she said. “There’s maintenance, there’s the people that have to sign off on the budget. It’s not just that certain things can’t get done because there’s not the desire to.� But even if things on campus aren’t perfect, Moder said they’ve exceeded expectations. “UGA was definitely the right place for me to end up,� she said. “And for as old and historic as it is, it’s surprisingly easy to get around. That’s probably due to a lot of hard work throughout the years.�

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4 | Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | The Red & Black

Mimi Ensley | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Rachel G. Bowers | Managing Editor me@randb.com Courtney Holbrook | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

‘F’ word not OK for family paper T

he “F” word was in The Red & Black eight times last Wednesday. Did you see it? The word appeared in a front page teaser and seven times on page seven, in an article written by Casey Echols, (“‘Nasty’ band wanted to be dentists,” March 29). The band name would not be publishable in family-friendly publications, such as the New York Times. The Times removes swear words and replaces them with asterisks or dashes. Or they insert brackets explaining items in the article are unprintable. Other publications, such as Rolling Stone magazine, are able to print foul language, because they don’t advertise themselves as family-friendly establishments. Rolling Stone’s concentration on the popular music industry and their often provocative covers give the magazine a more mature readership. So, does the F word shock you? It would shock my grandmother. It would shock my mother. The Red & Black assumes its audience doesn’t include either of them. But it does include me, and I was shocked. The newspaper may be tailored to college kids, but we are not a unified demographic. I suppose as a college kid, it shouldn’t bother me. University students often sound like sailors. Curse words are heard around every corner. They linger in the air as uninvited as second-hand smoke. And they are equally unavoidable. But the words chosen and printed in The Red & Black are avoidable. Every noun, verb and adjective is read through by the writer and many editors before receiving a nook in the newspaper. That’s two chances for unneeded words — objectionable or lewd — to be removed. I don’t for a moment support reigning in First Amendment rights. As a newspapers major

Opinions

opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

TRACY ROGERS and future law student, I believe in free speech and press. But using an offensive word when an inoffensive word would suffice is unnecessary. I believe it takes readers away from newspapers. The Red & Black’s band preview needs to include the name of the band, which is “The F***ing Hotlights.” But just because the band uses foul language does not mean The Red & Black must follow suit. The infamous F word could have been printed once in the first mention of the band’s name. The rest of the article could then indirectly reference the band or call them by a cleaner name. More than once, the writer referred to the band as “The Hotlights” — the name minus the naughty word. So why not follow that practice throughout the entire article, thereby making the article more reader-friendly? The Red & Black inserted the full name of the band throughout the article, in a picture, in the photo caption and on the front page. The article thus became more about their name and how scandalous it was, rather than the band itself. Everything else of consequence about the band members was upstaged by the eight paragraphs reporting the name and how dirty and gross the band is. A journalist’s use of shocking language can reduce an interesting piece of information to sensationalism. Obscenity should appear in print only if necessary to inform the public. Sensationalism will hurt you in the long run, Red & Black. Does that shock you? — Tracy Rogers is a senior from Suwanee majoring in newspapers

Mailbox

E-mail and letters from our readers

No more free speech zones “Free speech” implies that one has the right to express oneself without interference or obstruction from a third party. For this reason, I say that speech at UGA is inherently “unfree.” After relocating their signs from Tate Plaza to Baxter/Lumpkin sidewalk to avoid blocking anyone’s walkway, the Young Americans for Liberty were told to leave because they were displaying signs in a “non-free speech zone.” They left, as they were told, but the issue isn’t whether they abided by the rules — it’s whether the rules should even exist. Yes, one’s speech cannot interfere with the purpose of the university — teaching its students — but speech that does not block pathways, obstruct traffic, or interrupt classes can’t justly be restricted. St. Augustine once said, “When the law is unjust, it is no law at all,” which is why, as President

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033

of YAL, I call on the Student Government Association and students of all backgrounds to demand an end to the idea of “free speech zones” on our campus. BRIAN UNDERWOOD Freshman, Evans Political science and History

LETTERS POLICY Letters must include name, year in school, hometown, phone number, major or job title or other appropriate identification. Letters are edited for spelling, grammar, length, style and libelous material. All letters will be published — either in print or online.

Georgia needs Sunday alcohol sales I

love Jesus and I love booze. I learned about Jesus growing up in the Bible Belt of northern Georgia, reaching adulthood as a believer. I learned about alcohol at the University, discovering the healing power of drinking beers at Copper Creek with my friends. But some Georgia legislators and lobbyists say that to love both on a Sunday should be against the law. Georgia is one of 10 states still hanging on to a “blue law” — a law meant to uphold religious standards by banning or limiting sales of alcohol on Sundays. The law is old and outdated. And many are starting to agree. A new bill that would allow local counties and cities to decide whether to permit Sunday alcohol sales has been proposed in the Georgia Legislature. The bill has already passed the Georgia Senate and is still being debated in the Georgia House of Representatives. Gov. Nathan Deal has already promised he would sign the bill into law on July 1 — as long as it gains House approval. Though this bill is better than

News Editor: Rachel Bunn Associate News Editor: Polina Marinova Sports Editor: Nick Parker Variety Editor: Joe Williams Photo Editor: Sara Caldwell Design Editors: Amanda Jones, Haley Temple Copy Editors: Cindy Austin, Megan Holley, Beth Pollak Online Copy Editor: Malkah Glaser Editorial Cartoonist: Sarah Quinn, Colin Tom Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Sarah Jean Dover

the present law, I think there is still room for improvement. The proposed bill leaves loopholes for individual cities and counties to continue enforcing a “blue law.” On Sundays, I go to a grocery store where I purchase my food for the week. But if I want to purchase a bottle of wine for a meal or beer for the weekend, I have to come back on a different day. Why is that? Conservatives argue the ban on Sunday sales should remain intact to promote Christian beliefs. As a Christian, I believe in a day of rest and helping others. What if drinking a margarita helps me do both? Some estimate the state is missing out on between $3 million and $5 million in tax revenue by not allowing Sunday purchases of alcohol, according to the Distilled Spirits Council of the United

Author promotes female education abroad

G

reg Mortenson, best-selling author of “Three Cups of Tea” and “Stones into Schools,” couldn’t care less whether or not people know who he is. One gets the feeling that if he could operate the Central Asia Institute anonymously, he would. CAI, the non-governmental organization created by Mortenson with the help of many others in 1996, serves to promote literacy and education throughout Pakistan and Afghanistan by establishing schools. Unlike similar organizations, the CAI achieves its goals through local initiative and the building of trust between the native population and the CAI’s staff. The incredible story of its founding and operation is detailed in Mortenson’s two books. Despite his amazing story, the last thing Mortenson wants is praise. So rather than promote the man, I believe he would prefer that I promote the cause. What started as a promise to the elder of a small Pakistani village has become a life-long dedication to alleviating one of the region’s most serious concerns. Literacy is estimated at an alarming rate of only 50 percent in Pakistan and 28 percent in Afghanistan, according to the CIA. Literacy largely eludes these

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NEWS: 706-433-3002

RACHEL BUNN

States. In our state with its growing budget deficit, this extra revenue could be put to good use. Some, including the editorial board for The Red & Black (“Raise your glass,” Feb. 1), have suggested lifting the ban and using the revenue for HOPE scholarships. The idea isn’t that crazy: the lottery was created after a “blue law” prohibiting state-sponsored gambling was repealed. And it has now helped fund education for more than one million students in Georgia, according to the Georgia Student Finance Commission. The tax revenue produced by Sunday sales also could go to philanthropy programs such as the Brain and Spinal Injury trust fund — a grant that provides funds for persons with traumatic injuries to help pay for medical and living expenses. Let’s raise our glasses to philanthropy and education. And let’s do it on a Sunday. Jesus turned water into wine, after all. — Rachel Bunn is the news editor for The Red & Black

Recruitment Editor: Katie Valentine Senior Reporters: Jacob Demmitt, Dallas Duncan Staff Writers: Umarah Ali, Becky Atkinson, Jason Axlerod, Ryan Black, Mitch Blomert, Chris Brandus, Hilary Butschek, Kelsey Byrd, Adam Carlson, Melissa Cohen, Lindsey Cook, Kelly Corbett, Chris D’Aniello, Christopher Desantis, Zach Dillard, Casey Echols, Nick Fouriezos, Briana Gerdeman, Sarah Giarratana, Emily Grant, Melissa Harward, Mariana Heredia, Charles Hicks, Drew Hooks, Kathryn Ingall, Shawn Jarrard, Abbey Joris, Emily Karol, Elaine Kelch, Edward Kim, Heather Kinney, Alex Laughlin, Jamie McDonough, Christopher Miller, Kristen Nipper, Tunde Ogunsakin, Robbie Ottley, Wil Petty, Crissinda Ponder, Michael Prochaska,

EVAN TIGHE nations’ populations and indicates the lack of a viable system of education. This dynamic proves to be even more prevalent amongst people living in rural areas far from the reach of government funding and infrastructure. But the most striking facet of this problem lies among the female demographic of these nations, where women’s literacy is estimated to be below 10 percent in some provinces, according to UNESCO data. This is the result of poverty and manipulated tenets of the Islamic faith by organizations such as the Taliban. Though Islam urges both men and women to acquire education, extremists seek to suppress the education of females and believe that performing acts such as throwing acid into the faces of young girls attending school is in accordance with the teachings of the Qur’an. It is not at all uncommon for girls’ schools to be destroyed and young women brutally punished for the innocent and commendable act of educating themselves. Something that we take for granted as an

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inherent human right remains an insurmountable obstacle for many women in this part of the world. Female education can have a substantial positive effect on local and national levels, according to the World Bank and the Council on Foreign Relations. These include economic benefits, higher levels of health and greater amounts of women’s empowerment. But regardless of these advantages, there is a moral imperative which exists in the effort to educate those who are denied opportunity. The human mind yearns for freedom. There exists a light in every mind, no matter how dim due to circumstance, which needs to be fueled to achieve a life of fulfillment and meaning. When given the opportunity, people will fight for the chance to do so. When a society allows the light of all its members to shine, it can achieve the impossible. Even in a place as ravaged and war-torn as Afghanistan, there remains hope for this light to bring the country back from the brink of destruction and transform it into a functioning, stable state capable of peace and prosperity. Unfortunately, this is an ideological fight that cannot be won with drone strikes or M-16s.

It must be waged with the promise of intellectual liberation and the resolve to press forward in the bleakest of circumstances. There is no doubt many influential figures in these countries wish to see their young women educated. However, they need help in the form of funding, supplies and people brave and willing enough to teach these young minds in the face of extremist retribution. This is the mission of the CAI. Mortenson will be visiting the University on Friday, April 8 to receive the Delta Prize for Global Understanding. Though the award ceremony is a private event, there will be a moderated discussion with Mortenson at 3 p.m. in the Mahler Auditorium at the Georgia Center, which will be free and open to the public. I would encourage anyone interested in the CAI’s mission to attend or visit its website (www. ikat.org) for information about helping to accomplish the mission which began 15 years ago. We may only be able to do so much as individuals, but together we can help the people of these proud nations create their own bright future. — Evan Tighe is a graduate student from Alpharetta studying international affairs

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SPORTS

The Red & Black | Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | 5

TRANSFER: Pitcher adjusting to new home

FAME: Former Georgia great on her way to Springfield

¢ From Page 1

ized the year off the mound as a positive opportunity, though. “Way more fans, way more “I kind of learned how to be a media, way more hype for all the regular student, not be an athgames and everything.” lete, and just live a normal life,” Beyond the difference in Gullickson said. “You have to do magnitude, the level of competi- everything on your own, and get tion naturally increases in D-I, a job, and I mean it was tough Hester said. [but] I needed to grow up and “In Ju-Co, I faced some really learned a lot from it.” good pitching, but the differBeyond his personal growth, ence is, in D-I there’s good Gullickson developed bonds pitching every single day,” he with the team. He roomed with said. Jeff Walters, a starting pitcher A population difference also last year, and the connections came for Gullickson as he left he built have paid off on the Clemson for Athens. field this year. The kid from South Florida “We got to build a relationdidn’t have a whole lot to do in a ship,” Perno said. “I really trust town of 12,000 in the South him, and I think he trusts us.” Carolina piedmont. After two But trust can only go so far years at Clemson, Gullickson — at some point, Gullickson had felt the need to depart, describ- to perform on the field. He ing his decision in the same way pitched for the first time in any other college student nearly two years against might. Baylor in February, say“I just don’t think ing that upon his return Clemson was a good fit to the mound he was for me,” he said. “[In] “excited and nervous at coming to Georgia, one the same time.” of the main factors was In the Baylor game, because my sister was Gullickson left after just here.” 2 1/3 innings and nine Gullickson’s sister runs, three of them Chelsey is a junior tennis GULLICKSON earned. Since then, standout, who won the Gullickson’s performed individual NCAA nationbetter and stayed in the al championship last year. The game longer. His ERA sits at Gullickson family includes six 4.38, and Sunday he capped off siblings, and his father Bill had a sweep over Mississippi State a 14-year career pitching in the with one run in 5.2 innings. big leagues. The family relation“I think it’s just confidence,” ship helped to keep Georgia on Gullickson said. “When you’re Gullickson’s radar. not pitching for two years and “I used to come visit my sis- then going out and pitching ter all the time, so I knew the against Baylor, it’s kinda a lot to area and knew her and knew a take in at first. And as the sealot of her friends,” Gullickson son goes on, you loosen up, you said. “[Then] I was looking for a get your feel.” place to come play, and I called Gullickson gets to face off Coach [David] Perno and told against his old teammates twice him the situation, and they were this season — the Diamond real accepting towards it.” Dogs lost to Clemson 11-5 last The NCAA transfer require- week, and will play the Tigers ments meant that though again April 20. As a weekend Gullickson received a redshirt starter, Gullickson’s not likely to and retained two additional pitch against his old team. Still, years of eligibility, he still had to switching dugouts at Clemson’s sit out last year. He character- Doug Kingsmore Stadium isn’t

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$350/MO FOR 1/2 house, furnished! Private Bedroom, Office, Bath. Share Kitchen, LR, DR, Laundry w/male tenant. 7 mi/15 mins from UGA. 404-2178266. 1 & 2 & 3 BR. Awesome close to campus. Houses for Fall! Historical houses, modern amenities. Porches, yards. Pet friendly. $350-$1050 mo. luckydawg96@hotmail.com 1BR $495, 2BR $545 and 3BR $695! For entire apartment. Preleasing for summer and fall! Open house April 1st-15th, with giveaways! First month is free for two and three bedrooms. Pet friendly, on busline. 706 549 6254. Restrictions apply.

2BR 2BA CONDO with Bonus Room/Office. All appliances including W/D. 1 Block from campus. Move in 8/1/2011. $800/mo. Pet friendly. 478-609-1303. 2BR 2BA DUPLEX $650. w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $600 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, DW, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500 2BR 2BA ON College Station. Huge apartment, FP, deck, lots of closets, DW, W/D, CHAC. Avail. 8/1. Pets OK. $575/mo. 706-369-2908.

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2BR 2.5BA WOODLANDS Luxury Living gated community, 2 level condo, very close to campus. Large rooms/ closets. Hardwood/ Carpet. W/D, all appliances. Swim, tennis, fitness center. $850/mo. 678-427-4977 or 770-4531531

2BR CONDO FLAT 1/2 block off Milledge, newly renovated with hardwood floors, complete stainless appliance package including W/D with an awesome location and private patio. $950/mo. Call today, only one left. 706-255-6003 ugastudentrentals.com

2BR 2BA AT Oakridge Apartments near downtown and campus available now! Rent is $675. Low utility bills, great neighbors & awesome location. Call 770-468-8939

3BR 2BA DUPLEX $750 W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $700 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, dw, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $450 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com

3BR 3.5BA Townhouse Eastside. $1200/mo. Private bathrooms. HW floors. W/D. Call 404-326-5034 or email aliavia@savtek.com

¢ From Page 1

FRANCES MICKLOW | The Red & Black

S Craig Gullickson transferred to Georgia after two years at Clemson. Gullickson was familiar with Georgia because his sister, Chelsey, plays on the tennis team. something most players experience. “That was definitely a once in a lifetime experience,” he said. “It’s different looking in at Clemson, playing there when I used to play there.” He dismissed the suggestion that he has divided loyalties when playing his old roommates, though. “Naw, not really,” he said.

GEORGIA VS. CHARLESTON SOUTHERN When: Tonight at 7, Wednesday at 5 p.m. Where: Foley Field Probable Starters: Chase Hawkins (Tonight) and Ben Cornwell (Wednesday)

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3BR 2BA WITH bonus, living room, dining, full kitchen. Refrigerator and W/D. Eastside, Pinecrest Subdivision. $1100/mo. 706-372-6198. 5 POINTS 2BR plus office 1.5BA apartment. 2 Blocks from campus. W/D, Dishwasher, HVAC, All electric. $900/mo. Available 8/1. 706-369-2908 5BR 3BA HOUSE. 1/2 mi. from campus, zoned for students. 2 LRs, 2 decks, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $2000/mo. Call Matt 404-808-3190 5BR 3BA LARGE Eaglewood Condo, DW, W/D, FP, 2 Decks, 2 Dens Avail 8/1 $1200/mo. 678-644-3351 5BR 4BA $2250/MO. Downtown on North Ave. All appliances included. 4 car garage. 5 min. walk downtown, busline. 706-202-4648. A VIEW OF Downtown. Off North Ave. 4BR 4BA. All appliances incl. 5 min walk downtown. On UGA Busline. $1800/mo. Avail. August. 706-202-4648 ADORABLE 3BR 2BA, close to campus. New master BA w/ double sink. HW flrs, fenced back yd. W/D, DW, CHAC. Avail 8/1. $1200/mo. 706-369-2908. AMAZING 1BR 1BA duplex. Half mi from campus. HW floors, high ceilings, W/D, fenced back yard, pets ok. $575/mo. Available 8/1 call 706-3692908. BEAUTIFUL 3BR 2BA house in quiet established subdivision near Georgia Square Mall. New carpet. The baths have brand new tile. Large corner lot with lots of old oak trees for shade. Brand new back deck for grilling out and relaxing. $925/mo. No pets. Security deposit required. Call 706-5463314.

BRICK DUPLEX 2BR 2BA 2 mi from campus. North side, very clean, all extras. $500/mo plus deposit. Pets ok. Call Sharon @ 706-201-9093. CAROUSEL VILLAGE APARTMENTS. Quiet, affordable one bedrooms. UGA Bus Line. Furnished/ unfurnished. Special Prelease for Fall before 4/31/11. 1907 S Milledge Ave A-9. 706-548-1132. www.carouselvillage.net COTTAGE AT THE Woodlands! 2BR 2.5BA available for lease beginning August 1. $1020/mo. Please call Sharon 404-247-8405.

begins as far as meeting people you’ve never seen before — of course, I’ve admired all of them from a distance.” But Andy Landers did not have to admire Edwards from a distance. The Lady Bulldogs head coach saw Edwards up close and personal during her four seasons in Athens, from 1983 to 1986, a time which saw the women’s basketball program reach unparalleled heights. Behind two-time All-American Edwards, Georgia compiled a 11617 overall record, went to its first Final Four in 1983, finished as NCAA runner-up in 1985 and captured three SEC titles — 1983, 1984 and 1986 — in a four-year span. So when Landers heard she got the call from the hall, he said he was pleased to see his former player earn yet another accolade. “We were thrilled, but not surprised,” he said. “This isn’t like opening a Christmas present that is all wrapped up under the tree on Christmas morning. This is one of those deals where you picked it, you knew what was under the tree before you unwrapped it. She’s done everything that there is to do as an athlete and a basketball player. I’ve said on many occasions that I think Teresa Edwards is the greatest competitor to ever lace up a pair of high-tops.” And as a great competitor hailing from a small Georgia town, Edwards has always served as a good teaching tool for Landers. “This isn’t a kid from Chicago or New York City or Los Angeles,” he said. “I use her as an example that it doesn’t matter where you come from. What matters is that you want to be as good as you can be.”

COTTAGE HOUSING AVAILABLE. Special! $400/bed. 2-5 bedrooms, private baths. Blackmon Shoals Development. Call 866-213-0577. leasing@greenleafmgmt. com FALL PRELEASES. BEST rentals in Athens! 1-5BR houses, apts, condos, In the heart of UGA/Dwntn/5pts. Avail Aug! Call 706-369-2908 for more info. NEW GRANITE COUNTERTOPS and ceramic tile floors! S. Milledge Ave Hunter’s Run 2bd/2ba $700 3bd/2ba $800 4bd/4ba $1100 W/D, alarm system, pets welcome hancockpropertiesinc. com 706-552-3500

NOW PRE-LEASING for Fall! Houses, condos & townhomes 1 to 4 bedrooms. Five Points, Downtown & Eastside. Great locations at unbeatable rates. Aaron 706-207-2957. atlasrealestateadvisors.com STUDENT TOWNHOUSE 5BR 3BA: new carpet, paint, all appliances, including W/D, total electric, lawn care & trash p/u, furnished. $995/mo. Call 706-621-0077. SUMMER LEASE AVAILABLE! Brand new house in the downtown area. $495/bedroom utilities and internet inlcluded. 706-296-9546 www.cityblockonline.com THE SUMMIT OF Athens 3BR 3BA 2-story luxury townhouse, gated community, W/D, DW. $1260/mo. ($420 per room per month) call 404.550.4820 email mnn@uga.edu

$415/MO 2BR 2BA townhouse without utilities at TowneClub off Milledge with bus service, pool, volleyball court. Semi-furnished with living room and kitchen furniture. Contact johnmhailey@gmail.com 901-831-6311 WHISTLEBURY SUBLEASE: 1BR 1BA. Largest room in townhouse. 2 closets, 2 pools. Furnished. May 14-July 24. 3 female roommates. $405/mo +1/4 utilities. joanna.hilimire@gmail.com 404-944-9953.

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WEIDER PRO 4300 Weight System. 1 year old. Excellent Condition. Retails $299.88, Asking $150. Israel 678-4461541

TECH STOP COMPUTERS on Atlanta Highway next to Georgia Square! Stop by our location: 3690 Atlanta Highway - best prices on computer sales, service and repair. 10% student discount.

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CAMP COUNSELORS, MALE/FEMALE, needed for overnight camps in PA. mountains. Have fun while working with children outdoors. Teach/assist with A&C, aquatics, media, music, outdoor rec, tennis & more. Apply on-line at www.pineforestcamp.com

CLASSIFIEDS DISCLAIMER The Red & Black does not verify, investigate, or endorse any classified ad. Readers are urged to use caution when responding to an ad. CLOSE TO UGA. Female aide needed. 7-14 hrs/wk, some nights, weekends, $9/hr. Must love animals. Email for info: almuldune@hotmail.com EARN UP TO $100! UGA researchers seeking participants for an fMRI study. Must be 18 or above with a BMI of 30 or higher. Please e-mail ugafmri@gmail.com or call 706-542-3827

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EARN UP TO $100! UGA researchers seeking participants for an fMRI study. Must be 18 or above and induce vomiting, use laxatives, and binge eat at least four times a month. Please email ugafmri@gmail.com or call 706-542-3827 ESP SUMMER CAMP Counselor: Full summer employment for special needs camp. June 1- July 30. Pay based on experience. Applications due Friday April 1st. Email samantha@extraspecialpeople.com for application. Pre-interview at volunteer program Saturday April 2nd. LIFEGUARDING OUTDOORS IN neighborhoods (subdivisions) in and around Atlanta, $7.25-$10.00/hr based on experience. Apply at www.bluewhalepools.com or call Blue Whale Pool Management @ 770-8939017. LOCAL CCTV COMPANY seeking PT/FT installers. $10-$15/hr. Must have computer and networking knowledge. Call 706-316-0210 or fax resume @ 706-546-5551. hpunjani@ customsurveillanceinc.com NAUTIX POOLS IS now hiring lifeguards in Cobb, Cherokee, and Paulding counties for the 2011 summer season. Apply online at www.nautixpools.com or contact 770-485-3672. lauren@nautixpools.com

PART-TIME SITTER NEEDED, caring for 2 young children. Boy 4 & Girl 2. Monday-Friday. 4pm-7pm. Must have reliable transportation and be able to pick children up from school. Rare night & weekend availability. UGA student preferred. Must be able to work long-term; 1-2+ year(s). Email rkritzman@gmail.com for more information. SPECIAL EVENT VENUE near Athens seeks experienced part time Banquet Servers. To apply: Submit resume and two references to info@carlhouse.com Compensation based on experience. SUMMER INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE working in the Atlanta area. Develop your resume while gaining a valuable experience. Find out how I made $9,473 last summer. For more information call Eric at 404-7861664. WEBSITE SALES WANTED $100 commission. Part-time phone/email work. Help others while helping yourself. Local company. More at SiteMast.com/positions.

FIRST ANNUAL PRODUCT Expo hosted by the UGA Chapters of ASID & SIDA! Thursday, April 7 UGA Memorial Hall Ballroom 10:00-4:00. Free for all!

PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! SAVE MONEY! Maine camp needs fun loving counselors to teach All land, adventure & water sports. Great summer! Call 888-844-8080, apply: www.campcedar.com

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6 | Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | The Red & Black


April 5, 2011 Issue