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Cemented Legacies.......................6 Rivalrous Roar............................7 Love Letters...............................8 Junkfood Diaries.........................11 Inspired Bites..............................14 Sound the Horns..........................16 Party Places................................18 Programmed Identity....................21 Denim Days................................22 Bleating Out...............................30 Fighting Words............................32 Theatrical Union..........................34 Founding Feminism......................36 Just Brew It................................38 Local Hero..................................40 Artistic License............................43 Religious Reach...........................44

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MANAGING EDITOR Lori Keong SECTION EDITOR Gina Yu Kate Devlin DESIGN EDITOR Akshay Gopalakrishnan ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITORS JG Ginsburg Julie Rodriguez PHOTO EDITOR Kristyn Nucci ONLINE EDITOR Grace Donnelly FOOD DEPARTMENT HEAD Kylie Woodall MUSIC DEPARTMENT HEAD Will Guerin FASHION DEPARTMENT HEADS Meredith Thornhill Maria Kouninska COPY EDITOR Stephen Mays

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Shannon Adams Sarah Bennett Sam Darby Emily Dardaman Grace Donnelly Daniel Funke Kathryn Greene Kendall Little Abi Lambert Kameel Mir Diondra Powers Aepril Smith Elizabeth Vogan PHOTOGRAPHERS Emily Dardaman Bobby Dominy Ersta Ferryanto Jasmine Gainous Penn Hansa Rachel Jeffs Anna Pence Darcy Richardson Emily Schoone DESIGN TEAM Michelle Caudill Bleak Chandler Carson Shadwell Sarah Jon Abi Lambert Jennifer Lucas Ansley Maness Samantha Sego Maddie Shae Carson Shadwell Mary Sommerville Killian Wyatt ILLUSTRATORS Betty Huynh Stacey Suss Mandy Le

PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR Allie Amato SOCIAL DIRECTOR Sapna Mistry STUDENT AD MANAGER Josie Brucker ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Sydney Crumley Graham Currie Samuel Dickinson Felisha Ellison Debbie Feldman Danny Jacob Alexander Peterson Ali Rezvan Kelly Taylor Ava Toro AD ASSISTANT Laurel Holland STUDENT PR MANAGER Stephanie Pham PR TEAM Russel Abad Lauren Blight Patrice Boswell Jamie Herndon Caitlin Huff Megan McNerney Alston Meritt Brandon Murphy Colleen Reillye

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Dan Roth STUDENT PRODUCTION MANAGER Victoria Nikolich CREATIVE ASSISTANTS Jessie Bonham Marcella Caraballo GENERAL MANAGER Natalie McClure EDITORIAL ADVISOR Erin France OFFICE MANAGER Ashley Oldham STUDENT BUSINESS ASST. Chandler McGee DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Will Sanchez CIRCULATION MANAGER John Berrigan DISTRIBUTION TEAM Drew Allen AJ Meyer Nicholas Parker John Ward Hunter Whitfield


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Storytelling––an integral part of daily life, but not necessarily one to which we give much thought. We all tell stories––even your grocery list tells a story about you. (Yeah, think about that next time you write it out). But what kind of a story does a city tell? From its roots as a mill town, to its isolated, hyper-cozy college town state today, Athens is bursting at the seams with the stories it’s begging to share. Where we were able to catch a hint of one, we tried to wrangle these stories on paper for this issue. For example, we tried to capture the identity crisis of a band as it begins to stand on its own feet (pg. 21), and we tracked down decadesold house party spots, where there was a high chance of accidentally seeing the B52s (pg. 18). We examine one man’s transition from a highprofile musician to a successful local businessman (pg. 40), and hear from other prominent Athenians about their experience as such (pg. 8). Rivalries are a surprisingly telling story, because the roots have often been buried by decades of unfounded hatred, so we discovered what those relationships look like on the field (pg. 7), on the stage (pg. 34) and behind closed doors (pg. 32). We question the university’s development of salient issues like women’s rights (pg. 36) and religion (pg. 44) on campus, and last, what would an origins story of Athens look like without beer (pg. 38)? (A lot less fun, that’s what).

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What kind of story do you think Athens tells? Or how does your personal story impact the story of our city? Let us know and we just might feature you online! Tweet us @ampersand_uga, message us at facebook.com/ampersand.uga, or tag us in a picture Instagram @ ampersand_uga.

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BY DANIEL FUNKE

Driving around the Classic City, you might have noticed that certain names seem to crop up everywhere. Here’s some history behind those historic names.

CLAYTON STREET The tree-lined downtown bar corridor, Clayton Street was named after Augustin S. Clayton, who graduated with the inaugural class of Franklin College at UGA. Interestingly, his daughter married Henry Grady, the acclaimed Southern journalist whom Grady College is named after. Clayton used to live on the north side of Clayton Street, close to where the Volstead is located today. Clayton is buried in Oconee Street Cemetery.

BALDWIN STREET Named after Abraham Baldwin, UGA’s founding father and first president, Baldwin Street is the physical divide between North and South campus. Baldwin designed Old College and New College on North Campus after buildings at Yale University, where he received his undergraduate degree.

LUMPKIN STREET

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One of Athens’ main arteries, Lumpkin Street is named after Wilson Lumpkin, a two-term governor of Georgia. Lumpkin served in the U.S. House of Representatives and originally practiced law in Athens. His original mansion is still standing, located next to the Agricultural Sciences building on South Campus.

THOMAS STREET

MILLEDGE AVENUE

This street is named after Stevens Thomas, who was the most prominent merchant of his time. His store was located close to where Dupree Hall is today, and his house, a large Greek revival mansion on Hancock Avenue, is now home to a Young Women’s Christian Association chapter.

Athens’ second main artery is named after one of the University of Georgia’s original trustees, John Milledge, who bought 663 acres for the creation of the university and named Athens after the hometown of Plato and Aristotle. Today, Greek Row resides on this street primarily between its intersection with South Lumpkin Street at Five Points and West Broad Street.

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BY: AEPRIL SMITH

The Georgia-Auburn rivalry is a rivalry best embodied by the now famous image of Uga V standing on his hind legs and lunging, teeth bared, towards a frightened and retreating Auburn player. This photo, many say, sums up the “Deep South’s oldest rivalry,” and the old-fashioned hate that has pervaded it since the age-old days of 1898. In the words of Georgiadogs.com, these foes have met on the field every year since 1898. A world war has been the only thing to keep these two teams from duking it out. The “Deep South’s oldest rivalry” has slowly transformed into the “Deep South’s dirtiest rivalry” after topping the charts in the Wall Street Journal’s analysis of football rivalries––determined by the most unsportsmanlike conduct, late-hit and roughness calls. Georgia-Auburn averaged 5.4 calls a game with Georgia accounting for more than half of the offenses.

The Yellow Jackets and The Bulldawgs first faced off in 1893 – and like an antipodal love story, it was hate at first sight. According to Yellow Jacket fans and Tech lore, Tech fans were met with so much heckling and harassment by the bulldawg fans that it inspired them to write their now indoctrinated fight song, “The Rambling Wreck,” complete with the lyric “To hell with Georgia.” What added fuel to this already brightly burning fire was when Tech, as a member of the South Eastern Conference in 1932, left due to concerns about student athlete treatment and scholarships. They tried to re-enter the conference years later, but according to bleacherreport.com, were met with too much opposition from UGA to do so. Thus, Tech was forced to play as an independent before entering the Atlanta Coast Conference in 1979. The team reportedly has bulldog replicas in their urinals. How’s that for hatred? For UGA running-back J.J. Green, the Georgia/Georgia Tech game takes on a whole new meaning. This rivalry is personal because the game is basically a battle for run of the state. “We’re the big brother,” Green says. “And we have to let them know every year that they’re the little brother.”

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Love Letters to Athens is a recurring series of tributes to the Classic City, a place for community members to share moments—in prose, poem or art form—that have shaped their experience of our beloved city. For the Origins issue, we reached out to prominent community members that have either grown up in Athens or ventured from abroad, but have inevitably stayed to make their mark here. Key contributors to three integral Athens spheres— food, art and music—share colorful retrospectives of their experiences here, how they have influenced the city and what they have received in return.

P H O T O B Y E M I LY B . H A L L

About 15 years ago we moved back to Athens, GA, my wife and I, to open a restaurant. I wanted to introduce a place that would be universally loved for being a significant part of its community - a place that would revel in great food and drink where the patron would, quite simply, feel happy. As a chef, I wanted to open up our back door to buy product from our neighbors, something that seemed odd at the time. It was the way I had been taught to run a restaurant, how I was trained to cook, and I felt a natural obligation to be a proponent of the local economy. I was the lead partner and chef and my devotion to the craft, to my dedicated employees, to my town and its fine citizens, manifested itself in working 80 hours a week to make it a great place to eat. It worked, and the restaurant became lauded for those commitments. That success was a result of the town, not of the hours I worked; there have been many restaurants that fail as the chefs toil away trying to make it. It was also from the effort of tireless cooks, waiters, dishwashers, bartenders, bussers, and more, and it continues to be so every day. We persist on the same path of dedication to our neighborhood, our community, our town and our state. It just feels right to do so. I cannot pinpoint the moment that opportunities starting coming in that changed the course that I had plotted for myself, but soon a mixture of chef travels, television gigs, book tours, and food policy work began to take me off the pitching mound to become more the manager of the team. It really is like I am a baseball manager now, and I enjoy it immensely. It is a role where I scout the talent, manage the order and strengths of the players and come up with strategies to continue being successful in a very challenging game, a role where I relish in watching a prospect make me proud. I look to Bobby Cox and Paul Bocuse for equal inspiration

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now. “I” have become a “we”. “We” are my team of Athenians who work everyday to put great food on tables, to wow visitors and locals alike, to continue our little contribution to putting Athens on the food map. Since we opened so many years ago, many great restaurants have opened in our town, restaurants that need your constant patronage as well. Apart from restaurants, there are a lot of local small businesses that need your commitment - the farmer’s markets, the local food co-op, the bakery that is producing world class bread, the beer store hell-bent on selling every beer they can find, the bar that really caters to people over 22 years old, the print making shop, the super-cool kids shop, the local BBQ joint, and the little restaurant that has the best pupusas anywhere north of the Rio Grande - to name but a few. Commitment comes in many forms, but I am talking about spending money, the key to supporting businesses and the only way we will make these local gems flourish. We need to meet their passionate business plans with consistent and localized spending. Really, I guess this is first a thank you to my community and secondly a call to arms at the same time. Athens, I thank you for giving me the opportunity to succeed, for being the eaters I have always enjoyed feeding and the people I am proud to call my neighbors. The call to arms is to get out there and show support to the businesses who palpably love the community. It’s pretty easy to spot them.

Award-winning chef at Athens restaurants Five and Ten and Cinco y Diez, judge on Top Chef and author of new book Pick a Pickle


Athens shifts and churns. Its annual influx of fresh faces, coupled with an exodus of diploma-­toting wannabe yo-­pros, should make for an unsteady ecosystem. Yet the heart of it all persists. When I returned a couple summers ago after some years away, I found the city’s creative core unchanged—faces were different, maybe, but the song remained the same. I graduated from Grady in 2008. Today, I’m a working writer and editor (lookamee!), with a salary and everything, meager though it is. Even so, I doubt my school experience prepared me for my current job as much as my unofficial Athens education did: staying out late watching music, drinking probably too much, wandering around and soaking up but generally taking for granted the great and generous vibes that emanated from the downtown core outward. Back then, I played in many bands and

The sweet seduction of a calling, a person and a place heralds something altogether new. Athens, you have all of that and more.

of time and the heartbeats of past, present, and future. You hold me in the palm of your hand, and for this I am all the more blessed. Upon arrival to your shores, the world was my oyster, you showed me pearls. Learning of life, love and Art, I tripped through your streets, alleys and gardens, the world was vast and inviting. With pen and paper, line and colour I embraced the un-embraceable, your security was at times a blanket of comfort, and a smothering of creativity. We battled and argued as young lovers do. We fought, made up, kissed, made love. As an artist you were the grit that would become a pearl. Your pearl of comfort enabled me to risk and reach past your city limits to push beyond my boundaries. Seeking greener pastures, new loves, I journeyed to Europe and the cities that were your rivals. Yet you lingered in my heart. Your music I carried with me, and thought as I learned of other cultures and arts, how to share them with you, if I ever returned. Your patience and warm embrace lingered in my heart. Cortona became my new love, yet you showed me love has no boundaries and we formed a beautiful love triangle. Entwining cultures and philosophies our ‘ménage a tois’ has grown beyond a golden age and moved me into the ‘now’ and far into our future. The Pearl came next in the form of my studio, my private Cathedral and Kingdom and what has become a Sanctuary. How was I to see the wisdom and foresight of such a meeting. I can recall my first sight, a kudzu mountain shielding a treasure beyond time.

made many pals. I spun many favorite late-­night tunes in the DJ booth at WUOG, back when the station was located on the fifth floor of Memorial Hall and one could crawl out the windows in the vinyl room to stargaze (or “stargaze”) on the roof. I slurped from the fountain that was Athens, and I enjoyed every drop. (Well, almost every drop). Now, I’m six years removed from that life and living a different one in the same old town, which is itself different and yet very much the same. I am married and own a house, which would have seemed weird to 20-­year-­old me and kind of does to current me, too. I still manage to stay out late and see bands and drink probably too much (just, y’know, not every night). Mostly, I make a point to relish those rare-­diamond vibes— the ones that have always been and will always be a hallmark of Athens, GA, whether you or I are here to soak them up or not. As I put pen to paper to write you this love letter my mind travels lengths

Music Editor at Flagpole Magazine and writer for music and film webzine Tiny Mix Tapes An assembly of my favorite places, Athens, Cortona and Alexandria, the city of my childhood, the studio became the quest. Learning of your willing and openness for more, I leaped at the world’s possibilities. Your beauty and grace enabled me to seek the world, and bring it home to be made new in art. The great unknown beckoned, and now with a crucible to create; I leaped at the adventures. A Knight of Art, seeking the Grail, I set out for adventures; Continents and Countries, Cultures and Peoples, all of these I set out to embrace and explore and bring home to mine for artistry. Athens, you provided the comfort and foundation to soar to new heights. The newest Pearl is sculpture. O Athena, how wise you are. Your location and proximity to the Granite City now shine with such beauty I marvel at our potential. With your sister Savannah on the ocean, we can receive blocks of Carrara marble from Italy and marble and granite from all corners of our world. I now set out upon adventures in Stone …a Stationary Nomad. The world is a vast ocean full of oysters, and I know that here in my home town, I can create pearls of beauty to be cast out for all to see. As we grow together, I come to know more the wisdom of your love. Your isolation, hardships and limitations of the past have been blessings in disguise. Through Isolation we forged a unique style and personality. The hardships were sculpted and polished to form gemstones of brilliant colors and pearls of artistic integrity. Through limitations we created new vessels of travel, breaking new ground in Arts and Sciences. Our new chapters promise to be even more exciting as we come into our own. What new adventures we will create and what new direction we will embrace? Line and Colour, Stone

and Bronze all of these and more are our destinies. For these and so much more I thank you O Athens. With all my heart I sign this love letter to you and wish for us a shining future beginning today.

Celebrated local artist who created the Vince Dooley statue on south campus and whose beautiful studio, which frequently doubles as a venue, is located on Pulaski St P H O T O B Y M A R K A C O S TA

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The Dish BY KYLIE WOODALL

on your FOOD STYLING BY GINA YU

From salty to sweet, craving junk food isn’t an uncommon phenomenon. While most purchase their favorite snack from the nearest convenience store, we delved a little further and found ways to make your favorites at home. In the process, we uncovered the surprising tales behind some of America’s most beloved snacks— chocolate peanut butter cups, pretzels, chocolate chip cookies and the classic potato chip.

People commonly attribute the creation of pretzels to an Italian monk circa 610 AD. While there’s no documented evidence to support this, oral tradition tells a tale of a monk who gave “pretiolas”––“little rewards,” or baked strips of dough he had shaped to resemble folded arms in prayer––to children who had memorized their prayers. By 1440, pretzels became a symbol of good luck and spiritual wholeness, most likely due to an association of the three holes in pretzels with the holy trinity. In Germany, pretzels were worn by children on New Year’s Day, hung on Austrian Christmas trees in the 16th century and used as a precursor to Easter eggs. In Switzerland, married couples would pull on a side of a pretzel like a wishbone tradition. The person with the bigger half was said to be the one to bring prosperity to the marriage. In Catholic faith, pretzels, for a time, were considered the “official food of Lent.” While the average soft baked pretzel can take over an hour to make at home, this recipe requires a mere 30 minutes.

Start to Finish: 30 minutes Yield: 8 Pretzels 2/3 cup baking soda 9 cups boiling water 1 1/2 cups lukewarm water 1 packet active instant yeast 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 2 cups white whole wheat flour 2 cups all-purpose flour Surplus flour for dusting 1 large egg, beaten 2 tablespoons butter, melted (optional) Coarse sea salt

PHOTOS BY KRISTYN NUCCI

In a large pot, boil nine cups of water with baking soda. Preheat oven to 425 F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or grease. In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in 1 1/2 cups of lukewarm water, stirring until a few clusters of yeast remain. Stir in granulated salt and table sugar. Stir in three cups of flour, alternating whole wheat and all purpose. Slowly add in remaining cup of flour until dough is no longer sticky (or until it bounces back when poked with your finger). On a floured surface, knead dough for three minutes. Shape kneaded dough into a ball and separate into eight smaller balls. Roll each ball into a rope (slightly less than two feet long). Place each rope in the shape of a circle with the ends facing away from you. Twist the ends and bring them toward yourself pressing down into a pretzel shape. Dunk the shaped pretzels individually in boiling baking soda mixture for thirty seconds. Once dunked, brush both sides of each pretzel in egg wash. Place pretzels on baking sheet, sprinkle with sea salt and bake in the oven. After 10 minutes, turn oven to broil and continue to bake the pretzels until golden brown (less than five minutes). Watch pretzels carefully to ensure that they do not burn. Allow pretzels to cool and enjoy. Optional: brush the pretzels with butter while they are cooling.

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George Crum, a Native American/African American chef, worked at a resort in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. in 1853. In reaction to an angry customer who vehemently complained that his fries were too thick one evening, he hoped to annoy the pestering customer. Crum made him fries that were too thin to eat with a fork. To everyone’s surprise, these fries were well-received by the eater. Later known as “chips,” the fries became so well-known that Crum eventually opened his own restaurant. Made in the microwave, you can make your own chips at home with half the hassle Crum had to go through.

Start to Finish: 10 minutes Yield: 5 Servings of Chips 1 potato, thinly sliced* 1 sweet potato, thinly sliced* 2 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 teaspoon coarse salt

Line a large, paper microwaveable plate with parchment paper. In a large plastic bag, shake both types of thinly sliced potatoes in oil and salt. Place chips on plate and microwave for 4.5 to 5 minutes, watching carefully to make sure that they do not burn. You may have to repeat this step to cook all of your potatoes. *While a mandoline is the best option for evenly slicing a potato into thin strips, a potato peeler works as well and at a fraction of the cost.

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups were invented by Harry Burnett Reese in the 1920s. Known as “H.B.” among his friends, Reese grew up on a farm, got married and had 16 children. Always in search of a new way to support his large family, Reese worked a number of odd jobs from butcher to factory worker. Eventually, he had then lost a job at Hershey dairy farm, only to work for the Hershey Chocolate Company a few years later. There, he took up the hobby of making his own candies and named most of his creations after his children, such as the Lizzie and Johnny Bar. He eventually created the penny cup. Coined after its sale price, the peanut butter-filled chocolate cup became the money-maker and focus of Reese’s booming franchise circa World War II. After his death, his six living sons sold the Reese’s company over to the Hersheys Food Corporation. Reese’s is consistently one of the top ten ranked candies across the globe. Now, satisfy your sweet tooth by making your own peanut butter-filled chocolate cups at home.

Start to Finish: 15 minutes Servings: 20 large candies 4 tablespoons butter, softened 1 cup peanut butter 1 cup powdered sugar 1/8 teaspoon table salt Two 12-ounce packages of chocolate chips

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Line a muffin tin with paper cupcake liners. Melt one package of chocolate chips (using double-boiler method or by microwaving and stirring in 30 second intervals) and divide amongst the cupcake liners, placing any remaining chocolate in additional cupcake liners as needed. Place muffin tin and chocolate-filled cupcake liners into the freezer for five minutes. In a large bowl, mix together melted butter, peanut butter, powdered sugar and table salt until well combined. Remove muffin tin from the freezer. Scoop a spoonful of peanut butter mixture on top of the chocolate in each. Melt the second bag of chocolate chips and place a spoonful of chocolate on top of the peanut butter mixture. Lightly tap the muffin tin and additional cupcake liners on the counter to make sure chocolate spreads evenly. Let set and store in freezer.


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Ruth Wakefield, who ran the popular Toll House restaurant along with her husband, is credited for having invented the Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookie in the 1930s. With a degree in household arts and experience as a food lecturer and dietitian, she invented this pioneering chocolate chip cookie to serve as an accompaniment to ice cream. Its popularity (not so unexpectedly) soared, and even Marjorie Husted (a.k.a. Betty Crocker) praised it on her radio show. In 1939, Wakefield sold NestlĂŠ the rights to both her recipe and Toll House name for a mere dollar. While Wakefield has attested that she has never received this compensation, she did reportedly receive free chocolate for life from NestlĂŠ and was Start to Finish: 1 hour paid for future consultation. Servings: 2.5 dozen cookies Inspired by multiple family recipes, try our take 2 1/4 cups whole wheat flour on the traditional cookies. 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup butter, softened 1/2 cup shortening 1 cup packed brown sugar 1/2 cup granulated sugar 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 2 cups (12-ounce package) chocolate chips 1 cup pecans, toasted and chopped Preheat oven to 350 F.

In a small bowl, combine flour, baking soda and salt. In a large bowl, cream butter, shortening, brown sugar and white sugar. Incorporate egg and egg yolk into the large bowl, following with vanilla. Gradually beat in flour mixture. Stir in chocolate chips and nuts. Let cookie dough chill in fridge for 30 minutes to an hour. Drop by rounded tablespoon on to ungreased baking sheets. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool.

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BY SHANNON ADAMS PHOTOS BY PENN HANSA

You’re walking down Clayton Street in Athens, making your way through downtown on another afternoon ramble or evening outing, and you pass all the venues and restaurants you’ve seen many times before. As you stroll down the street, your eyes land on the sign for Pauley’s Crepe Bar. The sign is nothing new, but this time it makes

When you walk into Ike & Jane, the smell of donuts probably holds your full attention, but if you take a second, wipe the inevitable drool off of your chin and wrench your eyes away from the rows of scrumptious donuts, you’ll notice little details that might make you wonder. Why are there black and white photos on the counter? Who is the couple in the wedding photo? In fact, who are the people in all of these photos? The answer dates back to 1901 in a New York bakery, the first bakery in the United States to buy and sell Fig Newtons. This bakery belonged to the family of the “Jane” in question. Corie Dickherber, Jane’s granddaughter, is now the coowner of Athens’ Ike & Jane. Her grandparents earned the honor of having their names on her restaurant for a couple of reasons. “Not only do Nana Jane and Ike have the most adorable names,” Dickherber says, “but my Nana Jane actually is a third generation bakery owner.” Since her own bakery closed in the ‘60s, Nana Jane was very excited to have another bakery in the family, especially one named after her. “She thinks it’s the cutest thing in the world,” Dickherber says. Dickherber also says that

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she and co-owner Matt Downes struggled at first to come up with a name for their restaurant. When they finally came to her grandparents’ names, it just clicked. “We went through a litany of names and none of them were really very thought-provoking or fun or good or really what we wanted to be going for,” she says, “Then we were talking out the idea of having it be someone’s name, like you were going to someone’s house.” Once they had decided on a name, it was simple to add in little details to represent her grandparents, giving the cafe its homey vibe. The cafe’s decor features photos of Ike and Jane––one of their wedding in 1945 and one of the New York bakery––and the menu makes reference to them as well. “[Jane] used to make this lavender iced tea all the time so we have Jane’s lavender ice tea,” Dickherber says, “and we actually use her chicken salad recipe, so it’s Jane’s chicken salad.” There is also a burger named after Ike on the dinner menu. Even though Nana Jane’s bakery is closed and Ike has passed away, a little bit of their legacy will live on here in Athens in the form of the bright cafe that bears their names. A P R I L 2014

you pause and think. How does a restaurant get the name Pauley’s? We often assume if a restaurant bears a certain name, it’s probably named after the owner. So often this is not the case. There are eateries and cafes like this all around town whose names have a history which lends a little bit of character to each establishment.

IKE & JANE’S CHICKEN SALAD SANDWICH

Mama’s Boy sells t-shirts and onesies to new moms who want to christen their children as “mama’s boys,” some of whom have never even tasted the restaurant’s famous biscuits or its other breakfast favorites. Cooper Hudson, the co-owner of Mama’s Boy says the name fit the restaurant for a variety of reasons, but the mama’s boy in question is the father of her business partner, Alicia Segars. “Alicia’s father had passed away right before the restaurant opened,” Hudson says. “Her mom always teased her dad about being a mama’s boy, and I don’t know

that he necessarily liked it, but it kind of resonated with her for that reason.” The idea did not initially come from Alicia’s dad, though, but from an HBO show. Hudson and Segars were at the end of their rope trying to come up with a name, even downing a few drinks to get their creativity flowing, when they turned to a pop culture restaurant for their inspiration. “Alicia had seen an episode of the show Curb Your Enthusiasm,” Hudson says, “They go to a restaurant and its called Mama’s Boy, and everything’s terrible and they have this horrible experience, and


it seemed to fit with what we were looking for.” If that was what they were going for, they may have been misled. There is nothing terrible about eating at Mama’s Boy, except maybe contending with a packed crowd of people excited to grab a biscuit with their meal. The very popular Milltown Breakfast– –a feast of eggs, grits, bacon and a huge biscuit––is named for the

mill town roots of the area. The food speaks of home and comfort, and the blue Mason jar chandelier and big windows beckon you to sit down and indulge. Hudson explains that this cozy atmosphere is another reason why the name fits. Mama’s Boy, she says, was supposed to be about bringing comfort food and nostalgia to a college town.

The bright blue and yellow walls of Marti’s at Midday are so inviting you would never guess that it was not originally intended to be a restaurant. Marti Schimmel, the owner of Marti’s at Midday on Prince Avenue, planned to start a catering business, and she did, but she also ended up with a bustling lunch restaurant. “I had no idea it was going to be a restaurant,” Schimmel says, “I thought I’d serve a sandwich every once and a while.” Schimmel’s business bears her name, but it also indicates a lot of her personal style. The bright walls sport a bunch of artwork and hangings, including a large chalkboard displaying the ‘Marti Made’ casserole

dishes that customers can order to take home. There are photos behind the counter and strings of garlic hanging above the order window. Even the menu is completely Marti’s: every sandwich is named after an Athenian friend or employee. You can order a Rinne––a pimento cheese sandwich named after Rinne Allen–– or Marti’s own favorite, a cheddar and apple sandwich. Schimmel studied culinary arts in Boston and then returned to Athens and began catering. After four years, she decided to open Marti’s at Midday. “It’s kind of fresh, healthy,” she says. “I make 24 loaves of bread a day. We make everything in house.”

COREY RIPLEY: CO-OWNER OF PAULEY’S

A MILL TOWN BREAKFAST AT MAMA’S BOY

Pauley’s is known for its crepes and its beer. In fact, it has 28 beers on draft and cooler space for others. It’s hard to miss the rows and rows of completed beer cards on the walls, tributes to customers who have tried 100 of their beers. “While people are here we want to teach them how to drink beer,” co-owner Corey Ripley says. He says often people come in at the start of their beer card with established preferences in mind, and by the end they are willing to try them all. Ripley is from Athens, and he worked in local bars, always knowing that restaurants were his passion. So when the lease for the building fell into co-owner Paul DeGeorge’s hands, Ripley suggested that they open a restaurant together. It was the restaurant’s liquor license that ended up giving Pauley’s its semi-accidental name. In the midst of construction, the co-owners needed a name to

put on their liquor license, but were undecided. They thought that, just for the license, they would name the restaurant Pauley’s after DeGeorge. But when they went back later to change it the local government wouldn’t let them. They sort-of shrugged and had to accept it, but in the end it worked out alright. Ripley says he doesn’t mind the name and thinks DeGeorge ended up feeling proud. “He owns a couple different places in town,” Ripley says, “but he takes a little bit more pride in this place because it’s his namesake.” Ripley also said that when the restaurant opened in 2009, they were in about half of their current space, and people nicknamed the restaurant “Smalley’s.” Taking inspiration from friends with a crepe business in Miami, the pair have been serving up crepes and influencing people’s tastes in beer ever since.

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P H O T O S B Y BOBBY DOMINY

BY SAM DARBY Under a pounding sun on a late summer afternoon in 2012, the Lone Trumpeter waited. He auditioned for this moment and lost track of how many times he had rehearsed. Until the time came, he fingered through the notes and buzzed on his mouthpiece. Then the announcer came on, his voice echoing through the concrete stands of Sanford Stadium. The Trumpeter could not mess up, he would not mess up. And he did not mess up. Michael Watanabe, a fourth-year music education major from Acworth, has twice been the target of more than 92,000 fingers, pointed at by the University of Georgia’s Bulldog faithful. He was the Lone Trumpeter (as some people call him) in the southwest corner of Sanford Stadium playing the “Battle Hymn of the Bulldog Nation” solo at pre-game. “The playing of the solo is a blur,” he says, “and the walk back to the seating area is filled with the adrenaline that was suppressed during the solo, all rushing in at once.” Heading back to the student section, fans congratulated him, “part[ing] like the Red Sea to let [him] through,” he says. The story of the Redcoats began in 1905, when 20 all-male cadets founded UGA’s band as a part of the Military Science Department. Over a century later, it has grown to become a pillar of the Hugh Hodgson School of Music, providing community for about 440 students, male and female, music and non-music majors. Why are they called the Redcoats anyway? The most accepted speculation for the name came from a reporter in Atlanta who was writing about a back-to-back concert featuring the Georgia and North Avenue Trade School bands. Since the latter was known affectionately as the “yellow-jacketed band,” the reporter

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ALEX BLITCH PLAYING NEAR HERTY FIELD

thought it was necessary to describe Georgia’s band as “red-coated.” A better excuse than honoring the British redcoats who occupied colonial Georgia for much of the Revolutionary War, right? To some, it is not just clothing that separates the Redcoats from other college bands, but their sense of class. John Ashley, a graduate student from Kennesaw and Redcoat alumni, confirms this. “We don’t play ‘Drag Net’ when a penalty flag is thrown, he says, “like Florida does.” Songs performed by marching bands have often come and gone, but the same spirit remains. Our own fight song was not always “Glory, glory to old Georgia,” but instead, an archaic tune called “Hail to Georgia.” Other old songs, like “Dixie” and “Bulldog Boogie,” have also slipped from memory. And despite these changes, the band’s place in the culture of Athens has hardly moved. “In a town of this much musical culture and this much musical history,” Brett Bawcum, the assistant director of bands, believes the Redcoats are the sound of the University. “When you leave [UGA] and you start to reflect on college,” he says, “you remember what things look like. You remember what the Arch looks like. You remember what the stadium looks like; everybody’s wearing red and black.” He adds, “Then you remember what Bolton [Dining Commons] smells like, or what tailgating smells like. But when you think about what college sounded like, some of it is going to be the stuff you heard downtown, but a big, whole chunk of that, I think, is the Redcoat Band.”


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Although it may seem like the geography of Athens is cemented as the same old college town, the landscape constantly evolves. Bars, popular today, have once been punk venues, restaurants or trendy shops. The bassist of the band Pylon, Michael Lachowski, has watched Athens grow and change over the past couple decades but believes Athens has also stayed the same, in some ways. “I believe Athens has changed a lot now,” Lachowski says. “There have been enough tear downs and renovations. I used to think it was incremental. The very core of downtown hasn’t really changed. The big differences are the parking decks and the ugly massive complexes like Hilton Garden Inn and the Classic Center. The edges of downtown have changed the most. Athens is one hundred times more of a metropolis [than when I moved here].” Many things have come and gone, but some locations, so quintessential to the city’s music history, cannot be forgotten. What is now the trendy term, “house show,” used to be the good ole fashioned house party with a band playing, of course. Today, recurring show locations are known by names like the Secret Squirrel orMount Tibbetts. But that is now, this is then. Where did it all start?

BY ABI LAMBERT

C O U R T E S Y O F DANA DOWNS

Stitch Craft was an old sewing factory down Oconee Street that has been replaced today by the Waterford Apartment complex. Downs of the Tone Tones remembers Stitch Craft as being one of the first party scenes she attended. She says, “Back in the day, before there were any clubs, we had house parties. In the ‘80s, we had Stitch Craft behind Farmers Hardware. It was an old factory.” Stitch Craft contained a halfbasement living space that was used for shows.

What was Five Star Day Cafe and is now the vacant store front next to Agora Vintage used to be an infamous record store called Chapter 3 Records. The upstairs was occasionally used for shows or parties. “It wasn’t legit, but someone would bring a small sound system occasionally. We played our first show there,” Pylon’s Lachowski reveals. The punk band The Cramps played in 1980 upstairs after being canceled at the Georgia Theatre.

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40 Watt Club

The popular 40 Watt Club possesses a long and complicated history. The original 40 Watt Club was not on Washington Street, but on College Avenue on the third floor above The Grill, which at the time was a Schlotzsky’s Deli. The drummer of Pylon, Curtis Crowe, rented the loft as an apartment despite it being completely trashed and inhabited by pigeons. Lachowski remembers Crowe putting in a great deal of work to make it sanitary, since living with pigeons is a health hazard. Parties and shows were thrown here with a cover fee to get in. This original location led to the subsequent locations of the 40 Watt Club, including one on the south side of Broad Street, and another that now houses the Caledonia Lounge. Dana Downs of the Tone Tones, a late ‘70s Athens band, remembers, “The 40 Watt Club was a dollar to get in. You could drink all the beer you wanted. Our first gig was opening at the 40 watt club.” Since then, the 40 Watt Club has had five different locations, and at some points, more than one location.


IMAGES COURTESY OF DANA DOWNS A N D MICHAEL LACHOWSKI

Pylon Park was a lot behind a home of the previously mentioned Lachowski, bassist of Pylon, on Barber Street. According to Lachowski, Barber Street has been a popular residence for artists and musicians for a long time but even more so in the ‘70s and ‘80s. “The houses on this street used to be more apartment style but have since changed to more family home style,” he says. Pylon Park is the only location Lachowski recalls that developed an iconic alias. Not many bands played at Pylon Park, but the residents would use the lot for parties to play and share records.

The Landfill was a house show location whose repertoire boasts a couple dozen shows between the years of ‘95 and ‘96. The location just west of downtown dawned performances by artists such as Neutral Milk Hotel, Olivia Tremor Control, Jucifer and Elf Power. The founder of the music magazine Chunklet, Henry Owings, was a resident and expressed that his new magazine helped attract bands to playing at the house. He looks on the experience fondly, remembering, “There would be a lot of real illegal shit going on. We would get kegs of beer and pay my rent that way. We would put on a show and charge everyone five dollars and the rest of the money would go the band. Now that I’m 45, it seems so wrong, but at the time it seemed natural and normal, but of course I was always broke.” For house shows today, charging five dollars for a cup is a regular occurrence.

Ever thought that ‘The Last Resort’ sounds more like the name of a bar than a restaurant? That’s because it used to be one. It was split into two parts that had a bar area and a dining area. Lachowski labels the B-52’s gig at The Last Resort in 1978 “a huge deal.” “To us, that was cool, because it was an affirmation that the scene we were in was being appreciated,” he says. At the time, Athens alternative rock had not reached full recognition by the town. The pride came from “[playing] somewhere like downtown.” Although The Last Resort did not typically have shows for the younger crowd, the B-52s playing there was symbolic of the forward move of the scene. In 1992, The Last Resort became the upscale restaurant it is today.

Where the Athens-Clarke County Police Station resides today was wildly different years ago. In the ‘70s, The Hodgson Oil Building on Oconee Street was a rock club called the B & L Warehouse. Lachowski recollects it as a place Pylon could not relate to well. “The type of bands that would perform here are bands that perform for hours. Kind of like the type of bands that would play at fraternity parties now––hard rock, Southern rock,” he says. “They were usually bands from Macon or Atlanta or a neighboring state. They were not recording artists though unless they recorded one for vanity or something.” Although it did not begin as an innovator for Athens music, the B & L Warehouse eventually became the practice studio for many Athens music groups, including Pylon. The B & L became another bar called the I & I in 1980, where Iggy Pop once performed.

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“Wait, have you heard the story from the very beginning?” It’s a point that Robby Casso stresses, cutting off founding member and guitarist Dillon McCabe before he can get a few words into his account of the evolution of Athens synth-pop quintet Programs. McCabe seems a little miffed as he talks underneath Casso and assures me that it’s 100% the same story, but seems used to the bickering as he defers the floor. Casso doesn’t pull punches, and some may say he lacks a filter. Socially, this has made him a few enemies – I could probably make him a few more if I included some of his firecracker commentary from our interview. Musically, this has steered him away from the status quo, making Programs a surprisingly unique act amongst an indie-rock/Americanadominated scene, a scene in which he used to be involved through Grass Giraffes and Glasscrafts drumming duties. Casso claims it was an unconscious decision to fill the electronic niche that, locally, is only occupied by Yip Deceiver and ... that other band. Casso refers to Reptar as “the band that starts with R” when he’s threatened with the comparison. He states, without much humor, “I would rather have people come to our show and say very LCD Soundsystem and not Reptar.” Now, with keytars and synths blazing, Casso resides on the fringes of the guitar-driven rock market where he began. He relates, “At first, I recorded a bunch of indie stuff that was god awful. Eventually I was like f*** the guitar, I’m going strictly electronic. Then I played a show at my school, and Dillon was there, and I picked him up.” Clearly, McCabe liked what he heard. From there, Casso glosses over details of the meeting that turned Programs into a duo, making the encounter seem inevitable. However, the band’s family tree sprawls quite a bit further than their current fivepiece setup. Members of Dana Swimmer and Grape Soda were namedropped as part of a lengthy list of collaborators and former members. Their steady accumulation of talent reflects on the band’s past as much as it pushes its future ahead; Joel Hardin (keyboards), Michael Buice (bass) and Grafton Tanner (drums) have been recruited piecemeal after being wooed by Programs’ live sound. Those guys dutifully stand in Casso’s ‘80s sex-god image, complete with blonde mustache, a closet full of velor jackets and the moxie of a Miami drug kingpin. But even though Programs will always be perceived as Casso’s baby, the full band setup has taken the songwriting process and presentation into a more democratic forum.

Now, Casso shops out his unfinished demos to the band and allows each member’s instincts free reign within his templates. It’s a different take they are eager to showcase with production help from electronically minded Yip Deceiver’s Davey Pierce and Nicolas Dobbratz, Athens mainstays who can list of Montreal contributions on their resumes. Though the Programs Facebook page promises a full-length album this spring, don’t hold your breath. Everything is on hold ‘til Pierce and Dobbratz return from a cross-country tour in support of Turquoise Jeep. In the meantime, Programs will be perfecting a live sound that was tested by recent additions--Buice and Tanner. They’ve only been playing as a full band since January. Tanner relates, “One of the things we were all trying to find out, when you move away from an entire electronic act, you lose a little bit of funk and bump to it.” It’s far easier to play along with computerized samples and drum machines. Despite its problems, the gradual evolution to a completely live sound breathes life into the band’s performances, giving each show novelty. Their promisingly innovative live approach has landed them opening slots for Rubblebucket, Family & Friends and Elf Power. Part of that novel appeal lies in the band’s outgoing and spontaneous personality that lights up the stage with their off-kilter banter and mannerisms. They take their music very seriously, but they have a sense of humor. Like when I jokingly ask them about a manager I’ve never seen or heard of, McCabe incredulously replies, “We have a manager?” Eventually, it was revealed he is a friend of the band who filled the “sort of a manager” position. From there, they go on to casually mention Googling their songs to discover illegal MP3 download sites and Puerto Rican slacklining videos featuring their songs. And when Tanner calls them “our songs,” Casso retorts with a bite of sarcasm, “what do you mean, OUR songs.” I’ve seen Programs about five or so times now, and I’m still not sure I’ve seen the same line-up twice. Coinciding with the “pardon our dust” signs that have been hung up on their Bandcamp since the Promises EP debut, Programs is still a band in flux, searching for its identity. This situation, though, acts less like a question mark and more like ellipses as the push forward fends off stagnation. And with the idea of a finish line feeling like a glass ceiling, it felt appropriate that during the course of the interview I had to blurt out, “Wait, did we finish the story of how you guys met each other?”

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By Meredith Thornhill and Maria Kouninska Tucked away on a quiet crevice off Athens’ Chase Street lies the Wilkins Industries jean-manufacturing factory. In 1969 it was established as one of the nation’s largest manufacturers of women’s jeanswear. After its closing in 2001, the warehouse has become a decrepit and decaying landmark of Athens’ once-flourishing industrial apparel depot. We stumbled upon this ruin and saw the remains of size and dye labels, which gave us inspiration for this story. Denim remains to this day a staple of American fashion that has transcended decades through trends and styles. So modern interpretations of each decade’s differentiating denim styles are embraced both in men and women’s wardrobes. #LongLiveDenim. Photography: Ersta Ferryanto Models: Prosper Hedges, Mason Gepp, Emily Erdelyen, Madeline Hill, Trey Pasqueriello

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Prosper Baby Doll Jean Dress, Agora Co-Op Trey Flare Jeans, Fab’rik Madeline Ruffle Cropped Tunic, American Threads

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Prosper Floral Baby Crop Top, American Threads Madeline Chiffon Top, American Threads Emily [model’s own]

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Models’ own clothes when not otherwise noted

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GO DAWGS! BY KATHRYN GREENE Tell anyone that you attend The University of Georgia, and their response will be “Go Dawgs,” “You’re a bulldog!”, or some variation of the two. With a mascot as iconic as Uga, it’s hard to imagine a time when the bulldogs and Georgia football didn’t go hand in hand. “Uga is probably the most reputable, widely-known mascot, period,” says Patrick Garbin, a freelance journalist and sports historian who grew up in Athens, the son of a ubniversity sociology professor. He has chronicled decades of the University’s sports history, back to the first football season in 1892, when the mascot was a goat. That’s right, the Georgia goats. “When you look back,” Garbin says, “It’s neat to think that there has actually been a longer period of non-Ugas than a period of Ugas. It’s important to note that there are a lot of other mascots that came before.” Sir William the Goat wore a jacket with U.G. emblazoned on it, and a matching hat in black and red colors, as a nod to the football team’s earliest nickname, The Red and Blacks. While Sir William had a lot of school spirit, it wasn’t long before he was replaced by the next unofficial mascot, Trilby, a bull terrier. Trilby remains largely forgotten in the University’s sports history, but has made an extraordinary contribution to football in his short-lived time as a mascot. One of the players quipped, “Well, Trilby has brought us a name... bulldogs.” Shortly after, “The Atlanta Constitution” referred to the university’s football team as the bulldogs, although there would not be an

official mascot for 27 years. After Trilby, the mascot remained a dog, but the breed varied dramatically from dachshunds to mutts. “In the 1920s, there was a policy in place that if a student brought a dog to the game to be the mascot, he or she would receive free entry. Obviously now, they charge babies a full ticket to get in…” Garbin laughs. This policy was later discontinued due to numerous fights between dogs that began to break out on the sidelines during games. Even though the football team had been nicknamed “the Bulldogs” years prior, it wasn’t until 1938 that a bulldog named Count was crowned the official mascot. While official university research recognizes only four mascots prior to Uga, Garbin can name eight; Count was followed by Bozo, Baldy, Mr. Angel, Tuffy, Butch, Stinky and Mike. Charles Seiler, the son of Frank “Sonny” Seiler, tells how the Uga era began in 1956, saying, “My father was a law student working in the ticket office at the University. Coach Butts knew my father had a bulldog and asked if they could use him for some publicity shots.” The rest, as they say, is history. In 1997, Uga’s icon status was secured when he made the cover of “Sports Illustrated” after being named the best mascot in the country. Although many are still unaware of the pre-Uga era, be grateful that our beloved bulldog mascot is here to stay–because, let’s face it, “Go goats!” just wouldn’t seem right. ILLUSTRATION BY BETTY HUYNH

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RING UP THE CURTAIN BY KENDALL LITTLE

PHOTO BY JASMINE GAINOUS

When pressed to give her favorite part of the Thalian Blackfriars, artistic director Kayla Sklar says, “The community that we’ve created... the family we’ve built, I’m really proud of that.” This family dynamic is most evident when watching the Thalians’ rehearsals. Even when preparing for a show as challenging as Social Prescriptions, which deals with mental illness, laughter abounds. Energy remains high as actors play warm-up games. No one is irritated when they are forced to change rehearsal spaces. Someone pulls out a guitar, and everyone gathers to sing along. This kindred feeling is exactly the goal of the Thalians: to “create a safe space where people who aren’t necessarily in the Theater Department can get involved in theater,” according to the other artistic director, Connor Brockmeier. The Thalian Dramatic Club was borne in 1893 out of many students’ discontent over the limited number of student organizations at the University of Georgia. “The club’s original productions were mostly student-written work,” says Brockmeier, “but as the years went on, each new director, which was often a faculty member, would up the caliber of the production.” As they continued to grow in prestige, the Thalians became more exclusive. They established a small, 19-person membership. Becoming a member was considered one of the highest honors a student could receive. Not long after its founding, the Thalians’ membership became more closely aligned with politics than talent. Those who opposed this direction began their own organization: the Blackfriars, named after a famous London Shakespearean theater. Competition inevitably formed between the two. “Eventually they lost sight of the common goal of making good quality, educational, informative theater,” Brockmeier says.

The stakes rose with every production and budgets continually increased as audiences dwindled. In 1931, the two theater groups united as the Thalian Blackfriars. Limited memberships were a thing of the past. Production values rose again, and the experience became much more enjoyable for members and viewers. The man who sparked this union was a journalism professor named Edward C. Crouse. According to Sklar, Crouse was “the one who united the two, made them see that they would be more effective as one large group.” He became instrumental to the club and a huge reason for why the Department of Drama was founded in the 1930s. As that department grew, more people who didn’t necessarily want to take theater classes or become drama majors, but were still interested in performing, joined the Thalian Blackfriars. Since then, the organization has mostly operated in the same way--members are only inducted after they participate (whether directing, acting, writing, producing or doing technical work) in two shows. In 2013, however, Sklar and Brockmeier wanted the Thalians to operate more like a professional theater company. They scrapped the induction requirement and expanded board positions to include a more diverse range of responsibilities. Board members collaborate to put on three to four productions every semester. So far this semester, the troupe has staged productions which include Almost, Maine and Social Prescriptions, with Love Lab and Belladonna still to come. The Thalian Blackfriars are continuing a tradition of fulfilling UGA’s need for a theater outlet, producing some of the most interesting, culturally important works on campus.

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WELCOME TO EXIST: The Women’s Center Initiative & The Evolution of the Gender Debate at UGA BY: KAMEEL MIR

THE

University of Georgia has been gripped by a rivalry even more impassioned than its football fandom. With the campaign for a Women’s Center at UGA, heated debate arises from different corners of campus about gender issues. The task force promoting a potential Women’s Centercor, a possible Center for Gender Equality, has strived to develop an inclusive approach to gender equality, focusing on fostering unity behind its cause by upholding a precise, non-discriminatory use of language. Students on the task force have expressed that they envision a center devoted not only to providing resources for those subjected to rape culture and sexual violence, but also to promoting awareness of the damage inflicted by improper and irresponsible usage of terms. “In calling the initiative ‘Dawgs for a Women’s Center at UGA,’ inevitably one is brought to wonder what the term ‘woman’ currently and should mean to UGA students,” says Uzma Chowdhury, vice president of the Student Government Association and member of the task force. Continuing, she adds, “We are conscious of the women’s movement in the U.S., across college campuses, often becoming a marginalizing entity itself––becoming white, straight women’s feminism instead of a more diverse version.” An emphasis on making the initiative a movement for men, women and everything in between represents the task force’s appreciation of Intersectionality––the idea that all forms of oppression are interconnected and must be addressed with regard to one another. Historically, the feminist movement at UGA has mobilized in the context of a broader-based activist counterculture. Founded in 1971, WOMEN, or Women’s Oppression Must End Now, protested campus policies on admitting too few female students, marched on the President’s office and had several members jailed for their efforts. The establishment of the Women’s Studies program in 1977 also served as an anchor for the feminist movement at UGA. According to Elisabeth Joy Strickland’s history of Women’s Studies at UGA, the initial committee that proposed the program emphasized the need to amend several key things: the lack of women named in history books, the misrepresentation of women in the social sciences and the study of exclusively primitive women in anthropology. This proposal was met with outrage from indignant faculty who denounced the committee for its extremism. In homage to its activist roots, the Women’s Studies Student Organization continues to promote informal discussion of women’s issues and broader gender-related topics among students. WSSO’s representative on the task force Samantha Meyer has worked to alert UGA students to the realities of campus gender dynamics. “Some students are worried something like [the Women’s Center] would perpetuate inequality. I’ve been asked, ‘Aren’t women equal now?’ I don’t think people are aware of the specific issues women and other marginalized genders face,” said Meyer.

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TERMINOLOGY

Certain issues have proved to be persistent problems for UGA feminists, in fact. Though the current task force formed out of a University Council resolution passed in 2013, the idea of a Women’s Center was first proposed in 2008––at the same time that a resolution was passed regarding the planning of a daycare center. When put to vote, the Women’s Center was shelved in favor of the project with greater mass appeal. “How poignant that students at UGA were made to choose between a women’s center and a daycare,” Chowdhury says. “Hasn’t the choice for women always been family or self, fulfilling societal duties or exploring one’s own identity?” Now that the task force has been established, a complex endeavor lies ahead. The Women’s Center intends to spur discussion of those previously suppressed identities in conjunction with existing campus centers, such as the LGBTQ

Micro-aggression

As opposed to blatant acts of physical violence or hate crimes, the subtler wrongs committed against minorities through perpetuating stereotypes or insensitive language

Resource Center and LAMBDA Alliance. Feminism at UGA has the support of multiple groups in the activist sphere, widening its potential reach and diversifying its audience, but also heightening its level of responsibility. Colclough, a member of the LGBTQ Resource Center and a new member of the task force, was charged with sifting through the initial 33-page proposal for the Women’s Center to make sure that the language was trans-friendly. “Pronouns are obviously very important,” Colclough says, clarifying, “the pronouns that people need to be called by rather than their culturally prescribed ones, which are very important in affirming people’s gender identities.” Members of the Women’s Center task force have already undergone intensive safe space training, in which they have been taught how to

Third Wave Feminism

Popularized as early as the 1990s, a movement defending the rights of women by promoting the acknowledgment of diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds, racial and religious identities and political views

properly employ gendered pronouns, as well as how to engage each other in a debate of ideas rather than personal attacks on individuals. He, zie, she, hier, it, them and em, for example. The alphabet soup of pronouns may at first seem daunting to cisgender males and females––people whose gender and orientation correspond with their biological sex. As the project continues to unfold, and as the broader movement continues to develop from its origins in the ‘70s, the Women’s Center aims to make discussion about gender more common on campus, familiarizing UGA students with those and other terms. Awareness, after all, tends to breed sensitivity. “Through subtle measures,” Colclough says, “we want to make sure people feel as though they are in a safe space at UGA, that they are welcome to exist.”

Gender Binary

The traditional view that only two genders exist, correlating to the male and female biological sexes

Inclusivity

Intersectionality

The crossover among different forms of oppression, making it impossible to analyze one without the other

Being open to people of all racial and gender identities, political ideologies, etc.

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How do you Brew? BY GRACE DONNELLY

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P H O T O S B Y RACHEL JEFFS

Across the cold concrete floor, boxes of bottles sit empty, waiting for the malted barley along the back wall to become the cherished golden liquid that will fill them. Before that can happen, a process that humans have been practicing and refining for thousands of years must take place––the brewing of beer. People have been producing beer since the advent of agriculture and from the ancient Egyptians to America’s founders, this familiar beverage has remained the drink of choice for generations. At Blockader Homebrew Supply, owner Evan Smith provides materials a few hundred ambitious Athenians need to embark on the beer-making process. Smith says he first bought a brew kit the day after his 22nd birthday and fell in love with the process “batch after batch.” The practice of brewing at home has become more popular in recent years. The science behind the brew remains the same, but the water, malt, hops and yeast are combined on a much smaller scale than at a commercial brewing company. The rise in popularity of home brewing beer coincides with a larger movement in Athens, and across the country, of individuals taking control of the goods they consume. Michael Day, president of the Athens League of Extraordinary Zygamists (someone who studies

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the process of fermentation), says that along with gardening, canning and pickling, home brewing fits into his DIY lifestyle. He and his wife began gardening while he was attending graduate school, and the hobby stuck. “We have hops growing in our garden,” Day says. “It’s just sort of a natural extension to start making your own beer.” Brewing beer yourself can be less expensive and more rewarding. While the initial cost of the equipment might be substantial, beer brewed at home ends up costing about half as much per bottle as commerciallyproduced craft beers, according to Smith. Taking the brewing process into their own hands, and homes, allows enthusiasts to clone craft beers that may not be available in Georgia or even concoct a fermented beverage all their own. “It’s a great way to get the beer that you can’t get as well as create new beer that doesn’t even exist yet,” Smith says. “It’s a very nice creative outlet.” With the right know-how and ambition, there are essentially endless combinations for home brewers to try. Day’s favorite creation is one he brewed with the lemon balm grown in his garden; Smith once accepted a dare to brew a beer with radishes. In addition, brewers have complete knowledge of what is going into their beer. “Because beer is not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, it’s regulated by the Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms division, ingredient lists don’t really exist on beer,” Smith says.

Evan Smith, Owner of Blackader Homebrew Supply


Understanding the elements often leads to a new appreciation for the origins of the liquid in your bottle. The ingredients are simple, but complex reactions occur before the beer hits your lips. “It’s a very exact science,” Day says of fermentation. Although Jonathan Ledoux, a marine biology graduate student and vice president of ALEZ, brews his beer entirely in his kitchen and often ferments it in his bedroom, the casual setting does not negate the scientific nature of the process. Ledoux says that a scientific background can be a great asset when home brewing. “If you make a good batch of beer, it’s almost like being in a laboratory,” Day says. “If you take good notes and you control things the right way then you can make that batch again.” This concept is perhaps the most alluring for connoisseurs of beer in the Athens area, where growing interest in craft beers may outpace the rapidly expanding cluster of craft breweries. This support for regional and hyper-regional beers has been evident in Athens since the establishment of Terrapin in 2002 and has continued with brew-pubs like Copper Creek and newer brewery projects like Creature Comforts and Southern Brewing Company. The inclination toward specialty beers is especially prevalent among Athens “townies” and graduate students, according to Ledoux, but is beginning to spread to the undergraduate population. “It’s a source of pride. It’s a sense of regionality,” Smith says. “It’s a great source of job growth, job creation.” In Europe, it is not uncommon for every town to have their own brewery with their own distinct beer, and that mentality is beginning to take hold in the United States as well. “It’s another thing that Athens can be famous for other than great music,” Day says. “There’s starting to be great beer that’s associated with Athens as well.”

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The

Real

BY SARAH BENNETT hroughout much of Athens’ past, the city has been known not only for its thriving intellects and athletes, but also as a hub of artistic and musical expression. However, this plethora of voices comes with one caveat: maintaining relevance. Although it’s been six years since he’s been on tour, Bain Mattox has found a way to cheat the system. Not only has he managed to stay relevant in the Athens community, he has remained influential. Mattox first fell in love with the Classic City in 2000, after moving to Athens and getting his start with chilling folk-rock duo, Maple Yum Yum. “It’s cheap to live here,” Mattox says. “You can go out and make music for five days, then go make quick money at a bar.” After a few years of touring under his belt, Mattox decided

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to branch out and pursue his self-titled side project for the next seven years. Although extremely successful and prevalent in the music scene, Mattox found his life changing directions with the birth of his first child. “Touring wasn’t what it used to be,” he says. Spending time at home and taking on a bartending position at 5 & 10, he quickly found a new love––the food industry. After speaking with a friend one night about his new passion and the lack of bars in the Normaltown area of Athens, Mattox formulated a plan for what would later become Normal Bar. Opening in 2010 with the intent of being a “cozy” place with outstanding customer service, Normal Bar has become just that. “I love coming here because it’s a low-key stop on my way home,” says Grant Kevins, a local nonprofit youth soccer club director and


PHOTOS BY DARCY RICHARDSON

avid Normal Bar patron. I can wear sweats and drink good beer.” While the success of Normal Bar was ever-growing, Mattox refused to stop there. “Normal Bar is a place where everyone can relax, including local artists, without having to worry about a musical or business relationship,” he says. “I always wanted a venue.” In 2013, Mattox fulfilled that desire by opening not only a venue, but a fully-functioning bar and restaurant--The World Famous. With an Asian-Latin American inspired menu ranging from the chicken and waffle club to a crispy tofu lettuce wrap, diners can enjoy something new, yet familiar, with a unique taste of Athens. As far as the performance aspect of The World Famous goes, Mattox has weaved in his own show preferences, saying, “I’ve always preferred smaller crowds that really want to be there, versus bigger crowds where everyone is talking and distracted from the show. The artist puts on a better show and is ultimately more engaged with the crowd.” While The World Famous attracts smaller crowds, that doesn’t equal lesser-known performers. “We’ve had some great shows so far. Elf Power, Easter Island, Kishi Bashi and Margaret Cho were all packed,” says Hubie Lang, a bartender and server at The World Famous. “We have dance parties three to five times a month. Most people grab a pork-braised bun on their way out.”

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Mattox says they shoot for an average of two shows a week and currently have a sponsored brunch show every Sunday at 12:30 p.m. At both establishments, Mattox has clear goals and knows how to cater to what Athenians want. “I think what I aim for most is intimacy,” Mattox says. “It’s always been about quality over quantity. Something great about Athens is that the town is very welcoming. Local business thrives very well here, and people seem to be much more supportive of that than chains.” To say he’s hit the mark might be an understatement; The World Famous, at just a year old has already been mentioned by The New York Times and is a go-to spot in Athens. Mattox himself just received his third consecutive award from Flagpole Magazine for “Best Bartender” in Athens. So what’s next for this musician-turned-businessman? Quite a lot. “Normal Bar is expanding, I’m soon co-opening a New York style pizzeria called Automatic Pizza, and besides that, enjoying my time with my children and wife,” Mattox says. Although Mattox has changed his focus, he continues to contribute to the Athens community by providing a relaxed atmosphere. Whether it’s a dive-bar retreat or intimate performance space, Bain Mattox leaves locals with an experience that will last long after the music fades.

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The Legacy of Lamar Dodd

BY ELIZABETH VOGAN Through glass windows, vivid paints are mixed, charcoal smears create heavy shadows, cameras flash and fresh ideas brew in the minds of inspired artists. This scene hardly begins to capture life inside a building that caters to hundreds of art students, but it’s a telling glimpse into one of the largest and highly ranked art schools in the nation, the Lamar Dodd School of Art. “[Lamar] Dodd was among the most important American Scene painters of the 1930s and 1940s,” says Paul Manoguerra, former curator of American art at the Georgia Museum of Art. As a highly prolific painter, Dodd’s subjects ranged from heart operations, to current events, to foreign countries, to his primary passion for southern landscapes. “I believe those scenes of everyday life and landscapes of the South are his best works,” Manoguerra says. It’s difficult to imagine, but at one time, the University of Georgia had fewer than five art students, a fact Dodd refused to accept. “I think there were only three students when he took over,” says Annie Laurie Dodd, speaking of her late husband’s progress with the University of Georgia. “He brought it up until there were over one thousand students.”

Mrs. Dodd, a talented painter herself, acknowledges the way Lamar was able to set the example for the new wave of talent he brought to UGA while simultaneously advancing his own body of work. She recalls his stories of learning to paint at a young age. In exchange for mowing the lawn at an all-girls school, he was able to take classes where the common practice was copying old masters. Many successful artists start this way, she notes. Years later, when he acted as director of the art school, her husband fostered artistic awareness in the South and set a goal of helping other artists hone their craft in university settings. A former professor and former director of the Cortona, Italy study abroad program, Rick Johnson recalls Mr. Dodd’s generosity when Johnson was a graduate student. Dodd, he says, awarded him a scholarship to help him pay for a trip to Italy. “He simply reached into his desk’s top drawer,” Johnson says, “pulled out his checkbook and wrote me a check.” He adds that Mr. Dodd held a genuine interest in Johnson’s artistic progress and made a concerted effort to keep up with his work. This kind of generosity was shared with everyone he cared about, Mrs. Dodd says, describing his habit of giving artwork to people he liked. “There is no telling how many people have paintings from a birthday, wedding or anniversary that he just gave to them,” she says. In fact, she admits she doesn’t know how he managed to produce so many paintings on top of all the work he did as the head of the art department, as a father and as someone who made time to travel. Remembering this man who could paint four to five watercolors in a day and an oil painting in one sitting, his former students and loved ones attest that Mr. Dodd is a great face for the art school that bears his name. The Lamar Dodd School of Art continues to inspire through Dodd’s generosity and to teach increasing numbers of creative artists who produce innumerable works of art that honor the man behind the name.

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BY EMILY DARDAMAN The University of Georgia holds an unusual position as the nation’s first public university, located in the heart of the Bible Belt. UGA’s longtime reputation as a “blue dot in a red state” has shaped the evolution of campus attitude towards religion since the University’s founding in 1785 and remains the guiding force behind religious dialogue today. Many argue that the University’s policies have always been progressive. While UGA’s original charter mandated that all administrators be Christians, it also included a clause forbidding discrimination against potential students on a religious basis. Of late, University policies are growing supportive of students’ rights of expression of religion. Every year, the administrative office sends professors a comprehensive list of religious holidays. On those days, professors are required to grant students leave for fasting, prayer or other practices. UGA’s Campus Ministries Association, which is officially affiliated with the University, initially included only a small group of prominent local Christian ministers. Hillel at UGA was the first non-Christian group to reach similar status. CMA is now much larger and more inclusive, but Baptist Collegiate Ministry representative Nathan Byrd says the expansion, while indicative of an increasingly diverse student body, comes at the cost of making the group “less like-minded.” “We have a harder time agreeing on anything,” Byrd says. Others feel that the sheer number of different religious groups makes it too easy for students to tune out competing messages and isolate themselves from the rest of campus. “We’re all in our own corners, because we don’t want to clash, and we don’t want to be politically incorrect,” says Kerelos Isac, secretary of the Coptic Orthodox Student Association. With an issue as sensitive as religion, it’s difficult to strike a balance between being respectful and walking on eggshells. Political correctness is a phrase that tends to make everyone nervous and often paralyzes communication. Incidents like November’s protest against racial and homophobic slurs on Facebook remind us that in the age of social media, consequences are instant. According to UGA class of ’69 graduate James Klein, the proliferation of campus ministries and open discussion is a recent trend; in the past, faith was a more private matter. “Your religion was your religion back then,” Klein says. “You lived what you were brought up.” Now, UGA students are more willing to engage in conversations about religion than ever before. Reflecting this trend, new interfaith groups like the Abraham Alliance have sprung up over the last couple of years. These groups host panels, holy book studies and holiday celebrations to help foster mutual respect between students of different faiths. Kaytlin Butler, one of the founders of the Abraham Alliance, describes their mission as “building bridges of understanding.”

PHOTOS BY EMILY DARDAMAN

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“We’re not improving diversity so much as improving conversation,” Butler says. The organization’s name derives from the prophet Abraham, a figure held in common by the “Big Three” American religions—Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Other groups ranging from the Secular Student Alliance to the Nichiren Buddhist Association are equally included in panels and discussions, and representatives speak positively about the atmosphere of respect found there. Despite such continued efforts, UGA still struggles with prejudice. Najla Abdulelah, president of the Muslim Student Association, recollects incidents of being harassed by evangelists in the Tate Plaza because of her hijab. Despite those negative experiences, she expresses gratitude towards bystanders––strangers––who came to her defense. Because of students like them, Abdulelah says, “I’m honestly really proud to be a Georgia Bulldog.” Learning how to handle tense situations takes time; fortunately, UGA has ample resources to help. It may seem counterintuitive to turn to an academic institution to address social ills, but dispelling ignorance is what professors do best. When in a disagreement with someone, Islamic Studies professor Dr. Kenneth Honerkamp thinks it unwise to give in to the heat of the moment. “Ignorance—there’s no way to deal with it in a confrontational matter,” says Honerkamp. “Education, yes. I believe in education. That’s why I’m here. That’s why I like my job.” Arriving at UGA, students are flung into a teeming mass of new faces and ideas. At such a large university, there will be something for everyone, which means that there will also be something outside of everyone’s comfort zones. At the end of the day, respect is key. Isac encourages students to put themselves in each others’ shoes. “You’re still a person with a beating heart,” he says, “You’re still a person with faith.”

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Ampersand Magazine: The Origins Issue  

The April 2014 Issue of Ampersand Magazine, the Lifestyle magazine of The Red & Black.

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