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fandom taken to a new level: smell like uga Masik Collegiate Fragrances introduces University of Georgia cologne and perfume inspired by aspects of the campus and Athens, a spirited addition to any Game Day outfit. ➤ PAGE 19

UGA students share thoughts on Rutherford University of Georgia students express their appreciation and enthusiasm for the newly renovated Rutherford Hall and reflect on the dorm's changes since its reconstruction. ➤ PAGE 3

Thursday, August 15, 2013 Vol. 121, No. 2 | Athens, Georgia redandblack.com

Houston fighting for playing time

Playground pounds Diverse disciplines tackle obesity

BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey Kolton Houston is no stranger to fights. The junior offensive lineman, reinstated just last month by the NCAA after a well-chronicled, multi-year struggle to regain his playing eligibility, has been doing that for most of his college career. But now, Houston is fighting for his spot on Georgia’s offensive line, and he’s not content with waiting his turn. After watching from the sidelines for over three years, he says he could see the field as early as Aug. 31, when the Bulldogs march to Death Valley and square off against Clemson. “[Playing] is a good possibility,” Houston said. “I think I’ve made it into the top seven right now. My job is just to come out here and get better and HOUSTON better every single day, and that’s what I’m trying to do.” Offensive line coach Will Friend could give Houston a nod in that contest. If so, it would be the culmination of a remarkable turnaround for an athlete whose future was murky just one month earlier. That’s not to say that Houston’s road through fall camp was an easy one. The Buford native told reporters he hadn’t practiced in five months on the day following his reinstatement. “The first practice, the speed of play, that was definitely what was most rusty. Assignment-wise, I was fine,” he said. “That was rough, but it was fun to be able to be out there, so I didn’t really worry about the grind too much.” Though the game’s physical nature dealt some harsh lessons — at least early on — it was Houston’s mentality that served as a strong motivator through the punishing trials of twoa-days and early mornings. “When it’s late in practice and you’re doing conditioning, you’re just like ‘this is just terrible.’ You’re doing all this conditioning for no reason. Now when I’m able to do conditioning, I’m like ‘this is going to help me in the fourth quarter. This is going to serve a purpose,’” he said. With at least half of his college career lost to what was an extraordinary set of circumstances, many could reasonably assume that Houston would feel rushed or pressured to return to the field immediately. Both head coach Mark Richt and Friend have perhaps played a role in lessening the burden of those expectations. But when it comes down to it, Houston knows he can see the field soon. “Coach Richt and coach Friend both told me they’re not expecting me to be a superstar right away. They want me to be able to take my time,” he said. “But I think I’m ready to be able to play.”

iLLUSTRATION BY CAITLIN LEMOINE

$2.4 billion Obesity costs Georgia an estimated $2.4 billion annually, which includes direct health care costs and lost productivity from disease, disability and death.

73% 59% Of males in Georgia are obese or overweight.

Of females in Georgia are obese or overweight.

$344 billion Obesity is expected to cost the United States $344 billion per year in related health costs by 2018. Source: UGA Office of the Vice President for Research

Jeanette Kazmierczak | @sciencekaz

G

eorgia was one of 19 states to see obesity decline in low-income preschoolers between 2008 and 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

reported this month. This follows a report made earlier this year by the Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health that Georgia is now 33rd in rates of childhood obesity in the United States — a significant improvement from Georgia’s status as 49th in 2007. But with one-third of the nation still obese, the American Medical Association recognized obesity as a disease at its annual meeting in Chicago in June, although it is important to recognize that the decision has no legal standing.

In 2012, more than 100 University of Georgia researchers and faculty came together to form the UGA Obesity Initiative to help address this epidemic in the state of Georgia, where the rate of obesity in 2010 was 29.6 percent. Different teams are addressing the problem in many areas, including the workplace, food ingredients and policy. “I can probably claim now 14 different teams that are working togeth-

er,” said Clifton Baile, the executive director of the initiative and a D. W. Brooks distinguished professor of animal and dairy sciences. “That resulted in new conversations — it varied between new grant applications to a lot of effort in improving thinking about how we teach about obesity and weight management.” See OBESITY, Page 2

UGA drops from party elite Princeton Review ranked UGA No. 11 party school in the nation BY ARVIND DEOL The Red & Black The senior class and University of Georgia alumni may remember a time when UGA was ranked the No. 1 party school in the nation. This ranking, given to UGA in 2010 by the Princeton Review, was based on a number of student surveys sent out online at the end of the year. The Princeton Review has done a similar survey each year since 2010, but UGA has not maintained its party reputation. For the 2012-2013 school year, UGA’s party ranking fell to No. 11. Bulldog Nation has been in party school decline since 2010. UGA fell to No. 2 in 2011 and No. 5 last year. With the University of Iowa grabbing the coveted No. 1 spot and the University of Florida narrowly grabbing the No. 6 spot this year, the Dawgs are no longer on top. But, what led to this decline? “I don’t think the party scene in Athens has changed much,” said Korey Lane, a senior early childhood education major from Brunswick. “Considering how many bars we have — and we have over 20 frats. So, I don’t think we did anything wrong, but it is still very disappointing.” Schools have almost never

stayed No.1 for more than one year, and the ranking tends to draw a lot of press towards the universities. Yet, does this new ranking appeal to incoming freshmen looking for a fun school with a party atmosphere? “I think it’s freaking awesome that we got No. 11,” said Gustavo Cortina, a freshman civil engineering major. “It’s kind of a good and a bad thing we dropped from No. 1. Honestly, you want to have fun in college, but, at the same time, you don’t want to go crazy. This freshman class will bring us back to top though.” Jimmy Williamson, chief of the UGA Police Department said he believes UGA’s does still have a party atmosphere — a safe one. “Any institution of our size is going to have a lot of people trying to have a good time. It’s a part of what college life is,” said Jimmy Williamson, chief of the UGA Police Department. “The real issue is how people are partying at UGA. We try to create a responsible atmosphere for having fun. So I think UGA should be ranked top 10 as a responsible party school.” With UGA’s size, academic standings, strong athletics program and expansive campus, Williamson said it’s hard for a school like UGA not to acquire a party school reputation. See PARTY, Page 3

2010 2011

2012

2013

The Princeton Review's list of party schools ranked UGA at No. 11 in the nation, 10 spots away from its first place position in 2010. Photo Illustration/Staff

NEWS, 2 • VIEWS, 4 • SPORTS, 9 • PHOTO, 16 • VARIETY, 17 • PUZZLES, 21 An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia and Athens Communities

Established 1893, Independent 1980


2 News

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

POLICE BLOTTER UGA student victim of battery

damaged in storage theft

A University of Georgia student was “slammed…to the ground” after being denied entry into a downtown bar, according to an Athens-Clarke County Police report. The student was allegedly not allowed into the bar because the bouncer said the building had “reached capacity,” but the student believed the doorman was “personally” denying him access. The doorman began “kicking [the victim]” while he was on the ground. The student said he did not feel any pain, according to the report. The victim reportedly stood back up to fight when a “another male and the doorman…threw him against a car trunk, and threw him to the ground again.” The victim told police he went to Saint Mary’s Hospital and that he would like to prosecute, but he cannot identify the doorman. — Brad Mannion

Roughly $3600 in belongings were stolen and $4000 were damaged as the result of a break-in at an Athens storage center on Monday between midnight and 10 a.m., according to an AthensClarke County Police report. An employee of the storage center reported the incident when he noticed that “locks were missing off of several units.” The units were reportedly checked on Saturday [Aug. 11], but on the morning of the incident, the gate “was not operational.” Items stolen include two Chinese vases and bowls, a watchmaker’s tools kit and a watchmaker’s desk. According to the report, a $4000 Egyptian chandelier was also damaged in the theft. — Brad Mannion

$4000 Chandelier

Registered sex offender charged after giving officers wrong name University of Georgia Police arrested a registered

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sex offender and barred him from UGA property for two years after giving false information to the police on Saturday at 12:24 a.m., according to a police report. Officers saw a green minivan sitting in an empty parking lot near Dudley Park and decided to investigate, because the officer reported that the area “is known for drug activity,” according to the report. A man “popped up from the floor board of the vehicle” where he was reportedly sleeping, as the officer shined her light into the van. The man said that “he was waiting for his friend to get off of work from Mama’s Boy,” which was not open for dinner hours. The officer asked why he was not waiting in the restaurant’s parking lot, and the man, Garrett Fiddyment, 22, said that he thought it would be “weird,” according to the report. The officer asked Fiddyment for identification, where Fiddyment did not present him with an ID but instead gave the officer a fake name and birthday. Fiddyment also said that he was a student at Gainesville State College, but when the officer tried to look up the name he gave on Gainesville’s student directory, she couldn’t find it. The officer had already checked for a driver’s license registered to the name in both Georgia and Alabama but was unable to find anything. The officer asked Fiddyment “if he had anything inside of his vehicle with his name on it” but Fiddyment said he did not. Fiddyment eventually told the initial officer that he was lying about his name and he “possibly had warrants,” according to the report. Fiddyment was reportedly on probation and had three active warrants from Barrow County for child exploitation. The Georgia Bureau of Investigation lists Fiddyment as a registered sex offender. The officers found “a clear plastic baggie containing a green bud of suspected marijuana,” which was confirmed via a color change test. They also found a wallet containing Fiddyment’s driver’s license. Fiddyment was arrested and charged with possession of less than one o.z. of marijuana and giving false name and date of birth. He was barred from UGA property for two years. The Red & Black was not able to reach Fiddyment for comment concerning his arrest. — Jana French

The University of Georgia started an initiative to educate students and the Athens-Clarke County community about weight management. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

OBESITY: Education at epicenter for UGA researchers looking to end obesity ➤ From Page 1 Obesity Education The initiative is in the early stages of developing a certificate specifically designed to educate students on how to address the obesity crisis through classes spanning agriculture, family and consumer sciences, food and nutrition, education, pharmacy and public health. “We had an idea to reach out to groups such as people pursuing the master’s level — that’s what we were very interested in,” said Mary Ann Johnson, the Bill and June Flatt Professor in Foods and Nutrition, “Because we really saw [these students from different departments] as a current and future segment of the workforce that really interacts with children and communities every day. And it’s just been fascinating to see how all our different colleges, departments, the people we train — the work force we’re training — how they all have a role to play in obesity.” Although the breadth of departments interested in the program initially surprised her, Johnson said it made more sense if one considered the importance of their position in local communities. “We have pharmacists on our campus [who] are very interested in what we’re thinking about right now because the pharmacist is the most accessible health professional in the community,” she said. “They’re very interested in the health of the whole person, how medications go along with being physically active and eating right. A good example is the cholesterol pill. You’re not just supposed to take your cholesterol pill — you’re supposed to be eating a good diet along with that.” Medical Partnership Suzanne Lester is an assistant professor and the site clerkship director of family medicine for the Georgia Regents University — UGA Medical Partnership. She said medical students learn not only the biological factors of obesity and other chronic diseases, but also clinical aspects and how to approach patients by looking at the whole picture. “Addressing issues of lifestyle — you always want to start there — I think is our perspective on that. So, some of that is going to look at the social determinants of health,” Lester said. “Is it a person who is obese because they don’t have access to healthy food? Is this a person who is obese even though they have access to food that have other psychosocial issues playing into it? We try to look at all the things that go into why would a person eat the way they eat. Then we also try to look at what’s the family history.” Lester said she prefers lifestyle changes to pharmacotheraputic approaches because data on longterm efficacy is mixed and the counseling that should accompany a prescription is sometimes harder to provide than the drug itself. The AMA decision will not affect how she teaches students, Lester said. The focus will still be on lifestyle and empowering the patient to make changes to improve their health. “This all will relate back again to some degree to social determinants and biological determinants of health again,” Lester said. “So whether it’s labeled as a disease and given its own

billing code that will reimburse or not shouldn’t change our approach. It should just change how we document that approach.” UGA Health Center There are no specific statistics about obesity rates at UGA, although the rate in Athens-Clarke County in 2007 was 25.7 percent. “We don’t see all the students and when someone enrolls in the University they don’t have to include their weight when they sign in,” said Liz Rachun, the University Health Center’s health communications coordinator. Lindsay Allday, a junior English and theatre major from Lumber City, and William Towne, a junior genetics major from Folkston, both thought having a statistic like that would be beneficial. “We would find out if the resources we have are really working. If the dietician at Snelling and if Ramsey are a good investment,” Allday said. Towne said he wished more people understood how obesity and overweight were defined — according to the CDC, having a Body Mass Index of 30 or higher and between 25 and 29.9, respectively — and said he thought that system had limitations. “I think education on different body-types and if someone is really considered obese,” he said. “When you think of obese you think of the extreme. So yeah, a little more education would be nice, more pamphlets.” Allday said college students especially could use more educational material. “Not only are we learning valuable things education-wise, but we’re also learning about ourselves,” she said. “And so I think it would be convenient to see how we stack up against the rest of Georgia, the rest of the nation.” Students taking action Other students are hoping to eventually use the new certificate to expand their understanding of obesity to help tackle it in the community. Alison Berg, a doctoral student in food and nutrition in family and consumer sciences, graduated with her masters degree and went out into the work force as a registered dietician before returning to school. She is providing a student’s perspective as development of the certificate’s curriculum begins. “For example, I said to [Johnson] I would definitely like more education with regard to policy and policy development because that really drives a lot of what we do in the public health area of like school nutrition,” she said. Berg said going out into the work force helped her realize how multifaceted the issue of obesity is and the importance of being able to expand the scope of her knowledge and cooperating and collaborating with other disciplines or practices. “I think we just all need to be curious and we need to be open to the idea that our field doesn’t cover everything and that it’s really about the individual or the population and helping them in the best way we can,” Berg said. “And so a program like this would be really good even if you’re not quite sure how you’re going to use it to begin with. If you know you’re going to be in that general area it certainly can’t hurt to get a better idea of what’s going on outside of your scope.”

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The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

News 3

New UGA deans anticipate for a successful semester by Stephen Mays @stephen_mays

Rutherford residents at the University of Georgia enjoy the classic scenery and historic feautures of the newly structured residence hall as part of the Myers community on Sanford Drive. Taylor Michelle Carpenter/Staff

Students pleased with renovated Rutherford By Marena Galluccio @MarenaGalluccio Palace. Castle. Mansion. These are just a few examples of what the new Rutherford has been referred to as. With Rutherford Hall now holding 261 rooms while holding onto that classic historical structure of old Rutherford, it is not hard to see that comparison and those that live there are proud to call it home. Jamie Lyons, a sophomore environmental engineering major from Decatur, said she really enjoys being in her new room. “I think the rooms are really nice,” Lyons said. “I mean it’s brand new. It’s bigger than all of the freshmen dorms so it’s nice and roomy and we have nice furniture.” The rooms all have their own sink and private bathroom with a toilet and shower and range around 20 feet by 13.5 feet in a variety of shapes, according to the University of Georgia’s Housing website. “I’m looking forward to living in the room. It’s nice to have our own bathroom. It’s a big step up,” she said. Taylor Harrell, a sophomore art major from Camden County and Lyons’ roommate, is also enjoying living in her room since this past Wednesday and appreciates that it’s in a central location. “I was super excited that it’s in the center of campus so it’s close by

to all of my classes and two dining halls and there are busses that go by here every day,” Harrell said. “It’s not like Brumby where I had to walk up a hill. That was terrible.” Harrell said that she also appreciates the landscaping around the building. “All of the foliage is really nice around here and I like living on the Quad too as you can play Frisbee,” she said. “So I’m really excited to be able to play Frisbee with friends.” Rutherford also holds the Franklin Residential College once again after having a year in 1516. Molly Pease, a junior theater and public relations major from Marietta, is a dean’s student assistant of the FRC who lived in old Rutherford her freshmen year. With being back to the original area, Pease said it’s nice. “We are just really happy to be back in the center of campus. It just makes it so simple to have everyone in one building again because last year we had nonresidential members and members of the residential college,” Pease said. “It was really hectic moving to 1516 and we just had people everywhere so it’s really nice to have just one central location and for the central location to literally be a central location on campus. So it’s great. We love it.” Melina Lewis, a junior psychology and

criminal justice major from Leesburg, Va., is also a dean’s assistant and Pease’s roommate who lived in old Rutherford her freshman year. Even though the old and new Rutherfords are very different, Lewis still appreciates what effort housing put into it to make it similar. “I have to give housing credit for trying to have some similarities like the marble staircase and the door panels by the lobby are actual doors from the old Ruther In old Rutherford,” Lewis said. Little things like the piano being played, Pease said, is what really makes her remember the old Rutherford. “It’s just surreal,” she said. Wi t h new Rutherford actually being lived in, little things are being found to be improved or could have been useful. “I like it a lot. I just wish there was a trash shoot or something so I didn’t have to walk all the way to Meyers to take my trash out. And also I wish there was more than one elevator in here,” Harrell said. “The only other problem we’ve had is with our bathroom. The hook by our shower doesn’t hold our towels and the door squishes the rug if we have it outside the shower.” But these new renovations did not come without a price. The cost to live in a double room in 2011 was $2,094, increasing

this year to $3,117. Single rooms in 2011 cost $2,438, which also increased to $3,366. Before Rutherford was renovated, quadrupal room floor plans were offered at a cost of $1,553 but are no longer an option for Rutherford residents. But Rutherford will still be familiar to previous residents with some housing events remaining unchanged. Rutherford will get back to its normal routine of having cookie nights and dean’s teas that all the FRC students will be able to partake in, according to the FRC’s blog. “I think this is really a chance for us to be able to rebuild the FRC,” Harrell said. “With moving out of Rutherford last year, the FRC almost began to deteriorate as an organization, but I’m really looking forward to changing that and revamping what the FRC to what it used to be.” Harrell said that she is looking forward to meeting new people as well as meeting with the FRC dean, Gene Wright, as he is head of scientific illustration, her intended major. Other Rutherford events that are planned include a performing arts series and the Sapelo Island trip during fall break. But Rutherford, old or new, has a lasting impression on those that live there. “It made UGA feel like home,” Lewis said.

Along with a new president, four new deans take the reins this fall at the University of Georgia. The Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, the College of Engineering, the School of Public and International Affairs and the Terry College of Business received new leaders over the summer. Charles Davis assumed the role for Grady, Donald Leo for the College of Engineering, Stefanie Lindquist for SPIA and Charles Knapp for Terry’s interim dean. “I feel like we’re in really good shape heading into the year,” Davis said. For the first time in 25 years, Davis said he is “struck with the oddity of not having a syllabus in [his] hand.” Davis made the transition from professor at the University of Missouri School of Journalism to Grady dean officially on July 1 and has since been spending a large portion of his time meeting with Grady’s donor base, alumni and faculty. “I’ve had a lot of homework,” Davis said, noting that he has been reading up on the policy’s of UGA as well as working to develop a strategic plan for the future course of Grady. Leo, previously a vice president, former associate dean and executive diretcor of the National Capital Regions operations at Virginia Tech, said he too has spent most of his time since July 1 meeting with staff, students, faculty and university administrators while simultaneously ensuring that the fundraising aspects of the college are primed. “We’re in an exciting time,” Leo said, noting that the college would “be hiring a number of new faculty in the coming years.” Leo pointed out that this coming year will have the largest number of students the program has seen to date. He has been working with faculty on plans to ensure that as the student population grows, there is equal growth in services provided to them. “Growing rapidly provides excitement and apprehension to ensure resources are spent appropriately,” Leo said. Lindquist, who took the dean position on Aug. 1 said the bulk of her time has been spent “familiarizing [herself] with school policy and procedures and meeting with faculty” to begin developing a vision for the school going forward. Lindquist left her position as the Charles Alan Wright Chair in Federal Courts and associate dean for external affairs at the University of Texas School of Law and returned to the campus where she began her academic career in 1996. “The students are what make it worthwhile,” she said, noting her excitement for the beginning of classes and recalling how much she enjoyed teaching at UGA in the past. “The position requires a lot of energy and discipline, and I’ll try to bring my best,” Lindquist said. Knapp, who’s only serving as interim dean of Terry from July 1 to June 30, 2014, held position as the president of UGA from 1987 to 1997. Knapp was unavailable for comment due to a tight schedule, according to Matt Weeks, public relations coordinator in Terry. Weeks noted that Knapp has been extremely busy with faculty meetings, conference calls and preparations for the coming year. Although newly appointed to their positions, these four deans have hit the ground running with the intentions to help their respective departments move forward successfully.

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PARTY: No ‘real difference’ in habits despite ranking ➤ From Page 1 “I don’t think we would be the institution we are today if it weren’t for our hospitality district downtown and our ability to have a good time,” Williamson said. “Just look at the music scene, the great bands that have come out of Athens. Honestly, it acts as a lighthouse effect — a lot of people from surrounding areas get attracted and create a downtown which is a really fun place to be.” With around 100 bars and restaurants per square mile in downtown Athens, it is easy to see the attraction for college students to attend UGA. The bright lights, music and promise of a good time are enough to draw in even the biggest hermit — making Athens a consistent spot for night life. Previous rankings from The Princeton Review have proven this pint, as UGA has been name in the top 10 party schools between 2010 and 2012, with a first place spot in 2010. Every year, hundreds of thousands of people make the pilgrimage to Athens for the populated parties and tailgating events that come with UGA home football games. Whether it’s visiting friends, relatives or coming to watch the Dawgs take on the Yellow Jackets from the Georgia Institute of Technology, people visiting Athens have developed a habit of finding their way downtown following games and perhaps adding to UGA’s reputation as a

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Free Cheese Bread, Garlic Bread, or Hummus with purchase of full-priced entree. • limit one per customer • must present coupon UGA's rank as a top party school was lowered to No. 11, but that will not stop crowds of people from heading downtown. TAYLOR CRIAG SUTTON/Staff party school. Being a bar downtown is big business in Athens with some bartenders picking over five hundred dollars in tips a night. In essence, this creates a multi-million dollar industry that is reliant on the love of partying and poor spending habits of UGA students. But bars in downtown Athens are not worried about UGA’s drop in party school ranking. Michael Houck, a former UGA student and bartender at Boar’s Head Lounge, said he doubts Athens’ bars and clubs will be affected by the new ranking. “Anyone who goes out on a

Thursday, Friday or Saturday knows plenty of people are still going downtown,” Houck said. Despite a fall in rankings since 2010 ­— a year when UGA was ranked at the top of the list — Houck said there is no longlasting effect on the revenue earned by downtown businesses or the amount of bodies piled into the area's late-night clubs and bars. “I don’t think our dropping in the rankings has really made any real difference in the bar scene,” Houck said. “Besides, if you think of how many schools there really are in the nation, eleventh ain’t all that bad.”

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Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

Views

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Red & Black wants to know what you think — so let’s start a conversation. Email: opinions@randb.com or letters@randb.com Facebook: Like The Red & Black Twitter: @redandblack

OUR TAKE

Obesity epidemic will need everyone

I

f there was only one thing Georgia did well, it would be food. With southern fried chicken, flaky, butter soaked biscuits and sweet tea abounding, it’s not hard to see why this southern fried state has a reputation for big trucks and even bigger waistbands. But putting stereotypes aside, obesity is a serious issue with a number of negative health implications affecting an individual’s quality of life. And the University of Georgia is making great strides to combat this problem, for the sake of both its students and the rest of the state. The first step in the fight was to define obesity as a medically recognized disease. Despite healthy on-campus options for food, the extensive Ramsey Student Center and weight-management services available at the Student Health Center, the issue of obesity remained. Rather than prescribing a routine of exercise and meals that strictly follow the Food Guide Pyramid, the best way to alleviate the problem is through teaching healthy practices and good decision-making skills. Because obesity is such a far-reaching disease, understanding its variety of causes and influences is more important than ever. UGA is at the forefront of multiple health education initiatives, including its Obesity Initiative, and it should continue to expand efforts beyond the range of fields that seem obvious. Teaching a social worker or community official about cutting-edge obesity developments can be just as effective — if not more effective — than teaching the concepts to a dietician or personal trainer, who may only be available to a small number of people. Anyone who can influence others should be tasked with advocating healthy practices. In order for the state to truly take control of its weight, obesity awareness needs to be common knowledge. We don’t need another 24-hour gym or organic smoothie stand, but rather, a shift toward a culture that challenges people and encourages them to carefully evaluate what is best for their bodies. And, admirably, the first step toward a healthier Georgia is being taken right here on campus. Now that university officials have taken initiatives toward combating obesity, the choice is placed in the hands of the students. With the resources UGA has made available, students have no excuse not to better their health, the quality of their lives and to make sure the message is carried past the Arch. — Laura Thompson for the editorial board

Sorority recruitment overwhelms with sound, color Laura Thompson Views Editor

T

here is something about sorority recruitment that a girl can never understand until she actually goes through it. There are other aspects that she still won’t understand as she strolls down Milledge in her carefully chosen sundress. Or possibly, I just couldn’t understand because I distanced myself from Greek life until the last possible moment, a week before the fall recruitment deadline. Perhaps it’s just my demeanor, but the first practice I couldn’t understand was the constant yelling. Why would you think that yelling peppy chants at me would make me desire your company? It may be a premature assumption, but I can’t see how these “walk songs” gain any Potential New Member’s (affectionately known as PNMs) favor for a particular sorority. Until a sorority serenades me with the musical stylings of Tupac Shakur, I would prefer if everyone stuck to “inside voices.” When it came to round three, or “skit round,” as it is called by those in the know, there was another peculiarity that I observed: an odd fixation with the disturbingly popular television series, “The Bachelor.” At least half (if not more) of the six houses I went to made reference to the dreadful entertainment value of forced love. And while some were funnier than others, the general fascination with the show was a bit offputting, at least when you’re a dedicated consumer of offbeat History Channel documentaries and crime comedies like myself. And just as every bachelorette reacts with anger or devastation to the news of her departure from the show, PNMs have equally dramatic reactions when they are cut. I can’t deny that tensions run high during rush, but seeing a girl bawling in

A group of soon-to-be sisters hugs each other at their new sorority house after Bid Day 2013 at the end of Panhellenic Recruitment. Taylor craig sutton/Staff public because a group of strangers dropped her is hard to have sympathy for. Toughen up. Not everyone has to like you, and it’s not the end of the world. Why would you want to be inducted into a group of girls who don’t want to be around you? But perhaps the final, most traumatizing moment of recruitment occurred at the not-so-bitter end. While standing on the lawn of Delta Zeta, bid card clenched in disbelief and a grin creeping across my face, one of my soon-to-be pledge sisters squealed with excitement about this discovery: Lily Pulitzer was none other than a sister of Delta Zeta. “I bet they give discounts to DZs!” And in that instant I saw the next few years of my life flash before

my eyes — pink floral patterns and pearls galore. What have I done? Despite my initial reaction, it wasn’t long before my brief anxiety was relieved. I’m not sold on the idea of plastering my monogram all over everything I own, but I soon realized that those aren’t the things that really matter anyway. I don’t understand everything that goes into sorority life, but I don’t have to yet. One of the most wonderful parts of the journey is the learning I’ll get to do along the way. For now I’m quite content to put on a cheerful smile, wear some pink and green and embrace my newfound home on Milledge as a baby turtle. — Laura Thompson is the views editor of The Red & Black

CURO Summer Fellows reap benefits of undergrad research

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oward the beginning of the summer, I referenced my research into the philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau in a column. But alas, as summer drew to a close, so did my research fellowship with CURO. I thought it appropriate to take the opportunity to sing the praises of CURO and the Summer Fellowship program. The workload was strenuous and time-consuming. While most UGA students did not see the sun much this summer due to rain storms, the other Summer Fellows and I locked ourselves away in labs and libraries for some forty hours a week to pursue research in our chosen fields. It was not easy work, but it was certainly rewarding. As I explained to the other Fellows in my final presentation, that they chose to spend their summer in intellectual pursuits says a great deal about them philosophically. Ideally, it says that they view knowledge produced through their research as beneficial — something to be sought on the basis that it would improve their understanding of both the world and their own lives. The CURO Summer Fellowship offers students the ability to pursue specific knowledge as an undergraduate under faculty guidance, and then to present their research to one another multiple times within the next year. It gave participants experience in areas I believe to be far more fundamental to one’s personal education and self-improvement than any of the research topics themselves: self-determination (it is not easy to wake up each day to do nothing but read, for example), critical thinking, rational judgment, academic curiosity and a pursuit of truth. And there were wide variety of truths under investigation despite there only being 30 Fellows. Fellows Mathew Joseph and Allison Doyle sought medical truths in their research of placental malaria. Fellows Jane Egbosiuba, Travis Williams and Stanislav Bushik conducted research that has implications in biofuel technolo-

Brian Underwood Guest Columnist

gy (as well as in other areas), making biofuel more costefficient and less detrimental to the food market. Fellows Seth Euster and Anthony Sadler joined me in shedding light on the lessons of history. Even after all that, one has scarcely scratched the surface of the research conducted by the 2013 Summer Fellows and years past Sure, others may not find spending two days listening to research presentations on seemingly foreign topics interesting, but I have the benefit of being interested in everything and, as such, I enjoyed the presentations. To avoid confusion among readers, I find it necessary to say that my opinions on public education and publiclyfunded research have not changed since the last time I addressed the topics. As beneficial as education and intellectual pursuits are, the government should play no role in funding them, as that is not the government’s purpose. Nevertheless, while the money is being provided, it is better it be put to good use than expended frivolously – as public money often is. I am pleased to say that in the case of CURO’s Summer Fellowship, the grants — by and large — have been well spent. On behalf of all Summer Fellows, I offer thanks to all those in CURO and the Honors Program as well as research advisors who made the Fellowship possible and worthwhile. — Brian Underwood is a senior from Evans majoring in political science and history

Opinion Meter: The week that was

End of an era: While seniors remember UGA in all of its beer guzzling glory, freshmen only see remnants of its past as the No. 1 party school in the nation. The class of 2017 may have broken all academic records held by previous classes, but can they also restore the late-night social scene to its former prestige?

Got beef?: In the South, nothing says welcome back quite like all-you-can-eat BBQ. Stop by the Classic Center this weekend to taste some of the best BBQ the country has to offer and perhaps get some pointers for your next tailgate. Pack some sweet tea and spare napkins and prepare to taste the sweet, the spicy and the smoky.

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The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

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UGA campus changes create new freshmen experience Brian Underwood

Jalynn Carter

Guest Columnist

Apple wrongly persecuted: Competition is not a crime

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n 2012, the Division of Antitrust within the Department of Justice sued Apple and e-book publishers for an “illegal price fixing conspiracy.” Cut through the Mouchian language about Apple’s alleged attempt to “forcefully” facilitate a plot to injure consumers by raising e-book prices, and the tale ceases to be a matter of “fat cats” screwing over “the little guy.” The reality is Apple offered e-book publishers an alternative to Amazon’s pricing model in which Amazon determined the price of the book — often at $9.99. Taking note of a demand for an absent service in the market, Apple proposed a new pricing model in which publishers could set the price of its own books and Apple would take 30 percent. Where, exactly, is the crime? Who was robbed or beaten? Against whose head did Steve Jobs place a gun and demand their money? Obviously, no such crime occurred. The contracts were voluntary, the transactions were mutual and the property rights of all remained unabridged. No one in the process had their rights violated, hence why the government probably noticed the absence of crime and thus decided to commit one through the invention of imagined crimes. The government has proposed a set of draconian punishments for the “world’s most admired company,” including the termination of five of its existing e-book contracts, being barred from entering into new e-books contracts for five years, allowing “other e-book retailers like Amazon and Barnes & Noble to provide links in their store” and accepting an “external monitor” into Apple. The regime of antitrust in the U.S. is a persecutory tool in the hands of the government to attack men and women who have committed no crime under the guise of “consumer protection” and “encouraging competition.” Here, Apple was accused of a “conspiracy to raise prices” while the law simultaneously disallows underselling one’s competitors and selling at the exact same price as one’s competitors. The law is formatted so that any business of any considerable size has broken it, allowing it to be enforced arbitrarily. The regime of antitrust is about power, not the protection of rights, and it ought to be abolished. — Brian Underwood is a senior from Evans majoring in political science and history

Guest Columnist

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GA’s highly anticipated class of 2017 arrived on campus just over a week ago. Over 7,000 new faces are here and ready to call themselves Dawgs. But these new faces aren’t the only additions to campus. Myers community has once again welcomed Rutherford Hall to the quad. First opening in 1939 to be torn down 70 years later, the residence hall is now new and improved and houses 261 lucky residents. I must admit, I was a little jealous after exploring Rutherford for the first time. I thought that 1516 was the nicest hall on campus. But I think by far, with its old-fashion style and spacious floor plan, Rutherford takes the win. If you want my advice, make sure to keep Rutherford in mind for room sign-up next semester. So if all those new faces weren’t enough, how about that new dining hall on the Health Sciences Campus? I think the Health Sciences bus will get a lot of traffic now with its new addition. How convenient is the new dining hall for the residents living in Brown Hall? That’s right. Brown Hall made its debut this year. It offers students an off-campus feel with on-campus amenities including the new dining hall, The Niche, and its own miniRamsey. I have heard nothing but good reviews for the new spotto-be on campus. To the upperclassmen girls: remember your days in Brumby? Let me refresh your memory if you’ve forgotten. Remember having girlfriends on every floor? Remember visiting each other in your footie pajamas and hair wraps? Remember trying to rush boys out of your room before 2 a.m.? Well, for the 2013-2014 Brumby residents, these memories are nothing but history. I used to joke around with my Brumby hallmates last year about how we wished Brumby were coed, but now that I think about it, it’s almost like tradition. Nine floors of nothing but girls trying to get along and to get the boys out by curfew. That’s a freshman experience that only a Brumby girl can tell the tale of. The class of 2017 has arrived on a noticeably different cam-

Rutherford Hall is just one of the many new changes campus has seen since the conclusion of spring classes. FILe/Staff pus than the one that was previously known. From big changes, like the history of Brumby, to the little things like the walk to the high rises. Thanks to the construction of Bolton, this batch of freshmen can’t travel down the beaten path along Baxter to get to the high-rise dorms. Campus may have changed, but some things remain the same for every incoming freshman — Saturdays between the hedges, afternoons lounging on the quads and late nights fueled by coffee. Are you ready class of 2017? — Jalynn Carter is a sophomore from Atlanta majoring in journalism

Fractured fan base: SGA revokes ticket priority for graduate students

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n Aug. 5, I received the e-mail many of us had been waiting 217 days to get — the notification that the student ticket request period was finally beginning. Just as groundhogs usher in the beginning of spring, the ticket e-mail is often the first sign that a new season of Georgia football is approaching. Now I could lie and tell you football wasn’t the best part of my four years in undergrad here at UGA. I could also lie and tell you it wasn’t the primary reason I decided to return for three more years as a law student. But not all lies are created equal, and I have a feeling mine are fairly weak. For the past six years, my fall Saturdays were dedicated to Sanford Stadium. But now, in my last year as a student at this university, my attendance record may be forcefully tainted. You see, the overwhelming excitement from reading that e-mail was soon laid to rest as my eyes scanned over these words from the athletic association. “The credit hours earned during undergraduate years at UGA [for graduate students] will NOT factor into the football student ticket process.” Apparently, my groundhog didn’t see its shadow. After many angry calls to the ticket office, it was discovered that, unbeknownst to many Double Dawgs, this provision was approved by the Student Government Association last semester. Now, many of us who were ecstatic to watch our beloved Bulldogs play likely will be watching in front of a television instead. I dedicated many a column while writing for this paper in undergrad to defending SGA. It is a vital organization necessary to ensure student voices are heard on campus; however, it seems lies aren’t the only thing not created equal. Graduate and professional programs made up 8,260 of the 34,475 students at this university in the fall of 2012 according to the UGA website. SGA is responsible for representing every single one of us — undergraduate and graduate. This new policy represents a clear failure in upholding that duty. And while it is often thought that graduate students siphon away tickets from those making their first round at UGA, that is far from accurate. The former standard was strict,

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Jeremy Dailey

Guest Columnist

www.vivaargentinecuisine.com Delivery available through www.bulldawgfood.com only allowing Double Dawgs who went straight from graduation back into a UGA program to be eligible to apply their undergraduate hours toward tickets. Anyone who took time off, as so many people do, had to start back at the bottom of the totem pole. Though SGA is often wrongfully criticized, the organization just as often tarnishes its own reputation by ignoring the interests of various factions of students in favor of their own. As a body packed full with undergraduate students and little graduate representation, this was no exception. We have served more time. We have paid more dues. And now, we have less to show for it. While it may be too late to fix for this season, I urge SGA to return to the previous policy for post-season tickets and the many years of Georgia football to come. After all, even if a groundhog didn’t see his shadow, spring has to come eventually.

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UGA students explore learning opportunities with internships BY Laura James The Red & Black The summer months are usually a time for vacations, part-time jobs, family visits or lounging by the pool, but some University of Georgia students spent their summers doing something else — interning. Several students represented UGA in internships across the country this summer. Jared Dunn, a senior public relations major from Johns Creek, interned in the office of Sen. Johnny Isakson in Washington. “I worked a lot with handling his social media and press appearances,” Dunn said. “I also handled media requests.” Dunn said he learned life skills by working in Isakson’s office. “Honestly, some of the biggest lessons I learned weren’t even career related,” he said. “Just living on your own, being responsible and working a 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. job were a lot of big things I learned from.” Dunn landed his internship after his acceptance into the UGA Honors Internship Program. Once accepted, Dunn and 10 other students were selected to intern in Washington, D.C., through the Honors in Washington Internship Program. The program also sent two students to New York and one to Savannah. The students worked an average of 40 hours a week for a minimum of nine weeks and received a stipend to offset travel and living expenses. Whitney Jinks, a public relations and Spanish major from Jonesboro, also participated in the Honors in Washington Program. She interned for National Geographic. “I was there to support each member of the communications team,” Jinks said. “I got to work with pitching, help with events, build media lists and do a lot of research.” Jinks said she learned how to communicate with “so many diferent people from so many different places,” and how the newsroom operates. “Since I got to see all the different sides of communication, I definitely have a lot more experience and knowledge of how the teams work together,” she said. “National Geographic kind of makes all of its employees feel like one family.” Kelsey Butterworth, a junior communication studies major from

University of Georgia students gained life and career experience in various internship positions this summer. UGA students interned with senators, National Geographic and the American Psychological Association. Heather e. pitts/Staff Arlington, Va, also worked in the media field this summer. She served as the social media and public affairs intern at the American Psychological Association in Washington, D.C. “My work involved looking at newspapers and Google news for anything related to psychology or mental health every morning and compiling daily clips to send out to people in the office,” Butterworth said. “I would draft tweets that go out throughout the day from the APA Twitter account and would post daily on Facebook, Google+ and YouTube.” After hearing about internship opportunities from her mom, who works at the APA in a different department, Butterworth applied and interviewed for two different internships and was chosen for the social media and public affairs paid position. Butterworth, who is also pursuing a new media certificate and a music business certificate, emphasized how much she learned at her internship.

“I thought I was a beast at social media before, but I’ve definitely learned a lot of skills and know how to market a lot more effectively now,” she said. Sarah Lane, a junior pursuing an undergraduate degree in microbiology and a master’s degree in public health with a concentration in health policy and management from St. Simons Island, also travelled north for her internship. Lane interned at the Greater New York Hospital Association in New York City. “What we do varies each year based on what the most pressing public health policy issue is at the time this year,” Lane said. “Because Hurricane Sandy hit New York City last fall, a lot of what we’ve been working on was emergency preparedness for hospitals.” Looking forward to her future career, Lane, a pre-med student, found it helpful to get the “big pic-

ture” of health care at her internship. “It was nice to see how different hospitals approach issues in different ways. It was really valuable,” Lane said. Aaron Brown, the student employment manager at the UGA Career Center, stressed the importance of having internships. “[Interning] is probably one of the best things you can do as far as preparing yourself for careers,” he said. The Career Center offers many resources for students hoping to get internships including resume critiques, mock interviews and DAWGlink, a job board that allows students to search for internships and jobs. The Career Center also hosts several career fairs on campus throughout the year. The UGA Fall Career Fair will be Sept. 18 from noon. to 5 p.m. at The Classic Center. “At those career fairs, employers are hiring for internships,” Brown said.

Students plan for graduation with career resources BY Marena Gallucio @MarenaGallucio

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Many Dawgs experienced the last first day of school of their college careers this week. These seniors who will travel down new paths through commencement in December or May may want to use the job-finding resources the University of Georgia offers — and Executive Director of UGA’s Career Center Scott Williams said they better start sooner than later, regardless of their major. “Each student I believe has different career goals. Some might be a full time entry level position. Some of them might be a graduate program or a professional program,” he said. “I think the timelines are slightly different for each of their career goals. The best thing they can do regardless what dynamic goal applies to them is to get an early start.” Samantha Bond, a senior scientific illustration major from Alpharetta, planned out her goals early on in college. “I’ve always been an extremely preparation-based person,” Bond said. “I tend to think of things months even years before I really need to think of them, so I started looking at GRE books about a year ago and I’ve been reading through them for about that long.” Bond said she plans on going to graduate school. If that doesn’t work, she said she will either move back into her mother’s house to save some money or move to Atlanta and pursue web design. Williams said he agrees with Bond’s approach and stressed seniors can never start the job hunt too early. He said the “key is preparation.” Bond said she uses

DawgLink frequently to look for jobs that are available in her major. She also said she plans on going to the Career Center’s Career Fair this fall. But UGA has more job-hunting resources than those offered through the Career Center. Kayla Quinton, a senior English major from St. Marys, hopes to be an editor at a publishing house. She said she relies on the services the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences provides to help with her job hunt. “I know the placement here at UGA is one of the highest in the nation, like placement from college into a career path,” Quinton said. “So I plan on talking to my advisor a lot about that and spending my spring semester and most of my fall semester looking for a job, so I have something to jump into right after college.” Bond is in the Lamar Dodd School of Art. She said she also takes advantage of the help her school offers. “I think a lot of it is that our department is incredible. They set us up for success. They are constantly talking about grad school and our futures the entire time,” she said. “So our department is great and my major is really fabulous when it comes to that thing.” Walker Smith, a senior theater major from Decatur, doesn’t only take advantage of the services his school offers — he said he looks for opportunities in other schools as well. “The theater school posts a lot of how to get auditions and other schools offer a lot of opportunities such as being in student films,” he said. “The theater school is great about helping out to move you on your way.” Smith also would like to use

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Seniors plan for jobs months before graduating. FILE/Staff some of the credits he has left to specify different areas of theater such as writing and scenic design courses in order to help him find a job and “make the degree more valuable” for him. But Smith said that he is not entirely sure what he would like to do with his major. “I would like to see where that goes partially, but none of that is secure guaranteed. I’ve worked on a movie over the summer and work on some in the next year to try and get credits towards the screen actors guild or the union that the people work on the crews on movies.” Williams said he would advise students like Smith to prepare as much as possible before graduation and see where the path takes them from there. “The best advice I can give in finding a job is a lot like anything else in life: the more time you put into that process, the more likely you will be successful,” Williams said. “So finding a job itself is much like a part time job.”


The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Happy birthday, MLC: Learning center celebrates 10 years with new technology by MARIANA VIERA @mariana_viera1 The Zell B. Miller Learning Center celebrates its 10-year anniversary this fall with new computers and printing stations. In the biggest computer replacement in the MLC in five years, Enterprise and Information Technology Services installed 375 new, thin-client computers and seven new Wireless Everywhere Print Anywhere printing kiosks. Thinclient computers have more compact processing units that attach to the back of a computer monitor, which saves a lot of space at each computer station. The change cost EITS $262,829, all paid for by the student technology fee, which is $126 per student. Caroline Barratt, the director of the MLC, said they piloted the new computers and printers last spring semester. “We’ve added the WEPA printing and thin-client computing, which actually started back in the spring with just a couple of WEPA printers and thin-client computers in the central section of the third floor [of the MLC],” Barratt said. She said they have now implemented the new technology throughout the building and that there might be a slight learning curve to using the new technology. Each computer and printing station has detailed operating instructions Shawn Ellis, the director of EITS client services, said more compact computers aren’t the only advantage to the thin-client computers. “[The computers] are utilizing a virtual back infrastructure,” Ellis said. “They’re a lot faster to log into and they protect the students’ privacy better because we rebuild them every time you log

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Hunker Down With Housing helps dorms survive move-in madness by MARIANA VIERA @mariana_viera1

Students working out of the MLC can now take advantage of new cloud printing kiosks and thin-client computers. Taylor craig sutton/Staff out; all the content gets destroyed and recreated. And they let the students go to any position in the MLC and pick up their session again.” EITS, by popular demand, also replaced the laser jet printers with WEPA print kiosks. WEPA printers are cloud-based. They allow students to send documents from their computers or tablets wirelessly through the WEPA website, the WEPA print driver software on a desktop or the WEPA Apple or Android app and print them at any printing kiosk on campus. Students can also use a USB flash drive at the kiosk. Lynn Wilson, the associate CIO of Planning and Engagement for EITS, said students requested printing prices to remain the same and to have the option to

pay with a credit or debit card. She said EITS granted those wishes. Students have to pay $0.06 per page for a black and white print and $0.50 for a color print, with an additional $0.20 if they pay with a debit or credit card. Joffre Rivera, a sophomore computer systems engineering major from Johns Creek, said that he used the new computers to check his schedule. “I like how compact the new computers are,” Rivera said. “They leave more room on the desks for books.” Both Ellis and Wilson said the new technology seems popular with the students. “Everything is very high volume, very popular,” Ellis said. “We had about 1,700 log-ins and 3,500 print outs [on Monday].”

The University of Georgia’s Hunker Down with Housing program employed more than 250 volunteers to help tame move-in madness this year. The program employs mostly student volunteers to help dorm move-in days run smoothly. The program is organized by Deputy Director of University Housing Keith Wenrich. “[The volunteers] help direct traffic, direct people to the right building, help out with breaking down boxes, help out with any cart rentals and help with any directional signs for people to go park after they’re done unloading,” Wenrich said. Wenrich said that they had more students move in on early move-in day, on Tuesday, than they did in previous years. But student volunteers Lise Pierre, a sophomore biology major, and Paige Sullivan, a junior political science and criminal justice major, said that things ran smoothly in their stations. Sullivan, who has

volunteered for Hunker Down with Housing for two years, said things went smoothly this year. She only encountered one hiccup. “The most difficult thing we had to deal with was really bad rain on Wednesday,” Sullivan said. “We ended up having to shut down because it was pouring rain, but other than that it was great.” This was Pierre’s first year volunteering for the program. She said the only problem she saw was residents had only one hour to unload their cars before being told to move to a larger and farther parking lot. “After an hour, [residents] had to move their car; some people where coming from so far away and they had a lot of things,” Pierre said. Pierre and Sullivan both said that they appreciated the opportunity to volunteer for the program. Even though they had to move-in early, they said that it was a good way to start the year and interact with other students. Wenrich, Sullivan and Pierre said they considered the program a success this year.

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Study finds journalism market showed improvement in 2012 by Lauren McDonald @laurenmcdonald2 The job market for journalism and mass communication graduates across the country has improved in the past year, according to a recent study. The study showed an increase in the average salary and in the number of full-time job offers for bachelor’s degree recipients. The James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research at the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication released the 2012 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates on Aug. 9, According to the report, in the spring of 2012, just under three out of four of bachelor’s degree recipients in journalism had at least one job offer upon graduation. Lee Becker, director of the Cox International Center, has directed the Cox Center report since 1987. He said he is optimistic these improvements are a sign that the worst is over for this recovering job market. “I don’t have a crys-

Grady dean Charles Davis hopes this study will entice more students to journalism. ERIN O. SMITH/Staff tal ball, but the trend line is certainly in the right direction,” he said. Bachelor’s degree recipients earned on average $32,000 in 2012, up slightly from the $31,000 average reported for those in 2011. The job satisfaction amongst journalism graduates also improved in 2012. A total of 58.7 percent of bachelor’s degree recipients in 2012 reported they took their job “because it was what they wanted to do,” while 34.6 percent said “they took the job because it was the only one available.” Becker said he believes that the improvements in the job market for journalism graduates is directly related to the recovery of the job market

overall since the economic crash of 2007. “The overall labor market is showing improvement,” Becker said. The Cox Center report said “the market showed signs of continued improvement, suggesting that the worst in terms of the market is in the past.” The job market for journalism majors crashed in 2008 and only continued its decline in 2009. According to the report, “the unemployment rate for journalism and mass communications bachelor’s degree recipients across time has always been higher than the unemployment rate in the labor market generally.” Katherine Sims, a senior public affairs

major from Augusta, said she is excited about the improvements in the journalism job market. She also hopes this improvement means she will have a better chance of finding a job that is directly related to her major. “I think it’s kind of sad that recent graduates have had to settle for jobs that aren’t what they spent their tuition money preparing for,” she said. “They’re capable of providing more in the job market.” Researchers noted in the report that “the job market for journalism and mass communication graduates in 2012 was not much improved from the year before, but the movement was in the right direction, at least for those who earned a bachelor’s degree.” Charles Davis, dean of the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, said he hopes the upward trends will encourage students to study journalism. “Barring some unforeseen calamity, I think we’ll see an upward trend in the foreseeable future,” Davis said. “It’s really good news for students who are in Grady now and who are about to enter Grady in the next few years. ”

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8 News

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

Textbook costs cause students to seek alternatives By Kendall Trammell @KendallTrammell Over 900 students will be taking one of the seven sections for LEGL 2700, The Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business course this semester taught at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. Along with registering for this course, students will be heading to the bookstore to buy the $239.25 textbook for this course — co-written by UGA President Jere Morehead. Elizabeth Cooper, a junior business management and psychology from Jonesboro, took this course last fall. Cooper said she rented her textbook for $90 from the Off Campus Bookstore located on Baxter Street. But she also said she remembered how expensive the textbook was to purchase new from the UGA Bookstore located across from the Tate Student Center. “A lot of people rented [the textbook] my year,” Cooper said. “I had the year when too many people didn’t have enough money to purchase it because it was over $200.” Cooper said at the business school, many professors are writing their own textbooks but putting them in e-book formats, causing their sellback values to be low and benefitting the wallets of students. “That’s kind of frustrating because you’re spending a lot of money on books you’re really other than taking that one class you’re not really getting that much value out of it,” she said. Cooper had access to a textbook but said she relied more heavily on her professor for help with the course and a better understanding of

New Multicultural Services and Programs office considered ‘safe haven’ for UGA students By Brad Mannion @madbrannion

University of Georgia students make decisions on whether to purchase new or used textbooks, rent or download digital e-books for courses. DAVID C. BRISTOW/Staff the material. “It wasn’t the best textbook, but it wasn’t completely awful,” she said. “It was an okay read.” Although she did not realize at the time of taking the course that her book was co-written by Morehead, she said she now questions why her professor chose to use this particular textbook. “It kind of makes me wonder if whether we have that textbook not because it’s the best textbook out there for our class or because there’s an incentive if you’re a UGA teacher to use another person that works at the UGA campus’ textbook,” Cooper said. As of press time, UGA Bookstore employees were unable to comment to The Red & Black regarding the rising costs of textbooks.

Many other courses include costly textbooks. Here are six priced over $150 that can be purchased at the UGA Bookstore: TITLE: Molecular Cell Biology CLASS: BIOL 3400 BUY COST: $175.75/$132 TITLE: Techniques in Archaeological Geology (written by professor) CLASS: ANTH 6700 BUY COST: $219/$164 TITLE: Worlds of Music (w/ 4 CDs) CLASS: MUSI 3020 BUY COST: $280.75/$210.75 TITLE: Sexuality Now CLASS: PSYC 3260

BUY COST: $173.25/$130 TITLE: Heat and Mass Transfer: Fundamentals and Application CLASS: ENGR 3150 BUY COST: $243.50/$182.75 RENT COST: $146.10/$116.88 TITLE: Media Programming CLASS: TELE 3310 BUY COST: $182.50/$137 RENT COST: $109.50/$87.60 DIGITAL OPTION: $68.49

Within one year, the Multicultural Services and Programs organization at the University of Georgia underwent changes with new faces and places. Since plans established in the summer of 2012, the MSP offices were moved to the fourth floor of Memorial Hall, and both students and workers in the division positively responded to the change at a reception on Tuesday. “We love it so far,” said Aakash Patel, president of the Indian Cultural Exchange. “All the orgs are really excited about the new space, and we want to be able to show it off.” The renovations include offices for each of the 13 organizations, and an office area for associate director of student life for MSP Zoe Johnson, as well as Megan Segoshi and Sandra Goolsby — two additional workers in the division. Even though renovations were delayed during the summer and fall of 2012 and into spring of 2013, students of the 13 organizations under MSP said they enjoy the proximity and inclusion of each group’s members. “Yes, the delay was a hassle last year, but we’re looking forward to it this year,” Patel said. “Everyone’s on the same floor this year. We were all on the same floor last year, but a little more spaced out.” In a reception to commemorate the event on Tuesday, Johnson said that the “new team” under her direction has shown support for its organizations, members and workers in the office. “Support to our students to their students organizations and the important things they are doing here to advance and live out our institutional values for social justice, for respect and for inclusion,” Johnson said. “Our team is a new team — we are a dynamic team.” Johnson also stressed the importance of people not associated with MSP to see the new offices and renovations for these distinct organizations. “I really want to encourage each of you to learn about our 13 organizations — learn more about the organizations and students ... that are working day in and day out that not only want to pursue their passions, but also live out the mission and vision of these really important student organizations,” she said. UGA’s Vice President for Student Affairs Victor Wilson also spoke at the reception. Wilson shared a history on MSP and its different locations. Since his time at UGA, Wilson said a recurring theme from MSP was changing location. “We’ve been through this whole thing ... when I was here and when I wasn’t,” he said. “I know there was a group of folks who said ‘why are we on the fourth floor? Why can’t we be somewhere out or in the middle of a field — we want to be out, we want to be seen.’ And then, we went through it and moved things , and folks said ‘well, we really want our own space,’ so we went back and forth. But it was really always the fourth floor that became ... a safe haven.”

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The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Sports 9

Sports IMAGE IS EVERYTHING Partnership with IMG College carries UGA Athletic Association into digital era

BY ROBBIE OTTLEY @rgottley In the days before the 24/7 news cycle, before the pandemonium of SEC Media Days, before fans could learn team news outside a daily paper, there was the SEC Skywriters Tour. In the football preseason, a group of 35 to 40 writers would charter a plane and fly to the then 10 SEC schools, talking to one school’s players and coaches every day for 10 days. Today, hundreds of media members descend on Birmingham, Ala. each July to hear from the same people on a massive scale. The advent of constant sports talk radio, sports television networks and sports websites has created a torrent of attention and information devoted to college sports and pressured

sports communications departments across the country to keep pace. While those traditional media still provide college athletic news, websites such as the Georgia Athletic Association’s georgiadogs.com have also become a wellspring for that news. “We in essence have become our own media source,” said Christopher Lakos, associate sports communication director at the Athletic Association. But the Athletic Association doesn’t just rely on its own resources to provide information through their website, or to manage the rights to Georgia’s intellectual property. Rather, they turn to IMG College, holders of the multimedia rights for more than 75 colleges and universities across the nation. In 2005, the Athletic Association first entered into a partner-

ship with IMG’s predecessor, and signed a new deal for the 20092010 academic year. For a scant $92 million over eight years, IMG manages Georgia’s multimedia rights, from radio to the Sanford Stadium video board. The IMG deal, emulated across the nation, represents a paradigm shift in the distribution of information and corporate sponsorships in college athletics. Where once athletic associations provided these services by themselves, college athletics has exploded to the point that it no longer makes economic sense for them to administer their rights in-house. Today, IMG’s relationship with the Athletic Association represents a partnership the two entities hope will benefit them both.   See IMG, Page 11

Terry: ‘I wish I could go back in time and not play in the Shrine Bowl’ BY CONNOR SMOLENSKY @COnnorSmo

Freshman wide receiver Tramel Terry suffered an ACL tear in last year's Shrine Bowl of the Carolinas. steve colquitt/Courtesy

The Georgia football team is about three weeks from its opening game against Clemson, but freshman wide receiver Tramel Terry doesn’t have much confidence heading into the matchup. It’s not the assurance in his team that Terry is lacking, but the belief in his own ability to produce. Terry, a native of Goose Creek, S.C., was a four-star recruit and Mr. Football-South Carolina coming out of high school, but suffered an ACL tear on the opening kick-off of last year’s Shrine Bowl All-Star game on December 15. He underwent surgery Jan. 4, and is now on a mission to find that confidence and explosiveness that once got him an offer from Georgia. “It’s just frustrating man, because I’m working hard, but I wish I could go back in time and not play in the Shrine Bowl,” Terry said. Before injuring his knee, Terry had already committed to enrolling early at the University, and even with the injury, he still went through with his original plan. The idea was to get familiar with the life

of a college student and Georgia’s system, but the latter soon went askew. “It’s different trying to learn something new and not being able to practice it, and during the spring I was really hurt because I couldn’t be out there with everybody,” Terry said. “Just knowing how I got hurt, I got hurt in the opening kick-off of an all-star game. The thought of that kills me every time so I wasn’t really with it. Coach [Tony] Ball was getting on my behind in the class and everything, and I was working hard and trying to get back. Now I’m catching up.” Since the beginning of camp Terry has been practicing, but doesn’t feel like he’s back to 100 percent — something that can’t come soon enough for the Goose Creek native. “I was trying to get [Coach Mike] Bobo to get me in the toss plays because I’m either going to make a play or get hit,” Terry said. “I haven’t really gotten hit since I’ve been back and I just want to get a feel for it and get comfortable and get my confidence back.” While Terry may be in a rush to make a play, his coaches are in no hurry to see him do so. See TERRY, Page 12

Herbstreit and Musburger weigh in on Bulldogs BY CONNOR SMOLENSKY @ConnorSmo Two college football experts tuned in with media via conference call Tuesday and had plenty to say about the No. 5 Georgia vs. No. 9 Clemson matchup Aug. 31. Brent Musburger and Kirk Herbstreit will work their eighth season together, and will in fact be calling the Bulldogs’ opener for ABC. What do they think? “It’s an incredible matchup on paper. You never know how it’s going to play out on the field,” Musburger said. “Obviously they are neighborhood rivals. I was amused a couple weeks ago I got a text from Clemson that said, ‘If Clemson was in the SEC, this would be the closest distance between two SEC teams’.”

With the teams separated by only an hour, Bulldogs’ fans should have no trouble traveling to Death Valley, but Clemson is sure to have a decided home field advantage. But besides the hostile environment, Musburger sees another glaring distraction that could hinder Georgia heading into the opener. And no, it’s not suspensions. “I think the fact that the Bulldogs are looking up and seeing South Carolina right down the road as a conference opener for them, I think that could be a distraction for players and coach alike,” Musburger said. The Bulldogs also see LSU in week four, and Herbstreit said that this Georgia team is going to find out where they stand in the first month of the season. Contrasting with his sidekick,

Kirk Herbstreit (left) and Brent Musburger (right), ABC's top college football broadcasters, will call the Georgia-Clemson game Aug. 31. ESPN/courtesy “Herby” was in Athens a week ago with College Football Live, and said he saw a real sense of focus surrounding the Bulldogs, but offered up a little advice for Georgia’s inexperienced defense. “If I’m a Georgia fan, my thing is

not giving up a lot of big plays at Clemson,” Herbstreit said. “If they can avoid giving up big plays, and keep that crowd somewhat tamed, then they have a shot. That game on paper looks like a shootout.”


10 Sports

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

Torri Allen named to preseason All-SEC team

Former gymnast Worley to be inducted into Hall

BY TYLER SERRITT @TSerrittII Georgia soccer central defender Torri Allen has earned a spot on the College Sports Madness unofficial preseason firstteam All-SEC. “I thought it was awesome to be recognized,” Allen said. “It helps to show the hard work that my team does through me and all the hard work that we put in during practice. It really helps to get our team on the map.” Allen, a senior who started all games in 2012, will look to once again anchor a potent UGA defense that fought its way to six shutouts and allowed averaged a meager 1.10 goals a game last season. Georgia head coach Steve Holeman said Allen’s selection was “nice,” but he doubted a player of Allen’s caliber was too worried about preseason plaudits. “I think it was nice to recognize her,” he said. “She is a returning senior and she is one of our captains and leaders. She’s probably not concerned about the preseason SEC team as she is the postseason one.” Allen’s 2012 campaign landed her on the second-team All-SEC and the All-South region’s first-team in 2012. Her stellar junior season thrust her into the spotlight and onto the SEC Official Watch

BY CY BROWN @CEPBrown Former Georgia gymnast Shayla Worley will be inducted into the USA Gymnastics Hall of Fame, as a member of the 2007 U.S. Women’s Artistic Gymnastics World Championship Team, Thursday night in Hartford, Conn. Worley will be inducted alongside her 2007 World Championships teammates Shawn Johnson, Alicia Sacramone, Anastasia Liukin, Sam Peszek, Ivana Hong and Bridget Sloan. The 2007 team won the United State’s second ever gold medal at the competition in Stuttgart, Germany. It was the first time an American World Championships team won gold outside of the United States. The U.S. Women’s Team won seven medals at the 2007 World Championships, including four gold, two silver and one bronze. The team’s performance at the World Championship’s qualified them for the 2008 Olympic Games in Bejing. While at Georgia, Worley led the Gym Dogs to the NCAA Super Six and was named an All-American on bars and beam. She was also named Southeast Gymnast of the Year while at Georgia.

Forward Chica Ibiam (left) attempts to dribble past defender Nikki Hill (right) in last week's Red and Black scrimmage at Jack Turner Sports Complex. David c. brostow/Staff List for the upcoming season. Three soccer games to be televised The Southeastern Conference announced on Wednesday that Georgia will play on television three times during the 2013 season, including one national broadcast on ESPNU. The first of the three televised games will come on Sept. 29 against

Kentucky in Lexington. The game will air at 6 p.m. on CSS. The ESPNU national broadcast will take place when Georgia welcomes Texas A&M to Athens Oct. 20 at 3 p.m. The final scheduled televised game for the Bulldogs will come when they travel to Fayetteville, Ark. to take on the Arkansas Razorbacks, Oct. 27 on CSS. All ESPNU broad-

10 Bulldogs named to Georgia Sports Hall of Fame

casts are available on ESPN’s live streaming platform, watchESPN. All games on CSS are also available on WatchESPN, but are subject to regional blackouts. The Bulldogs will play in an exhibition game against The Citadel at 7 p.m. this Friday at Jack Turner Sports Complex in Athens before they open the season on the road against Texas Aug. 23 and Houston Aug. 25.

Ten former and current Georgia Bulldog players and coaches have been nominated for induction into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame class of 2014. Finalists who went to Georgia include Leah Brown (athlete, gymnastics); Cris Carpenter (athlete, baseball); George Collins (athlete, football); Manuel Diaz (coach, men’s tennis); Janet Harris (athlete, women’s basketball); Alec Kessler (athlete, men’s basketball); Kermit Perry (athlete, track & field); Peter T. Persons (athlete, men’s golf); Robert Sapp (coach, baseball); and Scott Woerner (athlete, football). The 2014 induction ceremony will be held on Saturday Feb. 22 in Macon.

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The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Sports 11

IMG: Athletic association relies on outside help ➤ From Page 1 The evolution of sports communications In the beginning, Karlene Lawrence, now publications manager for Georgia Sports Communications, created a website for the Athletic Association. “I have to give credit [to Lawrence] as really the mother of our website,” said Claude Felton, senior associate athletic director for sports communications. “She nurtured it and started it from the getgo.” The Athletic Association issued requests for proposals regarding multimedia rights periodically every five years. When the Athletic Association issued an RFP for 2005-2006, some five companies bid — the market of college sports multimedia rights holders has never been extensive, and several companies have consolidated. “The numbers have always been kind of thin,” said Alan Thomas, associate athletic director for external operations. The RFP for 2005 included the rights to the website for the first time, and ISP Sports, which would be bought by IMG in 2010, won the bid. ISP greatly expanded the website, providing an outside staff to manage the Athletic Association’s online presence. ISP also had a staff to develop video for Georgia sports, as online video became more and more popular in the last decade. “We got into just so many more things involving video than we ever could’ve done internally,” Felton said. News used to break on just two occasions — the morning paper and the nightly news. Today news arrives instantaneously to iPhones and Twitter feeds. The sports communications department has to keep up with the new technologies — no longer can the staff type news releases on electric typewriters and put them in the mailbox to arrive at news organizations the next day. “We’ve been through telecopiers and fax machines and all that, and now it’s email,” Felton said. “It all happens instantaneously.” As media developed, the methods by which fans could interact with college sports changed. When Felton began his tenure at Georgia in 1979, few fans could publicly share their thoughts on the Bulldogs. “If a fan wanted to express an opinion, the only way they could do it was to sit down and write a letter to the editor, put it in an envelope, get a stamp, address the envelope, put it in the mail, and somebody at the newspaper would open it up,” Felton said. The website allows full coverage of some of the less popular sports such as baseball and soccer, between full stories that wouldn’t fit in the limited column inches of a daily paper and streaming live matchups that wouldn’t be aired on television. “That was a tremendous boost for a bunch of our programs,” Felton said.   Monetizing the relationship IMG pays dearly for the opportunity to manage georgiadogs.com and Georgia’s other multimedia sources, and they work hard to recoup their investment. Through their Georgia Sports Properties division, IMG can sell ads across Georgia’s multimedia properties. IMG has an advertising division in Athens, but also has regional and national offices — some corporations advertise just with Georgia while others advertise with every IMG school across the country. To develop those corporate sponsorships, IMG emphasizes the ties that bind them to potential advertisers. To be prepared to offer opportunities for corporations as they seek to enter the Athens market, the sales staff must have strong affinities for those businesses. “For us it’s more of a relationship sale as opposed to a transactional sale,” said Ryan Gribble, general manager of IMG at Georgia. IMG says its corporate clients drive the decisions of how it will advertise with Georgia. If certain advertising methods have worked for a company in other mediums or at other schools, it will often want to duplicate those methods at Georgia. “[Clients say] this is what we’re trying to accommodate, this is what we’re trying to accomplish,” Gribble said. “Then we kind of build a package together on how we feel they best can accomplish that through their partnership with the University of Georgia.” For the Athletic Association, retaining a significant authority over the work of IMG across the board represents an important aspect of the two entities’ relationship. Gribble sees that condition as completely reasonable, saying if the roles were reversed, he wouldn’t want to lack approval over another company’s decisions. Thomas called such restraints key to a relationship with a multimedia rights holder. “That’s been a central point from the University administratively is that we want to certainly activate these rights and opportunities, but maintain University control,” he said. Should IMG’s ad sales reach a certain level, it will share some of that revenue with the Athletic Association. Throughout the two entities’ relationship, they have not reached that level, but they both hope to make that money every year. “That’s the goal of both sides — that the property’s successful enough that we’ll reach into those areas,” Thomas said.   Media on the eastside Take Barnett Shoals over to Research Drive, turn into the first office park on the right, and you’ll arrive at Georgia Sports Properties’ New Media division. Go past the bullpen, crowded with computers

Video production assistant Kevin Copp edits soccer footage at the IMG office on Research Drive. IMG is in charge of new media and video production for the UGA Athletic Association. Taylor Sutton/Staff displaying sports graphics, and you’ll enter the office of Mike Bilbow, executive director of new media for IMG at Georgia. Sitting on his desk is a copy of John Hodgman’s “More Information Than You Require” — it’s not hard to make the leap to the plethora of Georgia sports coverage IMG provides. Bilbow and his team manage georgiadogs.com, Georgia’s social media, stadium scoreboard videos, and assist with radio coverage. They also help develop Georgia television not owned by the SEC, such as certain game replays, coaches’ shows, and game day previews. Georgia Sports Properties controls even a wider range of multimedia. In stadiums, they can sell ads on LCD screens and fixed boards; in print, they can monetize game programs and season ticket holder inserts; even Mark Richt represents a potential cash flow. But when Bilbow meets with Gribble, his first concern is providing the best content for fans. “We use the term compelling content, but that’s a little bit antiseptic,” Bilbow said. “We want to come up with good things that people want to watch and make them as available to our fans as we can ... Our theory is if we do stuff that the fans want to see, the sales side takes care of itself.” Bilbow and IMG still review the numbers — how many times fans view a video, how often they share a game story on Facebook, how many times they retweet a scoring update. But IMG still covers sports that will never see an ad before a practice video. They usually provide news for every home game, as well as practice reports for every sport. Although they may not make money on any given volleyball video, Bilbow said such content is an important aspect of the relationship with the Athletic Association. IMG wants to provide the most benefit it can for Georgia, and the higher-ups appreciate the exposure given to every program, revenue-generating or not. Plus, Bilbow says, the fans love their Georgia sports across the board, and that’s no small consideration. And an interview at Foley Field won’t add to IMG’s expenses. “From a business perspective ... it does not cost us anything to cover those sports,” Bilbow said. “So we’re not losing money because we cover those sports.” Bilbow and his team pride themselves on staying on the bleeding edge of sports content production, and he’ll compare his content favorably even to professional sports teams. IMG at Georgia considers itself among the top five, if not the top three, collegiate multimedia producers in the country. They single out a pair of their job’s characteristics enabling them to stay at that high level. Bilbow says IMG’s corporate offices, located in Winston-Salem, N.C., largely give them the resources they need to do their job and get out of the way, allowing the Georgia office to do their work without heavy micromanagement. But IMG’s national scope also means what works for one school can spread to another — Georgia might buy new equipment if it works for Auburn, for instance. Another boon to IMG’s work came in the form of a high-definition control room the Athletic Association built in Sanford Stadium in time for the 2012 fall sports season. As a result, the quality of a live-game web broadcast has shot up to a level comparable with television. Where once fans would see the view from one camera and the score, they can now see the view from four cameras, replays and advanced graphics. Bilbow enjoys watching broadcasts using IMG’s mobile app with his Apple TV at home. “We do as good a job as anybody in the country on a collegiate level,” Bilbow said. “We were kind of at the head of the trend. We’ve been doing this for four years, and we’d like to continue to be at the head of the trend.”   The partnership The trend among college athletic associations is to work with third-party rights holders to manage multimedia rights, and the Athletic Association says that arrangement simply represents the better opportunity. The Athletic Association isn’t in a position to manage those rights as effectively as an outside group can — it’s essentially in a different business than rights management. They’ve evaluated what makes the most sense for that business, and determined in today’s college sports landscape IMG can just do it better. “We’re still all end of the day from a University perspective in higher education and that’s the core competency,” Thomas said “You have to determine

the difference between if you do it yourself, the manpower, people power, and how does that change the direction of where you’re going as a department.” The two staffs also speak highly of their professional relationships. In some cases, it’s as simple as IMG hiring people amenable to the sensibilities and work styles of the Athletic Association. “It boils down to they’re an extension of us, and we’re a partner of theirs,” Thomas said. The contract between IMG and the Athletic Association runs another five years, and will be reevaluated after that. But all indications point to a secure relationship today and a secure relationship in the future. “For everything I’ve learned, everything I’m aware of, this is one of the strongest relationships throughout the entire country,” Gribble said. “And we have every intention of having this [be] a longterm relationship that benefits [the Athletic Association] the same if not more than IMG.”

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12 Sports

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

Major college athletes deserve more compensation from NCAA or universities

TERRY: ACL injury only a setback

If you were to walk into the UGA bookstore and ask a clerk to assist you in finding the Aaron Murray jerseys, you would be directed to a rack of red, No. 11 Georgia jerseys with no trace of the word “Murray” on them. Those are Aaron Murray jerseys, though. Everyone knows it. If you’re wearing No. 11, you’re in a Murray jersey. The notion that these numbers are arbitrarily selected with no idea of a specific player in mind is preposterous. But, that’s what the NCAA would have you think. For years, the National Collegiate Athletic Association has sold jerseys, memorabilia and even players’ likeness and physical attributes in the pursuit of the almighty dollar. It has ignored players’ rights in order to keep the cash-cow fat and the money flowing. It’s manipulative. It’s unfair. Finally, however, there are signs that change may be on the horizon. Former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon has filed an antitrust class action lawsuit on behalf of Division I men’s basketball and football players, which will challenge the NCAA’s use of player likenesses for commercial revenue. For the first time in it’s existence, the NCAA looks scared. Enter Jay Bilas. Bilas, an ESPN college basketball analyst and Twitter rascal, has spent years railing against the NCAA’s archaic policies. On August 6, Bilas took to Twitter and showed that even though the NCAA says all these jersey numbers are random, you can search for the word “Manziel” and magically a No. 2 Texas A&M. The NCAA, justifiably embarrassed, disabled the search function soon after, then decided it wasn’t worth it to be in the jersey business after all. “I think seeing the NCAA sell those kinds of goods is a mistake,” NCAA President Mark Emmert said in a conference call. “It’s not what the NCAA is about. So we’re not going to be doing that any longer... We’re exiting it as soon as we feasibly can. Again, I think it was inappropriate for us to be in that business, and we won’t be in the future.” With a few simple tweets, Jay Bilas shut down one of the NCAA’s largest hypocrisies in recent memory. The NCAA may not have made much money off jersey sales, but the principle matters. And so does the message it sends. The message that the NCAA as we know it is in its death throes. The question then begs itself: how do you compensate these major college athletes? Many people are proponents of some sort of trust system. Allow each institution to put money into a trust for players which they can access once they have graduated. Another option is pay-for-play. Each school can give each athlete a healthy stipend that will not only serve as income while they are in school, but help them after college if their future doesn’t involve an NFL contract and multiple zeros on a check. There are people who want to use an outright free agent system, with the top players being paid the most and going to whichever school meets their price tag. However, this would likely create more problems than it would solve and lead to a

➤ From Page 9

A Georgia football player signs autographs for fans. The NCAA prohibits players from selling their autographs. ERIN O. SMITH/Staff

Cy Brown

Sports Editor

larger gap between the college football haves and have-nots. The most simple system would be to allow players to market and endorse themselves on a free market. It may be because he has been on the news every minute of every day for the past month, but I can’t help thinking of Johnny Manziel. Undoubtedly, Manziel is one of, if not the, best quarterbacks in college football. His status as professional one day is still in question, however. He is 6-foot-1, shorter than most NFL quarterbacks, and rail thin. He likes to run and takes a lot of hits. Who knows if his game will translate to the much faster and stronger NFL level. If there is no telling how his talent will translate to the NFL, why shouldn’t Manziel be able to market himself and make money of his own image when his value is at its highest? What happens if Manziel flames out in the League and never makes a significant amount of money? He can’t go back in time and make all the money the NCAA wouldn’t allow him to make while in college. Obviously, there is a problem with the state of amateurism in college athletics. That is why this semester, the sports desk of “The Red and Black” will be working to investigate, analyze and report on every angle of how the NCAA uses amateurism, the possibility of the NCAA’s demise and the effect the NCAA’s mandate on amateurism has on those for whom it matters most: the athletes.

“Tramel is in a rush. He wants to play so bad you can just see it,” Georgia head coach Mark Richt said. “We want him to be 100 percent healthy. He’s healthy enough to practice or he wouldn’t be out there, but we know he’s going to get better and better, and healthier and healthier. Whether it happens this year or not remains to be TERRY seen, but we don’t want to push him before he’s ready. We’re going to keep practicing him. He’s getting better everyday, but I know it’s not coming as fast as he wants it to come.” Now, as an 18-year old kid, instruction from your elders is often brushed off, but when your friends and mentors are giving you similar advice, it starts to hit home. Georgia wide out Malcolm Mitchell, who actually hosted Terry on his recruitment visit, has made it a point to try and keep his understudy in good spirits. “I just told him that the hardest thing to do in life is to be patient and wait for things to happen and not force it,” he said. “He’s coming off a bad injury, we all know he’s a great player and those type of things take time, and I told him in this game, everything doesn’t have to be done the first year.” Similar to Mitchell, wide receiver Michael Bennett has extended a helping hand. Bennett suffered a similar ACL tear in

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October of last year, and him, more than anyone, knows what it takes to come back from the serious injury. “I just told him to keep his head up. If he redshirts, don’t think that’s a downer,” Bennett said. “I feel like there is a lot of pressure on him right now being Mr. South Carolina in football. I feel like he has handled it well and he kind of knows where he’s at in his rehab. He’s going to do a lot of good for us in the future.” And the advice seems to be paying off. Terry admitted to his poor attitude at the beginning of camp. With his early preseason camp woes now behind him, Terry said he is done sulking in his sorrows. “I just really have to focus on being focused and not feeling sorry for myself,” he said. “I felt myself feeling sorry for myself the first couple practices and today I just tuned it out. If I didn’t make a play, I just got up and went on to the next play.” It’s unknown when, or if, Terry will return to the field this season, but it seems like he is now more excited than worried to see what his resurrection has in store. “I’m used to outrunning everybody, outmuscling everybody, and if I could work on that with a brace on, I cant imagine what I’ll be once I get that off and be able to execute it,” Terry said.


The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Sports 13

Football notebook: Richt quiet on status of Marshall Morgan BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey

The Dalton native also knows he won’t need to land a starting spot to potentially see significant playing time on what is a fairly deep offensive line. The top seven or eight linemen could be used in a type of rotation — a tactic that offensive line coach Will Friend has used before — meaning that Dantzler has an even better shot at seeing the field. “I feel like I am in that group. Coach Friend hasn’t specifically said that, but as far as camp has gone I’ve rotated a good bit with the ones,” he said. “I think I’ve proved that I can be accountable. Hopefully if I do good Wednesday, it will earn his trust more and more and I’ll be in the rotating group.”

Monday’s practice session — closed to members of the media — focused on special teams and was held in Sanford Stadium. The team did not practice on Tuesday, the second day of fall classes, and held late practice on Wednesday night. Richt has options on special teams As with the offensive and defensive lines, Richt sees kick return and punt return becoming roles that will involve several contributors instead of just one or two designated starters. “I think we got a lot to choose from. I’d say some of the guys are going to be starters on both sides of the ball, but I’m not sure who’s going to be the starters in some instances on defense, especially,” he said. “I don’t know if it’s going to be just one guy. I wouldn’t be surprised to see more than one guy get reps as the season rolls along ... by design we might rotate them around a bit.” As far as the most criticized specialist of the offseason is concerned, sophomore placekicker Marshall Morgan (arrested for boating under the influence in July) will not have the length or nature of a possible suspension revealed to the public until, well, Aug. 31. “Any announcement on Marshall Morgan is going to be halftime of the [Clemson] game,” Richt said. “By halftime you should know what’s up.” 9 Bulldogs listed as ‘out’ The Bulldogs are getting healthier — or at least some of them. Monday’s practice report only listed nine Georgia football players as “out.” Even better for the team, head coach Mark Richt said that more should be ready in time for Wednesday’s team-wide scrimmage, which is the second of three to be held before this month’s heavily anticipated Clemson matchup. “There were so many that wouldn’t have practiced even Saturday, and there’s a lot of them that will be [practicing on Wednesday],” he said. With so many starting jobs left to be won, especially on defense, the scrimmage represents an excellent chance for many Bulldogs to seize their moment. Georgia’s secondary, defensive line and offensive line in particular have several players fighting for top spots on the depth chart. “We’ll have a better idea on where we are [after the scrimmage],” Richt said. “Now it’s just a matter of who deserves to start and how much playing time have the other guys deserved. There’s a couple, if it were today, we might go 50-50 on the playing time and just observe in the game to decide who [should start].” Senior quarterback Aaron Murray sees plenty of the competition firsthand, something he says has made for a more intense fall camp than in seasons past when the starters have been more defined. “At the receiving position, offensive line, running backs; everybody’s pushing themselves,” he said. “Some guys have definitely separated themselves a bit, but it’s still 20 days to go until the first game, so there’s still a lot more to be gained on and

Freshman tight end gaining confidence

Safety Josh Harvery-Clemons (left) and linebacker Dillard Pinkston use blocking and tackling dummies during preseason camp. david c. bristow/Staff off the field to get guys ready to go and see who’s going to be starting game one.” Dantzler on becoming ‘a badass’ Junior offensive guard Watts Dantzler finds himself in an interesting spot this fall. With a crowd of talented players returning on the offensive line, including all five of last year’s starters, he could have justifiably been frustrated at not taking a redshirt last season. He still may get one this year. But Dantzler’s focus has simply been fighting for a spot on the field this season after being hampered by an ankle sprain for a sizeable chunk of 2012. “I came into camp looking to earn playing time, earn a spot,” he said. “I don’t regret anything that’s happened to me. I’ve had two awesome years here at Georgia.” This year, however, Dantzler approaches his craft with a new mentality — a mindset he has adopted after being dealt some tough advice by a teammate’s father over the summer. The suggestion? Be a badass. “[David Andrews’] dad sat us down, said to write out our goals, what we wanted to accomplish this summer. I wrote out some goals, and he looked at me and goes ‘These are crap.’ He goes ‘Your main goal is you need to become a badass. You need to become a badass this summer,’” Dantzler said. “It kind of hurt, but then it was kind of motivation. It kind of made me look in the mirror to know I needed a good summer.”

One of the many Bulldogs to miss practice time due to injury last week was second-string tight end Jay Rome, who is still nursing what has been called an ankle sprain. The talented sophomore out of Valdosta is not expected to be back on the field by Wednesday’s team-wide scrimmage, either. “I doubt [Rome] will go Wednesday, unfortunately. But that gives Jordan [Davis] a lot of reps,” Richt said. A true freshman, Davis committed to the Bulldogs as a consensus three-star prospect out of Thomson, Ga. The 6-foot-2, 232-pound tight end has seen a majority of the second-team reps in Rome’s absence, an opportunity that he says has helped him improve as a player through his first fall camp. “I’ve been getting a lot of reps with the twos. That’s what’s been allowing me to learn the plays a whole lot better and feel more confident about getting in the ball game,” Davis said. Aaron Murray, who has spent plenty of time throwing to the tight ends during the early portions of Georgia’s practices, has seen the young tight end trending upward as he logs more practice time. “He’s definitely smoothed out a lot. He’s gained more confidence in his route-running ability, his understanding of the plays and defenses, because it’s hard coming in any freshman, any position,” Murray said. “There’s so much going on in your mind, you become so mechanical with your routerunning and everything. Then once you continue to rep it more and more it becomes more fluid and second-nature.” With the Bulldogs expected to continue relying on formations that utilize two tight ends, Richt sees Davis contributing on offense even early in the season — especially if Rome’s ankle fails to heal quickly. “I don’t think we have any thoughts of redshirting [Davis] right now. I think we got to get him ready to play. The tight end is very important in our system. Two veterans and one hurt, obviously he’d be playing right now,” Richt said. For Davis, who says he has added about 10 pounds since spring practice, improvement has simply been physically adjusting to the size and speed of his college teammates. “Blocking, being physical with guys who are a lot bigger than me, like Jordan Jenkins, Ramik [Wilson]. Just being able to match those guys physically and showing improvements every day, getting better on my routes and catching the ball,” he said.


14 Sports

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

Speedster Reggie Davis hopes to avoid redshirt

Alec Shirkey

Senior reporter

BY CONNOR SMOLENSKY @ConnorSmo There are more questions surrounding Georgia’s offense than just who’s going to line up against Clemson Aug. 31. It’s now also a question of who’s the fastest player on the team. Before the start of summer camp Aug. 1, it was thought that either redshirt sophomore wide out Justin Scott-Wesley or sophomore running back Keith Marshall held the title, but there is a new name that’s joining the bunch. Reggie Davis, a freshman out of Lincoln High School in Tallahassee, Fla., has impressed coaches and teammates with his blazing speed and is seen by some as faster than both Scott-Wesley and Marshall. “Oh man he can run, he’s fast,” freshman running back Brendan Douglas said. “We were running those 300s out there and he’s getting it now. He’s definitely a track guy and he’s showing it, he’s got some wheels out there.” Davis’ days as a speedster began at Lincoln High, where he led the school's 4x100 relay team to a 2012 State Championship. Davis also put up 486 receiving yards and four touchdowns on 32 receptions as a senior. Despite his meager output of four touchdown receptions in 2012, Davis holds the Lincoln High record for most receiving touchdowns in a single game with three. Although the debate is yet to be settled, Davis is confident that he could win the race if it’s a little longer than a 40-yard dash. “I think I would in long distance, they get me in short distance like the 40, but if the 50 and 60 come along, I could probably get them,” Davis said. Davis ran track in high school for Lincoln, helping them to a 2012 State Championship in the 4x100 relay, and said he once ran a 10.4 in the 100-yard dash and a 20.2 in the 200. Despite Davis’ gifted speed, his first love is football, and he only took part in track to further his skills on the gridiron. “I did track in high school because it helps out with football and I’ve just been running track in high school and getting faster and I can just translate that to the field,” Davis said. “It helps me because I’m small so I need something to cover for

Three strikes against ‘NCAA Football’ ratings BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey It hasn’t been since the early days of Grand Theft Auto that we’ve seen a video game franchise draw as much criticism as has EA Sports’ “NCAA Football” series. Of course, Grand Theft Auto only caught flak for being violent and explicit — two qualities which we see overflowing out of our favorite movies and TV shows. That is of little concern on the grand spectrum of entertainment. “NCAA Football,” on the other hand, has come under fire for reasons that are altogether different and, in this writer’s opinion, far more important. But that mess is for another day’s discussion. Right now, it’s time to enjoy (and mock) what looks to be the final EA Sports college football game, now that the NCAA has chosen not to renew that partnership. That doesn’t mean we won’t see a “College Football ‘15”

Reggie Davis goes through drills under the watchful eye of receivers coach Tony Ball. Courtesy Steve Colquitt that.” It seems that Davis’ decision to do track is in fact paying off, because before fall camp it was thought that Davis might have to redshirt this year to make the most of his college football experience. That’s not really a question anymore. With returning receivers like Malcolm Mitchell, Chris Conley, Michael Bennett, Rantavious Wooten and Rhett McGowan, there wasn’t much room for incoming freshmen to see the field, but it’s something that Davis said he did not want to miss out on. “I feel real great about that because I didn’t want to redshirt so I just have to come out here, work hard, and show these coaches that I can play at this level and continue to get better,” Davis said. Davis has been working on the outside at the Z-receiver position, and is behind Mitchell and Conley at this point in camp. Davis doesn’t know when or what game he will see the field, but will continue to put in the work until his time comes. “Reggie, he’s really stepping out and I’m happy for him because he’s showing out right now. It’s good to see we got some guys that are willing to work,” freshman receiver Tramel Terry said.

this fall since schools and conferences can individually negotiate their licenses with game developers. The NCAA license, however, looks to be on its way out. Maybe such an exterior makeover could be a good thing. After all, the NCAA version really botched a couple of Bulldogs in this year’s game. HB Todd Gurley 92 overall Maybe a little low for Gurley. The thing about “NCAA 14,” however, is that running seems to be much less effective than passing, unless you’re running a toss or sweep. That makes Georgia’s balanced offensive attack much more unwieldy ingame than, say, Louisville or Oregon. The game also seems to favor a speedster such as De’Anthony Thomas (97 overall), who pretty much makes everyone else look like an offensive lineman. Gurley, more of a power runner, wouldn’t really shed many tacklers, which is supposed to be his forte. LB Chase Vasser 88 overall Wait ... what? Vasser is not only the top linebacker on Georgia’s roster in “NCAA 14,” but he is also the team’s top defensive player period. I’m not so sure he’s even the best linebacker on the team, if we’re talking real life. Nothing against Vasser, of course, who by all accounts is a solid player who should be a valuable contributor to Georgia this season. But best of the Bulldogs defense? I feel like Garrison Smith would have some choice words for the game developers. Strike one, EA. PK Marshall Morgan 84 overall

OP E

If this were Wave Race 64, Morgan would deserve the highest of ratings, if only for his uncanny ability to tear it up on the water — sober or otherwise! Morgan was actually very reliable for me in game. He even connected on a 50-yard field goal. But does making eight of your 14 field goal attempts, as Morgan did last season, really earn him a solid “B”? I think that would be more in the “D” range, at least if we’re in the world of academia. Oh, and he missed four extra points. Looks like strike two.

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WR Justin Scott-Wesley 83 speed rating That’s a big strike three right there. While Scott-Wesley didn’t exactly make waves as a freshman last season, he is also literally a track star. He competed on Georgia’s men’s 4x100 meter relay team at the 2012 NCAA Outdoor Championships, and also ran a collegiate personal best of 10.39 seconds in the 100-meter that same season. I’m pretty sure he’s faster than someone like Teddy Bridgewater (80 speed rating). Step your game up next time around, EA. Like my father always said: if you’re going to make money off the likenesses of unpaid labor, at least do a good job of it. Or maybe that was John Rockefeller. Oh well, it’s not like anybody’s gonna sue or anything, right? — Alec Shirkey is a finance and English double-major from Dunwoody


The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Sports 15

Sports shorts Football USA Today Coaches Top 25

Roster

Team 2012 Previous Record Points Rank 1. Alabama (58) 13-1 1545 1 2. Ohio State (3) 12-0 1427 NR 3. Oregon 12-1 1397 2 4. Stanford 12-2 1262 6 5. Georgia 12-2 1250 4 6. Texas A&M (1) 11-2 1215 5 7. South Carolina 11-2 1136 7 8. Clemson 11-2 1047 9 9. Louisville 11-2 1010 13 10. Florida 11-2 930 10 11. Notre Dame 12-1 872 3 12. Florida State 12-2 844 8 13. LSU 10-3 797 12 14. Oklahoma State 8-5 726 NR 15. Texas 9-4 622 18 16. Oklahoma 10-3 620 15 17. Michigan 8-5 589 NR 18. Nebraska 10-4 426 23 19. Boise State 11-2 420 14 20. TCU 7-6 400 NR 21. UCLA 9-5 202 NR 22. Northwestern 10-3 186 16 23. Wisconsin 8-6 172 NR 24. USC 7-6 165 NR 25. Oregon State 9-4 135 19 Others receiving votes: Kansas State (11-2) 113; Miami (Fla.) 101; Michigan State 89; Baylor 80; Virginia Tech 65; Fresno State 62; Arizona State 51; Mississippi 32; Vanderbilt (9-4) 29; Utah State (112) 23; Brigham Young 20; North Carolina 19; Northern Illinois (12-2) 19; Tulsa (11-3) 9; Ohio 8; San Jose State (11-2) 8; Arizona 5; Cincinnati (10-3) 3; East Carolina 3; Kent State 3; Mississippi State 3; Washington 3; Central Florida 2; Arkansas 1; Arkansas State 1; Rutgers 1; Tennessee 1; Toledo 1. Schools dropped out: No. 11 Kansas State (11-2), No. 17 Utah State (11-2), No. 20 Vanderbilt (9-4), No. 21 San Jose State (11-2), No. 22 Cincinnati (10-3), No. 24 Northern Illinois (12-2), No. 25 Tulsa (11-3). UGA Schedule Date Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Nov. 2 Nov. 9 Nov. 16 Nov. 30

Opponent Clemson South Carolina North Texas LSU Tennessee Missouri Vanderbilt Florida Appalachian State Auburn Georgia Tech

Location Clemson, S.C Athens Athens Athens Knoxville, TN Athens Nashville Jacksonville, Fla Athens Auburn, Ala. Atlanta

Time 8 p.m. 4:15 p.m. TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 3:30 p.m. TBA TBA TBA

1 Tramel Terry FLK 2 Sheldon Dawson CB 2 Parker Welch QB 3 Todd Gurley RB 3 Paris Bostick CB RB 4 Keith Marshall 4 Brendan Langley CB 5 Damian Swann CB 6 Shaq Wiggins CB 6 Michael Erdman SE 7 Blake Sailors CB 7 Greg Bingham QB 8 Blake Tibbs FLK 8 Shaun McGee LB CB 9 Reggie Wilkerson SE 9 Curtis Wyatt 10 Faton Bauta QB 10 Kennar Johnson CB 11 Aaron Murray QB 11 Connor Norman FS 12 Brice Ramsey QB 12 Austin Herod SS 13 Marshall Morgan K QB 14 Hutson Mason 15 J.J. Green RB QB 16 Christian LeMay 17 Rantavious Wooten FLK 17 Davin Bellamy DL 18 Jonathon Rumph SE 18 Jesse Jones CB 19 Shaquille Fluker CB 20 Brandon Harton RB 20 Quincy Mauger FS 22 Brendan Douglas RB SS 23 Marc Deas RB 23 Alex Parsons 23 James Eunice WR 24 Lucas Redd FS 25 Josh Harvey-Clemons SS SO 25 Jake Star TE 26 Malcolm Mitchell FLK CB 26 Tristan Askew 27 Rhett McGowan SE 28 Tray Matthews FS 29 Uriah LeMay WR 30 Kosta Vavlas ILB 31 Chis Conley FLK 31 Jon Bailey CB 32 Collin Barber P 32 Matt Stagg OLB 33 Chase Vasser OLB 35 A.J. Turman RB 36 Kyle Karempelis RB 36 Devin Gillespie SS 37 Devin Bowman CB 37 Kenneth Towns SE 38 Ryne Rankin ILB 38 Clay Johnson FLK 39 Corey Moore SS 39 Dominic Bryan RB 41 Brandon Burrows OLB 41 Jared Chapple TE 42 Tim Kimbrough LB 43 Merritt Hall FB 43 Tommy Long ILB 44 T.J. Stripling OLB 44 Drew Wilson TE 45 Reggie Carter ILB 46 Corey Campell FB 46 A.J. McDonald ILB 47 Ray Drew DE 47 Taylor Maxey FB 48 Quayvon Hicks FB 48 Dillard Pinkston OLB 49 Nathan Theus SN

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Bulldog players Brendan Douglas (left) and Nathan Theus chat over watermelon after practice Monday at Sanford Stadium. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff 50 Johnny O'Neal 51 Ramik Wilson 52 Amarlo Herrera 53 Clint Kirk 54 Brandon Kublanow 56 Garrison Smith 57 De'Andre Johnson 58 Sterling Bailey 59 Jordan Jenkins 60 Josh Cardiello 61 David Andrews 63 Xzavier Ward 64 Dallas Lee 65 Eddie McQuillen 66 Hunter Long 67 Michael Scullin 68 Chris Burnette

LB ILB ILB DE OL DE DL DE OLB OL C OT OG OT C OL OG

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69 Trent Frix 70 Aulden Bynum 71 John Theus 72 Kenarious Gates 73 Greg Pyke 74 Austin Long 74 Thomas Swilley 75 Kolton Houston 76 Zach DeBell 77 Preston Mobley 77 Glenn Welch 78 Watts Dantzler 79 Mark Beard 80 Greg Mulkey 81 Reggie Davis 82 Michael Bennett 83 Jack Looman

SN OG OT OT OG OG OL OT OT C OL OL OT TE WR SE TE

FR FR SO SR FR SR FR JR SO SO FR JR JR SR FR JR SO

84 Leonard Floyd 84 Hugh Williams 85 Jordan Davis 86 Justin Scott-Wesley 87Jay Rome 88 Arthur Lynch 88 Toby Johnson 89 James DeLoach 89 Cole Trolinger 90 Ethan Jackson 91 Josh Dawson 93 Chris Mayes 93 Patrick Beless 94 John Taylor 94 Thomas Pritchard 96 Mike Thornton 97 John Atkins 97 Adam Erickson

LB TE TE SE TE TE DE OLB TE P OLB N PK DE PK N N P

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Closet

Powder

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Bedroom

Game Covered Patio

STOR. 1

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Living Room Closet

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Kitchen DW Closet Pantry

Two Garage

Bedroom

BASE RENT

CABLE, INTERNET, ALL UTILITIES (LESS ELECTRIC)

FURNITURE (OPTIONAL)

$420 $50 $29

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16 Photo

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

Showcase

{ } Top Left: Bid day spectators cheer for new sorority members along Milledge Avenue. Center: Georgia tackle Mike

Thornton enjoys a slice of watermelon at the annual watermelon cutting in Sanford Stadium. Bottom Left: New

sorority members leave the MLC after

receiving their bids, Bottom Right: Ella Reese Baker, 18 months, eats water-

melon with the football team in Sanford Stadium.

TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

JONAH ALLEN/Staff

TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff


The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Finding Fashion: Fall trends reflect awareness of body shape By HUNTER LACEY @HunterLacey Summer break is a time of selfdiscovery and adventure. For some — myself included — adventure involves starting about seven different television series on Netflix, and self-discovery is a lot more depressing than converting to Buddhism while abroad. But take heart, fledgling couch potato. Summer may have been uneventful, but fall semester inaugurates a new era: the resurgence of tailgating, concerts and dancing on tables at Whiskey Bent. Start the semester off on the right foot, styled to perfection and ready for a night out with friends or a day at Sanford Stadium to cheer on the Dawgs. And as per tradition, this fall season is redefining the shapes and patterns that dominated spring and summer. “I think we’re going to be seeing a lot of really feminine rompers,” said Ariella Cross, sales associate at Cheeky Peach boutique. “We’ve discovered the waistline is best around your natural waist and not a drop waist.” Bid farewell to the low-rise jean of the early 2000s, as it seems like the high waisted trend that overtook Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr this summer is here to stay. Cross says styles are moving towards a more bohemian look this fall, a deviation from the über-preppy, pastel aesthetic that was prevalent in the spring. “People this semester are really going for comfortable and cute,” Cross said. “Palazzo pants are selling out the roof — every pattern is selling really well.” And as for patterns, toss last spring’s chevron to the curb. “When we brought on chevron, we brought it on really strong,” Cross said. “Because we had it in every style, it got really overwhelming.” Instead, opt for a bolder print this fall, like a captivating ikat or a daring tribal print. Demitria Lyles, a junior fashion merchandising major from Atlanta, insists the wide array of prints expected to become popular this season will make the streets of Athens seem more like a safari excursion. “I’m seeing a lot of tigers and elephants,” Lyles said. “Elephant prints is going to be out, and people are going to start wearing a lot of it.” Of course, animal prints like leopard are always a chic classic. And for the more daring patrons

Feminine rompers accenting the natural waistline are in for fall. Courtesy Flickr of fashion, overalls are back from the dark depths of the ‘90s with a vengeance. That is not a misprint — overalls are back, albeit much more tamed than the medium washed, boot cut atrocities that give me night terrors. Overalls have risen from the ashes of a humiliating past, being recreated in brilliant printed and cropped varieties that celebrities such as Alexa Chung and “Revenge” star Ashley Madekwe have been spotted wearing. “Definitely for the hipster crowd, overalls are happening,” Lyles said.   Cross attributes a new understanding of shape as the reason behind the revival of overalls. “Girls are learning the appropriate fit for their bodies,” she said. “I think it’s a great possibility that overalls will pull through down here.” Keeping up with the latest trends can seem like a losing battle not entirely unlike a dog furiously chasing its own tail. In the timeless words of Heidi Klum, German goddess of fashion reality TV, “One day you’re in, and the next, you’re out.” But don’t lose sight of the most important goal of apparel, which is self-expression. “People take pride in how they look because it helps your selfesteem,” Cross said. “It’s important to be able to express yourself through clothes.”

Variety 17

Taste Test: home.made catering opens for lunch By CHELSEY ABERCROMBIE @comma_freak On Monday, awardwinning home.made catering opened its doors on Baxter Street for lunch. With a brand new, sit-in dining room, 1,000 Faces Coffee and the promise of fresh food with a down-home twist, the folks at home.made take their title seriously. The meal was somewhat reminiscent of a lunch your parents packed for you when you were little. If your parents were gourmet chefs, that is. While not everything that is available on the extensive catering menu is offered in the new location, the lunch menu is enough to please those who elected home.made Best Food at Taste of Athens, as well as any lover of Southern cuisine, or even just cheese. To sample the new restaurant’s fare on the day of its opening, I tried the Swanee bites and veggie muffaletta, which came with an assortment of pickled veggies and cheese straws. To start at the most basic level, the cheese straws are essentially gourmet Cheetos, only twice as addicting. I could fly through a bag of those very quickly, especially during finals, but the handful that came with the sandwich did well in that it didn’t overwhelm the muffaletta, and it really offset the vinegar of the pickled veggies. Would it be weird to say the sweet pickle chips were my favorite part of this meal? When I interviewed Maumus before the opening of her restaurant, she talked about how much she enjoyed pickling

The Best Food winner at Taste of Athens in February is open for lunch service. ERIN O. SMITH/Staff things. The care that goes into it shows in something as simple as pickled okra, pickle chips and green beans. The green beans and okra were spicier than they were sweet — an eternal debate amongst fans of pickled anything — but my personal favorite were the sweet and sour pickle chips. “Swanee Bites” is probably a term some Southerners haven’t heard before, but one which they will immediately take a liking to as — you guessed it — they’re fried. And made entirely out of cheese. Two fried cheese straws sandwiching a dollop of pimiento cheese will either make your mouth water or send you running for the treadmill, depending on your opinion of everything fried and cheesy, but I immediately wished I had ordered more than two. Maumus is a New Orleans native, so she is no stranger to the wonderful world of muffaletta: an enormous sandwich of meat, cheese and olive tapenade made popular by Italian immigrants in New Orleans. I got the vegetarian version, which swaps cucumbers for shaved prosciutto, but otherwise

all the remaining ingredients are the same. Enjoyment of muffaletta all depends on how much you like or don’t like olives, as the olive tapenade is one of the strongest flavors in the sandwich, but I personally thought it was great. I had planned on eating half for lunch and the other half for dinner, but a few bites coerced me into consuming the entire thing in one sitting. No shame. If I have one regret about my trip to home. made's new location, it’s that I didn’t try a dessert. Chocolate chip cookies and a red velvet cake sat on the front counter that kind of looked like the best thing I have ever seen, but I didn’t end up sampling any of the sweets. Maybe next time. The only problem with home.made’s new space is that it perhaps doesn’t have the room to accommodate a bustling lunch crowd that might want to dine-in, but otherwise the food was superb and definitely worth a return visit. home.made catering is located at 1072 Baxter Street and is open Monday through Friday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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18 Variety

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

AND SCENE!

Almodovar’s ‘I’m So Excited’ neglects good taste for cheap laughs By COLBY NEWTON @redandblack

Pedro Almodovar’s “I’m So Excited,” the follow-up to 2011’s cerebral bodyhorror “The Skin I Live In,” seems to have been created as a thorough rejection of the latter’s values and quality. Trapping a cast of stereotypes and caricatures in the belly of a passenger plane unable to land, Almodovar casts away the bleak palette and twisted plot of his previous fare in favor of raunchy, gaudy comedy. Unfortunately, while Almodovar has proven he can create clever, relatable comedies, “Excited” is far from his usual level of quality. The skill and style the director brought to the previous films is still on display, but these talents are unfortunately applied to a film filled with uninteresting plotlines, clashing tones and some of the most cringe-worthy, offensive comedy seen outside a Jeff Dunham special. More than anything, “I’m So Excited” feels like a throwback to the comedies of the late ’80s and early ’90s. Every mention of sex and sexuality is expected to draw titters and blushes from the audience, and drinking, drug use and homosexuality are the punchlines to 75 percent of the jokes on display. The sexual politics and characterizations on display seem to be the products of an utterly adolescent mind-set, rather than the clever filmmaker Almodovar has proven himself to be. A gay steward never gets a line not directly related to his sexuality, and while the film displays an admirable range of sexualities in its broad spectrum of characters, its inability to develop them into characters beyond their sexual preference makes for a bland and repetitive sequence of events. In one particularly egregious sequence, a woman-on-man rape sequence is treated as an act of pure joy between the woman and her unconscious meat puppet. At the end of the film, the pair has become a couple, walking off into the sunset to (presumably) seek some sort of psychiatric help. Beyond the film’s extremely questionable politics, it’s just a bland piece of work. Almodovar grafts stock dramatic narratives onto characters clearly created for comedy, generating a bizarre clash of tones that keeps “Excited” from ever settling into a comic or compelling narrative. Even the touches of strangeness around the edges of the film seem to have been inserted as a last-ditch attempt to make something of an uninteresting story. Characters like a psychic virgin or drug-smuggling newlywed seem transplanted from some different narrative, and no plotline is strong enough to carry the bulk of the narrative to its

The cast of ‘I’m So Excited’ consists of cheap stereotypes and one-note characters that fail to elevate a weak script. Courtesy Miramax limpid finish. “Excited” brings with it more than a few laughs — clever-butoffensive jokes are still clever, but the aftertaste is sour and unpleasant. Almodovar is a talented director, and he’s assembled an incredibly talented cast, an effort that almost carries it through the rough patches. Sadly, though, “I’m So Excited” can’t rise above the worst instincts of its creator, and becomes a grueling ordeal that betrays its lighthearted intentions. “I’m So Excited” is playing at Ciné through Aug. 15.

Whiskey Gentry celebrates new album By BEN DELL’ORTO @bend353 Whiskey Gentry has been spending a lot of time in Athens lately. The Atlanta-based group played a few shows in Athens last year, including at Twilight Americana Music Festival in April. The band has also been recording its second album with John Keane in his Athens studio for the past several months, and it will be featured at a CD release show Friday at the Georgia Theatre. “Overall, the new album feels much more sure of itself,” said the group’s singer Lauren Staley. “We developed a relationship with John who isn’t really a stranger anymore.” The group plays country-bluegrass music with a punk influence, as several players are from punk groups. “Jason Morrow and I are the primary song writers,” Staley said. “But this album definitely felt more collaborative. Rather he and I working out every detail, we had a lot more input from other members of the band.” The new album stays true to the group’s mostly Southern roots, but demonstrates the influence years of touring can have. “A lot of my songwriting has to do with the South,” Staley said. “But Jason wrote ‘Reno’ and ‘One Night in New York,’ which are about other places.” The new record gets its title from one of its softer songs, “Holly Grove,” which tells a story about two children who experience a tragedy. “‘Holly Grove’ remains one of the most intricate songs we’ve ever put together.” Staley said. “And even if it tells a sad story, it is a good story.” The track “One Night in New York” features a duet between Staley and one of her influences, Birch Walker of the Marvelous Three. “He was an old friend of mine, and we remained friends and he really inspired me to play music,” Staley said. “It felt like it came full circle since he sang on my record.” The group will be spending the next several months promoting its new album. “We go to Europe the last week

The album debuts before the band's European tour. Courtesy The Whiskey Gentry

The Whiskey Gentry CD Release WHEN: Friday at 8 p.m. WHERE: Georgia Theatre PRICE: $8 CONTACT: georgiatheatre.com

of August, and in September we’ll be opening for one of the members of Leftovers Salmon,” Staley said. “We’re going to do a radio campaign for the record too.” The CD release supports two supporting acts: American Aquarium, a country-rock group from Raleigh, N.C., and Seven Handle Circus, a bluegrass group from Atlanta sporting punk and alternative influences. The show will also be the first opportunity for fans to buy a copy of the new album. “We’re going to have plenty of copies of the CD, and we’ll be taking pre-orders for vinyl,” Staley said. “The album actually comes out September 10, so this Athens show is special because people will be able to purchase the record early.”

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The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

New cologne captures UGA scent in a bottle BY CAROLINE BROWN @cbrown130 Georgia pride has reached a whole new level.  Now University of Georgia fans can smell like the beloved campus. Masik Collegiate Fragrances, a New York City-based company, has created “signature scents” for campuses across the country, including UGA. “I’ve always been really fascinated by the scientific link between scent and memory,” said Katie Masik, founder and CEO of Masik Collegiate Fragrances. “A lot of people say they’ll smell something that will remind them of their grandmother’s pie, or freshly cut grass takes them back to Little League — that’s such a powerful connection.” They take into consideration many aspects of campus to capture the school’s scent in a bottle. “For each school, we look at different things like the flowers and trees that grow locally on campus, we get pictures, the stadium, the architecture, different areas of the school,” Masik said. “We look at the school colors and how they can translate to aromatics.” For UGA’s scent, inspiration was drawn from the Arch, between the hedges, Georgia bulldogs spirit, Athens, and the colors red, black and white that translate to aromatics like red poppy, lychee, chilled Fugi apple, and white birch. “For Georgia, we put in red poppy and some magnolia, which is certainly very prevalent in the South, particularly Athens,” Masik said. Masik grew up in Pennsylvania and graduated from Bucknell University in 2001, but she lived in Georgia for two years, so she witnessed firsthand just how much love there is for the bulldogs. “We certainly have school spirit in the North and big schools up here, but it’s really big down there,” Masik said.  The perfume itself is produced in New Jersey, but Masik worked closely with the University, asking men and women who work for the school if what the perfumers are coming up with matches the campus.  Both the men’s and women’s scents have three layers. The top notes are the light, crisp and fresh aromatics that first hit you. After it wears off, the middle notes come into play until they wear off and then the heavier, woodier musks come into play in the bottom base. For the cologne, the top layer consist of cool ozone, chilled Fugi apple and frozen bergamot. The middle layer has Asian pear skin, lavandin and frosted nutmeg. The final layer at the base features white birch, skin musk, blue cypress and blonde woods. For the ladies, the UGA perfume contains red poppy, fizzy mandarin, crisp green apple and lychee-tini accord as the top notes; water lilies, baby violet, lush jasmine and dew kissed poppy in the middle layer, then finishes with crisp moss, soft musk, whisper of teakwood and golden amber at the base.

Classic Center’s BBQ Festival hosts competition BY HILARY BUTSCHEK @hilarylbutschek Southern pride will spill over the streets of downtown this weekend, and football season hasn’t even started yet.  At the Classic Center's first annual BBQ Festival on Friday, Aug. 16 and Saturday, Aug. 17, professional chefs and home cooks will compete to win prizes for their own specially prepared protein.  Homer Whitmire, a part owner and executive chef at DePalma’s Italian Cafe downtown, has been preparing barbecue food in a cooker in his backyard since 2002. “I like the party aspect of [barbecue],” Whitmire said. “Just sitting around, having a couple of beers and talking, and then I like to see everyone’s face when you bring out the food and they’re chowing down.” Saturday, he will compete in the backyard competition, which is open to any level of barbecue cook. The competition requires a sample of chicken and ribs for the judges to be turned in by 10:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. respectively, so he’ll have to get an early 4 a.m. start to get cooking. Free samples will be offered throughout the day.  Admission to the festival is free both days, but tickets will be sold for indoor events. “The atmosphere will be great because it’ll be outside and you’ll be able to smell the barbecue cooking,” said Angie Estes, the marketing and PR coordinator at the Classic Center.  Friday's outdoor “Iron Chef” cook-off has competitors from local restaurants including The Royal Peasant, George’s Lowcountry Table, Athens Country

Classic Center hosts its first BBQ festival this weekend which includes backyard competitions open to any level of cook. FILE/Staff Club, Foundry Inn and Spa and Center Stage Catering competing for a prize of $1,000 and a statue of a pig made by a local potter. Later, bluegrass bands Balsam Range and The Boxcars will play an indoor concert. Tickets are $22 for the public and $10 for students.  The festival continues early Saturday morning. Two competitions, one for professional teams and one for “backyard” chefs of a more novice level, will compete.  Professionals traveling from around the state for the competition, sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbeque Society, will vie for $10,000. Backyard competitors will be cooking to win $1,000. While the meat is roasting, a trade show will be open inside the

Groucho’s Deli brings affordable food to Baxter Hill By CAROLINE WINGATE @cmargaretw Athens draws many businesses, but the food market tops out. The college town atmosphere attracts crowds of casual connoisseurs, which is the perfect niche for the newlyopened Groucho’s Deli, a reasonably priced, high quality sandwich joint located across from the freshman dorms on Baxter Street. Current franchisee and operating manager and partner, Kevin Lloyd, is committed to serving diners the finest sandwiches, salads and soups, and something special. “We kind of have a little bar atmosphere with four taps on keg. Statesboro is the only other location to have this feature,” Lloyd said. “Athens is a beer town — everyone enjoys beer." Opening in the Classic City was basically a no-brainer. “The reason we picked Athens is it’s a big college town. We thrive in college towns and liked the atmosphere. It's a very chill and nice town,” Lloyd said. Groucho's had a soft opening on Aug. 2. “We try as a company to get all of the kinks

Variety 19

Classic Center. Vendors will sell various types of food and drink, as well as tailgating supplies. The event will close with the People’s Choice Awards, where,

for $10 entrance, anyone can taste all of the competitors’ food in the professional competition and vote on the winners, who will be announced at 4:30 p.m.

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Replacing Sudz Laundry, Groucho's Deli offers affordable deli sandwiches, soups and salads, as well as four kegs on tap. Taylor craig sutton/Staff out before we do a grand opening,” Lloyd said. So far, so good for the Columbia, S.C.based deli. Lloyd brought in three employees to get the place running and has since hired college students as servers.

Terry believes business is part of the community.

“We strive to have quality quickly. All ingredients are fresh. We cut the meats and vegetables each day. We make all of our dressings in house except for the raspberry vinaigrette,” Lloyd said. The favorite is STP Dipper with Formula 45

or Danish Bleu dressings. The STP is an acronym for a “small taste of paradise.” Groucho’s Deli is located at 396 Baxter Street and is open Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. until 9 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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20 Variety

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

Events FRIDAY AUGUST 16

Adam Klein When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $8 Contact: heworldfamousathens.com

Classic City BBQ When: 3 to 6 p.m. Where: The Classic Center Price: Free Contact: classiccenter. com

Places in Peril with T. Hardy Morris When: 8 p.m. Where: Cine Barcafe Price: $10 (adv.), $15 Contact: athenscine. com

Scarlet Stitch CD Release When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: hendershotscoffee.com Seven Handle Circus, The Whiskey Gentry, American Aquarium When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $8 Contact: georgiatheatre.com Abbey Road Live When: 9 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $10 (adv.), $13 Contact: meltingpointathens.com Back City Woods, Shane Bridges Band, Reluctant Saints When: 9 p.m.

Trivia When: 6 p.m. Where: Blind Pig Tavern (Broad Street) Price: Free Contact: blindpigtavern.com

Little Gold, The Wild Ones, Salts, Koko Beware, Tom Television, Onchi, Black Moon, Thunderchief When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Max Canada Price: Free Contact: Facebook.com/ The-Max-Canada

Dawgs After Dark: Road Trip When: 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Where: Tate Center Price: Free (w/ ID), $5 Contact: union.uga.edu

Hamlet When: 8 p.m. Where: Town & Gown Price: $12 to $15 Contact: townandgownplayers.com

Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ amiciathens

Trivia When: 7 p.m. Where: Buffalo’s Cafe Price: Free Contact: buffaloscafe/ athens

Timmy & The Tumblers, Faux Ferocious, Ebony Eyes, Concord America When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com

The Town & Gown Players will perform its haunting "Hamlet" through next Sunday. Courtesy Town & Gown Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: 40watt.com Ken Will Morton When: 4:30 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Rooftop Price: Free Contact: georgiatheatre.com Sam Sniper, The Viking Progress, Family & Friends When: 10 p.m. Where: Max Canada Price: $5 Contact: facebook.com/ The-Max-Canada Del The Funky Homosapien When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $10

Contact: newearthmusichall.com Roadkill Ghost Choir, T. Hardy Morris When: 9 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $10 (21+), $12 (18-20) Contact: caledonialounge.com Velocirapture, Strays, Ginko, Scott, Bad Nudes, DJ Max Wang When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: $5 Contact: facebook.com/ Go-Bar SATURDAY AUGUST 17 “Back to Cool” Handcraft Market When: Noon to 8 p.m. Where: Max Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ The-Max-Canada

MONDAY AUGUST 19 Margaret Cho When: 8 & 11 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $30 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com Hendershot’s Grand Reopening When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Price: Free Contact: hendershotscoffee.com

Dangfly!, Rest, Street Rhythm & Rhyme When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: caledonialounge.com

Jazz Funk Jam with Drew Hart When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ nowherebarathens

Grassland String Band, Katie Pruitt, Manmade Mountains When: 7:30 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 Contact: meltingpointathens.com

Kinky Waikiki When: 6 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Rooftop Price: Free Contact: georgiatheatre.com

Cult of Riggonia, Naan Violence, Ant’lrd, Bong Marley Song System, Wild of Night, Isidro, DJ Blowpop When: 8 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ Go-Bar

Werewolves, Chimes, Gondola When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com

Party Time Back To School Music Festival When: 1 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $10 (adv.), $12

Heaven When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge

Grand Opening: Agora Vintage When: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Where: Agora Vintage Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ agoravintage

Mayer Hawthorne When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $15 Contact: georgiatheatre.com

Whiskey Gentry bring its bluegrass stylings to the Georgia Theatre this Saturday. Taylor craig sutton/Staff

Bombadil, New Wives When: 9 p.m. Where: Green Room Price: $5 Contact: greenoomathens.com

SUNDAY AUGUST 18

AUG 15 ..................................................... Yacht Rock Revue AUG 16 ..................... Ken Will Morton - Rooftop Happy Hour

Contact: newearthmusichall.com

Price: Free (21+), $2 (18-20) Contact: caledonialounge.com

The Darnell Boys When: 6 p.m. Where: Heirloom Cafe Price: Free Contact: heirloomathens.com Free Associates, Rampy Bird, DJ Marie When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ Go-Bar Water Liars, White Violet When: 9 p.m. Where: Normaltown Hall Price: $5 Contact: facebook.com/ NormaltownHall WEDNESDAY AUGUST 21 Back To School Bash When: 9 p.m. Where: Jerzees Sports Bar Price: $3 (21+), $5 (1820) Contact: jerzeessportsbar.net

Meet the Author: Haldol & Hyanciths When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: avidbookshop. com Asher Armstrong When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: Free Contact: terrapinbeer. com

Hot Corner Trio When: 8 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: Free Contact: theworldfamousathens.com

Rock & Roll Trivia When: 9 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ lkshuffleclub

Shewolf, Panic Manor When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com

Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: The Capital Room Price: Free Contact: thecapitalroom.com

TUESDAY AUGUST 20

Monsoon, Sin, Philthy, Rabies Scythe Fight When: 9 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: caledonialounge.com

Margaret Cho When: 8 & 11 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $30 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com

Trivia When: 9 p.m. Where: Amici

Lettuce, Earphunk When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $17 Contact: georgiatheatre.com

now serving Brunch!

Trivia wednesdays 8pm

AUG 17 ................ Twin Powers Birthday Dance Party feat. Immuzikation & Z-Dog - Rooftop 11pm

daily lunch specials $ 1 Pints $ 5 Mini calzones changes weekly

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Juna, Growl, New Wives, Mothers When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: caledonialounge.com

Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Highwire Lounge Price: Free Contact: highwirelounge.com

AUG 17 ..................Mayer Hawthorne w/ Roman GianArthur

AUG 21 ................................................. Lettuce w/ Earphunk

The Welfare Liners, Tommy Jordan When: 7 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 Contact: meltingpointathens.com

Hamlet When: 2 p.m. Where: Town & Gown Price: $12 to $15 Contact: townandgownplayers.com

AUG 16 ..........................................Seven Handle Circus and The Whiskey Gentry (CD Release Show) w/ American Aquarium

AUG 19 ..................................... Kinky Waikiki - Rooftop 6pm

Swing Dance Night When: 7 to 10 p.m. Where: DanceFx Price: $3 to $5 Contact: athensswingnight.com

SALSAthens When: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $8 Contact: facebook.com/ lkshuffleclub

Classic City BBQ When: 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Where: The Classic Center Price: Free Contact: classiccenter. com

Muuy Bien, Woodfangs, Dana Swimmer, Monsoon, Pograms, Will Weber When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: 40watt.com

OpenTOAD Comedy Night When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: $5 Contact: flckertheatreandbar.com

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The Red and Black

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Thursday, August 15, 2013

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Where: 3567 Atlanta Hwy Phone: (706) 316-3382 Website:

Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items including crab legs Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items including crab legs Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items including crab legs Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

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Where: 175 N. Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 353-2439 Website:

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Where: 161 Alps Rd. Phone: (706) 548-8599 Facebook:

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$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life

HAPPY HOUR $1 Pints of High Life all day

8pm - Trivia $7 Domestic pitchers, $1 High Life pints

www.facebook.com/inoko

Where: 320 E. Clayton Suite 201 Phone: (706) 613-0892 Website: mellowmushroom.com

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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Downtown Location

O PE N L AT E , athens best burrito

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10 YEARS & COUNTING!

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Burritos tacos Quesadillas nachos fajitas salads

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puzzles

22 Puzzles

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Red and Black

1

Puzzled by your current

P U Z Z L E

housing situation?

S P O N S O R

Landmark has the soLution! CaLL 706.395.1400 for more info!

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE AUGUST 15

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 25 26

28 31 32 34 36 37 38

ACROSS City near Lake Tahoe Tortilla chip dip Barbecue rod Like garage sale items Mountain path __ up; relax Raced Says again In the __; ultimately Dishonest one “...to __, dust to dust...” Divulges classified info “Much __ About Nothing” East European or Asian plain Playground attractions Desert refuge House of snow Bread variety Compact __; CD Iron alloy Actress Gilbert

39 40 41 42

44 45 46 47 50 51 54 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

__ the time; constantly Spirited horse Leg bone Solar __; the sun & planets Hobos May honoree Smell Once more Pantyhose problem Mai tai ingredient Write letters Give a pink slip to Actor Estrada Eagle’s nest Scraps of cloth Adriatic and Caribbean Desert fruits Dollar bills

L

DOWN Trick Sports network Unnecessarily Peculiar Union action Regions Hideaway Take a chair Brewed drink Fall or summer Hiker’s trail Words of understanding Actress Harper Standard car feature Drinks like Fido Time-honored heroic tale Base deserter Drink made with ice cream 27 Coin toss call 28 Toboggan 29 Specialist in rules of

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 21 24 25 26

30 32 33 35 37 38 40 41 43 44 46 47 48 49 50 52 53 55 56 57

writing Pancake topper Gossip subject “__ whiz!” All __; listening Flower support Stitched joining Pebble Kermit, for one Smiles smugly Exchanges “Little Orphan __” Top cards VP Al __ Opera solo Organize into categories Egg on State of clutter Woeful Tiny vegetable To and __

king F o r S o m e t h i n g ?

Check Out Our Classified Ads online! www.redandblack.com/Classifieds

FRIDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE AUGUST 16

ACROSS 1 __ off; disregard 6 Title for former Iranian rulers 10 Journey 14 Sierra __; African nation 15 Bull, in Spain 16 Got up 17 Refueling ship 18 Actress Chase 19 Qualified 20 Start of the U.S. Constitution 22 Bandleader __ Cugat 24 Paul, before his conversion 25 Feels bitter about 26 Voice box 29 Elephant teeth 30 Tavern order 31 Song of an Alpine goatherd 33 Punctures

Everywhere is within walking distance given the time. Don’t drink and drive. 256 E. Clayton St • 706-549-0166 • Mon-Sat Noon-2AM

37 39 41 42 44 46 47 49 51 54 55 56 60 61 63

64 65 66 67 68 69

Cubs or Bears Despondent Christmas One living abroad Money hoarder Religious sister Remained optimistic Liquefied Toiled Actress Russo Bigger Snail’s feeler Zone Rue or Gilbert “Come __?”; words of those who missed it __ and groan; complain Skunk’s defense Tempted Actor Griffith Gives a silent assent Grains planted

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 23 25 26 27 28 29 32 34

DOWN Dinner in a sty One listed in a will Acting part Uncomfortable Berlin’s nation Not moving Bagel’s center Noah’s boat Practical jokes __ of justice; unfair ruling Songbird Bit of land in the sea Looks through a keyhole Healthily plump Inquires Regulations Tardy Emcee Trebek Gather crops Lukewarm Like many a capitol roof Mom’s sister

35 36 38 40 43 45 48 50 51 52 53 54 56 57 58 59 62

Depressed Transmit Cabinet wood Nation in the Middle East Ripped Tenants’ homes Human being NFL or NHL Peruvian pack animal Burr or Spelling Sandwich requirement Raises, as kids Trampled Give a hoot Fibbed Stops Hustle & bustle

Import Car DoCtors Automotive RepAiR

10% OFF LabOr

w/Student or Military ID 1900 W. Broad Street

(706) 353-6006

SATURDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE AUGUST 17

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 34 35 36 37 38 40

ACROSS Tiny skin opening Air freshener brand Make a tiny cut “Once __ a time...” Last one to finish a race Castro’s land Beef or pork “A rose by any __ name...” Similar; related Actress Julie Out of work Golfer Ernie __ Rowed Evening coffee, perhaps Purchase Gets closer to Way out Up until now McArdle or Mitchell Summer month: abbr. Punishment “Brylcreem, a little __’ll

do ya...” 41 Camels’ smaller cousins 43 “Wow!” 44 __ list; chores written down 45 Alley cat, e.g. 46 Buzzing insect 47 Most awful 48 Trait carriers 50 Pea casing 51 Baseball officials 54 __ allegiance; vowed loyalty 58 Powder 59 Audio’s partner 61 Volcanic output 62 Vicinity 63 Royal decree 64 At any time 65 Get well 66 Smells strongly 67 Payment made to a landlord

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 23

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DOWN Wild feline Not locked Highway Beg Shines Plenty Bit of soot Radio music show host Mistake Burned with liquid Heat in the microwave Long-billed bird Skillets Leprechaun Goodman with an orchestra Electrical failures Sells drugs Rejoice Groucho’s prop Stein or Stiller Passion

32 33 35 36 38 39 42 44 46 47 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 60

Peruses Wooden shoe Affirmative Dined Check writer Spike or Bruce Like wizardry Little child Next to Misfortune At no time Schemes Provo’s state Female horse Tearful request Actor Gregory Donated Like 2, 4 and 6 Move quickly Pass away

Red&Black

MONDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE AUGUST 19

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ACROSS As blind __ bat Shining brightly Music’s Lady __ Gray wolf Treasure __; rich cache Corrupt Comrades Itchy, burning skin rash Run-of-the-__; ordinary Symbolize In a lazy way Go on a tirade Obi-__ Kenobi of “Star Wars” Groups of eight Most terrifying Ravels at the edges Mass of bees Have regrets Evening bugle call Noise Garment of old Rome

40 N  ew Year’s __; December 31 41 Actor Jeremy 42 Furniture wood 43 Baby bird 45 Ne’er-do-wells 46 __ at once; suddenly 47 Go from a solid to a liquid state 48 Clutch 51 Aiding 56 __ it up; have a ball 57 Invalidates 58 Vittles 60 __-friendly; easy to operate 61 Denmark’s dollar 62 Days of __; yesteryear 63 State of clutter 64 Run __; chase 65 Barbie’s beau

DOWN 1 M  ount Blanc or the Matterhorn 2 Zoom skyward 3 Up to the task 4 Capital of Greece 5 Batch of grain 6 Elvis’ “__ Me Tender” 7 Heating chamber 8 “__ Ho!”; Kingsley novel 9 Zodiac sign 10 Zealous 11 Fish’s breathing organ 12 Friendly nation 14 Fish hawks 21 Word of disgust 25 Upper limb 26 Frequently 27 Want badly 28 Sticky strips 29 Dangled back and forth 30 Fires, slangily 31 Wear away

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Sweet granules Sorrowful drops In just a bit Asian nation Bear witness in court Sick Young horse Narrow candles __ amount; smaller number Pooh’s creator Sad-looking Ascend Currier and __ Ride the waves Job opening Wall recess Pierce Lion’s lair


puzzles

The Red and Black

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Puzzles 23

1

RECRUITMENT

August 19-22

“Fast Turn Around”

10% off for students with valid ID

rsvp to:

recruitment@randb.com

Better Business Bureau Accredited 3690 Atlanta Highway • #110 • Athens, GA 30606 • 706.247.8877 | TechShopAthens.com

TUESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE AUGUST 20 ACROSS 1 Ping-__; table tennis 5 Skier’s incline 10 __ up; tallies 14 Out of town 15 __ out; paid no attention to 16 Show boldness 17 Oval fruit 18 Occurring now and then 20 Donkey 21 “Oh, for Pete’s __!” 22 Southerner’s accent 23 Containing nothing 25 Rush 26 Elevator alternative 28 Covered with trees 31 Country music singer __ Cline 32 Royal decree 34 Energy 36 Wading bird 37 Fill wall cracks with

material 38 Casino game 39 Prefix for fat or sense 40 Inn 41 Local jargon 42 Mean woman in a fairy tale 44 One who dies for his beliefs 45 Bit of cereal 46 Japanese three-line poem 47 Sum 50 Tie up 51 Bit of soot 54 Modest 57 Actress Sheedy 58 Waist accessory 59 Bart’s mom 60 Applaud 61 Invites 62 Deadly snake 63 Sort; variety

DOWN Mama’s man Hooting birds Sickening Place for a workout Short-tailed weasels Fortunate A single time Split __ soup Koch & Asner Worshipped Comic Carvey Sketch Peddle Bonehead Lively Avoid hitting Pawn Twirl Forbidden Ferrell or Smith In the long run Dirty & shabby

DOWN 1 Moist 2 Region 3 Payment by a bridge crosser 4 Real __; land and buildings 5 Fate 6 Aerosol 7 Part of the foot 8 “__ you thinking what I’m thinking?” 9 Breakfast toast alternative 10 Hall 11 Winning, so far 12 Burn the edges of 13 Carried 21 Kolkata, __ 23 Kiln 25 __ care; wasn’t interested 26 Hooting birds 27 Twelve inches

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 21 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

32 Sups 33 __ to; because of 35 Boggy area 37 Expense 38 Actor Cameron 40 Makes well 41 __ off; idle due to job cutbacks 43 Cuts of beef 44 “Away in a __” 46 Hardware for a door hanger 47 Largest brass instrument 48 Singles 49 Converse 50 Wren or swan 52 Smack 53 Excessive publicity 55 Ms. Thurman 56 Irate 57 Perform

for great coupons check out

The MarketPlace www.redandblack.com/marketplace

WEDNESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE AUGUST 21

‌Auto

‌FOR SALE

‌ or Sale. 2008 Piaggio Fly 150 F scooter. Red. Mint condition. 150 cc engine.  Top speed 55 to 60 mph.  Blue book $1700, asking $1500 firm. Contact Vern. 706207-0096.

‌ 013 Kymco Super 8 150 2 Scooter; brand new missing left mirror; paid $2499, asking $2000 obo (706)206-9159

‌Employment

‌ bedroom and studio apart1 ments available for rent. Located off Milledge Avenue on both UGA and Athens Transit bus lines. Furnished and unfurnished options available. Call 706-3531111 or visit Argo-Athens.com

‌Beef O Brady’s on Athens Eastside looking for cook w/ experience. Apply M-Fr between 2-4pm 706-850-1916 ‌Fast, accurate typists needed for audio transcription. Create your own schedule M-F, 7am to midnight. Pay based on speed and accuracy, $7.25 to over $12. Close to campus. Ideal for PT and Students! Apply online: www. sbsgrp.com ‌ eeking journalism student S for sideline and practice video coverage of UGA football. Please submit resume and video sample to sp@ugasports.com part of the Rivals.com/YAHOO! Sports network.

‌Housing

‌2BR/2BA Condo at Summit, $775/month/ Swimming Pool, Gym, Clubhouse, 3 Miles from campus, Pets welcome, Contact (910)-876-1030 or michael. leinwand@gmail.com ‌4BR/2BA large condo located minutes away from campus, Conv. to busline, UGA golf course and UGA soccer fields. New carpet an paint, new ceiling fans in each BR, washer/dryer in unit $1100 month call 770-6052210 for details

AthensLivingUGA presents register a team

5 questions every week

*Questions

1 6 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 31 33 37 39 41 42

ACROSS Went out with Pillow cover Throw Went skyward Lima’s nation Cincinnati, __ Becomes liquid Ridge of sand “For __”; landlord’s sign Spacious and elegant Hunt for food Wee 15 __ by 3 is 5 Hurt by insulting Yearned Misfortune Give in Fictional work Burden Correct; improve Talk wildly Undress

Great roommate set up in spacious remodeled Condo. On South Lumpkin. 3 bed, 2.5 bath, full basement w W/D and separate entrance. $800 a month. Call Hal 404-966-9675. Brick Duplex 2 Bed/1 Bath $500/Month. 2 Miles North of Downtown, just off the loop. Stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer/dryer connections. Pets OK. Call 7062476444. ‌Brick Duplex Still Available 2 Bed/1 Bath $500/Month. 2 Miles North of Downtown, just off the loop. Stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer/ dryer connections. Pets OK. Call 7062476444. ‌ lean 4br/2.5ba with w/d for C $700/month. 5 miles from UGA campus. Off highland park drive athens please email stayathighlandparkdr@gmail or call (770) 883-6969

44 Fancy cracker toppings 46 Collection 47 Venetian blind pieces 49 Parking __; coin-operated timing devices 51 Rapturous bliss 54 Israeli circle dance 55 Empty 56 Done 60 Press clothes 61 Heroic tale 63 Out of the way 64 Swamp reptile, for short 65 Danger 66 Windowsill, e.g. 67 Use a PC keyboard 68 Tennis court dividers 69 Slumber



‌Notices ‌ ray to St. Joseph of CuperP tino, patron saint of test takers. Posted as promised in appreciation of his help these last several semesters. Patrick

‌Roommates

‌Subleases

‌ bedroom in 3-bdr house. 1 Hardwood floors. Spacious yard. 3 blocks from 5 Points. Mature roommates. Academic year lease. Prefer graduate student or professional. jhueys at uga dot edu

‌Abbey West Apartment Sublease. $320/month, $40 in utilities. Great location near Walmart, Kroger. Lowe’s and Home Depot. Looking immediately.

‌ 700/mo 2/2 upper level in my $ home includes water,garbage service, internet/Wi-Fi and Direct TV. Contact Mary Ann @ 706899-0120 to see.

What is the best way to advertise in Athens?

‌Free Rent First Month! Polo Club Athens 1 Male Roommate Needed!!! 3BR/3BA townhouse fully furnished. Includes all benefits and amenities. Special discounted rate of $415 per month plus $20-$30 in utilities. $200 deposit. Awesome apartment! 706-201-2939

2. How many new deans were hired last semester? - 3PTS

Tri v a 3. Is obesity more prevalent in wealthy or poor areas? - 5PTS 4. Which dorm that was under construction last year is now open? - 3PTS 5. Name one high profile company that a UGA student interned at this past summer. - 7PTS

How to Enter: 1. Register a team 11767

28 Apprehension 29 Tearful requests 32 “E” on the gas gauge 34 Bouquet holder 35 At any time 36 Permits 38 Go the __; stay in until the end 40 Evil spirit 43 Think ahead 45 Soap operas 48 Toward the rear of a ship 50 Graduation cap dangler 51 Kick out 52 __ on; continue 53 Cone topper 54 Rubes 56 Clenched hand 57 Conceal 58 Border 59 Profound 62 Dessert choice

Classifieds Information Rates

(0-24 words)

Private Party..................................$10.00 Housing..........................................$23.00 Help wanted..................................$23.00 Business..........................................$21.00

FREE ADS

For University Community Only

(Private Party Merchandise, Under $101) (0-15 words) 3 Consecutive Days..................................................FREE

(Merchandise must be priced. One item per hsld per week. Ads must be received from UGA e-mail address only. No walk-ins or standard mail accepted.)

CLASSIFICATIONS

(Hint check out Red & Black publications)

1. What ranking was Georgia in the top party school rankings? - 3PTS

‌Roommate wanted two bed condo across from new UGA med school. all utilities included $525.00/month. Newly remodeled, need your own bedroom furniture. Call 706-224-7652/706614-3052.

?

2. Submit answers online by Wednesday at 12 noon.

The Red and Black Classifieds

10. Roommates 30. For Sale 45. Seeking Job 75. Tickets 90. Yard Sales 110. Personal

20. Housing 35. Computers 50. Auto 80. Employment 95. Events 120. Lost & Found

25. Subleases 40. Wanted 60. Services 85. Travel 100. Notices

706-433-3011 classifieds@randb.co www.redandblack.com/classifieds/

Classifieds Disclaimer The Red & Black does not verify, investigate, or endorse any classified ad. Readers are urged to use caution when responding to an ad.

www.redandblack.com/contests_events/trivia submit answers online

win cool prizes!

Grand Prize

Tickets+Parking+Food @ The Braves Game!

Register a team with your friends or student organization!

3. PLAY EACH WEEK AND WIN BIG!!


Join Our Team Plasma Donors Needed Now

Sign a lease now & t recieve AugusE! E R F 2013 for

Name the Bulldog...

WiN aN iPad

E T ONLIN INTMEN O P P A R OU MA.COM BOOK Y ESTPL AS T IO B : T A

The bulldog is no stranger to Georgia, but a new Please help us help those coping mascot at Biotest Plasma Center in Athens with rare, chronic, genetic diseases. needs a given name, so the company is holding an New donors can receive $30 today online contest to help name the handsome pup. and $70 this week! Ask about our Specialty Programs! Must be 18 years or older, have facebook.com/BiotestPlasmaCenterAthens valid I.D. along with proof of SS# and local residency. Walk-ins Welcome. A new Apple iPad

will be awarded to the winner of the Wireless Internet Available. contest along with bragging rights. To enter, visit our Biotest Plasma Center Facebook page, “Like” the page and click on the 233 West Hancock Ave. Gold Star to enter your suggested bulldog name Athens, GA 30601 and contact info. A winner will706-354-3898 be selected and announced inwww.biotestplasma.com September, 2013.

edandBlack4.9X10.5.indd 1

8/21/12 9:01 PM

Sign a 1-year lease and get

$500 off

your first month’s rent! * Some restrictions may apply

Must present this coupon at time of initial signing, not good with any other offer.

Expires 8/31/13

Carriage House Realty Inc. 706-353-1750

SpecialS! · Free August Rent ($610-$625 value)

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CALL 706 -521-0499 EclipseOnBroad.com 805 East Broad Street

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• individual leases • electronic locks • hardwood style flooring • Walk-in Closets • Ceiling fans • Outdoor lounge area • resevered Parking • full-size Washer and dryer in unit


August 15, 2013 edition of the Red & Black