Page 1

BY BRAD MANNION @madbrannion

I am not aware of any other way this can happen now. No one seems to be able to willing to make things like this happen.

This is a missed opportunity for the University of Georgia. I'm very disappointed by this news. — Janet Frick, former chair of Human

Resources for the University Council

As America sat in anticipation for the Supreme Court ruling of two pivotal cases for gayrights, Janet Frick stood in awe over the University of Georgia Foundation’s decision not to provide health benefits to domestic partners of the school’s employees. “I’m very disappointed by this news,” said Frick, former chair of the University Council’s Human Resources Committee. “This is a missed opportunity for the University of Georgia.” The foundation announced on June 21 that its funds will not be used to provide “health insurance benefits for domestic partners for UGA employees,” said

Tom Jackson, vice president for public affairs. “Their reasoning was...they don’t consider that to be in their mission, and second, they do not believe they are sufficiently separate from the state to meet the requirements of being separate because the foundation is supported by state-paid employees,” he said. Frick said she is curious as to where this law, one that would not affect the “private funds” used for the coverage, is stated. “They say that…Georgia law and policy prevent them from using state funds for benefits for someone who is not defined as a dependent, so they are claiming that their hands are tied by state law,” Frick said. “I have not seen that state law.” See BENEFITS, Page 7

Thursday, June 27, 2013 Vol. 120, No. 38 | Athens, Georgia

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KCP NBA

On the move

to

Streets Café takes global eats mobile

BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey Kentavious Caldwell-Pope’s dreams will finally come true this week. Known affectionately as “KCP” among the Bulldog faithful, Caldwell-Pope is expected to hear his name called early during the 2013 NBA Draft on Thursday night, which should come as no surprise to anyone that followed his sensational sophomore season. Caldwell-Pope was Georgia’s leading scorer in 29 of 32 games during the 2012-13 season and its leading rebound man in half of those contests. He averaged 18.5 points, 7.1 rebounds and two steals per game in that span, and his performance was enough to make him the first Bulldog to win SEC Player of the Year since Dominique Wilkins in 1981. Caldwell-Pope was so productive, in fact, that he left the Bulldogs to pursue his goal of playing professional, a tough blow for Georgia head coach Mark Fox and the team. But despite losing his best player following a disappointing season, Fox was nothing but proud of the young man who was so key to what little success Georgia found on the court last year. He also thinks Caldwell-Pope won’t have to wait long before a team drafts him. “Kentavious will be a guy selected high in the first round. He’ll have a great night on Thursday. It’s a terrific night for Kentavious,” Georgia head coach Mark Fox said. “He will be right in that window [of No. 9-15 overall] and it does not surprise me. I felt like from day one that he was going to be an NBA guy.” Fox is not alone in those beliefs, either. As a 6-foot-5 shooting guard with impressive college production, Caldwell-Pope presents NBA teams with a talented player that could still possess untapped potential.

BY CHELSEA ABERCROMIE @comma_freak Local chef Ryan Morgan may have come to Athens to open up a Hooter’s, but he ended up using his extensive experience in the restaurant industry for a slightly less salacious goal. “I started in restaurants when I was 13 with my mom’s restaurant, Strutters, in Atlanta. It was a fried chicken place,” Morgan said. “I worked there through middle school and high school. I’ve been in and out of restaurants kind of across the board as far as high-end and low-end goes, for over 20 years.” Morgan’s food truck, Streets Café, is currently the only legitimate, non-restaurant-affiliated food truck in Athens. Streets Café’s menu is currently Koreaninfluenced, featuring hot dogs, French fries, tacos and sliders that are all Asian-inspired, but Streets Café is really focused on “street food” that’s international. “I’m definitely more about leaning towards Asian flavors and stuff in my own home-cooking, but the truck is about just food from around the world. Big, bold, fresh flavors,” Morgan said. “I like Indian and Caribbean-style food, Latin American-style food. Anything you would consider street food is on the table.” See STREETS, Page 12

See KCP, Page 20

DAWGS DRAFTED IN the first round

WILKINS Jazz, 1982

JONES Hawks, 1999

HAYES Wizards, 2003

Vern Fleming Pacers, 1984 Willie Anderson Spurs, 1988 Alec Kessler Rockets, 1990 Kentavious Caldwell-Pope Find out at 7 p.m. on ESPN Graphic and Photos

Hendershot's Coffee is moving to a brandnew location in the Bottleworks, while Farm 25 will close its doors for good on July 19.

by Taylor Craig Sutton

SEE PAGE 12 FOR THE SCOOP

NEWS, 2 • VIEWS, 4 • VARIETY, 8 • SPORTS, 13 An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia and Athens Communities

Established 1893, Independent 1980


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Crime Notebook UGA student driving wrong way, faces DUI charge Early in the morning of June 21, a University of Georgia police officer observed the offender making a right turn into the “wrong way” of traffic, according to the report. After attempting to make a turn from Broad Street to Hull Street, the offender, John Lewis Schimmel, was pulled over, and making contact with the driver, the officer smelled a “strong odor” of alcohol, according to the report. When asked how much he drank, Schimmel responded saying he “probably had three drinks,” but the officer still had the offender perform a field sobriety test.

After performing the test, Schimmel was given a breathalyzer test, where he was recorded to have a blood alcohol content of 0.172 grams, .092 grams higher than the legal limit. The officer proceeded to ask Schimmel once more how many drinks he had, and he said he had “four drinks” and asked the officer if he really did “that bad” on th sobriety test. Schimmel was transported to the Clarke County Jail and received two citations for DUI. Schimmel's vehicle, following the arrest, was left at the scene. —Brad Mannion

UGA students lose TVs in theft Returning home from staying at a friend’s residence the night before, the victim found “the rear was door pried open and the bedrooms were ransacked,” according to the AthensClarke County police report. Officers responded to the theft report at approximately 11 a.m. on June 23, where they were informed that the University of Georgia students’ two 32-inch TVs and an Apple iPad Mini were stolen from their residence. The total loss for the students was at approximately $800. —Brad Mannion

Report of rape on June 21

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The AthensClarke County police responded to a reported rape at approximately 10:56 p.m. on June 21. The collegeaged victim told officers the incident happened between 2 p.m. and 10:24 p.m. of the same day. According to the report, only one suspect was named, a collegeaged male. —Brad Mannion

Student, visitor barred from Sanford In the early morning of June 25, a University of Georgia police officer noticed two individuals near “Gate 6 at Sanford Stadium,” according to the report. Approaching the entrance to the stadium, the officer determined the gate was locked and that the two individuals “gained entry illegally,” as stated in the report. One of the offenders told officers, Maddison Knick, she wanted to “see the stadium” with her friend, a male visiting the school. The two individuals were barred from entering the stadium for 90 days, according to the report. —Brad Mannion

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For former Georgia Gov. Zell B. Miller's work in establishing the HOPE Scholarship, Gov. Nathan Deal declared June 26 as Zell Miller Day. Erin O. Smith/Staff

Georgia celebrates 20 years of HOPE BY BRAD MANNION @madbrannion Since its first award in 1993, the HOPE scholarship has donated more than any other scholarship program in the state of Georgia. In 20 years, the scholarship has provided exactly 1,480,056 individual students with more than $6.8 billion in awards – this all coming from the proposed legislation of former Gov. Zell Miller wanting to establish a statewide lottery in 1991. At the University of Georgia alone, HOPE has given approximately $1 billion in awards to roughly 208,303 recipients – and these numbers only range from fiscal year 2001 to 2012. “The HOPE Scholarship has truly had a transformative impact on the state of Georgia, the University System of Georgia and certainly the University of Georgia” said UGA President-elect Jere Morehead. “The HOPE Scholarship has exceeded its intended goal of transforming the way Georgians think about higher education in this state.” In 1991, the decision to amend the Georgia Constitution to allow for a lottery was near unanimous in the Georgia Senate at 47-9 and a landslide decision in the Georgia House 126-51. Miller, the mastermind behind the HOPE Scholarship, established three separate divisions to use a portion of the lottery money — the HOPE Scholarship Program, a voluntary prekindergarten program for four-yearolds and an instructional technology

Sessions begin for Terry Business Academy By Marena Galluccio @MarenaGalluccio The Terry College of Business has started its 2013 summer sessions for the Terry Business Academy, a program aimed at students both considering college and wishing to work in the business world. “It is a pre-collegiate program that we designed to expose high school students to various careers and opportunities that they would have as a business major at the Terry College,” said Randy Groomes, the director of diversity relations and the program director for the Te r r y Business Academy. The program is sponsored by Deloitte, the largest accounting and consulting firm in the world, Groomes said. “So they came in and decided that they wanted to invest in the next generation of business leaders,” he said. Applying for this pre-collegiate program is just as detailed as a regular admission process for the University of Georgia. “We have a pretty competitive application process that we try to mirror the UGA admis-

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program. Collectively, roughly $14.3 billion have gone to funding these three programs. In 2002, the same year HOPE reached the mark of awarding more than 600,000 students and awarded roughly $1.5 billion since its establishment, the state of Georgia was in its fifth year of “[leading] the nation in providing academic-based financial aid” as determined by the National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs, according to the Georgia Student Finance Commission website. Years after its creation, people from different states, and even foreign countries, have traveled to Georgia to understand “why [the scholarship] works so well,” said Tracy Ireland, president of the GSFC. “Just recently – not two weeks ago,” Ireland said, “we had visitors to the commission from Yemen to find out how we do what we do. Over the years – and practically every year – we have visitors from all over the country come and find out how HOPE works so well.” For his efforts in providing this to the state of Georgia, Gov. Nathan Deal declared June 26, 2013 as Zell Miller Day. “It is a great day for education into our state,” Deal said at an event commemorating the scholarship’s 20th anniversary. “It is a celebration of an idea that was born in the mind of our former governor Zell Miller. This is a tribute to him.”

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sions, and we are looking at their academics as well as their leadership and their interest in business and their application quality,” Groomes said. The program is offered twice during the summer, between June 23 to June 29 and July 7 to July 13, according to the program’s website. The program lasts for one week and the 30 rising juniors and seniors are able to stay on campus for the program, Groomes said. Current UGA students also serve as their Residential Advisors for the program. “It’s a great opportunity for our students to be able to have that leadership opportunity and relationship skills as well as being a mentor to the younger students,” the director said. Groomes said environments where business is conducted can always change, so students are prepared for the most formal and casual environments, such as a golf course. “So much of business is done on the golf course and so we try to give them some training of how to act and how to conduct themselves in a professional golf out-

ing,” Groomes said. Students also get to brush up on their artistic side in dealing with business. “We try to also include the arts so students also will spend some time at the Georgia Museum of Art,” he said. To conclude the session, students will compete in a marketing competition where they will have to compete by creating a special smart application for a project that they do for AT&T. Groomes said the program has a good influence on the future students and provides for a good foundation. At this time, the first group for the academy will soon graduate and put their skills to the test. “I think the program has had a really profound impact on the number of students that are interested...in being business majors,” Groomes said. “We are now at the point where our first students who did the program are now becoming to be seniors in college and are doing extremely well in their studies and are getting great internship opportunities and really build that experience that gave them a leg up.”


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Every Thursday during the months of June and July, Herschel's Famous34 Pub and Grill will hand out free chicken sandwiches to the first 34 eligible children to help promote fighting childhood obesity. Erin O. Smith/Staff

Herschel's unveils ‘stepping stone’ menu item By Laura James @laurajames225 Every Thursday during the months of June and July, 34 children ages 5-12 will have the opportunity to eat a healthy meal for free at Herschel’s Famous34 Pub & Grill. In an effort to fight childhood obesity and encourage healthy eating, Herschel’s Famous34 Pub & Grill, located on Clayton Street in downtown Athens, introduced a healthy chicken sandwich to its kid’s menu. On Thursdays, the sandwich can be purchased for $5 after the 34 complimentary sandwiches are given out to children who are accompanied by an adult. On every other day of the week, the sandwich will also be sold for $5. The sandwich contains a low sodium chicken breast, a slice of 2% Milk Reduced-fat Kraft Singles American cheese on a fresh-baked whole-wheat bun from Engelman’s Bakery, served with fresh apples and Planters peanut butter, according to a press release. Also according to the press release, Herschel Walker, a University of Georgia Heisman Trophy winner, expressed his passion for encouraging healthy eat-

ing among children. “As a young child, I was overweight and didn’t have much selfconfidence,” Walker said. “Once I discovered the importance of exercise and eating right, my life improved.” A student at UGA described the healthy components of the meal. “It’s definitely a balanced meal,” said Kylie Woodall, a fourth-year health promotions major from Alpharetta. “It has a protein, a dairy, a complex carb, and a fruit.” Although she said it was a balanced meal, Woodall acknowledged some ways to make the meal even healthier. “I was kind of shocked by the absence of vegetables because that’s one of the things we need to make sure kids are introduced to at a young age and are comfortable with eating,” Woodall said. “They could do something like have celery and apple slices with the peanut butter to get some vegetables on the plate.” Woodall commended the restaurant for their contribution to help combat childhood obesity, but also said their work isn’t over just yet. “It’s a step in the right direction to try to make sure that kid’s

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UGA weighs in on DOMA, Prop 8 court rulings By Stephen Mays @stephen_mays The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 on June 26 that the provision in the federal Defense of Marriage Act defining marriage as between one man and one woman was unconstitutional. Due to that ruling, same-sex couples who are married in the 12 states that have legalized same-sex marriages and the District of Columbia are now offered the same federal benefits as heterosexual partners. That action allows those couples to claims “hundreds or thousands” of benefits previously denied to them, said Hillel Levine, an associate professor in the University of Georgia School of Law. Some of the major benefits same-sex couples in those legalized places will now have access to include those related to Social Security, taxes, health care, housing and veterans’ benefits. “I think the Supreme Court’s decision today was one that was eventually going to happen,” said Nadgey Louis-Charles, a fourth-year biology and psychology major from Alpharetta. “I’m not saying I 100 percent agree or disagree with either side, but we are a generation of change, and today’s decision showed that once again. Today is a day that shows the progression of our rights and our country.” Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the majority opinion for the ruling, saying that DOMA “tells those couples, and all the world, that their otherwise valid marriages are unworthy of federal recognition.” Despite this victory for same-sex couples, the ruling only concerns federal law. States still have the ability, for now, to place parameters on same-sex marriages, evident in the 38 states which have banned same-sex marriages. Jon Hurst, a coordinator with the LGBT Resource Center at UGA said, “Today was a huge victory, but there are a number of battles to come.” Hurst expressed that today was only the beginning of a very long process to see equality across the country — specifically in the states where same-sex marriages have been banned. “I don’t think the Supreme Court just made a good decision today,” Hurst said. “I think they made the right decision.” Logistics for federal recognition in the states that have banned same-sex marriage have yet to be

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2161 W. Broad St. The Supreme Court's rulings on June 26 set a new precedence for same-sex marriages. Courtesy Doug Vinson fully developed. “The court ultimately left the biggest questions open for another day, much as most commentators expected,” Levine said. As well as the case concerning DOMA’s constitutionality, the Supreme Court also took a look at California’s Proposition 8 which banned same-sex marriage in the state. The court dismissed the suit concerning Prop 8 on the grounds that the proponents of the ban had no standing to appeal the lower court’s ruling that Prop 8 was unconstitutional. Same-sex marriages in California are expected to begin again soon. “It doesn’t only come down to money or particular benefits,” Levine said. “There’s a dignity that comes with being recognized by your federal government as equal.”

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BY BRAD MANNION @madbrannion Athens received a greater reputation in medicine when a formalized partnership between the Georgia Regents University and the University of Georgia formed in 2009. The Classic City may gain even more notice in the medical community with the construction of two medical office parks in suburban Athens. These two offices will provide “up to 2,000 health-care workers” with space to work, according an Atlanta Business Chronicle article. This $30 million project will

cover 30 acres and will “include up to 10 buildings including medical office buildings, an assisted living facility and a hotel,” according to the article. It has been roughly one month into construction, and potential tenants have already begun to show interest. “We’ve had several doctors that [are] interested in having their practices there on that property,” Edward R. Nichols, vice president of the Nichols Land and Investment Company, said in the article. Along with today’s doctors, students looking to become doctors have also shown interest in the rising medical reputation of

Athens. “It would definitely appeal to all the pre-medicine students,” said Halie Johnson, a junior biological sciences major from Warner Robins. “The possibility of finding work right after school, or the idea of coming back to the Classic City after med school, is really comforting.” Along with the proximity, Johnson said the thought of being helped by fellow UGA alumni for her medical needs is also a positive factor for the establishment of these medical offices. “Plus,” Johnson said, “who wouldn’t want their local professional medical doctor to be a bulldog?”

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WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Red & Black wants to know what you think — so let’s start a conversation. Email: opinions@randb.com or letters@randb.com Facebook: Like The Red & Black Twitter: @redandblack

Orientation leads to jealousy and nostalgia

‘Mad Men’ popular for many reasons Khadija Dukes

Amber Estes

Guest Columnist

Opinions Editor

A

L

ast week as I was doing homework at the MLC between classes, I noticed that my peers were unusual given the setting. They were younger looking teenagers nervously walking back and forth with whom I could only assume to be their parents. Then it hit me — it must be orientation. I answered several scared moms’ questions about where buildings were and what classes to take. I answered marginally more questions from excited upcoming freshman about what were some organizations to get involved with and what I thought of my freshman year. As I pondered over the latter question, I couldn’t help but get a little bit jealous. Here these 18 year-olds were, about to embark on what would be the most difficult, most frustrating and best year of their entire lives. All I could do was smile, and simply tell them it would be an experience they’d never forget. Freshman year provides a clean slate on which you can decide who you are and where you’re going. The incoming freshmen don’t know this yet, but coming to the University of Georgia changes you. You transition from belonging to some high school chosen largely by location and your parents, to being a part of this amazing institution that gives you the tools and processes by which to succeed — academically and otherwise. When people ask me where I go to school, I can’t help but smile when I answer. I’m so proud to be a Georgia Bulldawg, and in a couple of months these freshman will understand way. They will feel that sense of comradery as they cheer wildly in the student section of home football games. They will feel that sense of accomplishment as they make good grades at one of the most academically prestigious schools in the South. And they will feel that moment of absolute bliss as they call the Dawgs with their friends and perfect strangers alike, just because they share the same smoldering pride for what they once called their college, but has somehow transformed into their home. I can’t help but to think Athens and the university will always have an irreplaceable place in my heart. I found myself here. I grew up here. I learned more about academics, people and life here than I ever thought possible. And it all starts with freshman year. So as I listened to the zealous ramblings of the freshmen who couldn’t fully grasp yet what this place was going to mean to them, I took a minute to be grateful for the hours I’ve cried here, the feats I’ve accomplished here and the lessons I’ve learned here. Go Dawgs. Always. — Amber Estes is a junior from Athens majoring in public relations

JULIE BAILEY/Staff

XBox One still not worth purchasing

Y

ou don’t have to be a hardcore gamer to know that the initial reception of the upcoming XBox One has been extremely negative. For the most part, though, that criticism was well-deserved for a multitude of reasons. One major “feature” that Microsoft has recanted since the E3 gaming convention is that the system would require a one-time hard drive download for all games, which would have effectively wiped out the used games market. The blowback from that facet alone was strong enough that the company pulled a “just kidding.” The other recalled feature was that the XBox One would require a constant Internet connection to play any game, offline or not. That would have required each user to buy an XBox Live subscription, priced at $60 per year. A little extortion never hurt anyone. You could just sense the collective panic of the Microsoft executives when they realized they had gone too far with some of those ridiculous policies. So they made an attempt to fix them. Too late. The fact that Microsoft was either so unaware of how consumers would react — or perhaps cared so little that they would be screwing over a large chunk of its customer base — is almost enough to drive me away entirely. And in fact, it does drive me away entirely when you consider that, in addition to Microsoft’s horrible policies, each person who spends over $500 to get that shiny new XBox One is paying largely for the console’s other features — Netflix, social media connectivity, live television and access to sports programming via ESPN. Being someone who writes about and obviously enjoy sports, you might think that ESPN and live television apps would induce me to stay with Microsoft this fall. However, I already own a TV, which I use to watch sports, that does not cost $499. And I already own a laptop, which I use for social media, that also costs me less than the XBox One. And I already own a gaming system, that I actually use for — wait for it — playing video games! Microsoft barely cares about that aspect of its video game system, evident by the fact that gaming is the fourth category on the XBox One dashboard. (http:// indiestatik.com/wp-content/ uploads/2013/05/Xbox-One-Dashboard. jpg)

Alec Shirkey Sports Editor

I don’t understand it. Have we really reached a point in society where being required to find the input button on the remote is considered an inconvenience? I’m just waiting for Microsoft to require a social security number, bank account and life insurance policy to play XBox One so that it can begin managing my life for me. I know Microsoft is trying to pull off the whole “all in one system” marketing angle. And from what I’ve seen, the company truly believes that when the XBox One comes out, it will be operating on an entirely different level than Sony and Nintendo because of these added features. And I know that, by including the silly Kinect motion-sensor camera, Microsoft is blatantly appealing to families with small children — families that are totally willing to drop $499 on a console which may or may not have an appealing exclusive games list because Zombie Destructo Wars 9 is apparently too intense for little Jimmy. But hey, Kinect is great if you’re type of parent that wants your kid inside all day. Who needs sports? Or sunlight? I don’t care for Kinect — not only because I prefer controllers, but also because I feel ridiculous jumping and waving my arms in front of a TV screen. My neighbors would probably think I’m watching a Richard Simmons instructional video. So for those of you who buy video game consoles to play video games — it’s wild, I know — you’re probably better off going PS4, or even buying a Wii U (compatibility with old systems is a great thing). As for me, I think maybe I’ll break out the old Nintendo 64 and play some games that aren’t filled with 20-minute cut scenes or prepubescent 12 year-olds screaming at their headsets. Mario Kart, anyone? — Alec Shirkey is a senior from Dunwoody majoring in English and finance

MC’s critically acclaimed television series “Mad Men” is set in 1960s New York and centers around advertising man Don Draper and his associates who work at the Sterling Cooper advertising agency. This series not only delves into the ups and downs that are part of the advertising industry, but it also shows how that industry must change with the times. I have heard much praise about this series so I was curious to learn what all the excitement was about. After watching six seasons in one week I can definitely understand why this show is so popular. “Mad Men” is like a 1960’s version of “The Office” — only better. Viewers not only get to see the characters in the office but they also get to see them in their personal lives. Seeing Draper’s troubled childhood and darkest secrets adds depth to his character and the show as a whole. Draper’s protégé, Peggy, and ex-wife Betty are just as interesting as Draper. Both Betty and Peggy are considered old-fashioned and find it difficult to change with the times, yet Peggy has no other choice as the advertising industry is constantly fluctuating. Betty, however, is left to stay stuck in the past. Betty’s childish behavior and subsequent depression and weight gain that follows her separation from Draper reveals how she remains anchored in what used to be. The 1960s was a wonderful decade for fashion and “Mad Men” showcases this perfectly. The neatly-tailored suits worn by Draper exude confidence and let his good looks shine through, showing his desire to be the center of attention and his need to impress women. The perfectly pressed dresses worn by Betty are very Jacqueline Kennedy and demonstrates how she wishes to convey the image of a perfect woman with a perfect life. Draper’s business partner Joan by far has the best style. Joan and her fashion are mirrored after Marilyn Monroe and her image as a sex symbol. “Mad Men” is unlike any other show I have ever seen and I am sure that it will become a classic. As long as this show is running I will continue to be inspired by the amazing fashion, continue to be intrigued by the complex characters and continue to be mesmerized by the superb casting. — Khadija Dukes is a sophomore from Conyers majoring in journalism and comparative literature

Opinion Meter: The week that was

Dawgs snatch Dukes: Linebacker

Detric Dukes committed to Georgia on Sunday after recanting his commit to Louisville. Dukes is a three star recruit from Tucker High School in Atlanta. With Dukes, the 2014 recruiting class has 11 players.

The honeymoon is over: The University of Georgia Foundation’s executive committee voted not to fund full-health insurance benefits for domestic partners of UGA employees. This denial of benefits may be a turn-off for potential employees since so many other universities do provide these perks.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

Editor In Chief: Gabriel Ram Managing Editor: Taylor Sutton News Editor: Brad Mannion Associate News Editor: Stephen Mays Sports Editor: Alec Shirkey Associate Sports Editor: Luke Dixon Variety Editor: Chelsey Abercrombie Associate Variety Editor: Colby Newton Opinions Editor: Amber Estes Photo Editor: Erin Smith Design Editor: Caitlin LeMoine Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales

Herschel’s does healthy:

Herschel’s Famous 34 Pub & Grill will be giving 34 children a free healthy meal every Thursday during June and July. The grilled chicken sandwich will appear on the kid’s menu everyday in an attempt to promote healthy eating among children.

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

Shark week: an important time for television and people everywhere

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ere’s some advice I wish I would’ve got when I was your age...Live every week like it’s Shark Week.”- “30 Rock’s” Tracy Jordan With Shark Week quickly approaching this summer, I thought it important to stress the gravity of this event. First conceived as a means to promote shark awareness, due to what I can only assume was the public’s dwindling interest in the “Jaws” franchise, Shark Week premiered on July 17, 1987 and has since become a yearly staple of The Discovery Channel. Over time, this week long event has gained a considerable amount of traction. The series maintains a solid average rating of 7.6/10 on the popular online movie database IMDB, and is frequently hosted by celebrities such as “Saturday Night Live’s” Andy Samberg, the “Mythbusters” duo Adam Savage/Jamie Hyneman as well as “The Late Late Show’s” Craig Ferguson. There is no doubt that Shark Week has been a rousing success, but that success can only be attributed to the series’ tremendous societal importance. Unfortunately, television today is absolutely inundated with “reality” shows that are entirely lacking in substance and meaning. Without complaint, we’ve allowed scripted accounts of pawn shops, beauty pageants and duck calls to be thrust upon us. Yet this cultural wasteland has, at the very least, given Shark Week as a sharp relief against its peers. The series stands tall among the wreckage, a

Jackson Moore-Ragusin Guest Columnist

shining monument to humanity’s ability to overcome. Though we may live in an age in which the face of the moon is more familiar to us than the bottom of the ocean, Shark Week valiantly defies the 70 percent of the earth’s surface that has yet to be conquered. Today’s world needs Shark Week now more than it ever has before. Our lives are constantly threatened by a myriad of sinister forces — the stress of living in constant fear of government spying, terrorism and financial crises has begun to take its toll. These issues are dividing us, splitting the world into factions as we bicker over what matters are most pressing. With such an excess of infighting, there are a precious few things in this world that can provide us with common ground to stand on. Thankfully, The Discovery Channel gives cable subscribers everywhere an opportunity to rally together, and unite against a single common enemy. The Discovery Channel does not deal with abstract concepts and issues, but a single, physical threat. Although Shark Week may allude to the idea of conservation and protection of sharks, the underly-

ing message is clear — there is only room on this planet for one of these two species. Pitted against a shark in its natural habitat, a single human is easily overwhelmed. In fact, sharks have been clocked at swimming 20 miles per hour, possess rows upon rows of razor sharp teeth and do not know the meaning of the word mercy. Given this information, how are we to pretend that these creatures are anything but godless killing machines with an unquenchable bloodlust? Perhaps all of this could be excused, were it not for the fact that the beach is a universally recognized vacation destination. What was intended to be a place of relaxation, a period of time that could provide punctuation for your long stretches of fear and uncertainty, is instead spent in fear of a shark attack. Vacations, those too-few sacrosanct moments we’re allotted each year, are in grave danger. If we value any respite from the monotony of our day to day lives, we will interrupt our regularly scheduled programming and watch Shark Week. — Jackson Moore-Ragusin is a junior from Acworth majoring in English

Don’t die with regrets – the time to act is now

S

aturday night, as I was scrolling through my Facebook news feed, I came across a link to an article entitled “The Top 5 Regrets of the Dying.” As I read through the list, I realized that these were common themes I’d heard about often times before. The top two regrets struck me the most. Second Most Regret: “I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.” One thing that has been instilled in me from the time I was young is that money doesn’t buy happiness. There are many cases of famous, wealthy people who have ultimately fallen from their celebrity status, crashed and burned. Their lives were centered around making a dollar, and they had no true fulfillment in anything. I’m well aware that money is an important thing to have, but what about happiness? Is it just a myth? My answer is no, it isn’t. I’m a firm believer that life can be enjoyed by anyone as long as they are willing to make it more enjoyable for themselves. This all-out desire for wealth and prosperity has caused a great moral and ethical decline in this world over the last several years. While there are many stories

Justin Hubbard Guest Columnist

of people helping one another and showing genuine love and support for others, the vast majority of society, it seems, is out to become as rich as they can, and don’t care at all about their fellow man. I believe that if we all started caring for others a little more and cut back on our selfish desires we can see positive change in this world. First Most Regret: “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.” Something that has always bothered me is that some people want you to be solely who they want you to be, rather than allowing you to become your own person. Over the last few years, I’ve grown much bolder in my own personal beliefs, goals and aspirations. I am who I am, and couldn’t care less what anyone thinks about it. Sadly, many people today aren’t like that. Don’t get me wrong — I’m certainly not saying I’m better than anyone. I just hate the fact

that individualism is a fading concept these days. There are many people who are pursuing degrees and careers all because someone else told them to do so. These people are trying to please their parents, friends or any significant others they have. There will always be expectations for people to meet, but I believe that we should all make our own decisions. This world needs different, unique people, and a lot of times that comes about by going against the norm and challenging what ”society” expects of us. If you want to become an artist, do it. If you want to be an archaeologist, outstanding. And, if you’re like me, and you want to become a reporter and/or commentator for a professional baseball team, don’t listen to the critics who tell you that you don’t have the “look,” or that your southern accent is just a little too strong. We’re not perfect beings, but we can do great things with the abilities that we possess. Don’t wait until the end and have regrets — the time to act is now.

Terry believes business is part of the community. Major in

— Justin Hubbard is a sophomore from Union Point majoring in digital and broadcast journalism

FINANCE

It’s more than stock trading...

Texting puts an artificial spin on communication

A

few nights ago, I received a frantic phone call from my best friend asking why I was mad at her. I was instantly confused because I wasn’t, in fact, mad at her, and I didn’t comprehend how she had come to that conclusion. After a couple of minutes, I found out it’s because I responded to a text message she sent me earlier in the day with “Ok.” I wanted to laugh at this reason, but then I realized that this is product of our culture. Our conversations are dominated by texting — a form of communication that leaves us guessing at hidden meanings that most likely don’t even exist. Due to my usually enthusiastic style of texting, she found my absence of exclamation points and elaboration on whatever subject it was to be indicative of a rift. Such an instant, impersonal method of exchange makes for frequent misinterpretations. Fights easily manifest simply because people get their feelings hurt over exchanges that are meant to be nothing but amicable. Texting lacks tone, facial expression and body language — all of which are integral parts of human interaction. How can you expect to have a meaningful conversation with someone while staring at the screen of a phone? Even though texting is convenient, it’s not used only in opportune moments, but instead as the sole method by which some people talk.

terry.uga.edu/finance

Amber Estes

Opinions Editor

I have friends who hate to talk on the phone — they claim it’s uncomfortable. We’ve become so dependent on being able to type instead of talk that hearing a fellow human’s voice has become awkward when the alternative is available. The intrinsic value gained from putting your arm around a friend or receiving a big smile from a loved one is lost to text emojis and excessive punctuations. Don’t get me wrong — I’m extremely thankful for technology and all of the ways it’s improved our quality of life. I appreciate texting and how it allows us to communicate when speaking isn’t an option. Even though I’m grateful for technology and texting, I still resent the artificial spin it has put on communication. There’s something to be said about the proximity of a loved one during an important conversation or a hard time. And that something can’t be felt through letters on a screen. — Amber Estes is a junior from Athens majoring in public relations

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

Oglethorpe windows made ‘inoperable’ BY BRAD MANNION @madbrannion The summer of 2013 will welcome the newly renovated Rutherford Hall, with a dedication ceremony on June 27. Other renovations at the Unversity of Georgia include the changes made on Oglethorpe House, but not everyone may see them as improvements. “The windows have been completely replaced in all of the building, and the new windows are not operable,” said Arzu Yilmaz, project manager for the Oglethorpe House renovations. The reason draws to fiscal responsibility and climate balance within the residence hall. “The reason is to maintain the climate control within the building by building new units inside the rooms,” Yilmaz said, “so when you open one window, that changes the balance of the whole building.” While this may raise concern of safety hazard, Gerry Kowalski, executive director of University Housing, said the right precautions were taken before taking on this $5 million budgeted project. “If there was a major safety hazard, we wouldn’t be able to do it by code,” Kowalski said. “This is a project that will eventually be reviewed by the state fire marshal, and we wouldn’t go through the expense of that kind of replacement if we somehow thought there would be a problem at the end of the process. Because our mission is safe, comfortable and affordable, we wouldn’t do anything that creates

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a health or safety issue for students as we do a renovation.” He even said the idea is common among structures. The reason for this change, Kowalski said, was to make the over 40-year-old residence hall work with a better “efficiency” with student preferences also taken into consideration. “The windows were a very important part of the upgrade, in addition to complete new heating, cooling and fresh air makeup in the building,” Kowalski said. “There’s an opportunity to filter some of the sun rays and cut down on solar heat gain in the rooms, so a lot of the things we’re doing is based on student comfort.” Oglethorpe House will undergo installing these “upgrades” in two separate sessions — once during the summer of 2013 and the second during the folowwing summer — in order to “keep the facility in operation during the 2013-14 school year,” according to the University Architects' website. Along with the windows, the residence hall will involve basic mechanical, electrical and plumbing upgrades. Due to its age, Oglethorpe has undergone these renovations, so residence halls such as the newly constructed Rutherford Hall will not face this issue. Thanks to a unique system it shares with few residence halls at UGA, Rutherford Hall will serve as an energy-efficient building with in advanced system to cut costs. “We have a system in place in that building that is similar to that of Building 1516, which is when a student opens a window, the air conditioning unit in that room is shut down,” Kowalski said. “The building operates most efficiently if the entire building envelope is sealed. If you were on a ship, and you have a small leak...you’re going to try to close that leak because that small leak could potentially be damaging to the entire ship. It won’t be lethal and life-changing if we open a window, but the point is it operates best when the envelope is sealed.”

Oglethorpe House is in the process of upgrading mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems, along with installing inoperable windows. Erin O. smith/Staff

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By Brad Mannion @madbrannion The University of Georgia chapter of the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity lost someone who many would consider the 134th member of its organization. Larry Foote, house manager for the KA fraternity, passed away earlier this month, and with his passing, Foote has left a long legacy to be remembered by many of the fraternity’s brothers. “He was here I think in ‘82 or ‘81, so he’s been here for 30+ years,” said Hamilton Harbin, a senior finance major from Augusta and president of the KA Order fraternity. “He started out as our janitor, and he was so well liked that he was initiated like 20 years ago.” As manager, Foote helped with the sustenance of the fraternity house. “A house manager generally keeps up with the maintenance of the house,” said Will Douglas, advisor for the Interfraternity Council, “and even though nowadays it is much more common for a member of the chapter to fill that role, he stayed with the organization

The Kappa Alpha Order fraternity at the University of Georgia mourned the death of its house manager, Larry Foote. A funeral for Foote, which drew in current and past fraternity brothers, was held on June 24. Erin o. smith/Staff for such a long time that they sort of made him their manager.” Harbin admired his ability to single-handedly maintain the upkeep of the organization’s house. “People usually have cleaning crews, but he was the sole

man in charge,” Harbin said. Although he stopped helping with house maintenance due to old age, Foote still remained active with many members of the fraternity. “When he was something like 50 years

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old,” Harbin said. “he couldn’t clean the house, but he would come and hang around with the guys.” Both students and alumni recognized Foote as an excellent addition to Kappa Alpha. “He was born in Athens and has been a character around UGA for a long time,” said Matthew Molony, a UGA alumnus and former member of the fraternity, in an email to The Red & Black. A funeral for Foote was held on June 24, where current brothers and “all kinds of alumni” joined to mourn the loss of such a close friend to the fraternity, Harbin said. Reminiscing on the past, Harbin recalled one of many stories by which Foote will be remembered. “There’s about a million — anyone can tell you a funny story,” he said. “You’d be walking down the road, and you’d see Foote driving your car because he would just take the keys and do whatever he wants, and it wasn’t a big deal.” For many, Foote will be remembered as just the Kappa Alpha Order house manager. But for others, he will be remembered as a “character” who left his mark on the people of UGA. “Everybody that interacted with him had the pleasure to hang out with him and really enjoy his presence,” Harbin said. “He was one of our family, and he will be missed around our chapter. He’s one of a kind.”


7 News

Thursday, June 27, 2013

UGA student sues over photo By Brad Mannion @madbrannion A University of Georgia student has filed a lawsuit against a school administrator for using a Facebook photo of her in a presentation at a Georgia high school. C h e l s e a Chaney, a freshman at UGA, posted a photo on Facebook of herself wearing a “two-piece bikini next to a cardboard cutout of legendary rapper Snoop Dogg,” according to Yahoo! News article. The technical director of Starr’s Mill High School then used the photo — without

receiving or trying to receive Chaney’s or her parents’ permission – in a seminar. According to the news article, the picture was taken when Chaney was “a student at the school and a minor,” and the caption with the picture allegedly stated, “Once it’s there, it’s there to stay.” “I was embarrassed. I was horrified,” Chaney said to WSB-TV. “It never crossed my mind that it would ever — that this would ever happen to me.” While a school official has apologized to Chaney, saying it was “randomly chosen,”

The Red and Black

Bowman suspect indicted By Brad Mannion @madbrannion

A UGA freshman has filed a lawsuit against a high school for using a Facebook photo without permission. Graphic by Erin O. Smith Chaney was still skeptical of how random it was. As a result, Chaney’s attorney, Pete Wellborn, “filed a lawsuit on her behalf for $2 million” under the reason that “a

person does not cede rights to others by posting images on Internet sites such as Facebook,” according to the news article. “Their idea that putting something

on Facebook gives them a license to steal it and carte blanche to do with it what they did is wrong ethically, it’s wrong morally and it’s absolutely wrong legally,” Wellborn said.

William Wilson Heaton Jr., the man accused of fleeing the scene where a woman suffered severe brain damage after she was struck by a car, was indicted by a Clarke County Superior Court grand jury earlier this week. Heaton was charged with six counts of serious injury by vehicle, one count of driving under the influence, one count of driving with an unlawful alcohol concentration, one count of reckless driving, one count of leaving the scene of an accident involving serious injury, one count of failure to report accident resulting in injury, one count of failure to maintain lane and one count of open container, as stated in the indictment. Emily Bowman, the woman struck by the

HEATON vehicle allegedly driven by Heaton on Feb. 16, was left with serious brain damage, rendering her body “useless,” as stated in the indictment. Bowman, a student of Kennesaw State University, was visiting Athens to celebrate a friend’s birthday when she suffered severe brain damage, a broken pelvis and hip and went into a coma. Heaton was named a suspect on March 3, and the indictment was filed June 18.

BENEFITS: Despite UGA Foundation's denial to grant coverage, Frick remains ‘hopeful’ ➤ From Page 1 A proposal for domestic partner benefits was drawn up in 2005, and UGA met it with granting domestic partners a UGA card — a card allowing access to certain areas of the school. “It would allow access into [the Ramsey Student Center]…it would let you go to UGA-only events, it would let you check out a book,” Frick said. “They were very small things, and we thought ‘whooptydo.’” It was not until May 2013 when soft benefits – including vision, dental and accidental death and dismemberment coverage — were granted for domestic partners, at the expense of the UGA employee and no other entity. Providing hard benefits, however, would include the school to provide funding — which is what the foundation refused to do. But the foundation is not the only source of money to grant domestic partner benefits. “That was one way to do it, and that’s not going to work — let’s see what other options are on the table,” Frick said. Suggestions have been made to utilize funds from different organizations, such as the athletic association, to provide the benefits, but much like with the foundation, the setbacks are the employees paid by the state.

“They have the same issues,” Jackson said. “All areas have this problem because all of our supporting organizations have state paid employees.” The UGA Foundation does not recognize the need to provide what are known as hard benefits for unmarried partners of UGA employees, much like how the state of Georgia does not recognize marital status for samesex couples. No public institution in the state of Georgia has granted hard benefits to domestic partners, but peer institutions, such as the University of Florida, recognize Jackson domestic partner benefits while their state bans same-sex marriages. While the policy not to affect state funds remains the same in Florida, UF has still managed to provide coverage for domestic partners through its different sources of revenue. “The institutional benefits for domestic partners are paid with non-state dollars that the University of Florida has access to,” said Janine Sikes, assistant vice president for media relations and public affairs at the University of Florida. At the time, UGA has not found any alternatives for providing coverage.

“There’s not an apparent alternative, and I can not say what the next step is,” Jackson said. “I think we’ve gone as far as we can on this particular path.” The Supreme Court, having struck down California’s Proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act on June 26, has left Frick hopeful for future change. “While I was initially upset, I would say now I’m more hopeful,” she said. This decision could put UGA at risk of recruiting and keeping faculty, staff and even students. “I would say I think that UGA tends to be very cautious when it comes to moving in new directions,” Frick said, “but I think caution on this particular issue is highly detrimental to our national reputation.” Advocacy from administration, though minimal in some people’s minds, was met with a “wall,” preventing any more push to approve these benefits. “We pushed it to this point in administration, but it looks like we have gone as far as we can go,” Jackson said. Until these hard benefits are granted to domestic partners, Frick said she will continue to advocate against what she considers an “embarrassment” for a top-ranked institution. “In light of [June 26’s] Supreme Court ruling,” she said, “the long arc toward equality is moving forward, and we don’t want to be left behind.”


8 Variety

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

AthFest Rewind

ERIN O. SMITH/Staff

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Performers and spectators alike eagerly took in the sounds, sights and excitement of AthFest 2013. Bronson Tew of Lassine Kouyate (top left), Page Campbell of Patterson Hood and the Downtown Mystic Rumblers (top right), Matt McDonald of Ghost Owl (bottom left) and a bevy of crowd surfers (bottom right) were all high points of AthFest.

TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

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ERIN O. SMITH/Staff

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9 Variety

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

AthFest Rewind

TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

ERIN O. SMITH/Staff

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10 Variety

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The Red and Black

Animated film, television move up to the college level By Colby Newton The Red & Black For much of its history, American animation has been an afterthought of a medium, good for entertaining children and filling time on Saturday mornings but hardly acceptable for an adult to seriously consume. In the last few years, though, there has been a sea change in the mainstream acceptance of animation; suddenly, college students who 10 years prior would have rolled their eyes at the idea of watching a cartoon are salivating over the next episode of “Adventure Time.” Disney viewing parties are a regular event in freshman dorms, and the release of the latest Pixar or Dreamworks film is an event at least on par with the latest studio blockbuster. With the continually high ratings of animated television among college students and the recent $136 million opening of Disney-Pixar’s “Monsters University,” it’s worth asking: just how did animation break out of the children’s entertainment ghetto and become such a profitable, popular form of expression? As with most success stories, it all started with “The Simpsons.” While animated shows like “The Flintstones” aired in primetime before, “The Simpsons” was the first truly adultoriented animation to be broadcast nationwide, and viewer response was through the roof. “The Simpsons” rode a wave of popularity and viewer goodwill to become the longest-running show on network television – and paved the way for more adult-geared animation to rise in its wake. Animated features, meanwhile, continued to languish. While Disney saw some success with its 1990s slate of animated features (particularly “The Lion King”) the public perception of animated film still seemed to rest firmly on the idea of children’s animation. It wasn’t until 1997 and the breakout of CGI-loving Pixar Studios that animated features would truly become a respected medium. “’Toy Story’ was really the biggest thing for animation in the past 20 years,” said Richard Neupert, a University of Georgia professor of film and theatre studies. “All these animated TV shows sort of told people that it was okay to go see animated movies… ‘Toy Story’ built on that.” After “Toy Story,” Pixar was the darling of the animated — and film — world. Critics loved its films for their wellwritten stories and clean-cut animation, and audiences loved them for their relatable characters and clever, easy humor. The studio’s profits rose year after year, and as the creators became more financially stable, the films became riskier and more experimental. Meanwhile, Pixar attracted its own set of imitators, hoping to cash in on the sudden popularity of animated films. “The thing is, these are hugely expensive movies to make,” Neupert said. “It costs so much to put together a rig for these characters… if the film doesn’t have good storytelling to back it up, then it’s

WHAT: Photo Ops, Foe Destroyer and Little Francis WHERE: The World Famous WHEN: June 27 at 9 p.m. PRICE: $5

Photo Ops reflects on dark times By Jake Goodman The Red& Black

Everybody's favorite scary monsters return as college students in 'Monsters University,' a prequel to Pixar's 'Monsters Inc.' Animation is no longer just for kids, as many college students now list animated shows among their favorites. Courtesy Disney-Pixar going to fail.” Storytelling is what’s generally set Pixar apart from its host of mimics; too often an afterthought for animators concerned with clever visuals and bright colors, the stories Pixar tells resonate with audiences in a way that all the pop-culture references in the world can’t. “One thing I always tell my students is that storytelling is the most important part of making an animated feature,” said Mike Hussey, head of UGA’s animation department. “The best thing to do in the animation business is to become a creator of content… you don’t want to be an animator your whole life.” Of course, Pixar’s rise to success hasn’t come soley from its storytelling abilities; a generation of children who grew up on classic Disney animations suddenly found themselves in their teens and 20’s with money to spend and nostalgia hitting hard. “When [Toy Story 3] came out, people our age were kind of moving away from

animation,” Connor Cuevas, a UGA film student, said. “Afterwards, people started to remember why they liked animation so much. You saw stuff like ‘Adventure Time’ and ‘Regular Show’ got really big around that time, too.” The rise of collegiate interest in animated television may have been spurred by “Toy Story,” but it’s developed a culture all its own: from the semi-ironic “Brony” culture to “Adventure Time” hats sprouting up everywhere, animated television is the most popular it’s been in years — and just like the movies, it can be traced back to nostalgia and storytelling. “Kids our age, they grew up on stuff like ‘Dexter’s Lab’ and ‘Samurai Jack’ that tried to be better than older cartoons.” Cuevas said. “These shows are just the next level of that.” Rather than being taken as a sign of arrested development or immaturity, an interest in animation is now seen as simply another facet of the college experience, and we seem to be the better for it.

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Nashville-native Terry Price experienced more hardship in one part of his life than some people do in all their time on earth, the kind of hardship that would knock the average musician down and leave them there permanently. But Terry Price is not an average musician. In 2010, Price’s band, Oblio, a Nashvillebased rock trio, broke up after six years, around the same time that his father passed away. And as if that wasn’t enough, Price was then diagnosed with Bell’s Palsy, which paralyzed several muscles in various parts of his face. During these troubling times, Price channeled himself into his music, discovering how it became his main source of relief from the troubles of the world. “I found myself alone, in my life, and so I retreated and just wrote”, Price said. After compiling the most meaningful and powerful songs, he created his debut album “How To Say Goodbye” under the band name Photo Ops. Price describes Photo Ops’ music as a blend of indie, rock, and folk. Some of his musical influences include Paul Simon, Neil Young, The Beatles, Tom Petty and Neil Diamond. Each song off the album conveys the emotion Terry felt during the most difficult times of his life. “I wanted to make sure each song would hit you on the head, and roll smoothly”, Price said. For Price, the most meaningful song on the album was “February Ocean Breeze.” “I wanted to write a song to capture this day… we went to the beach and as soon as we got to the beach, I just burst into tears and it all hit me: my father was gone”, Price said. After his father’s death, Price discovered a collection of beautiful photographs from a trip across the United States that his father took in the 1970s. The photographs became the inspiration for his new band’s name. “He took all of these beautiful Polaroids of the country, like Manhattan, San Francisco, the Golden Gate Bridge, and originally I was going to call it ‘Photo Opportunities’”, Price said. Photo Ops, for the most part, is solely the writings and recording of Price, who plays nearly every instrument on the album. “I got my first guitar when I was twelve”, Price said. “I can play the bass, guitar, piano and drums. I can find my way around on a lot of instruments.” What inspired Price to choose the overarching theme of Photo Ops’ debut album, a catalog which he will perform much of during his upcoming stint at the The World Famous, isn’t difficult to understand. “The album is about rowing up and saying goodbye to your father, your friends, people you trusted and knew… just saying goodbye to youth,” Price said.


11 Variety

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

Visit the closet of a lifetime with the GMOA

WHAT: Fashion Independent: The Original Style of Ann Bonfoey Taylor WHEN: June 1- September 14 WHERE: The Georgia Museum of Art

By Gabrielle Baylor The Red & Black Jetsetter, Olympic-level athlete, female pilot and inventor of the fannypack — the Georgia Museum of Art is pleased to introduce the University of Georgia to the fearless style icon, Ann Bonfoey Taylor. The exhibit “Fashion Independent: The Original Style of Ann Bonfoey Taylor” will be at the GMOA from June 1 to September 14. With nearly 200 items, a short documentary, and enlarged snapshots by fashion photographer Toni Frissell, this is the museum’s first major fashion exhibit and hopefully a preview of things to come. Taylor is best known for her fashionable skiwear and collaborative couture designs with top fashion minds like the Spanish Basque designer Cristóbal Balenciaga, America’s first couturier Charles James, the infamous Hubert de Givenchy and many more. The exhibit spans from the 1930s to the 1970s and includes elegant eveningwear, innovative skiwear, casual sportswear and beautiful boots. “When you first walk into the exhi-

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Fashion Independent: The Original Style of Ann Bonfoey Taylor will hopefully function as a successful test-run for GMOA's fashion aspirations. Heather Pitts/Staff bition [you see] her lists of rules on the wall: no red lipstick, only pink; you’re not done until your hair is done. So she clearly had ideas and stuck to them,” said Hillary Brown, the Director of Communication of the Georgia Museum of Art. Taylor’s adventures clearly served as inspiration in her fashion designs. A woman with a lifelong passion for physical activity, her designs are comfortable and do not constrict but flow with the body. Her eveningwear is pure Americana with a special devo-

tion to the female form. When admiring the luxurious gowns, one is struck by the cleanly curved lines that emphasize and celebrate the breasts and hips, a trait not often found in modern couture. Taylor’s divine boot collection, which any shoe aficionado would envy, expresses her rugged determination and world-traveling nature. Her engraved Givenchy bags and accessories highlight her aristocratic lifestyle. “It kind of tells a story the way you go through the exhibition. You start

out by going through the first two galleries where you learn more about her life and her story, then the skiwear, the military outfits that she did and then you get more into the couture that she patronizes, and you finish up with the evening wear, which I think for many people that’s the highlight of the show,” Brown said. GMOA director William Underwood Eiland was impressed with the collection during a visit to Phoenix, and worked to bring the exhibit to Athens. Executing the exhibit has been a valuable experience for the museum, which seeks to host more major fashion exhibits in the future. “We have talked and made some steps toward doing an exhibition of Emilio Pucci’s work," Brown said. “He actually has a connection to UGA. He was Italian royalty but he came here in the 30’s to study the animal husbandry program, so we’re hoping to do something with that. It’s a lot to put on a big show like that and to draw things from all over the place, but we’re working on it.”

Double Dutch Press works with artists to produce work that is anything but [blank] By Chelsey Abercrombie @comma_freak When you picture a stereotypical artist, he’s probably a lone beretwearing guy standing at an easel in the corner of a dark room. But the [blank] project by Double Dutch Press, a joint venture between several local artists and the Prince Avenue printmaking stuio, proves that art can be a collaborative effort. “We have asked ten artists to send us designs specifically for this project, and it can be anything they want,” Burk said. “They just have a size perimeter to work within.” Five local artists participated in the current installation. “My role is essentially to create the artwork, choose the color, create the drawing, choose the scale, and then they make the screens and print the prints,” said Brian Hitselberger, an Athens-based artist and professor of painting and drawing at Piedmont College. Hitselberger’s print was inspired by a recent trip to an artist’s retreat located in Rabun Gap, Georgia. “There was a chainlink fence that had been punctured by something, just one of those things that caught my eye,” Hitselberger said. “There was this continuous grid of perfect geometric lines with this round shape missing in the middle. I just found it really beautiful.” Hitselberger’s sketches from his retreat became “Lacuna,” a four color screen print for [blank]. Eleanor Davis, an Athens-based cartoonist and illustrator whose work has appeared in The New York Times, BusinessWeek and The Guardian, also contributed a print to the current installation. Davis’ print, “Mulberry,” a six color screen print, depicts men doing strenuous labor on one side, surrounded by male mulberry trees, while the other side depicts women caring for children surrounded by female mulberry trees. “Most plants aren’t gendered,” Davis said, of her inspiration. “I’m just interested in gender and gender roles, and the positive and negative feelings associated with gender roles.” The process of creating the prints, whereby artists submit their work to Burk and Burk’s co-operator, Katherine McGuire, to create the actual prints, is somewhat unusual in the art world. Normally

artists create their work and print it themselves. The artist of the current [blank] installation range in profession from cartoonists to tattoo artists to professors, which insured a variety of subjects and styles for Maguire and Burk to work with in the printing process. “They’re not neces-

sarily pieces that are typical screen prints. We’ve been given challenges by those artists, which is really fun,” Burk said. Maguire and Burk print exactly 30 copies of each print, which are currently being sold for $50 each in their studio. Several pieces from [blank] are also on display in the MAKE:

Paper & Print Works gallery currently on display at Hotel Indigo. Curated by Didi Dunphy, the pieces will be on display through August 20. While [blank] is currently the biggest project at Double Dutch Press, reaching out into the artistic community is only one way of accomplishing the stu-

dio’s larger goal. “We want to generate a fine printmaking resurgence," Burk said. “We wanted to kind of access artists that maybe don’t do a lot of printmaking and open up that door to them, but also make art accessible for the public, too.” Artists stand to benefit just as much as

Katherine and Amanda. “Three weeks ago this thing was an idea in my mind, and now it’s real. This idea that I have exists in the physical world — that never starts getting old,” Hitselberger said. “The interesting thing with this particular process was that it was someone else who brought it there.”


12 Variety

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

Farm 255 to close its doors after eight years of organic goodness By Chelsey Abercrombie @comma_freak One of Athens’ favorite sustainable living staples, Farm 255, is closing its doors after eight years. “Over the past few years, Farm 255’s partners moved away from Athens and on to other opportunities in food and agriculture,” said Kate Venugopal, one of Farm 255’s several co-owners. “We felt the location could be better utilized as a community asset if operated by a local community member.” The decision to close the Washington Street restaurant was not a simple one. “Given that Farm 255 had become such a mainstay in the community, it was not an easy decision, and one that required many months of deliberation,” Venugopal said. Farm 255 experienced its fair share of ups and downs in its eight years. “One of the greatest challenges of running a restaurant is maintaining consistency,” Venugopal said. “We have been fortunate to have an amazing staff over the years to help achieve this.” Good memories are equally as vivid for Farm 255’s former staff, such as when the restaurant was filled with revelers during the 2006 World Cup. “The restaurant was packed wall-to-wall and had a great energy,” Venugopal said. Farm 255’s last day of operation will be July 19, after which Juan and Vanessa Molina, owners of Broad Street Coffee, will take over the space. Venugopal said the deal brokered between Farm 255 and the Molinas was an average real estate transaction that was executed without issue. “We worked through negotiations with Broad Street Coffee for several weeks to reach an arrangement that was suitable for all parties involved,” Venugopal said. “As with most real estate deals, there were many details to take into account.”

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Farm 255, which prided itslef on featuring farm-grown, locally and responsibly sourced ingredients for its cuisine, will officially become the fully vegan restaurant China Cat Sunflower on August 1. SEan Taylor /Staff Farm 255’s bevy of co-owners and operators have moved on both to other opportunties and other zipcodes. Farmer Jason Mann will remain at the helm of developing Farm Burger Enterprises and currently resides in San Diego. Olivia Sargeant was recently married and now divides her time between California and Italy, working as a consultant for food and farming businesses. Venugopal is employed with the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance in San Francisco. Jerid Grandinetti now works for Dunkin Brands International and lives outside of Boston. Juan and Vanessa Molina, owners of Broad Street Coffee, will be closing their Broad Street location before they move into the Farm 255 space.

STREETS: Streets Café blazes trail for future food truck initiatives Store #: GA04

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Customers have to go mobile to get the full Streets Café experience. Store #: GA08 Store #: GA09 “The [most fun] part is actually being on the truck,” Morgan said. “Once you’re there and everything is set up and good to go, just cooking for the customers is by far — it’s hot, sweaty work—but it’s instantly gratifying.” Morgan Atlanta worked in severalColumbus 3167 Peachtree Rd 1358 13th St restaurants in Athens before(706) the (404) 233-1989 323-0700 birth of his first child spurred his desire to open Streets Café. “IStore decided #: GA12 it was time toStore #: GA13 take the plunge because we had a child, who’s going to be three in July,” Morgan said. “Literally the truck was purchased and was supposed to be up and running before he was born, and it took me three years to get it legitimized in town.” Streets be Macon Café can regularly Atlanta Dr 2480 Briarcliff Rd found2440 onRiverside weekends until 2 a.m. (478) 745-8980 (404) 329-1999 around downtown, but operatStore #: GA16

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Ryan Morgan and Streets Café's global-inspired cuisine can be found around downtown on weekends until 2 a.m. Taylor CRAIG Sutton/Staff ing his business wasn’t always easy. “In the Caledonia lot three years ago was my first opening. I moved to 40 Watt for a period of time, then I got a citation from the Health Department because I wasn’t legit,” Morgan said. According to Morgan, foodrelated laws passed ahead of the 1996 Summer Olympics make it nearly impossible for a food truck to become legitimized by the Health Department. “I’m pretty sure I’m the first one since 1996 that’s solely a truck, not connected to a restaurant,” Morgan said. “For the Olympics they rewrote the laws so people couldn’t just pull over

on the side of [state route] 400 and serve food.” Morgan's ultimate goal is to open up an Athens-based food truck park. “I’m actively now trying to put together a food truck park with this other lady,” Morgan said. “I’ve had a couple people come by the commissary to see how it’s done the way [the Health Department] wants it, so that gives them something to see what they’re up against.” Despite the odds, Morgan has high hopes for both his Athens food truck park. “Apparently opening the food truck wasn’t really possible,” Morgan said, “but I did it.”

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Hendershot’s Coffee gains size, green room in move

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2440 Riverside Dr (478) 745-8980

“We bought the assets for Farm 255,” Vanessa Molina said. The Molinas’ new venue, China Cat Sunflower, will serve the same Vegan fare, but it will also feature an expanded menu and a Sunday brunch. China Cat Sunflower will open August 1. While Athenians might miss the grass-fed and antibiotic-free smorgeshboard that was Farm 255, the owners are leaving the space knowing it is the best thing for the community at large. “It’s hard to part with something you created and watched grow up into a thriving business,” Venugopal said, “but ultimately we knew it was the right thing to do for the community.”

After three years of Savannah serving coffee, cock8108up Abercorn St (912) 921-2199 tails and the cream of the local music scene, Hendershot’s Coffee is moving to a brand-new location. The Athens institution announced the move back in March, after a parking dispute with neighbor Transmetropolitan forced the hand of owner Seth Hendershot. The shop, which has gained a reputation as one of Athens’ best-kept secrets, will be moving

to a brand-new, much larger location in the Bottleworks complex on Prince Avenue. It’s a St. Simons Isle bold move for the out2463 Demere Rd (912) 634-2002 skirts coffee shop, but one that Hendershot hopes will pay off. “We have a fanbase, and that’s important,” Hendershot said. “This new place is in between downtown and Normaltown and everything. We’re in this nice little pocket where everybody can access us.” Almost twice the size of the original, the upgraded Hendershot’s features an expanded kitchen, more impres-

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sive bar service, and a newly-constructed green room for visiting artists. “What we found in the old place is that when we had good music and good people, those were our best nights,” Hendershot said. “We’ll be that sort of mid-level club that might attract a national act who’s doing his own thing... if Frank Black were to quit the Pixies and go solo, he could come here. In fact, I’m officially inviting him.” The new location also boasts an expanded version of the classic

Hendershot’s stage — transported piece from the old location — and a pizza oven. Hendershot’s old location will serve its last lattés on June 28 before closing for good. The new location will have a soft opening in the second week of July before its grand reopening August 19, the three-year anniversary of the original location’s opening. “We’ve got a lot of people that like this place, and we think they’ll follow us,” Hendershot said. “I think this will affect us in a positive way.”


13 Sports

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

SCOUTING REPORT: JACOB PARK BY JUSTIN HUBBARD @JHubb93 Park is an athletic signal-caller with a quick but strong delivery on his throws, and possesses superb accuracy on short and mid-range throws. There were multiple instances in his junior year in which Park displayed the ability to squeeze the ball into tight coverages over the middle. ESPN’s “300” lists Park as the sixth-best quarterback in the country, and a lot of it has to do with the fact that he is very nimble on his feet. He has the eyes of a good running back to see open lanes to run through, but he also has the ability to escape the pocket and give plays extra time to develop. On one particular play, Stratford was three yards outside of the end zone, and Park was able to maneuver around multiple rushing defenders and throw the ball over the heads of three men in the secondary to find his open receiver. As far as Park’s playing ability goes, there are no glaring weaknesses, but there are concerns regarding

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his decision-making abilities. On several plays, Park will opt to escape the pocket to buy time and find an open target. But with stronger coverage on deck at the college level, Park will need to learn to make quicker decisions and pull the trigger a little sooner. Park resembles Aaron Murray in regards to his quick delivery, and he fits Georgia’s scheme well. Park's running abilities are enough that offensive coordinator Mike Bobo may even create some tailored running plays should he ever develop a prominent role on offense. Park committed to Georgia over Alabama and Virginia Tech, and gives the school a talented quarterback.

DAWGS OFF THE LEASH

Wood shines for Braves, Isner gets fast win BY SAM LACK @samuellack Less than one month removed from his big league debut, Alex Wood is shutting down his competition from the mound. In nine games and 12.2 innings, Wood has already compiled 18 strikeouts and a 2.89 earned run average. Last week, he made his first major league start, giving up one earned run on two hits in three innings of work. Before being called up, Wood was 4-2 with a 1.26 ERA with Atlanta’s Double-A affiliate the Mississippi Braves. In 10 starts, he threw 57 strikeouts and allowed just one home run. Wood also held opponents to a .178 batting average.

Isner advances at Wimbledon

Farmer, Powell make minor league debut

John Isner breezed through his first-round match at Wimbledon, defeating Russian native Evgeny Donskoy in a 6-1, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (2) set sweep on Monday. He moves on to face Adrian Mannarino and looks to pass the second round for ISNER the first time in his career at Wimbledon. It was just over three years ago that Isner was vaulted into record books after he defeated Nicolas Mahut in a marathon 11-hour match that took three days to complete and became the longest tennis match ever played.

Former Georgia shortstop Kyle Farmer signed with the Los Angeles Dodgers on June 10, drafted as a catcher in the eighth round. Over the weekend he made his debut with the Ogden Raptors in the Rookie Pioneer League, recording four hits and four RBI in two games. Former Bulldog Curt Powell also debuted. Powell was drafted by the Detroit Tigers in the 21st round as a shortstop, despite playing third base for the Bulldogs. Powell has one RBI and no hits through three games with the Single-A Connecticut Tigers.

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14 Sports

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

Fix me up doc: UGA’s head trainer among the best Former Bulldogs sound off on Ed O'Bannon lawsuit BY LUKE DIXON @LukeCODixon

Summer at the University of Georgia is usually laid back and relaxing. For Ron Courson, Georgia’s Senior Associate Athletic Director and Director of the Sports Medicine Program, summer is anything but a vacation. “I think it’d surprise a lot of people, you know what do you do during the summer time, you’re off,” Courson said. “Summer is actually our busiest time of the year.” Courson, who works mainly with the football student-athletes, said that summer is a key time for him and his staff because it is when players have the most time available for injury rehabilitation and recovering. “When you’re in football and it’s during the season, you have practice at 4:00 and all 125 guys are out there at the same time,” Courson said. “The summer time we have three or four lifting groups, three or four running groups.” Courson wasn’t lying about the multitude of players who arrive for injury rehab on the first floor of the Butt-Mehre Athletic Complex. COURSON At 8 a.m. on a Friday, Courson, his staff and some of the studentathletes weren’t just starting their days - they were clearly well into their rehabilitation programs for the day as Courson tended to a patient while others were sweating profusely during workouts. “We may start at 6:30 in the morning and go until 7:30 at night,” Courson said. “We also have rehabs, physicals and we’re conducting some research studies with guys who’ve had head injuries.” The irony about Courson’s current position is that he began his career path after suffering an injury in college. “I played two sports in college and had never even thought about this as a profession. I was going to be a coach. My junior year in college I hurt my knee playing ball. My orthopedic surgeon and athletic trainer told me to change my major and that’s how I got into it.” Though Courson’s most recent posts have included Georgia and Alabama, he has also spent time working with Pop USA Football and the National Football League. In his work and research with the NFL, Courson has focused mainly on the prevention of head injuries and in particular concussions, which have recently become one of the most highly publicized injuries that affects former collegiate and professional players even after their playing days are over. “It’s been fun,” Courson said of his work with the NFL. “I think one of the reasons people get invested in (player safety) is they want to make a

difference. I’ve been blessed with some really unique opportunities. We have a sports concussion research lab here and I’ve done a lot things nationally with sports concussion and head and neck injury prevention.” Courson adds that he hopes his and others research with both the NFL and Pop Warner will help prevent future players from suffering head injuries. “That’s how I got involved with the NFL and Pop Warner USA football,” Courson said. “What [the NFL and USA Football] gives you is a platform to make a difference. For example, if you can make a rule change, you can impact hundreds and thousands of people and hopefully prevent some things.” Now that the game of football is again undergoing drastic changes, Courson believes that even though the awareness of concussions and head injuries has been raised and there aren’t as many catastrophic injuries as before, there’s still much to be done. “I think we’ve done a great job of learning how to better evaluate and treat [head injuries], but we got to learn how to prevent them,” Courson said. “I think it’s ultimately going to come with behavior changes. We’ve got to do a better job with teaching and coaching, better technique, and particularly in our youth sports.” In addition to his renowned research and work with the Athletic Association, Courson is also an adjunct professor at the University of Georgia’s department of Kinesiology. Teaching is something Courson believes is quite helpful, especially in keeping up in his rapidly-changing field. “I love to teach,” Courson said. “One of the reasons I’m here is because I had great teachers when I was in college. I really take that to heart. I really feel like if you’re going to be at the top of your game, you’ve got to be involved in teaching research because that’s how you stay current. Teaching, one, helps me because to be able to teach, you’ve got to go study yourself.” Courson adds that one of the most rewarding parts of teaching is seeing how students grow and develop, during and even after their time with him. “Last semester, I got a text from one of my former students,” Courson said. “She had graduated two years before and she said, ‘I was at a basketball game tonight and one of my student-athletes had a cardiac arrest. I did CPR, defibrillated him and saved his life. I learned that in your course.’ That’s rewarding again because you have a chance to make a difference.” For Courson, the best of the day and his career overall is getting to work with his student athletes and seeing them retake the field fully recovered. “There’s nothing more fun than having somebody, who maybe has an unfortunate injury, but working through a surgery and rehab and seeing them go back do what they did before at the same level, and having a big smile on their face,” Courson said.

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BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey

at how many people are walking around in No. 11 [Aaron Murray] jerseys right now. It’s It seems as if everysomething to consider.” one has words of critiThe issue cism directed at the O’Bannon and other NCAA these days. former players have in In the midst of the several cases do not potentially landmark attempt to hone in on Ed O’Bannon lawsuit, the the trade of athletic which seeks damages involvement for scholfrom the NCAA for arships and education, profiting off of individubut rather the meral players that received chandise and marketno compensation in ing profits the NCAA return, former players and its member schools are not mincing words earn on an individual, when it comes to the player-by-player basis. practices Mark Emmert A noted example of and company have this is the “NCAA adopted in recent Football” video game years. series designed and A major focus of produced by EA the suit has been Sports, which the powerhouse uses the likenessof college footes of famous colball. The sale of lege football playjerseys in univerers such as sity bookstores Darren and online, which McFadden and use numbers of Tim Tebow on its popular or succovers. cessful athletes Virtual quarat the collegiate O'BANNON terbacks are level such as made to have Knowshon throwing motions and Moreno’s No. 24, has celebrations similar to caused many to questheir real-world countion whether the terparts, clear evidence NCAA’s policies are fair of EA selling a game to the players that based on the feats and actually compete and habits of college footdrive the financial profball players. it tied to football “I don’t know if games. there’s a good way to “It’s such a grey address it,” former area whenever you’re Georgia offensive linetalking about college man Matt Stinchcomb athletics, because said. “I do think if you’re talking about you’re capitalizing on amateur sports, but an individual and there’s a huge, billionsomehow or other dollar business around there’s been a value it as well,” former that’s been set on that, Georgia quarterback and it’s zero dollars, David Greene said. and it’s unbeknownst “The way [the NCAA] to that individual that is getting compensated they’re creating value is sometimes directly as an individual, then I off the player. You look think that there’s merit to some type of request on that individual’s part. In the eyes of many, the fact that the NCAA can capitalize on the a player’s face or number goes beyond the scope of the scholarship contracts all athletes sign before enrolling in college. A popular counterargument from the ruling ranks of the NCAA with regards to player compensation is that college athletics serve as a springboard for players that wish to turn professional. But with no guarantee attached to this “positive” of college athletics, former players such as Greene note the necessity of examining the issue and evaluating what is objectively fair or unfair to the athletes that put their bodies on the line. “Is it a platform for most guys? Yeah, for some of them,” Greene said. “But you take 80 or 90 percent of the other guys that get a chance to play in the NFL, they only make it one or two years and they’re getting paid minimum salary and they’re out in the real world by 26.” The O’Bannon case will move forward, with the presiding Judge Wilken recently requesting that current players be included before a ruling takes place on whether the case constitutes a class-action lawsuit. If Wilken rules it a non-class-action case, players would have to file their grievances individually and essentially halt much of the current momentum. But if in fact it is ruled a class-action suit, the NCAA could potentially be staring at billions of dollars in damages. “It’s the balance of [fans thinking] ‘all these players are greedy,’ that they see an opportunity when they should appreciate the opportunity to play and represent your school and enjoy a game at the collegiate level. And we do. That’s the awesome side of football,” former Georgia offensive lineman Jon Stinchcomb said. “Is it greed, or is it somewhat being taken advantage of on the individual level?”

Full H ous for G es ro Availab ups le As Well!


15 Sports

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

‘Countdown to Kickoff’ combines past, present of Bulldogs football BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey Georgia’s annual Countdown to Kickoff charity event returns to Athens for its eighth edition next month, and the participants will include members from the 2002 Georgia football team. The brainchild of former Bulldogs Matt Stinchcomb, Jon Stinchcomb and David Greene, Countdown to Kickoff creates a special experience that brings together Georgia football alumni, current team members and fans, the proceeds of which all go towards Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and the Georgia Transplant Foundation. “My brain could not conceive of something this successful so far. I borrowed brain space and neurons from these two clowns,” Matt Stinchcomb said on Monday. “This year at the fan festival, the emphasis is going to be on the 2002 SEC Championship team. The idea of it is going to be an anniversary of sorts, 10 seasons removed.” The Kickoff’s fan festival, which runs from 12 pm to 3 pm on July 13 at the UGA football practice fields, allows Georgia fans to receive autographs, participate in drills and mingle with Georgia football legends of days past. “It kind of breaks down a couple of barriers in a number of ways, and I think the fans appreciate the most that there are direct interactions with current players,” Jon Stinchcomb said. “It’s fun for us because there are guys we haven’t seen for 10 years that we’ve contacted from this ‘02 SEC Championship team that have said they’re coming.” The list of players from the 2002 team invited to this year’s Countdown to Kickoff, though not yet confirmed, includes D.J. Shockley, Tony Taylor, Tony Gilbert and Martrez Milner. Also returning will be the Celebrity-Dawg Classic, a golf tournament being held on July 12 at the University of Georgia Golf Course that pairs fans with a Georgia football player or coach. The golf outing has attained plenty of success in recent years, and 2013 has been no different. “This is the second year in a row that the golf tournament has been sold out at least a month in advance,” Matt Stinchcomb said. “Through the par-

Former Bulldogs Matt Stinchcomb (left), David Greene (center) and Jon Stinchcomb (right) were essential in the creation of Countdown to Kickoff, which caters to fans while also serving a good cause. erin o. smith/Staff ticipation and support of this fan base, it will be over $1 million raised for these charities. To be able to say that, it’s something that everybody [is proud of].” Both Greene and the Stinchcomb brothers spoke not only to the event’s success, but also to the unique interactions it provides for both the fans and players that participate. “You get to see old players, you get to see old buddies and you’re raising money for a good cause,” Greene said. “It’s good the fans can actually see that these guys are real people. They’re more than just football players.” “And a defensive lineman can throw a spiral,” Matt Stinchcomb added. “It’s amazing how athletic

Dawgma a perfect example of Frisbee’s culture BY DRAKE NEWTON The Red & Black It may not be considered among the nation’s “traditional” sports, but with its fast-paced blend of soccer, football, and cross-country, Ultimate Frisbee provides many high school athletes a chance to continue their athletic involvement in college without participating in a varsity sport. Georgia’s women’s Ultimate Frisbee team was one of the most successful club sports of last year, sweeping the southeast regional competition and earning its first trip to nationals since 2006. Lane Siedor, one of the team’s three captains, spoke about the team’s incredible accomplishments this season. “We’ve been a team with so many high level

Dawgma, captained by Lane Siedor, earned its first nationals berth since 2006. Courtesy Lane Siedor athletes that just hadn’t quite made the cut for so many years. Now it was our turn to make it,” Siedor said Many ultimate Frisbee players pick up the sport later in life, after they can no longer compete at the highest level in other sports, but Siedor has been extremely passionate about the game

since elementary school. “I fell in love with the sport at an early age when my best friend and I could beat up on all the boys,” Siedor said. While there are some players like Siedor that have loved the game since childhood, many pick up the game in high school or

even college. The numbers show that Frisbee has been growing in popularity steadily over the past decade, and membership in collegiate teams is skyrocketing. Whether this “Frisbee state of mind” is achieved or inherited, Siedor confirmed that Ultimate players are quite involved in the sport, and especially at Georgia. “If you’ve ever encountered a group of Frisbee players together at one time you’ve probably noticed that all they can do is talk about Frisbee,” Siedor said. Whatever the reason behind Ultimate Frisbee’s rise to prominence on campuses across the country, it seems to be here to stay, and Dawgma continues to welcome new players into its tightknit community.

some of these guys really are. It’s like they’re trying out for the coaches.” Individual tickets for the fan festival are priced at $25, while four-ticket family packages are $75.

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‘The Vault’ app brings Georgia football’s storied legacy to life BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey They say there’s an app for everything, but not every app puts eight decades of Bulldogs football film right at your fingertips. The Vault, designed by the Atlanta-based company One of a Kind Films, brings fully restored, color highlights and game clips dating as far back 1929 to your iPhone. Georgia is the first school to have its footage available. “We want to give you access to [films] that you’ve never had access to before,” said CEO and President Myles Berman. “There’s so much stuff, it is literally unfathomable. To be able to [return] to these moments of the past, it’s a wonderful opportunity to share history in a very

unique way.” Former Georgia kicker Kevin Butler, a vice president with One of a Kind Films, helped the group to acquire decades worth of Georgia game film, which was then digitized, colorcorrected, synced with sound and uploaded to the app’s platform, which users can then search for specific games or players that they may have in mind. App users have unlimited access to that film, and can create a running “favorites” list of highlights and clips for quick viewing. “It’s very easy to find the play you want to see or highlights from the game you want to see.” Chief Creative Officer Bob Summers said. With its unprecedented archive access, The Vault pro-

vides younger fans with an educating experience that can expose them to all-time Bulldog greats no longer well-known. Hall of Fame halfback Charley Trippi, for instance, is just one of the many Georgia legends whose history is revived with the app. “If you mention someone like Trippi outside of maybe the hardcore fan base, maybe students or younger fans, they have no idea who he is,” said Operations specialist Jody Smith. “You get past maybe the mid-80s moving back and a lot of people have no idea of who makes up the Georgia playmakers.” The Vault can be purchased on the iTunes App Store at a subscription price of $4.99 and downloaded on any iPhone supporting iOS6.

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16 Variety

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

Events THURSDAY, JUNE 27 Write Club #3 When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $10 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com Jim Cook When: 6 p.m. Where: DePalma’s Italian Cafe Price: Free Contact: depalmasitaliancafe.com/timothy The Segar Jazz Affair When: 7 p.m. Where: The Omega Bar Price: Free ($5 after 9 p.m.) Contact: theomegabar. com Universal Sigh When: 11 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Rooftop Price: Free Contact: georgatheatre. com

(18-20) Contact: caledonialounge.com Tre Powell When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: Free Contact: terrapinbeer. com Photo Ops, Foe Destroyer When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $5 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com The Strays, Decent Lovers, DJ Mahagony When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com

Kyshona Armstrong When: 5 p.m. Where: Hotel Indigo Price: Free Contact: indigoathens. com

Danny Hutchens, Bryan Howard, Kathy Kirbo, Claire & Paige Campbell When: 7:30 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: Free Contact: meltingpointathens.com

Don Chambers, Bleed Stone When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+) to $7

Evan Barber & The Dead Gamblers When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/

nowherebarathens

Contact: farm255.com

I Am God, Visc., New Wives When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: farm255.com

SATURDAY JUNE 29

Leaving Countries, Station 42 When: 10 p.m. Where: Boar’s Head Price: Free Contact: facebook. com/The-Boars-HeadDowntown FRIDAY, JUNE 28 God Of Carnage When: 2 p.m. Where: Athens Community Theatre Price: $5 Contact: townandgownplayers.org Laughlin When: 8 p.m. Where: Butt Hutt BarB-Q Price: Free Contact: butthuttbarbecue.com Funk You, Lazy Locomotive, The Kinky Aphrodisiacs When: 9 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $7 Contact: georgiatheatre.com Tealvox, Stone Kids When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: 40watt.com Lefty Hathaway When: 9 p.m. Where: Green Room Price: Free Contact: greenroomathens.com Rick Fowler Band, Beverly “Guitar” Watson When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $8 Contact: meltingpointathens.com

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Crazy Hoarse, Revien When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $5 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com The Owsley Brothers, Shitty Candy, Los Meesfits When: 10 p.m. Where: Max Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ TheMaxCanada Night & Day, Avery & Thomas When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+) to $7 (18-20) Contact: caledonialounge.com The Cryptides, Black Moon, Killer Clue When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com The Looters When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ nowherebarathens

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Rebecca Jones, Mans Trash, U*S*A When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free

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Burlesque Beta When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: $3 Contact: facebook.com/ Go-Bar God Of Carnage When: 2 p.m. Where: Athens Community Theatre Price: $5 Contact: townandgownplayers.org Abbey Road Live When: 3:30 p.m. & 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $8 Contact: georgiatheatre.com Deja Vu When: 8:30 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $10 (adv) to $13 (door) Contact: meltingpointathens.com Prisma When: 10 p.m. Where: Green Room Price: Free Contact: greenroomathens.com PPP Vs. BHC Variety Show When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: farm255.com Of The Vine, Family & Friends When: 10 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Rooftop Price: Free Contact: georgiatheatre.com Showtime, The Swank, Crane, 3 & 20 When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: 40watt.com Savagist, Colossus, For The Vulture When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+) to $7 (18-20) Contact: caledonialounge.com Zigtebra, Ukelele Menace, Katie Pruitt When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: 9 p.m.

See parents battle over preschool in God of Carnage Courtesy of Town and Gown Players Price: Free Contact: classiccityband.org God Of Carnage When: 2 p.m. Where: Athens Community Theatre Price: $5 Contact: townandgownplayers.org MONDAY JULY 1 Drinking Liberally; Beer & Politics When: 7 p.m. Where: The Globe Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ groups/athensdl Blues Night With Big C When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ nowherearathens Kenosha Kid When: 8 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: Free Contact: theworldfamousathens.com Kater Mass, Todd Killings Jr., Wade Boggs When: 10 p.m. Where: Max Price: $3 Contact: facebook.com/ TheMaxCanada Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Highwire Lounge Price: Free Contact: highwirelounge.com TUESDAY JULY 2

Bad Tempered Rabbit When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ nowherebarathens

OpenTOAD Comedy Open Mic When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: $5 Contact: flickerthatreandbar.com

Pure Sun Project, Isaac Bramblett Band When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $5 Contact: facebook.com/ lkshuffleclub

Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $22 Contact: meltingpointathens.com

SUNDAY JUNE 30

Chief Rocka When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: Free Contact: newearthmusichall.com

Big Dogs on the River w/ Shonna Tucker & Eye Candy When: 12 to 8 p.m. Where: Oconee River Price: $10 to $25 Contact: altamahariverkeeper.org Classic City Band When: 3 to 4 p.m. Where: State Botanical Garden

Tuesday Night Confessional When: 9 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ nowherebarathens

Sacred Teachers, Cottonmouth, k i d s, Christ, Lord When: 10 p.m. Where: Max Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ TheMaxCanada WEDNESDAY JULY 3 The Athens Cowboy Choir, The Darnell Boys, The Shoal Creek Stranglers, Art Rosenbaum, The Orange Twin Family Band, Old Time Pickin Circle When: 5 to 11 p.m. Where: Orange Twin Conservation Community Price: $10 Contact: orangetwin. com Beer Academy When: 7 p.m. Where: Trappeze Pub Price: Free Contact: trappezepub. com Georgia Museum of Art: Tour at Two When: 2 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: georgiamuseumofart.org Speaking Pages When: 6:30 to 7:0 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: avidbookshop. com Canine Cocktail Hour When: 5 to 7 p.m. Where: Madison Bar & Bistro Price: Free Contact: indigoathens. com SALSAthens When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $8 Contact: facbook.com/ SalsaAthens Dwayne Holloway & Friends When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ nowherebarathens Faster Circuits, Hot Fudge When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: $3 Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com Rooftop Rondezvous When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Rooftop Price: $30 Contact: georgiatheatre.com


17 Views

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

Drink and Dining GUIDE Thursday

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Where: 256 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 549-0166 Website: www.allgoodlounge.com

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Where: 245 N. Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 543-5195 Website:

Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

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Over 300 items including crab legs Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

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Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

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$6 Frozen drinks, $13 House wine bottles

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Mommas Love, Nachos or Soup, and Drink $7.99

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Kids eat free (with purchase of an adult meal)

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Grilled Chicken Salad and Drink $6.99

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Turkey Delite Combo With Chips and Drink $5.99

Terrapin pints $2

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Mini mega nachos + PBR $10

Frozen Margarita pints $2.75

Selected craft/import beers $2

Loose-leaf tea 16 oz. - $2.85

Cubano Con Leche with cinnamon & sugar 12 oz. - $4.45

Real-Fruit Smoothies - $4.25

Cappuccino 6 oz. - $3.15

Frozen Latte Ghiaccio - $4.45

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Where: 247 E. Broad St. Phone: (706) 549-1446 Website: www.thetacostand.com

Where: 1680 S. Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 850-5422 Website: www. twostorycoffeehouse.com

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

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THURSDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 27 ACROSS 1 Penny 5 Donkeys 10 TV’s “__ Trek” 14 Declare openly 15 Color of half the checkers 16 Enormous 17 Evergreen tree 18 Instrument used for “Taps” 19 In the sack 20 Pullman car 22 Having no goal 24 Attempt 25 Last 26 Backstreet 29 Golfing term 30 Australian marsupial 34 Tush 35 That woman 36 Gems 37 Aswan or Hoover 38 Rattling gourds

40 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 50 51 54 58 59 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Rodent Large fish-eating hawk Took the prize Magazine title Adjust an alarm Made a lap Cut a sheep’s wool Bash Luau dish School bee participant Socked German car Fencing sword Actress Ballard French girlfriend Bleacher levels __ though; albeit Cave dwellers Asp or adder Examination

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 depth 11

DOWN Berets & tams Wicked Zero Small loudspeaker Monastery Insulting remark Droop Fancy dessert Coil of yarn Superficial; lacking T est __; tiny bottle in a lab Grows gray Communists Be nosy Creates In the distance Zeal Contract with a

12 13 21 23 25 26 27 landlord 28 Sources of light 29 __ person; apiece

31 32 33 35 36 38 39 42 44

Eagle’s nest Camel’s smaller cousin Fall flower Barn dinner Winter month: abbr. Iron or tin Rollaway bed Answers Dense growth of shrubbery 46 Overexert 47 Male child 49 Takes a nap 50 Handbag 51 Swedish auto 52 Wild feline 53 Correct a text 54 __ up; become cheery again 55 Possess 56 Facial features 57 Fender bender memento 60 Actress Arthur

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FRIDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 28 ACROSS 1 Small number 4 Walked the floor 9 Nylons 13 Gambles 15 Superior to 16 Man in Eden 17 Poison ivy symptom 18 Jots down 19 Accepted standard 20 Most cheaply constructed 22 Color of steel 23 Small lab bottle 24 Actress Lupino 26 Bits of parsley 29 Worship 34 Take __; put forth effort 35 Where cirrhosis strikes 36 Hightailed it 37 Ladder step 38 2-footed animal 39 Flash of lightning

Pompous fool High temperature Leg bone Adolescent Nauseated Go wrong Hurry Uses a straw Nonstop Border on Yankee Jeter Biden, for short Small brook Tomb Pitcher __ of Capri Lawn border trimming tool 65 Wild blue yonder

40 41 42 43 45 46 47 48 51 56 57 58 60 61 62 63 64

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 21 25 26

27 28 29 30 31

DOWN Japanese sash Equipment for trawling Engrave Black-and-white bears Bubbling away on the stove Pigeon coop Arden & Plumb Fated Airplane shelter Reason to bathe Actress Mia __ TV show award Pushing Delves German article “Jack __ could eat no fat...” DVD remote button Dishwasher cycle Deadly serpent Hardly __; seldom Fragrance

32 33 35 38

Ankle Doorway Not taped Resent; view disapprovingly 39 Colony for buzzing insects 41 __ away; in the distance 42 Complain 44 Get comfy 45 Member of the Friends Church 47 Late actor Christopher __ 48 Indian garment 49 Wading bird 50 Yank 52 Intellectual 53 Rugged peak 54 Latest info 55 Computer tech, perhaps 59 Use a crowbar

DOWN Use an ax Hawaiian island Found fault with Hubbub Lurch sideways Is tilted Encourage Large Look at Asking nosy questions Reddish horse Jillian & Curry Lion’s neck hair Beverage Secluded valley Pump or loafer “Time __ tell” Washing machine

32 33 35 37 38 40

41 43 44 46

You’ll find answers here... www.fcs.uga.edu 112 Dawson Hall 706-542-4847

SATURDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 29

1 5 10 14 15 16

ACROSS __-Cola Black suit Baby buggy Difficult Eagle’s nest Gossip columnist __ Barrett Cincinnati, __ Doll with hair made of yarn __ up with; tolerate Autry or Wilder Hose down Tiny bits of land Be victorious Fungal growth Tarry Chili dog topper, often Seal to keep water out Encountered Shaping tool Spin rapidly Actress Delany

17 18

Celebrating 35 years in Athens!

20 21 22 23 25 26 28 31 32 34 36 37 38

Are you Mild, Hot, or Extra Hot?

39 40 41 42 44 45 46 47 50 51 54 57 58 59 nation 60 61 62 63

Pass away Picture border Erie or Panama Venerated Round shape Refuse to allow Singer Page Faint Guinea pig’s home Play on words Early antibiotic Dad Cereal grains Sierra __; African Perched upon Horse’s gait Cat, to a toddler Camera’s eye

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 21 24 25 26 tubful 27 28 29 30

New Delhi, __ Entice; draw Set free Of the kidneys

2545 Atlanta Highway • Athens • (706) 354-8707

47 48 49 50

52 53 55 56 57

Actor Everett Goal Story Songbird Move quickly France’s dollar before the euro Give a traffic ticket to Woodwind player TV’s “__ & Lacey” Apply a coat of color to a wall Blemish __ out; become dilapidated Climb __; mount Blood __; cause of a stroke, often Come __; find Rests in the daytime Type; variety Luau garland Chum

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MONDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JULY 1

ACROSS 1 B  anana __; ice cream treat 6 Diminishes 10 Pigeon coop 14 Sierra __; African nation 15 __ as a pin 16 Finished; done 17 Actor Jeremy 18 Wind direction indicator 19 Shakespeare’s “King __” 20 Change; gene alteration 22 “Now that’s __ of a different color!” 24 Very small 25 Used dynamite 26 __ of; missing 29 Desert refuge 30 “__ Maria” 31 Hollers 33 Shirt neck tag

37 Lager 39 Source of news for many 41 Old stringed instrument 42 Lopsided; awry 44 __ B. DeMille 46 Kind of can 47 __ up; make happy again 49 Historical tale 51 Choices 54 Barking marine mammal 55 Material between bricks 56 Goes on; lasts 60 Vicinity 61 Capable 63 Boise’s state 64 Make well 65 Tenth-grader’s math class, often: abbr. 66 “Under no circumstances!” 67 __ up; tallies

68 Finishes 69 Say hello to DOWN 1 Thin; slender 2 Lima’s nation 3 Pillage 4 Natural; inborn 5 Declare under oath 6 Official ambassador 7 Three-__ salad 8 Prohibit 9 Takes illegally 10 Enormous 11 Plain to see 12 Josh with 13 Goofed 21 Bury 23 Icy form of precipitation 25 Fundamental 26 “Ali __ and the Forty Thieves” 27 Nights before 28 Smell strongly

29 32 punch 34 35 36 38 40 43

45 48 50 51 52 53 54 56 57 58 59 62

Less youthful Adds booze to the Computer memory unit Actress Moran Give for a time Piano students’ presentations Refueling ship Command to a running horse Renting Infuriate Silent plane Nebraska city __ over; read carefully __ on; trample Appears Trudge Keep for later You, biblically Put in order Actor Affleck


puzzles

19 Puzzles

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

1

Two words meaning great advertising

Puzzled by your current

P U Z Z L E

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housing situation?

S P O N S O R

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TUESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JULY 2

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 34

35 36 37 38

ACROSS Caveman’s mallet Huge fellow Wise man Socks & nylons Beneath Follow orders Eras Mr. Agassi Sand mound Baggage handlers Left empty, as a room Irate Rise __ Allan Poe Yrbk. section “All __ lead to Rome” Wrought __; fence material Letters before an alias Revoke, as a law Water barrier Mount __; highest peak in Greece

40 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 50 51 54 58 59 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Regret Come forth Unruly crowd Female red deer More unusual Mom’s mate Counts calories Postpone Wheel center Deep red Yellow fruits In this place Equestrian Relinquish Actress Chase Treats roughly Fogginess Closed sac Laziness Dating couple gossiped about

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8

DOWN Fellow Company symbol Drug addict Member of the wedding party Watchman Hostels Also say Bundle of __; anxious person “Trick or __!” Soft drink Lie right next to Actor Hackman Observed Hearing organ Makes well Rules for language use Sea duck with soft

9 10 11 12 13 21 23 25 26 down 27 Theatrical play 28 __ Pyle; role for Jim Nabors

29 31 32 33 35 36 38 39 42 44 46

47 49 50 51 52

53 54 55 56 57 60

32 33 35 38

Heaven above Eagle’s nest Discourage Toboggans Pub order Massage Villains Pea casing Beef or venison Small barbecue In __; refusing to face reality Final bill Shapes Severe; rough Stylish __ on; place one’s trust in Irritates Waist accessory Shipshape Shaping tool Appear Singing couple

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WEDNESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JULY 3

1 4 9 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22

23 24 26 29 34 35 36 37 38 39

register a team

5 questions every week

*Questions

to 40 41 42 43 45 46 47 48 51 56 57 58 60 blade 61 62 63 64 65

Rotten Secret agents Honking birds Slumberers Laughed loudly PC alternative Small brook Messy person About to occur Swimming spot Injures Orderly Tool with a curved Pyle or Els Violent wind __ with; be full of Homes in the trees __ away; fled

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 21 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

Tri v a

?

AthensLivingUGA presents

ACROSS Burst Shovel Seaweed Fills with wonder Warsaw natives Zone Jump Valuable item Orange peel Pharmacy Loose __; unfinished business Curved edges Female sheep Growls Handcrafted Can wrapper Yearned Cry Passionate Rescued Give the cold shoulder

submit answers online

win cool prizes!

Grand Prize

Tickets+Parking+Food @ The Braves Game!

4. Which video game system is mentioned in this week’s paper? 3PTS

2. Which UGA horticulture professor is retiring? - 3PTS 5. Where is Hendershot’s Coffee’s new location? - 7PTS

TOP TEAMS

3. How many years has the HOPE scholarship been active? - 3PTS How to Enter: 1. Register a team

Throw water on Lessened Couple Sample set aside for testing 39 Making airtight 41 Mineral spring 42 Wedding ring material 44 Symbol; badge 45 Hoses down 47 Send in payment 48 Quarrel 49 Mother __; rich ore deposit 50 Seep out 52 Female horse 53 Bowler’s targets 54 Within walking distance 55 Festive event 59 Bill denomination

www.redandblack.com/contests_events/trivia

(Hint check out Red & Black publications)

1. Which two restaurants in Athens are closing? - 5PTS

DOWN Buddy Was indebted to Bosc or Bartlett Charley horses Puts on Twitter Additionally Graceful forest animal Highly respected __ Abdul-Jabbar Gray or Moran Give to a borrower Cushions __ on; incited Fish’s breathing organ Marry Thick slices USNA; United States __ Academy Tolerate Bee colonies Singles Actor Edward __

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‌Subleases ‌FEMALE SUBLEASER NEEDEDFall 2013 Semester Aspen Heights 4 BR/4.5 Bath, $525/month Private room with 3 great roommates! Contact Kelsey at katurchi@uga.edu for info! ‌ROOM FOR RENT AT THE WOODLANDS OF ATHENS! Gated neighborhood, 4 bedroom house, 3 roommates, looking to sublease 1 room. Spacious bedroom with private bath, located directly across from clubhouse and pools. Will cover first month’s rent ($500/month). Contact: (912) 531-6923 ‌SUBLEASE!! 2013-2014 Year -$200 Gift card -River Club Town Homes -$395 per month -3 bedroom

August & September 2013 rent paid for you. Contact me: amoore92@uga.edu

ANNOUNCEMENTS Looking for that perfect getaway, or want to advertise a travel package? Reach over 43,000 people in the Red & Black TRAVEL SECTION Call 706-4333003 or go online to www. redandblack.com Looking for that PERFECT ROOMMATE?? What better way to find them than in the RED & BLACK roommates Section. Bringing roommates together for 110 years. *Need CASH for that old computer? *Looking for that perfect cheap computer? *Advertise your Computer business here ALL THIS AND MORE IN OUR COMPUTER SECTION!! Call 706433-3003 or go online to www. redandblack.com

Classifieds WHAT IS Information THE BEST Rates WAY TO ADVERTISE? (0-24 words)

Private Party..................................$10.00 Housing..........................................$23.00 Help wanted..................................$23.00 Business..........................................$21.00

THE RED & BLACK

CLASSIFIEDS

Bringing Jobs and Employees together since 1893.

FREE ADS

For University Community Only

(Private Party Merchandise, Under $101) (0-15 words) 3 Consecutive Days..................................................FREE

(Merchandise must be priced. One item per hsld per week. Ads must be received from UGA e-mail address only. No walk-ins or standard mail accepted.)

CLASSIFICATIONS 10. Roommates 30. For Sale 45. Seeking Job 75. Tickets 90. Yard Sales 110. Personal

20. Housing 35. Computers 50. Auto 80. Employment 95. Events 120. Lost & Found

25. Subleases 40. Wanted 60. Services 85. Travel 100. Notices

706-433-3011 classifieds@randb.co www.redandblack.com/classifieds/

Classifieds Disclaimer The Red & Black does not verify, investigate, or endorse any classified ad. Readers are urged to use caution when responding to an ad.


20 Sports

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Red and Black

2011-2012

STATS

2012-2013

31

Games started

32

32

Games played

32

422

Total points

591

13.2

Points per game

18.5

11

Blocks

17

58

Steals

65

45

Offensive rebounds

37

121

Defensive rebounds

189

5.2

Rebounds per game

7.1

39

Assists

58

39.6%

Field goal percentage

43.3%

30.4%

3 point shot percentage

37.3%

65.4%

Free throw percentage

79.9%

Caldwell-Pope played well as a freshman, scoring the second-most points for UGA. Taylor Craig Sutton/Staff

As a sophomore, KCP's performance was enough to earn SEC Player of the Year. Taylor Craig Sutton/Staff

KCP: Former UGA hoops star has size, shooting ability NBA teams covet in first round ➤ From Page 1 “Size, shooting and athletic ability. He has all three of those things, so you got to figure he’ll be at least a decent NBA player on that alone,” said Jonathan Tjarks, NBA Draft guru for SB Nation. “It’s kind of hard to tell [how he adjusts to the NBA] given what he was doing in college, because he’s had so little help around him. I thought he really did a decent job of not forcing the shot too much at Georgia.” Even when considering the concerns teams may have about Caldwell-Pope’s shot selection or the

mental aspect of his game on defense, Tjarks believes he should still be a mid-first-round pick. “I would say after the first seven or eight guys, there’s a huge range of possible spots,” Tjarks said. “He could go as high as probably No. 9 to Minnesota or No. 10 to Portland. Those are both spots he could go. If he doesn’t go there, he could fall down to maybe No. 20 with Chicago. I would guess his range is about nine to 20.” With all of his physical tools, Caldwell-Pope’s success might have seemed like a foregone conclusion, but his head coach spoke to a differ-

ent side of his star player that emerged last season. It was a tougher, more mature Caldwell-Pope that saw the changes he needed to make. Soon, he began rebounding more and playing better defense than he ever did as a freshman. “I think that [you have] to give Kentavious the credit he deserves. He was the hardest worker on our team,” Fox said. “We started the year slow last year largely due to the fact that he wasn’t playing as well. He was very willing to look himself in the mirror, become a much more efficient player the second half of the season and

continue to improve and grow.” With professional basketball calling, Caldwell-Pope will begin putting his college days in the rear-view mirror. His legacy still lives on, however, and the story of his success as a Bulldog can only serve to help Fox in his quest to recruit the state and build Georgia’s basketball program. “It shows that at Georgia your dreams can come true,” Fox said. “It is something that we use to our advantage in recruiting because every young guy has the dream of going to play at the next level, and you have to be able to prove that you can help players do that.”

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June 27, 2013 edition of the Red & Black  

June 27, 2013 edition of the Red & Black

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