Issuu on Google+

www.redandblack.com

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Vol. 122, No. 35 | Athens, Georgia

Photo illustration by Taylor Craig Sutton

For a detailed list of performances, locations and their prices, see page B8

Graphic by AJ Archer

A place just for LGBT pride Queer community, allies torn about importance, need for resource center BY BRAD MANNION @bradcrumbs Across the country, support for acceptance and equality of the LGBT community is growing. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled federal same-sex marriage bans unconstitutional in 2013 — just one year ago. This month, Darrin Gayles and Staci Yandle, two openly gay members of the LGBT community, received their confirmations to serve as federal judges. And Yancey Gulley said Athens, though in a conservative region, is a reflection of the support felt across the country. “It is wonderful,” the Athens Pride board adviser said. Gulley said the integration of queer and straight Athens community members is a strong reason for the city’s strong and vibrant LGBT community. “It’s not us against them,” he said. “It’s not like all the queers do one thing and all the straight people do this. There’s so much integration and support between them, which I think is really nice.” Leo Veiga, a University of Georgia senior, said he agrees with Gulley’s claims, considering the existence of a “large LGBT community” in Athens. Community resources or resourceful community But when it comes to the necessity of a LGBT community and resource center for Athens, the two share different opinions. Veiga said Athens would welcome

a resource center due to the city’s “progressive” beliefs. “Athens had its first pride parade a few years ago, which wasn’t very big, but it was there,” he said. “That’s more than a lot of smaller towns in the South can say.” In fact, a LGBT community center is in the works for the Classic City. Common Ground Athens, a non profit organization co-founded by LGBT advocate Ricky Roberts, is spearheading the project in order to establish a sense of belonging for gay people. “Having a social space for adults, the youth and seniors is kind of the reason we’re trying to have a physical space,” she said. Roberts said the organization held its first meeting in March 2013, but it is still in the early stages. “We need a board of directors,” she said. “We have a few people that are dedicated to moving the organization forward, but we still need people to push for a physical space and financial footing.” A comparatively larger portion of youth in the LGBT community is more at risk for suicide or depression than their heterosexual peers, according to a Common Ground Athens press release. By establishing a designated place for LGBT members and allies in Athens, Roberts said she hopes to change that. “We want to provide a space for the youth,” Roberts said. “If they want to come together on the weekends or get together on a function or dance, they have nowhere to go to have those things.” While Roberts is pushing for a

Boneshakers used to provide members of the Athens LGBT community with a gathering place until 2005. Today, the city has no designated gay bars. FILE/Staff place and defined location for the LGBT community to gather, Gulley said Athens is already home to several supportive LGBT groups and places, including Athens Pride, a Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays organization chapter and the gay-affirming Metropolitan Community Church. “[The church] is in town and has a very active congregation, so that’s a place, a space, an event every week,” Gulley said. The origin of many LGBT resource centers dates back to a different time — approximately 30 or 40 years ago, when the world was different, Gulley said. “The world was a very different place,” he said. “People needed counseling services, and honestly ... people needed somewhere safe to gather and

discuss things that they could not discuss elsewhere.” Gulley said following the AIDS crisis, these centers had to adapt to the times and support the community in a different way. “Even if you look in cities like Long Beach, Calif., ... from 10 years ago,” he said. “They were just then trying to figure out how to not just be focused on HIV and AIDS anymore and find out what is relevant to today’s needs for a queer community. They were really struggling with what a program would look like and if there was a need for them to exist.” Gulley said he fully supports the creation of a community center, but only if Athens, a place where he feels comfortable as an openly gay man, needs one. See LGBT, Page A3


A2 News

Thursday, June 19, 2014

CRIME MAP

The Red & Black

• 48-YEAR-OLD WOMAN Rape reported 6/17/2014

• FOUR STUDENT EMPLOYEES Trespassing, president’s house 6/14/2014

• CALI N TITO’S Theft 6/14/2014

Two TVs stolen from Cali N Tito’s A Cali N Tito’s employee reported to police on June 14 that two flat-screen televisions had been stolen from the restaurant’s covered patio. The theft allegedly occurred Saturday between midnight and 8:30 a.m.

“The funny thing is that this week—you know, we have a tip jar out front—we had that stolen as well, on Wednesday,” said Cali N Tito’s manager Franco Giannoni. “Then we got robbed on Saturday morning.” Giannoni said the restaurant “didn’t do much” in terms of secur-

CASH FOR BOOKS DOWNTOWN ATHENS • ACROSS FROM THE ARCHES

ing the televisions on the patio. “We secured one of the TVs but we didn’t put a lock on it. We used nuts and bolts and somebody came with a wrench and unscrewed it and pulled it out,” he said. “We kind of were asking for it, I guess.” Each television was valued at $500, police said. “There were three outside. He took two,” Giannoni said. “The other one was more secure than the other two, so I guess that’s why he didn’t want to take that one.” Police lifted a partial print from the outside of the service window and placed it into evidence. Former USG chairman fails to pay alimony Former Univeristy System of Georgia Board of Regents chairman James Timothy Shelnut Sr. was arrested June 13 on charges of contempt of court. Shelnut allegedly failed to pay nearly $200,000 in alimony, according to Judge David Roper, who presided over the case’s hearing. The court ordered him to make the payments in order to be released from Charles B. Webster Detention Center, where he is being held without bond. Shelnut served as chairman of the Board from 2005 to 2006, but left the Board in 2007. In 2008, the state ethics commission fined him $40,000 for violating state political campaign laws, donating an excess amount of $15,000 to campaigns before 1998 and exceeding limits by more than $40,000 between 1998 and 2004. Included in the excess donations was $12,260 to former state Sen. Charles Walker (D-Augusta). The $40,000 Shelnut was fined was the larg-

est civil penalty the state ethics commission has ever assessed against an individual, according to The August Chronicle. Four student employees found trespassing at president’s house Four individuals, all student employees of University of Georgia campus transit, were found trespassing at the UGA president’s property in the early morning of June 14. Shortly before 3 a.m. security for the president’s house reported to UGA police that “unknown individuals” were walking— and later running, when seen—in the grass behind the house. Upon responding, neither police nor the security officer were able to catch the trespassors, and the UGA officers left the scene. At 3:43 a.m. the security officer advised UGA police that he had again seen individuals who “could possibly be the same group of people” walking behind the house. At 3:46 a.m., the responding officer met another officer at the president’s house. He had detained four individuals “located in some brush near the gazebo.” After asking the group to come out of the brush, the two officers questioned the four student employees, who said “they were walking back from downtown and got lost” on their way back to the Da Ville apartments off Grady Avenue. They stated they “had no idea where they were and did not realize it was the UGA president’s house,” which they entered through an open gate, “simply using it as a short cut.” While questioning the group, the officers reportedly smelled an odor similar to alcohol coming from their breath. According to

CRIME BLOTTER BURGLARY

THEFT • PINEVIEW DR. 6/13/2014 1:15:00

• MULBERRY STREET 6/11/2014

• GLENWOOD DR. 6/13/2014 6:00:00

• SOUTH POPLAR STREET 6/10/2014 22:00:00

• ELBERT ST. 6/13/2014 11:00:00

• N. BLUFF RD 6/13/2014 0:05:00

• VINCENT DR. 6/13/2014 16:00:00

• S PETER ST. 6/13/2014 2:00:00

• BROOKSTONE DR. 6/14/2014 8:00:00

• DEER PKWY. 6/4/2014 8:00:00

• MEADOW CREEK DR. 6/9/2014 20:00:00

• 2300 W BROAD ST. 6/14/2014 15:00:00

• 800 HWY 29 N 6/9/2014

• 4800 ATLANTA HWY 6/14/2014 0:50:00

• HARVEST WAY 6/10/2014 20:00:00

• WEIR CIR. 6/15/2014 0:30:00 • ROLLING RIDGE DR. 6/15/2014 21:20:00

BATTERY • SIMMONS STREET 6/9/2014 21:10:00

ROBBERY

• HICKMAN DRIVE 6/12/2014 22:40:00

• VINCENT AND VINEYARD DRS. 6/13/2014

• 220 N LUMPKIN STREET 6/13/2014 2:00:00

the incident report, the officers also said the four individuals were wet and appeared to have “just gone swimming.” No criminal charges were pressed due to a lack of damages or theft, but the four student employees were barred from the UGA president’s house for one year.

A 48-year- old woman reported her rape to Athens-Clarke County police June 17. The sexual assault allegedly occurred at a residence located in the northern part of Athens-Clarke County, according to the incident report. She was allegedly raped by a 49-year-old homeless man.

Athens-Clarke County resident reports rape

— Compiled by Leighton Rowell

This Friday. . .

ROOTS, ROCK N’ ROLL!

A little country, and a LOT of rock!

COME DANCE WITH US!

ell

M

Publix

Hwy.

150 Coile Drive, Athens 30606 To rent, visit:

1097 baxter street, athens

h itc

Wells Fa

rgo Shell

78 / At

lanta Hw

Gas St

ation

y.

• Video surveillance • Gated & Secured Access Close to Campus • Boxes and moving supplies available • Indoor Storage & Fenced Storage Located at:

Mini-S torage

r.

Self Storage Services Include:

e Way

eD

DJ MIXX

On th

il Co

This Saturday. . .

On The Way Mini-Self Storage provides gated and secured storage units with 24 hour access. Open 7 days a week!

Hwy 78 / Atlanta Hwy. Tim

oth yR

d.

Br

ge

id

. Rd


The Red & Black

LGBT: Athens gays seek place to call their own ➤ From Page A1 “Because I have so much freedom and so forth, then what is the need for the center?” he said. “If we want to talk about starting, I think we need to talk about starting an assessment before we put the cart before the horse.” The return of gay bars Gulley’s thoughts on a supportive, integrated community within Athens explains his views on an LGBT center, but the community can only go so far to support LGBT-labeled businesses, like gay bars. Since the early 1990s, Athens played host to several bars labeled as gay bars, including Boneshakers, an establishment that called Athens home for 12 years. Roberts said she came to Athens too late to enjoy the nightlife at an LGBT establish-

Thursday, June 19, 2014 ment, but would like to see the creation of a gay bar in Athens. “It’s a shame,” she said. “Fortunately, there are a number of bars in the area that do allow us to have events in their spaces, but to have a dedicated bar for us would be very nice. I don’t know why, but we haven’t been able to sustain a dedicated space every single day of the week.” Looking at bars such as Boneshakers and Detour, Gulley said opening and profiting from a gay bar in today’s Athens would be “difficult.” “I’m a 36-year-old professional, married, gay man,” he said. “I’m going to go [to gay bars] a couple of times a year because I’m going to let my hair down and go. I’m not going to go very often. So who is going to this establishment? Mainly collegeaged folks who either are not old enough to drink or don’t have enough money to drink. Bars and clubs make their money off of alcohol sales, so if people like me who have money to spend are not going to consistently go—not because it’s not fun and festive, but it’s not a part of my life—how is a bar going to make money?” Veiga said bars in Athens host LGBT-affiliated events, but only on occasion. “They operate outside of the

LGBT realm, too, so I don’t think Athens is ready for a Blake’s or a Burkhart’s­ —like they have in Atlanta—anytime soon,” he said. “I don’t know if we’re at that level yet.” Gulley said the lack of sustainability is not in the idea, but the execution of the idea. “I think it’d be a great addition to Athens, but the model that has been tried so far is not one that is viable because they can’t make money,” he said. “People have said to me there should be one that’s an afternoon bar ... with a little bit of food that can transition to dancing at night. That might work, but it hasn’t been tested.” The practicality of a gay bar, Gulley said, also ties back to the level of support for LGBT individuals. He said the integrated support for the LGBT community in Athens is different from the lack of “community feel” in Long Beach, Calif. “The entire time I lived out there, I never went to just a bar. If I was going to go out at night or even have a drink in the afternoon, it was the gays were supposed to go and stay where the gays were supposed to stay,” he said. “It wasn’t integrated. What I like in Athens is the community that exists.”

News A3

Ricky Roberts co-founded the Athens group Common Ground to advocate for the establishment of an LGBT resource center in Athens. ORLANDO PIMENTEL/Staff

706-543-3473 283 E. Clayton St. Athens, GA 30601 www.tenas.com

We buy Gold, Diamonds, and used Rolex. Paying Top Dollar.

Where Athens gets engaged.

FREE APPETIZER W/ PURCHASE OF ONE ENTREE

The University of Georgia veterinary hospital completed its second successful feline kidney transplant surgery using stem cell regeneration. Courtesy UGA News

1 per table. Valid w/this coupon. Expires 6/30/14

UGA vet hospital uses stem cells in successful feline kidney transplant BY BRAD MANNION @bradcrumbs After suffering from chronic renal, or kidney, failure, four-year-old Arthur went under the knife to receive his newly transplanted kidney in May. He is fortunate his body accepted the kidney with the help of adult feline stem cells — his own, that is. Veterinary surgeons in the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital transplanted Arthur’s kidney, using adult stem cells pulled from his own fat cells. Chad Schmiedt, a board-certified small animal surgeon who heads UGA’s feline kidney transplant program, proposed the idea to use adult stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells, which has greater potential for Arthur’s body not to reject the new kidney. Arthur’s surgery marks the second successful feline kidney transplant using feline adult stem cells performed at the hospital, but it is not common practice. “Stem cells are a lot more popular in horses and are typically used for musculo-skeletal problems— tendon injuries, ligament injuries and arthritis,” Schmiedt said. “That’s been the majority of the use so far. I just took those cells and used them in a different way.”

Researchers outline six challenges to US natural resources BY EVELYN ANDREWS @evelynvandrews Two University of Georgia professors have co-authored a map that outlines six “grand challenges” to the U.S. in regards to natural resources. Rhett Jackson, a professor in the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, was one of 35 researchers that participated in creating the map. Jackson said the purpose of the roadmap is to prioritize research and policy decisions by deciding the most important issues surrounding natural resources. “The idea of this roadmap is to set priorities for research and outreach that the scientists, by consensus, decide are the issues that are most important that we need to be focusing on,” Jackson said. David Stooksbury, a professor

After Schmiedt harvested the fat cells, he sent them to the UGA Regenerative Medicine Service to grow the stem cells prior to Arthur’s surgery. John Peroni, associate professor of large animal surgery in the College of Veterinary Medicine, heads the laboratory and said this process is common for him and his staff. “When folks with ... an animal require stem cell treatment, they come to my lab,” he said. The stem cells used in the process are adult stem cells, which are different from embryonic stem cells, a category that sparks much debate in human and veterinary medicine. “There are similar concerns because embryonic stem cells, which are the ones that have the moral and ethical controversy associated with them, come from embryos,” Peroni said. “Because you have to terminate the life of the embryo to get the stem cells regardless of what you do with it, an embryo is an embryo.” Stem cell research of this nature is more common in veterinary medicine, which looks to adult stem cells more frequently than human surgeries do, Peroni said. “It’s pretty common now to treat veterinary species with stem cells,” he said. “The kidney transplant application is not common because you need substantial expertise.”

in the School of Engineering, worked on the overall coordination of the map’s coordination. “We surveyed the natural resources community of scholars that brought input of what they thought emerging research issues are going to be over the next decade.” Stooksbury said this roadmap will help grants be funded to the greatest priorities in natural resources. “The hope of this document is that it will guide research and grant-funding oppurtunities in the natural resource field,” Stooksbury said. The six “grand challenges” that the researchers determined were sustainability, water, agriculture, energy, climate change and education. The education portion deals with helping the shape the curriculum in schools around the most pressing challenges the U.S. faces. Jackson worked on the portion of the map that dealt with water challenges. “We collaboratively went through the literature, talked to colleagues, and the point of the roadmap was, based on current knowledge, decide what most important water quality issues are,” Jackson said. The audiences the map is meant for are the policy makers, federal science agencies, state

706.850.3020

1155 Mitchell Bridge Rd.

Marker Seven Coastal Grill Bring in this coupon to

BUY 1 Carafe GET 1 Half off!

Not valid with any other offers. Expires 6/30/14

On the corner of Lumpkin

and

Milledge.

706850-3451

Monday: General Knowledge / Wednesday: Sports! 8:30pm / Win house Cash!! 13120

1860 BARNETT SHOALS RD. STE 101 • 706-850-1916

BUY ONE ENTREE GET ONE 1/2 PRICE (Equal or lesser value)

Thai Cuisine *With UGA ID

Not vaild w/ any other offer

1 LARGE 1 TOPPING PIZZA DINNER FOR 4 WITH 4 SMALL SALADS for $25.99

governments, universities and the general public. “The main audience is for policy and decision makers so that they understand where we need to be doing research in order to *Limit one per customer & must present coupon be able to get valid and good 320 E. Clayton St. • Downtown answers to pressing issues in natural resources,” Stooksbury said. Become a Plasma Donor Today Jackson echoed Stooksbury sentiment in saying the map will Must be 18 years or older, have Please help us help those valid I.D. along with proof of SS# coping with rare, chronic, prioritize research. and local residency. genetic diseases. “One of the big intended audiWalk-ins Welcome. New donors can receive $30 today and $70 this week! Book your appointment online ences are the federal science New Donors will receive a $10 today. agencies that fund researchers. It bonus on their 2 donation with this ad. helps them decide what the most Biotest Plasma Center Ask about our Specialty 233 West Hancock Ave. important issues are when they Programs! Athens, GA 30601 are thinking about what types of 706-354-3898 www.biotestplasma.com @BPCAthens www.facebook.com/BiotestPlasmaCenterAthens research projects they want to fund. This would be a guide for that,” Jackson said. 1/9/14 11:39 PM The map was created in part-085RedandBlack3.22x1.5.indd 1 nership with the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via a grant to Oregon State University. “Scientists at our public and land-grant universities have developed this report to more clearly identify the challenges we face and prioritize our research, education and outreach efforts,” APLU President Peter McPherson said in a press release from the APLU. “It provides a needed framework and should help guide policy decisions in the coming years.” nd


A4 News

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Red & Black

Views

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Red & Black wants to know what you think — so let’s start a conversation. Email: OPINIONS@RANDB.COM or LETTERS@RANDB.COM Facebook: Like THE RED & BLACK Twitter: @REDANDBLACK

OUR TAKE

Starbucks offers to help students

S

tarbucks has made national news with the tuition reimbursement plan it will begin offering its workers for attendance at Arizona State University. With the rising cost of tuition in the US, praises have been sung in the company’s name. There have also been others pointing to the fine print of the deal—the part that says employees will be reimbursed for every 21 credit hours after completing the course. That approximates to $10,000, the Chronicle cites. Another point of contention comes with the fact that only juniors and seniors will be fully reimbursed, freshmen and sophomores receive roughly half and an employee must be working 20 hours per week to qualify. On the first day the news broke, the populace rejoiced and patted the company on the back. The days following, we’ve quickly began to point at all the company isn’t doing, or the fine print, rather than what it’s offering its employees. As a rising fifth-year senior, it’s been my experience that no one scholarship, grant or entity will completely cover the cost of tuition. That’s the biggest point we need to remember when it comes to this deal Starbucks has struck with its employees— expecting the company to cover the entire cost of tuition is farfetched. I’ll admit, being a resident of Georgia means I receive in-state tuition costs at UGA as well as have a portion of my tuition covered by the HOPE Scholarship. What’s a student to do whenever scholarships and work benefits don’t cover the full cost? Student loans. No, taking out loans this early in our life isn’t fun. There isn’t a physical object we can touch for signing away what feels like a portion of our souls. That’s ok, though. Were gaining an education, something I was raised to believe is priceless. While Starbucks’s deal with its employees may come with fine print and a few realities that employees weren’t hoping for, the deal as a whole is another of the possible ways for these individuals to fund their education. It may take the student incurring debt to pay for the 21 credit hours initially, but that money will be reimbursed to the student. There’s even the possibility that, with student loans, the student can’t cover the entire tuition cost. But that’s where the individual has to seek out other tools, other scholarships, grants and loan possibilities. But instead of pointing the finger at all the fine print points of Starbucks’s new plan, let’s acknowledge and give a nod to the fact that the company has created one more valuable resource for its workers. From another student’s point of view, that just means there’s a smaller pool of others to compete with for funds. — Stephen Mays for the editorial board

WORLD CUP: After losing to Ghana in the World Cup for the last two years in a row, Team USA finally broke the curse. Team USA defeated Ghana 2-1.

Ethics scandal finally over for the state

Summer heat not enough to slow Athens

I

A

f you pay taxes in the state of Georgia, congratulations—your hard-earned money just helped the state pay off disgruntled former employees. After years of investigating and millions in court fees, the state now knows that the State Ethics Commission is not so ethical. Apparently, the name “Ethics Commission” was too ironic after it was revealed that the commission was being charged with ethics violations. The State has since then changed the name to “Georgia Government Transparency and Campaign Finance Commission.” The state has finally closed all court courses against its ethics commission $3 million later. Now that the state has resolved its legal issues, it must now answer to the public. The scandal has received national attention and has left the state doubting the government’s ability to lead. Gov. Deal and his staff may have managed to avoid indictment, but the damage has been done. It has never been clearer that it is time for change in Georgia’s administration. In 2011, Stacey Kalberman was ousted as director of the Ethics Commission after pursuing an investigation into Deal’s campaign finances. Kalberman claims that she was fired because of “somebody’s desire to quash the Deal investigation.” Deal has been accused of “personally profiting from his campaign’s aircraft rentals, of improperly using state campaign funds for legal bills related to a federal investigation and of accepting campaign contributions that exceed limits,” according to the Atlanta Journal -Constitution. In April, a Fulton County court agreed that Kalberman was fired as a result of initiating an investigation into Deal’s 2010 campaign. Tax payers have every right to be upset, after all they are the ones covering the $3 million price tag. However, voters should be equally

Editor In Chief: Jana French Managing Editor: Stephen Mays News Editor: Brad Mannion Associate News Editor: Daniel Funke Assistant News Editor: Leighton Rowell Sports Editor: Nick Suss Variety Editor: Shelby Eggers Views Editor: Sam Woo Photo Editor: Joshua L. Jones Chief Photographer: John Roark Multimedia Editor: Emily Erdelyan Design Editor: A.J. Archer Editorial Adviser: Erin France Sports Editorial Adviser: Cy Brown

Views Editor

upset. Though Deal has denied all allegations and has been cleared of all charges, many are left wondering if the governor is involved in the scandal. “I would simply say that any ethics allegations against me were resolved about two years ago,” Deal responded after being asked about the trial. What Deal fails to mention is that he was part of an extensive FBI investigation in 2013 as a result of the ethics scandal. Fox News included Georgia on its list of “America’s Most Corrupt States,” and according to the Washington Post, “Georgia is really, really, really, really corrupt.” “Resigning from Congress to avoid an ethics investigation was only the beginning of Gov. Deal’s corrupt track record,” according to CREW’s 2009 Most Corrupt report. As governor, Deal is the state’s highest-ranking elected official and represents Georgia at the national level. This being said, being associated with an ethics scandal is unacceptable. As Governor, Deal represents the state 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. When voters elected Deal, they entrusted him to do what is best for Georgia. That trust has been broken. In politics, there are no second chances. One mistake can destroy everything that you have worked for – just ask former congressman Anthony Weiner. Quite frankly, Deal does not deserve a second chance. As a state, it is time to cut our losses and attempt to save Georgia from further embarrassment. — Sam Woo is a sophomore from Marietta majoring in business administration and international affairs

Fighting a war in Iraq is a lost cause

D

espite the best efforts of the United States, it looks like all hope is lost in Iraq. The Iraqi government is in ruins and is failing to protect its citizens from the threat of a terrorist take over. 4,500 American lives, $800 million and 11 years later, the United States is still impossibly far from ensuring peace in Iraq. Iraq has proven that not even the world’s most powerful military can force a country to change. Though it is important to protect American interests in the Middle East, it may be time to accept defeat in Iraq. The War in Iraq is by far one of the most controversial military conflicts of our time, and there are a wide range of reasons for U.S. involvement. Scholars give several reasons behind the invasion of Iraq, including fight-

KITTEN RESCUE: Errand Frazier of Vero Beach, Florida, cut open a part of his pickup truck to save a kitten’s life. Frazier reportedly heard purring coming from his truck while on a fishing trip.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

Sam Woo

h, Athens. Home of the Bulldogs, incomparable Southern food, temperate weather and downtown bar crawls to die for. Many call this place their home away from home during the school year, taking full advantage of the boundless freedom and beauty that this city routinely provides its inhabitants. However, a select few never go back to their boring suburban lives, instead opting to stay in the Classic City during its most magical time: summer. Having just completed my first year at the University of Georgia, I truly did not know what to expect when living in Athens over the summer. Rumors and whisperings of empty parking garages, a lack of waiting at restaurants and days consumed with poolside studying filled my mind when contemplating the decision of whether or not to stay here during the summer. For those simple reasons, I decided to stay here while the other students left, and I can honestly say I have not looked back. Athens is somewhat of a paradox in the months spanning from May to early August. The streets are largely empty, and there’s not a whole lot going on. Yet, at the same time, there’s never an absence of things to keep one busy; summer jobs and classes consume most of the day, leaving nights open for relaxation and things deemed impossible to accomplish during the crippling stress of the regular academic year. Now it’s true that the things enjoyed by Athenians during the

Sam Woo

Views Editor

ing terrorism, protecting economic interests and state-building. All of these things are great, but is it really worth it at this point? In some aspects, U.S. involvement did help restore stability in Iraq, but ultimately, there is only so much that the military can do. For the most part, the United States succeeded in pushing al Qaeda out of Iraq; however, an even more dangerous and radical group has taken its place. The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant, or ISIS, took full advantage of the situation after American forces pulled out of Iraq in 2011. “The U.S. military can do many things supremely well,” argues Bill Schneider for Reuters. “But nation-

TRACY MORGAN: Actor-comedian Tracy Morgan is showing signs of improvements after the fatal accident that left him in critical condition and killed comedian James McNair. Morgan’s medical team is optimistic about his recovery.

Our Staff

Staff Writers: Shannon Adams, Evelyn Andrews, James Anhut, Michelle Baruchman, Rachel Brannon, Kelly Cunningham, Benjamin Dell’Orto, Taylor Denman, Nikki Eggers, Alex Everhart, Justin Fedich, Marena Galluccio, Elizabeth Gerber, Evan Greenberg, Charlette Hall, Justin Hubbard, Danielle Jackson, Laura James, Jaclyn Kinney, Hunter Lacey, Sarah Lane, Savannah Levins, Mariya Lewter, Lauren McDonald, Erin Miller, Martha Nixon, Samantha O’Brien, Cody Pace, Andrew Plaskowsky, Scott Powell, Kevin Riley, Tyler Serritt, Austin Smith, Kennington Smith, Jaylon Thompson, Laura Thompson, Manfredi Tosini, Mariana Viera, Taylor West, Joseph Youorski Senior Reporters: Kendall Trammell, Erica Techo Staff Photographers: Jonah Allen, Christina Cannon, Orlando Pimentel, Heather Pitts, Diondra Powers, Taylor Renner, Hannah Pap Rocki, Randy Schafer, Ashleigh Shay, Taylor Craig Sutton, Polly Turrentine

Staff Videographers: David Glenn, Rainey Gregg Page Designers: Caitlin LeMoine, Lydia Davis, Nicole Wasson, Mi Lee Yu

ADVERTISING: 706-433-3001

Advertising Director: Will White Student Ad Manager: Ali Rezvan Inside Sales Manager: Laurel Holland Account Executives: Graham Currie, Allison Galenbeck, Abbey Loos, Anna Martin, Judson Parson, Kelly Taylor Student PR Manager: Stephanie Pham PR Team: Russel Abad, Lauren Blight, Patrice Boswell, Chelsea Gray, Jamie Herndon, Caitlin Huff, Megan McNerney, Alston Meritt, Brandon Murphy, Colleen Reilly

Daniel Funke

Associate News Editor

summer are small. However, maybe it’s the overworked journalist in me speaking, but it’s these niceties, like lying in a hammock on deserted North Campus or not having to wait in line at Starbucks, that make the city a paradise of sorts in the humid haunches of June and July. And of course, in addition to simple, good old Southern rest and relaxation, summer in Athens sees its fair share of excitement. AthFest brings in thousands of concertgoers every year, during which cheap drinks and less crowds downtown make for easy intoxication, a trend seen almost all summer in fact. And who can forget kayaking on the Broad River, one of Athens’ greatest summer traditions? For those that travel around the world during the summer: kudos to you. I’m sure you’re international escapades will render most of your friend group nauseatingly jealous. In my opinion though, summer provides the perfect time for students to experience what Athens is truly like. I love this city more than words can describe, and a little heat and humidity won’t scare me away. Perhaps a townie or two might, though. — Daniel Funke is a sophomore from Alpharatta majoring in journalism and international affairs

building is political, not military. And politics is not something the military can do very well.” Political discourse is able to succeed where military capabilities cannot. Establishing an amicable relationship with the people of Iraq can accomplish much more than airstrikes. Airstrikes instill fear into the innocent citizens of Iraq and only leads to hatred of the West. For the past 11 years, the United States has taken the wrong foreign policy approach in Iraq. The people of Iraq need more than just military aid, they need to know that there is something worth fighting for. If the United States government is not willing to engage in political talks with Iraq, it is time to leave Iraq completely, because war is not the answer. — Sam Woo is a sophomore from Marietta majoring in business administration and international affairs

KFC: Three year old Victoria Wilcher, recovering from a pit bull attack in April, was kicked out of a KFC in Mississippi. Employees claimed that, “her face is disrupting our customers.”

PRODUCTION: 706-433-3021 Creative Director: Dan Roth Student Production Manager: Victoria Nikolich

BUSINESS: 706-433-3000

General Manager: Natalie McClure Office Manager: Ashley Oldham Student Business Assistant: Chandler McGee Inside Sales & Classified Manager: Laurel Holland Distribution/Maintenance Manager: Kwesi Maison Distribution Assistant: Dimitrios Giannakopoulos Circulation Assistant: John Berrigan Distribution Team: Drew Allen, Josh Landers, John Ward


A6 Athfest

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Red & Black

AthFest, more than the music ADRIENNE ANDREWS AND SHELBY EGGERS @a_l_andrews @shelbybeggers

In conjunction with AthFest, Cine will show rock music documentaries and short, locally made films from their V.H.S. Film Festival. JOHN ROARK/Staff

THE

Furnished & Unfurnished Units

RIGHTCHOICE.

Water, Cable & Internet Included

Everything you need, everything you want and a few extra surprises—ALL RIGHT HERE.

5 & 10 Month Leases Available

See all of our fabulous amenities and now, apply and sign your lease online! ReserveAtAthens.com 175 International Drive | Athens, GA 30605 | 706.548.4400

AthFest is once again sweeping through the streets of downtown Athens, and with it comes a variety of art events. Yes! There is stuff at AthFest other than music. Although the line-up this year is amazing, there are a ton of other things attendees should check out this weekend. As usual, AthFest will be hosting their Juried Artists’ Market on Washington Street between Lumpkin and Hull streets. Over 50 artists from the Sourtheast will have booths to show and sell their work. Local judges look at all the booths and awards are given out to selected artists. There are all types of crafts available for purchase including caricatures, ceramics, fabric, clothing and accessories, glass, jewelry, musical instruments, photography, woodworking and furniture. For those who are new to Athens or who want to find out more about its rich history, Classic City Tours, a component of the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation, will host Athens Music History Tours during AthFest. Paul Butchart, an Athens native and music historian, will give a part walking, part bus tour of Athens. “I have been a part of the music community for years. In 1977, my band, The Side Effects, opened for R.E.M.’s first show,” Butchart said. “Over the years, people would ask me to show them around Athens and then the welcome center asked me to start giving official tours.” The tour will be on Saturday and Sunday at 10:40 a.m. and will include Downtown Athens, the Steeple, Nuçi’s Space, REM Trestle and an Athens Art Rocks exhibit. Participants should meet at the Welcome Center, and those with a AthFest wristband get a free CD of “Finest Worksongs: Athens Bands Play the Music of R.E.M.” Athens’ favorite independent theater, Ciné, also has some special events happening. “Ciné has hosted a film series and live music shows during every AthFest since Ciné’s opening in 2007, so this is our eighth year in partnership with the festival, and we’re excited to once again be part of this great downtown event,” said Kamala Lyons, Ciné’s communications director. Ciné offers a line-up of many free and discounted rock documentaries, complete with Q&A sessions with the directors, all of which have local ties; short films from the local filmmaking collective named Videographers’ Hella-big

ATHFEST ART EVENTS WHAT: Artisan Market WHERE: Washington St. between Lumpkin and Hull Streets WHEN: Fri. 5-10 p.m., Sat. 12-10 p.m., Sun. 12:30-8 p.m. WHAT: Rock Docs, V.H.S Film Festival WHERE: Ciné WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Thur. through Sun. WHAT: Music History Tour WHERE: Welcome Center WHEN: 10:30 a.m. Sat. and Sun. Show (VHS); and live music exhibitions to enrich this year’s Athfest experience. In reference to Ciné’s RockDocs showcase, David Marr, a Ciné board member commented, “This line-up of films strikes me as an exceptional one.” Marr placed special emphasis on Jason Thrasher’s documentary entitled Places in Peril, saying, “The of Montreal film seems like a big one. I don’t even think it’s been released yet.” Aside from its cinematic events, Ciné is also doubling as a live music venue during the latter half of AthFest. “The Cinélab events space will also be part of the festival’s club crawl, with live music performances on Friday and Saturday night … and we’ll also be hosting a kids dance party with DJ Mahogany as part of Kidsfest on Saturday afternoon,” Lyons explained. KidsFest, another event hosted AthFest, will also hold a concert from 12:30–5:00 p.m. on Saturday and 1:00– 4:45 p.m. on Sunday that will feature Zokky the Kangaroo, the Angaza Dancers, the Clarke Middle School Orchestra, Nuçi’s Space’s Camp Amped and others. Explore all that Athens has to offer at this year’s AthFest!

LUXURY STUDENT APARTMENTS COMING FALL 2015! Georgia Heights has everything a University of Georgia student needs and more! Our one, two and four bedroom floor plans feature contemporary furnishings, premium interior finishes and modern amenities perfect for your lifestyle. Plus, you’ll be just steps away from The University of Georgia and all the fun and excitment Athens has to offer. Visit us online for the latest Georgia Heights news and stay updated on our progress!

GeorgiaHeights.com Temporary Leasing Office Opening Fall 2014! 162 West Clayton Street | Athens, GA 30601 | 1.800.784.3033


The Red & Black

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Variety A7

AthFest music preview: Twelve bands to make you dance FAMILY AND FRIENDS

RUBY THE RABBITFOOT

REPTAR

ELF POWER

Playing their first show last April, these seven friends break down music to its most simplistic and beautiful form. Overwhelmingly supported by everyone in the Athens community, their first album, Love You Mean It, came out in January. Two guitars, two percussionists, a bass, a violin and a ton of vocals sing to your soul and make you inexplicably happy.

Since the release of her album, New as Dew, in March, Ruby Kenderick has emerged with more confidence and a better definition of what her music is and where she is headed. Sexy and fun, Ruby captivates you with her intoxicatingly sweet sounds with deceptively deep lyrics. Get lucky and head to Ruby’s performance Saturday at 8:30 p.m.

Named after a character from the ’90s TV show “The Rugrats," Reptar is a synth-pop/alternative rock band whose range of sounds keep you interested. Their most recent album, Body Faucet, received lukewarm reviews but definitely shows major potential. Reptar continues to be highly talked about and will continue to be for the foreseeable future.

One of the oldest bands at AthFest, Elf Power has been playing for 19 years, most recently with Neutral Milk Hotel, putting out 12 albums. Over the years, some of the band members have changed several times. Despite the changes, Elf Power has stayed the “modern melodic pychedelic folk rock” band that it was in 1994.

Fri., 7:45 p.m. at Pulaski Street

Sat., 8:30 p.m. at Hull Street

Fri., 9 p.m. at Pulaski Street

Sat., 7:30 p.m. at Pulaski Street

NEW MADRID

DANA SWIMMER

MONSOON

FOUR EYES

If you want to listen to some super chill songs with sick guitar riffs, New Madrid is for you. Their more popular songs like “Country Moon, Pt. I” imply a reference for the songs with faster melodies, but the slower songs with beautiful, dream-like sounds are a part of what makes them unique. But no drunkenly yelling “Country Moon, Pt. I”… please.

Embracing the title of “run-of-themill-dad-rock” (Gordon Lamb), Dana Swimmer continues to flourish despite a lot of hate and being placed in a category that is in opposition to many of the long standing bands of Athens. Thriving off competition, Dana Swimmer put out their debut album, Veloce, last year.

Monsoon, not the 1980’s UK rock band, but three 18 year-olds make up this “swing-new-wave-punkrock” band. They recorded Monsoon for a Wuxtry Record’s Record Store Day Compliation Album in 2013. Having performed all over Athens for the past year, Monsoon has yet to fizzle out and is still riding on its recent local fame.

Indie-pop artist Erin Lovett a.k.a. Four Eyes (assumingly a homage to the big-rimmed glasses she wears) will steal your heart with her simple songs that resonate the truths of life. “Our Insides,” the single from her new album, Our Insides, a tribute to jobs in the food service industry will become your new favorite song to sing in the shower.

Sat., 11:15 p.m. at Georgia Theatre

Fri., 6 p.m. at Hull Street

Fri., 10 p.m. at Go Bar

Fri., 10 p.m. at Flicker Theatre

KISHI BASHI

YO MAMA’S BIG FAT BOOTY BAND

MUUY BIIEN

THE COATHANGERS

For the past year, Kishi Bashi seems to be all anyone can talk about. Associated with Of Montreal and Regina Spektor, he has performed all over the country and recently headlined Slingshot. With a series of looping and huge orchestral arrangements, his sickingly sweet electro-pop songs will make you feel connected to the universe.

If you want the funk, they got it. Performing since 2002 all over the country in festivals like Wakarusa, they have perfected their mix of funk, soul, rap and high-energy rock. If their performance at AthFest is anything like their others, it will be full of crazy outfits, instrumental riffs and made up words. So get over to Pulaski Street and shake yo big fat booty.

If you feel angry after a long, hot day of drinking, then scream your feelings with Muuy Biien. Joshua Evans, the founder and front man, is a tortured soul that writes about hard truths and radiates hardcore punk-rock. Full of fierce rage, this punk-rock band’s name, translating to “very good” in Spanish, is highly ironic. For moshing at its finest, go to Go Bar on Friday.

Starting out as a couple of girls who just want to have fun, The Coathangers were born, starring three bad-ass chicks punk-rocking out on the guitar, bass and drums. The title of their fourth album, Suck My Shirt, inspired by one of the band members attempting to suck spilled tequila out of a shirt, tells you all you need to know.

Sat., 9 p.m. at Pulaski Street

Sat., 6 p.m. at Pulaski Street

Fri., 12 a.m. at Go Bar

Fri., 12:30 a.m. at 40 Watt — Compiled by Shelby Eggers, @shelbybeggers

2 bed | 2 bath

Just $445

per person, 12 installments

RIVER C LU B

938 sq ft

W

D

DW

$

live-riverclub.com

0 DOWN - limited time

Pet friendly UGA student townhomes

0

$ TM

DOWN

complete student living Rates from $370

no deposit , no fees LIMITED TI ME

live-riverclub.com/townhomes


A S H 2 N D A NN U A L

battle of the

bands JUNE 27 • 2-6PM • FREE FOOD & PRIZES

@ LAKESIDE APARTMENTS

1ST PLACE WILL RECEIVE

$1,000 2ND PLACE WILL RECEIVE PRACTICE TIME AT NUÇI’S SPACE

AT H E N S S T U D E N T H O U S I N G .CO M THE CLUB • LAKESIDE • RIVER MILL While supplies last. See office for details. Prizes may vary.


The Red & Black

Thursday, June 19, 2014

News A9

AthFest energizes summer economy BY LEIGHTON ROWELL @lmrow Athens residents will welcome the beginning of the AthFest summer music festival — and a crowd of approximately 6,000 people — this weekend. However, AthFest is good not just for music lovers, but for business as well. “It’s the busiest weekend of the year excluding football weekends,” Hubble Beasley, the Green Room general manager said. “Actually, it’s busier than some football weekends.” Beasley anticipates that Green Room, which is a venue featuring acts like Dank Sinatra and LINGO for the AthFest Club Crawl, will be at capacity each night of AthFest. “I think it’s a combination of bands and the Club Crawl, and people trying to get out of the heat and get something cold to drink,” he said. “The music definitely helps.” Richard Mikulka, a bartender at Flicker Bar and Theatre, agreed with Beasley. “The stage is right out front of where we are, so the street is full of a couple thousand people that want to get out of the heat,” he said. Like Green Room, Flicker is hosting shows as part of the Club Crawl. Karbomb as well as Timmy and the Tumblers, in addition to six other musicians and groups, will play. Since AthFest is a non-profit event, the 14 establishments participating in the AthFest Club Crawl do not receive any proceeds from wristband sales for the shows they host. Still, Beasley said he expects Green Room to have “double the business” it would have on a normal weekend. In addition, hotels around Athens also benefit from the business AthFest brings to the city. Angela Oliver, the Athens Holiday Inn Express sales manager, said that although there are other

An expected 6,000 concertgoers will be in downtown Athens for the AthFest Music Festival, and for bars, hotels and otherbusinesses in the area, they expect to see sales increase as a result. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff events and attractions that bring out-of-towners to Athens, the Holiday Inn Express books more guests during this weekend each year. “AthFest does bring in people,” she said. “Probably 20 to 25 extra room guests per night.” Both the Holiday Inn Express and the Holiday Inn have been sponsors of AthFest for the last five or six years, according to Scott Norris, vice president of sales and marketing at Benson’s Hospitality Group. Benson’s represents both of Athens’ Holiday Innowned establishments, the downtown Hilton Garden Inn and SpringHill Suites by Marriott in Oconee County. “We are a big supporter [of AthFest] and I think it’s a great summer economic engine for downtown Athens over a time frame typically where there is just not anything in the way of a convention or [another] city-wide event,” Norris said. “It’s great for

the hotel community.” For example, Norris said he thinks many Atlanta residents stay in Athens during the weekend of the festival. “People look at AthFest as a great chance to come back to Athens and just have a fun overnight stay and partake in everything that is AthFest,” he said. “Weekends in June typically do pretty well, but our occupancy this weekend at our downtown properties is pretty strong and we think that some of that is definitely related to AthFest.” In fact, Norris said he believes the “lion’s share” of economic activity in Athens this weekend has something to do with AthFest. “It’s something that we have really helped support and we will continue to do so in the future,” he said. “It’s a great leisure event that helps the city in June.”

CULTURE TALK

Black Affairs Council demonstrates prominence in social equality, traditions at UGA BY BRAD MANNION @bradcrumbs From its Unity Ball in the spring to its march against social injustice in the fall of the 20132014 school year, the University of Georgia’s Black Affairs Council had a school year as varied as its organization. As one of the 13 groups in the Office of Multicultural Services and Programs, the Black Affairs Council hosts several planned and unplanned events every year. “They usually do an event called Cafe Soul, and it’s kind of a competition that features student talent as well as usually a professional performance, and that can be anywhere from singing to playing instruments or spoken word,” said Megan Segoshi, senior coordinator in MSP. Among their other events is the Unity Ball, which is one of the BAC’s largest events on campus. “That’s a formal event that features a keynote speaker-from offcampus usually,” Segoshi said. “It’s to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of unity and diversity.” The event also attracts the attention of students not affiliated with the BAC, Segoshi said. “Oftentimes, students from many of our other student organizations attend this event, as well as students from Greek organizations and students around campus,” she said. The BAC has a history that precedes its name today, when it was called the Black Student Union before 1981. When UGA Vice President for Student Affairs Victor Wilson was a student at UGA, he saw an example of some of the change the BSU went through during the push to have its own meeting space. “We didn’t know any other thing to do except be happy ... because we went from nothing to something while also feeling that we had won a major battle,” Wilson said in a previous Red & Black article. In fall 2013, the BAC faced similar challenges as a result of a hateful Facebook post on their page. The post solicited significant student responses, including a march against social injustice on campus called “A Minority’s Plea: When will the injustice end?” in November. UGA students from the BAC, LGBT Resource Center and Undocumented Student Alliance

WORLD CUP STARTS JUNE 12TH! Watch EVERY game here! $1 OFF Guinness and $1.99 Pretzel Roll Sliders for every World Cup game when you ask for the R&B World Cup Special! 1860 BARNETT SHOALS RD. STE 101 • 706-850-1916

FRESH PRODUCE, KIMCHEE FRESH $.89 TOFU SEAFOOD, DUMPLINGS, RAMEN SNACKS, SWEETS, GLUTEN FREE

Members of the Black Affairs Council, along with members of the LGBT Resource Center and the Undocumented Student Alliance at UGA, marched on Sanford Drive in protest over derogatory comments made on the BAC and LGBT group's Facebook pages. SEAN TAYLOR/Staff

“We wanted to make sure we are addressing the issues the right way.” Caroline Bailey

Former Black Affairs Council President

participated in the march, and people took to social media with the hashtag #Home4Who in recognition of the march. “We wanted to make sure we are addressing the issues the right way, so, for us, that looks like reporting it to the people that are over us,” said former BAC president Caroline Bailey in a previous Red & Black article. A decade before this march, the BAC also led a “100 Man March,” a protest leading from the Tate Student Center to the Arch in recognition of the declining enrollment of black males, a

time when black undergraduate enrollment for both genders was at 4.7 percent. But Segoshi said the BAC welcomes all students of backgrounds to join, with varying degrees of membership. “They have members who are paying members, so I think there’s a $10 membership fee for the whole year,” she said. “But there are also unpaid member who might not receive some of the perks like discounted tickets to their events. But the group is open to all students.” Much like other MSP groups, the BAC serves as a collaborative effort. But the organization is under the direction of executive members, Segoshi said. “They have a president, vice president and other executive board members,” she said. “Every year, there’s an election, so students who are returning can choose to run again for re-election, but they’re not guaranteed that spot.” Kiondre Dunnam, upcoming president of the BAC, was unable to be reached for comment.

Thai Cuisine (706) 543-8898

12:10 2:45 5:20 7:55 10:30

11:15 1:45 4:15 7:00 9:30

BUY ONE ENTREE GET 2nd ENTREE 1/2 OFF (Equal or lesser value) 489 East Clayton St. | cozyyumyum.com

$10 buckets of domestic bottle beers and $.75 oysters... +tax & tip.

414 N Thomas St./Downtown squareonefishco.com

A bottle of chef selected wine, an appetizer, 2 surf & turf dinners and dessert.


A10 News

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Red & Black

Students and faculty are working for the creation of a semester-long, two-hour SCUBA diving course for University of Georgia curriculum. Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Student petitions UGA administration to add diving instruction class BY EVELYN ANDREWS @evelynvandrews William Hancock, a senior anthropology major from Whigham, is trying to convince the administration to add SCUBA diving instruction as a course. Hancock said he brought this issue to administration because classes in the University of Georgia Department of Marine Sciences required diving certification. Students are still allowed to take the course without the certification, but they cannot participate in several portions of the course. Hancock said problems arise because students spend several hours and hundreds of dollars on class work, but none of that can be used toward graduation. “Students have to get certified — and none of us are receiving any credit for that time — and we have to pay for it,” Hancock said. Since UGA does not offer diving instruction as a class, students must receive instruction from private businesses such as Dolphin Dive Center, costing them approximately $300. SCUBA Dawgs at UGA, a student group dedicated to diving, does offer students the chance to learn and experience SCUBA, but it is also a group paid for

out of the student’s pocket and not included in a student’s tuition. Hancock said he thinks UGA should be willing to add the course since the money that is currently being spent at private businesses and organizations could instead go to the school. He also said the entire course lasts two days — these two days include three hours of classroom work and three hours of instruction a day. A third day is used to visit an actual stream or lake to practice diving. Brian Binder, the department head of the Department of Marine Sciences, is helping Hancock in the process. Binder said although the certification only takes three days, UGA could create a curriculum that would last an entire semester and would include diving instruction and how diving is used for scientific purposes. “The faculty member that proposed the course thought it would take a semester to learn about diving and how diving is used for scientific purposes, so he proposed a two-hour course,” Binder said. Binder said the twohour credit course should gain some momentum a year or two after its enactment.

Incoming freshmen will see the new face of Bolton Dining Commons, a two-story dining hall filled with multiple eating options, ncluding an area for hand-spun milkshakes. Courtesy University Architects for Facilities Planning

Bolton to offer new food options in fall BY GIL GOLAN @Gil_C_Golan After months of c o n s t r u c t i o n , University of Georgia students can expect an open and fully operational new Bolton Dining Commons on the first day of fall classes. “I think students are absolutely going to love this facility,” said Jeanne Fry, executive director of UGA Food Services. Construction on Bolton began in January 2013, with the final stages of construction set for completion this summer. UGA will demolish the old Bolton and construct a parking lot in its place, Fry said. The new two-story Bolton will seat more than 1,000 patrons at once. The first floor contains approximately 350 seats. Traditional tables, chairs, booths and seating on the outside balconies make up the roughly 650 seats on the second floor.

• 1 Bedroom Deluxe - $575 • 2 Bedroom Townhome $685 • Don’t pay $700+ per bedroom, pay $342.50 per bedroom!

T

FRIE N DL

Y!

PE

• SAVE MONEY!

MANAGEMENT

Students can enter the building from the entrance on either Baxter Street or the Tanyard Creek side, Fry said. She also said most of the staff will move from old Bolton to new Bolton, and the dining hall will need significantly more workers because of its increased size and scope. “There will be more employees because of the complexity of the stations, the physical size of the building and because of Sunday dinner,” Fry said. New Bolton will close early on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. and will reopen on Sunday from 2:30 to 8 p.m. for dinner. Bolton will have 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. hours Monday through Thursday and will be closed Saturday. Bolton is the only UGA dining hall that offers a Sunday dinner, Fry said. Patrons who enter from the Baxter Street entrance will immediately see the bakeshop called the Baxter Street Bakery, which will serve several homemade dessert options, Fry said. Upon entering through the Tanyard Creek side, patrons will see the Corner Market, a new version of the salad bar that many students enjoyed at the old Bolton. Fry said, “The Bolton salad bar has always been big on choices and we certainly wanted to capture that,” she said. Also on the first floor is a station made up of three sections called the Bolton Bistro, Fry said. The first section, Classic Cuisine, serves traditional food like meatloaf and fried chicken. The second section, Hickory and Oak, will offer smoked meat and barbeque sides for dinner and rotisserie chicken for lunch. The third part, called Special Selections, offers a food concept new to Food Services.

Construction of the new Bolton Dining Commons began in January 2013 and is scheduled to finish before the fall 2014 semester begins. JOHN ROARK/Staff “Our dietary team has worked on recipes and selections that will be free of the big eight allergens,” Fry said. According to the Food and Drug Administration, the big eight allergens are milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybeans. On the second floor, patrons can enjoy breakfast all day at the Sunrise Café, along with more traditional fare like burgers and fries at the Tanyard Grill and made-toorder sandwiches at the Tanyard Deli, Fry said. Allison Harper, marketing coordinator for Food Services, said each station in Worlds Fare has a name that means restaurant, or a close translation, in another language. Canting will serve a variety of Asian options, Trattoria will serve made-to-order sautéed pasta and Taqueria will

mostly serve Mexican and fresh hot wings. Patrons will also find a station called Shakes, which will serve hand-spun milkshakes, Harper said. Food Services has used the milkshakes as a selling point for the new Bolton and incoming freshmen have already had a taste of the milkshakes at orientation. “We’re giving out samples of the milkshakes for new students who are coming in,” Harper said. The first floor includes a lounge room called The Hearth that is open to all students and contains approximately 120 seats and several fireplaces, Harper said. Food Services expects an overwhelming number of patrons in the first few days after Bolton opens, Fry said, but the crowds will likely reduce in size after a few weeks of operation.


The Red & Black

Thursday, June 19, 2014

News A11

UGA study finds new biomass conversion process for producing affordable fuel BY DANIEL FUNKE @dpfunke

The University of Georgia received a $1.8 million grant to study cryptosporidium, a parasite prominent in many developing countries. Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Researchers receive $1.8 million grant to study deadly parasite BY EVELYN ANDREWS @evelynvandrews Researchers at the University of Georgia were awarded a $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study cryptosporidium, a parasite that causes a deadly diarrheal disease. “There needs to be more research into how the disease could be prevented or treated,” said Boris Striepen, the principle researcher for the grant. Although the disease affects people universally, it is more problematic in impoverished countries because of the lack of access to clean water and quality health care. C h r i s t i n a McCormick, a health specialist at the National Institutes of Health, said they awarded UGA researchers the grant after a long peer review process because of the threat cryptosporidiosis poses in the developing world. According to the Wo r l d Health Organization, diarrheal diseases account for a greater percentage of deaths for children under five years of age than malaria and HIV/ AIDS combined. McCormick said previous studies cited similar findings that found cryptosporidium causes a large portion of diarrheal disease. “Crypto is actually a large contributor to diarrheal disease in the developing world, so it is important from a public health point of view,” she said. “It is a problem [in the U.S.] too, but it is a much bigger problem in developing countries,” Striepen said. Another reason cryptosporidium affects developing countries more significantly is because of the malnourishment that young children often face. While a healthy adult’s immune system will often fight off the disease in about two weeks, small children are not able to do so, especially if malnourished, Striepen said. Although the disease is often more deadly in developing countries, it remains dangerous even in developed countries. One of the most famous outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee after the city’s water supply was contaminated with the parasite. An estimated 69 people were killed and 400,000 infected, according to the Center for Disease Control. Even though cryptosporidium is a problem, scientists have shied away from studying the parasite, possibly because of the challenges it poses when trying to research it, Striepen said. While most other pathogens are easy to grow in a culture, cryptosporidium will only last a few days. The grant the researchers received will be used to develop new ways to grow and manipulate the parasite. “The second problem, and that is what

this grant is about, is our experimental tools to manipulate the organism are very poor,” Striepen said. Striepen and his colleagues will use the grant to develop new techniques that involve genetic modification and will cause the parasite to emit light or change color, making it easier to detect. “One thing we can do is to make the parasite produce a protein that is very easy to detect,” he said. This technique will

help researchers study the parasite as it spreads and how it responds to drug treatments. Striepen said other methods they will now be able to try include deleting proteins from the parasite to narrow down the important ones to study and develop weakened versions of the parasite that will grow long enough to induce an immune response but not well enough to cause disease.

A study conducted by researchers at the University of Georgia may be the key for unlocking the future of more affordable transportation. The paper, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, cites the use of newly engineered microbes during the biomass conversion process as a significant alternative to past methods of producing ethanol for usable transportation fuel. Janet Westpheling, a professor in the UGA Department of Genetics, and her research team, which included members of the BioEnergy Science Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, addressed the problem of ethanol generation in regards to corn production. “The big issue for biofuels is to use plants that are not corn,” she said. “Corn is not good because it’s a food crop and because you can’t genetically engineer a food crop.” Westpheling said plants like switchgrass and trees provide a more sustainable alternative to corn in the production

thus making ethanol a of ethanol as a fuel cheaper sustainable fuel source for cars and other source for gasoline-powmeans of transportation. ered transportation. “Plants like switch“This process is to grass and trees have make ethanol to put in evolved to prevent being cars in a more economic broken down by bacteway,” she said. ria,” she said. Paul Gilna, “Grasses and trees director of the are the most BESC, said in a promising source press release that of biomass Westpheling and because you can her team’s produce tons per research constiacre and it’s sustutes a major tainable.” stride in the field Grasses and of sustainable fuel trees are carbon n e u t r a l , WESTPHELING engineering. “To take a virWestpheling said, tually unknown and meaning they don’t uncharacterized organintroduce any new carism and engineer it to bon to the atmosphere, produce a biofuel of as opposed to burning choice within the space petroleum, which does. of a few years is a towerHowever, in the past, use ing scientific achieveof these more sustainment for Dr. able methods posed a Westpheling’s group and logistical problem. for BESC,” she said in “The biggest probthe release. lem in being able to use Westpheling said her switchgrass is it’s very, group’s research could very difficult to break have major ramifications down,” she said. “What for the future of the we’ve done is taken a transportation industry. bacterium out of nature “Biofuels are never that can actually do this going to replace 100 pernaturally. We developed cent of transportation genetics for this organfuels … I don’t think this ism and engineered in a is going to happen synthetic pathway to tomorrow or the next make ethanol.” day, but in the future it The bacterium, will have a profound Caldicellulosiruptor impact on transportabescii, could make the tion fuels worldwide,” biomass conversion proshe said. cess more economical,


The Red & Black

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Sports B1

Sports

Bulldogs look to build on success UGA softball was eliminated in the Super Regional round after winning the Southeastern Conference tournament for the first time in school history.

Georgia softball retains main contributors for 2015 BY TYLER SERRITT @TSerritt11 Although its quest to win a national championship was cut short last month in the Super Regionals, the Georgia softball team’s 2014 season was one of progress and triumph. The Bulldogs posted a 49-15 record in the regular season, including a 15-9 mark in the Southeastern Conference. The team’s record included 13 wins over ranked teams, six of which came against top-10 teams. UGA’s regular season efforts earned them the fifth seed in the SEC tournament. The Bulldogs were tasked with facing Florida and Alabama early, the two teams that eventually competed for the national title. The Bulldogs were up to the task, knocking the Gators out 2-0 and topping the Crimson Tide 5-3. Georgia was able to prevail over Kentucky 5-2 to capture the first SEC championship in the program’s history and earn the Bulldogs to the No. 4

seed in the NCAA tournament and the privilege of hosting a regional. UGA hosted NC State, Chattanooga and UAB. The Bulldogs dominated UTC 9-0 in the first game, but put themselves in a very difficult position by losing the second game to NC State. In perhaps the most impressive stretch of the season, Georgia won three-straight games in dominating fashion to fight off elimination. The Bulldogs threw a no-hitter, two shutouts, and an 8-0 mercyrule victory against NC State in the final game to advance. The team advanced to the Super Regionals and hosted Baylor in Athens. The Bears were able to take the three game series, but it was the sixth time in seven years that the Bulldogs advanced to the second round of the NCAA tournament. “I’m proud of the way our team fought,” Georgia coach Lu Harris-Champer said after the game. “The hardest part about today is the fact that the season is done. I love this team. I love the heart and grit this team has and its just something you don’t want to end yet.” UGA’s season was also filled with great individual performances and honors. Second baseman Alex Hugo and shortstop Paige Wilson both were forces in the batter’s box for the Bulldogs as Hugo belted 25 home runs and tallied 64 RBIs while batting .341 and Wilson batted a blistering .387 on the year and

JOSHUA L. JONES/Staff

knocked in 50 runs with 11 homers, 18 doubles and 5 triples. Pitcher Chelsea Wilkinson was dominant in the circle, going 33-10 with a 2.10 ERA and 299 strikeouts. She was also responsible for the no-hitter in the NCAA tournament regional. Both Hugo and Wilkinson were named NFCA All-Americans and all three players earned First Team All-SEC honors. They were also included on the SEC tournament first team, along with pitcher/ first baseman Geri Ann Glasco. Seven UGA players were named to the NFCA All-Region team as well: catcher and infielder Tina Iosefa, second baseman Anna Swafford, outfielder Samantha LaZear, Wilkinson, Hugo, Glasco and Wilson. While the Bulldogs made some waves this season, the future of this team looks even brighter. 17 out of 18 players on the roster are coming back next season, including every starter. UGA will also welcome touted recruits to the team and the only senior the team is losing is outfielder Tiesha Reed. I’m thrilled about where the program is,” HarrisChamper said. “I think these student-athletes have represented Georgia with class and heart and passion. The chemistry that they’ve developed this season will carry over into the future and I’m proud of them for that.”

Two days, three commits: Three high school standouts commit to UGA

GARY MCCRAE

JACKSON HARRIS

DEANDRE BAKER — Reports compiled by Nick Suss @nicksuss

A three-star linebacker from RandolphClay High School in Cuthbert, Gary McCrae was the 11th prospect to commit to the University of Georgia football team for the class of 2015. Physically and athletically dominant, McCrae possesses a unique combination of size and burst that makes him a terror to quarterbacks and offensive linemen. However, coming from as small of a high school region as he does, McCrae has

faced next to no competition so far in high school and it has yet to be seen whether or not his abilities will translate against stiffer opponents. Strengths: At 6-foot-5 and 220 pounds, McCrae already profiles as an edge-rushing specialist at the next level. An intimidating presence as a stand-up outside linebacker, McCrae blows by offensive line See MCCRAE, Page B2

A four-star tight end from Columbia Central High School in Columbia, Tenn., Jackson Harris verbally committed to the University of Georgia on June 12. A long and versatile tight end, Harris possesses many of the traits that make up an in-line blocking tight end and a split-out receiving tight end. Still in need of some coaching, Harris will benefit from a senior season worth of development, especially when it

comes to his first few steps off of the line of scrimmage. Strengths: The most striking quality of this tight end’s game does not come in the passing phase, but rather in the run game. Harris is not just a willing but a proficient run blocker who’s blocks almost always end on the ground. Harris’ quick hands make it easy for him to control defensive See HARRIS, Page B2

Deandre Baker, a three-star cornerback from Miami Northwestern High School in Miami became the 10th player to commit to the University of Georgia football team when he announced the news on June 11. A natural man-coverage defender, Baker has great reactions to the ball in the air and is an adept tackler as well. However, poor ball skills and less-than-elite size hold Baker back from being the kind of player

who could start from day one at the college level. Strengths: When the ball is in the air, Baker normally finds a way to get a hand on it. Possessing great reactions and very good leaping ability, Baker is capable of high pointing most passes and finding the ball often before the receiver can. Baker rarely looks lost on the field, meaning he looks as if he always knows See BAKER, Page B2


B2 Sports

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Red & Black

Jackson Harris driven physically, academically BY NICK SUSS @nicksuss With most high school prospects, you can expect the same handful of things from their highlight tape. You’ll normally hear the first few notes of a pump-up song, see the player’s 40-yard dash time and bench press max then be treated to about five minutes of amazing catches or sacks or runs or throws. Jackson Harris isn’t most high school prospects. A four-star tight end out of Columbia Central High School in Columbia, Tenn., Harris’ highlight tape features no music and no indications of his speed or strength other than the tape itself. For the most part, Harris let’s his tape do the talking. However, Harris does post one number to brag on himself. Located right below his name and his jersey number it lists one stat: GPA: 4.0. “I take pride in working hard in classes and getting it done with academics,” Harris said. “I plan on majoring in chemical engineering. I’m definitely a big academics guy. That’s something to take pride in.” The younger brother of two engineers, Harris said he absolutely knows that engineering is what he plans on studying at Georgia. Whether or not Harris, who describes himself as a “big math guy,” chooses chemical engineering or a different expertise inside the field remains somewhat undecided. One thing Harris is absolutely certain on is his commitment to UGA. After verbally committing to Georgia on June 12th, Harris said he is certain that his decision is final. “I think a lot of the coaches and the players and I really like what they’re doing on offense,” Harris said. “With everything in general, I think it’s just a great fit.” Before his commitment, Harris had whittled down his list of potential destinations to a top-three of Georgia, Alabama and the hometown school Vanderbilt. But when it came time for him to make a decision, he said that Georgia seemed to be the logical fit. “I just wanted to go to a place that’s good for me,” Harris said. “If that’s down the road, that’s awesome, but if it’s 10 hours away, that’s fine. Vanderbilt, it’s right down the road and I really liked the great academics and the early playing time and offense that they’re going to now. But, like I said, at the end of the day I just felt that Georgia was the best place.” Harris is a physical marvel and a great in-line blocking tight end, the two factors that contribute most to him being as highly-touted of a prospect as he is. Despite this, Harris said that it wasn’t until he was a sophomore in high school that he knew he would someday be playing college football.

➤ From Page B1

Four-star tight end Jackson Harris said he takes pride in both his athletic ability and his academic prowess and already knows in what field he wants to major. COURTESY Jackson Harris “Sophomore year we were in the state championship and it was a seam route, 20 or 30 yards downfield,” Harris said of the moment he realized he was a capable athlete. “It was real high and I just kind of jumped and put my hands up and next thing you know I had it and I just kind of charged 20 yards down field. I was just kind of like, ‘dang.’ After that, coaches started coming in and those few months or weeks it really just hit me that I have a great ability.” Harris added that coming from a family where both of his brothers were kickers – one walked on at Purdue and the other kicks at Tennessee Tech – the idea of him playing tight end in college is “kind of surreal.” But surreal isn’t necessarily the word some would use to describe the tight end situation upon his arrival at Georgia. That word would be crowded. Following the graduation of Arthur Lynch after the 2013 season, the only tight end with any experience on the roster is junior Jay Rome. That being said, the Bulldogs signed two tight ends in the class of 2014 in four-star Jeb Blazevich and three-star Hunter Atkinson and also signed another tight end outside of Harris for the class of 2015 in Christian Owens. Harris said he feels assured however that he will still be able to compete amid the quickly-cluttering tight end ranks at

UGA. “I feel like it’s a really good opportunity to come in early,” Harris said. “I know Jeb really well, he’s a great player, I’ve just got to look at it, the way we look at it, is that we’ve just got to be one of the great tight end duos in the country.” Harris said he and Blazevich met at the Georgia versus Kentucky game in the fall of 2013 and have been exchanging messages since then. And while Harris contends that Blazevich didn’t factor into his decision to come to Georgia, he did say that Blazevich’s presence doesn’t hurt. “I was doing the best thing for me but at the same time I was excited to have the opportunity to play next to someone like [Blazevich] who is such a great guy and such a good football player,” Harris said. “It’s definitely a big plus and I’m excited for it.” Already with a friend on campus in Blazevich and major of intent in engineering, Harris will enter college in the fall of 2015 already more sure of what is ahead of him than most freshmen will know for at least a semester. But Harris shouldn’t be stereotyped as just another freshman just as he shouldn’t be stereotyped as an athlete who doesn’t like to think. When he was asked if he fit that stereotype, Harris had a simple answer. “No,” Harris said. “No I’m not.”

HARRIS: Tight end profiles similarly to Arthur Lynch ➤ From Page B1 players and his strong, 6-foot-6 and 250 pound frame allow him to drive players downfield and into the dirt. Most people are hesitant to label a high school player a “motor guy,” but Harris appears to be precisely that as he rarely lets up on a block before the whistle is blown. Additionally, Harris has shown ability to block in the open field, something that is rarely seen, at least not as aggressively as Harris does. Harris’ most important strength may lie in versatility as he appears to be comfortable as either an in-line blocking “H-Back,” or as a “Y,” or a

MCCRAE: Small opponents, big talent

player split out as a wide receiver despite his tight end’s frame. As a Y, Harris is a natural pass catcher who has exhibited the ability to catch in traffic and high point the ball. He also has a knack for finding space in the defensive backfield and is a strong threat in the red zone because of his frame. Weaknesses: Most of Harris’ weaknesses stem from his youth and his reliance on ability over fundamental play. From the line of scrimmage, Harris often false steps before moving forward, allowing quick defenders an extra step of penetration before he even moves forward. At the high school level, Harris

has been able to make up for this with superior ability, but as players get better in college, Harris will need to fix this simple, fundamental error. Partially as a result of this, Harris often gets high into a defender’s pads and does not get his head across the defender. This allows the defender to more easily evade his blocks and get to the ballcarrier more easily. As a product of his body placement, Harris is a risk for holding penalties because he is often trying to catch up to a defender who has crossed his face. In the pass game, Harris needs to get better at turning upfield and gaining yards after the catch as he is not the strongest at this yet.

Final Take: Harris committed to Georgia in a curios time for the tight end position at Georgia. With Arthur Lynch graduating on to the NFL with the Miami Dolphins, the position at UGA will likely consist of the injury prone Jay Rome, the former fullback Quayvon Hicks and two incoming freshmen in Jeb Blazevich and Hunter Atkinson. Depending on the immediacy of the performances of Blazevich and Atkinson, Harris might be an automatic redshirt upon arriving at the university. However, if there is any difficulty at the position, Harris may be able to challenge right away for playing time.

men often untouched en route to the quarterback or ballcarrier. McCrae is always around the ball and both recovers fumbles and forces them at a high rate. He has a knack for crashing run plays from the outside inward, not allowing runners to bounce outside yet taking a strong enough angle not to break contain. He has shown some coverage skills and, mostly because of his athleticism, has proven able to cover most anyone coming out of the backfield. McCrae is also a very successful kick and punt returner, a trait rarely mentioned about a linebacker, possessing both the speed and the instinct to blaze down the field untouched. Weaknesses: Coming from the small town of Cuthbert, McCrae plays on a small-population team that plays other small-population teams. As a result, there is rarely a single player on the field who can match McCrae’s ability. The fact that he is so much better than his competition is what allows him to return kicks and show off his coverage skills in space; because he knows even that if he messes up there is no one on the field who he cannot catch from behind. Opposing quarterbacks have even been seen to line up deeper than they usually would to buy just a little more time before he gets around the blocking. McCrae also plays high, a product of both his size and the fact that there is rarely a need for him to play low as he is fundamentally taught.

BAKER: Fast, instinctive DB to UGA ➤ From Page B1 where he is in relation to the sidelines and the end zones without having to look down. Baker has been known to trap players out of play and make deflections in places that result in the best result for his team. Baker is a proficient tackler who wraps up ballcarriers more often than he tries to make the big hit. He runs a 4.50-second 40-yard dash which makes it very hard for opposing receivers to run by him. Weaknesses: Though Baker has intercepted passes in his career, he is more likely to drop or bat the ball away than he is to actually turn the ball over. While there is nothing wrong with a deflection, many of the situations on his tape show there were times when the ball was in his hands and he could have turned around for yardage but he chose to bat the ball away. Despite his lessthan-stellar ball skills, it is probably size that will hamper Baker. Measuring at 5-foot-11 and 170 pounds, Baker plays a style of football befitting a player much bigger than he. Taking advantage of high school talent, Baker has capitalized on talent and been able to outjump receivers and bate weaker passers. At the college level, his strategy of undercutting passes may not prove as successful as passers have stronger arms and receivers are more aggressive.


The Red & Black

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Sports B3

Former Georgia running back Herschel Walker said he believes sports had given him a platform to speak about his dissociative identity disorder. JOSHUA L. JONES/Staff

Herschel Walker talks mental health disorder stigmas BY SARAH SPENCER @sarah_k_spence “Hello, nice to meet you. My name is Herschel, what’s yours? Where are you from? What do you do?” Herschel Walker, Heisman Trophywinning Georgia running back, warmly greeted guests filing in to hear his speech at an event titled “Mental Health Awareness – Removing the Stigma.” The gathering took place in downtown Athens, fittingly at Herschel’s Famous 34 Chicken and Ribs Kitchen. Coming to terms with his dissociative identity disorder, formerly known as multiple personality disorder, led Walker to begin speaking for the Patriot Support Program, a United Health Services program that addresses behavioral and mental disorders in soldiers and veterans. “Out of my time at UGA, winning the Heisman, my record in the NFL, this is what I’m most proud of,” Walker said. “Sports has given me a platform to bring awareness to things like this.” Walker, who was bullied and teased as a child, said that because he never confronted those feelings, they affected him negatively later in life. “I had a speech impediment, teachers put me in the corner, kids beat me up and I never went out to recess,” Walker said. The desire to stand up to bullies is what inspired him to begin the rigorous callisthenic regime of push-ups and pull-ups for which he would one day become famous. Walker also started playing football for the same reason and took trips to the library and read aloud to better his speech. Walker went on to have a successful football career at UGA, and still holds nearly all of the school’s rushing records. During his time in the NFL, Walker was often referred to as “the Cleaner”

by many of his coaches and teammates. He was a role model and supporter of teammates who were facing problems in their lives or under emotional strain. “No mafia ties, though,” he assured a laughing audience. These are the same teammates who did not want to associate with him after he went public with his disorder, he explained. After his retirement in 1997, without football as a medium to channel his aggression, Walker began to notice out-of-the-ordinary personality changes. He would occasionally black out and be unable to remember violently losing his temper. After seeking help to explain this behavior, Walker was diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder. He received treatment, and his desire to reach out to others was still prominent. “Whether I talk to one person or 100 people, I’ve done my job,” Walker said. “Because that one person can tell others, and support will spread.” Because of the negative stigma associated with mental disorders, Walker insists that if he could tell the UGA student body one thing, it would be that there’s no shame in asking for help from professionals. “I don’t feel bad that I was in a hospital. I feel blessed that I had the opportunity to go,” Walker said. “I might not be here if I hadn’t gotten help.” Now a successful businessman, Walker owns both Renaissance Man Food Services, the largest minority chicken company in the country, and 34 Productions, which handles the promotional side of his enterprises. However, Walker continues as a spokesman for the Patriot Support Program and visits military bases every month. “A big man stands up for himself. A bigger man stands up for others.”

Future roster stable for women’s golf BY CONNOR RILEY @Connornotkevin In golf, sometimes there are bad rounds. In the 2013-14 season, the Georgia women’s golf team had its fair share of them rounds. But with almost the entire team coming back for the 2014-15 season, including all five participants from the NCAA regional in Tallahassee Fla., at the Southwood Golf Club, the future looks to hold fewer bad rounds for the Bulldogs. What Happened: The 2013-2014 team was a very young team, with all but two members of the team being underclassmen. That young team also faced a very tough schedule, consistently facing the top teams in the nation. The Bulldogs did have some bright spots on the season, including a fifthplace finish at the Lady Puerto Rico Classic. The Bulldogs finished tied for eighth at the S o u t h e a s t e r n C o n f e r e n c e Championship and came in 16th place at the NCAA regional. Despite struggling as a team, the Bulldogs did have some nice individual efforts. Amira Alexander finished in a tie for first at the John Kirk Panther Intercollegiate tournament, Manuela Carbajo Ré finished in a tie for sixth place at the Liz Murphey Classic and Sammi Lee finished tied for 24th at the SEC championships. Who they lose: The Bulldogs will only lose one senior, and that is Ameila Hill. Hill only competed in three

Georgia golfer Amira Alexander (above) finished in a tie for first place at the John Kirk Panther Intercollegiate tournament in March 2014. COURTESY UGA NEWS/JOHN KELLEY events during her senior season for the Bulldogs. Who they bring back: The Bulldogs return seven of the eight members of the 2013-2014 team. The five members who participated in the SEC and NCAA regional will all be coming back; Alexander, Lee, Carbajo Ré, sophomore Harang Lee and senior Rocio Sanchez Lobato all return for another season. Lee, Lee and Carbajo Ré participated in all 11 events for the Bulldogs while Sanchez Lobato played in 10 events and Alexander played in nine events. Sophomore Mary Ellen Shuman played in six events for Georgia and could push for more playing time next year. Who they bring in: With Georgia’s lone scholarship, the Bulldogs bring in Bella Skinner. Skinner, a Cumming native, came in third place as an individual at the 2014 Georgia High School Association AAAAAA Golf State Championship. Skinner attended West Forsyth High School.

“We’re very excited to have Bella coming to Georgia,” Georgia coach Josh Brewer said. “When we started at Georgia we said we wanted to keep the best players in the state. Bella and Mary Ellen [Shuman] are helping us with that cause by staying in state and coming to the state university.” 2014-2015 Outlook: The Bulldogs have again scheduled tough, including another loaded field at the Liz Murphey Classic which will feature 2014 NCAA champion Duke and in total 13 of the last 14 national champions, but this time the Bulldogs have the talent and experience to better compete. The SEC will also be another tough challenge as five of the top 15 teams at the 2014 NCAA championship came from the conference. With much of the team returning, the Bulldogs will have a good chance of advancing to the NCAA championship for the first time in Brewer’s third year at the school.​

The climbing wall at the Ramsey Student Center will be open for the summer session until July 30. Excluding Independence Day weekend, the wall will be available Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays from 3-8 p.m., Tuesdays from 12-6 p.m., Wednesdays from 12-2 and 5-8 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 2-6 p.m. Clincs are also available Tuesdays and Wednesdays. JOHN ROARK/Staff


B4 Sports

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Red & Black

Chloe Buckendahl’s path to Georgia first detoured at Oregon BY CHARLETTE HALL @Charlette_Hall At 15 years old Chloe Buckendahl secured herself a spot on the Oregon Ducks volleyball team. As a heavily-recruited sophomore out of Rancho Buena Vista High School in Vista, Calif., she achieved the dream: becoming a Division I scholarship athlete. But when the dream of playing volleyball became a nightmare, Buckendahl didn’t change the dream, just the location. “That has always been my goal as a kid, to make it and play college volleyball,” Buckendahl said. Buckendahl grew up surrounded by volleyball players. Her m o t h e r, Amy Buckendahl played volleyball when she was young and at the college level and many of Chloe’s other family members played volleyball too. “I really had no choice, my whole family played,” Buckendahl said.

Chloe Buckendahl began her college career at the University of Oregon before she transferred to UGA after her freshman season. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff Amy played a vital role in piquing Chloe’s interest in volleyball. She coached Chloe’s fifth grade team, which is when she noticed her daughter’s interest in the sport begin to grow. “When I coached the rec team when she was in fifth grade she played for me and she fell in love with volley-

We buy Gold, Diamonds, and used Rolexes. Paying Top Dollar. Where Athens gets engaged. 283 E. Clayton St. Athens, GA 30601

706-543-3473 www.tenas.com

ball,” Amy said. “By the time she was in seventh grade, I started a club volleyball program, and she started playing.” When Chloe turned 13 during her last summer before high school, she tried out for the high school’s volleyball team. One would think that junior varsity would be enough to suit the skill set of a 13-year old, but it was not. Buckendahl not only made the varsity team, she started as a freshman and continued that trend for four years. “She started on varsity as a freshman, and I was a little concerned about that because when she started high school she was only 13, and the seniors on the team were either 17 or 18 years old,” Rancho Buena Vista volleyball coach LeAnne DeBora said. “That’s a huge jump. Boy, did I underestimate her. In her first tournament, she exceeded my expectations in every way. The

kids here still talk about her.” On a team with older players, the move seemed risky, especially since DeBora decided to play Buckendahl outside. The thought of Buckendahl taking the spot of a senior, made her mother skeptical. “I was very apprehensive about how things were going to work, but LeAnne just took [Chloe] under her wing,” Amy said. DeBora saw something in Buckendahl that she knew would be a great asset for her squad. “I think that she had it all,” DeBora said. “She had the drive, the athletic ability, the relationship with her teammates. You put it all together and you’ve got a wonderful individual who is really a role model.” When the scholarship offers started coming during her sophomore year the choice was easy; Buckendahl’s father played basketball

for Oregon, and she would follow in his footsteps. After high school, it was time for her dream to become a reality. She knew she would be playing behind the top volleyball player in the country, but she didn’t know what kind of climate she was walking into when she stepped foot on the practice court. “Oregon wasn’t a good fit,” Buckendahl said. “I didn’t get along with my coaches, and it was frustrating. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to quit playing all together or transfer.” What came next was a decision no 18-year old, Division I college student-athlete ever thinks they’ll want to make. Buckendahl’s mom and coaches describe her as someone who knows what she wants and in this circumstance, the same could be said. “The decision for her to leave was absolutely brutal,” Amy Buckendahl said. “You have to give up everything before you can start looking at other schools and talking to other coaches." At 18, Buckendahl showed her maturity. She didn’t like a situation and removed herself from it. After giving up her scholarship, Buckendahl and her mother created letters to send to the schools that were interested in her before she committed to Oregon. One of Buckendahl’s former club coaches knew the volleyball coach at Georgia, so she contacted her. That coach, Lizzy Stemke, invited Buckendahl to come to Athens to visit and she instantly fell in love with the program.

There were three other girls on UGA's volleyball team who are from California, two of whom Buckendahl grew up playing against. The familiarity of some of her teammates, along with sense of family she felt from her visit, made UGA a clear choice for her. “When I came on my visit here there were a bunch of girls from California and I played against them all growing up,” Buckendahl said. “They were all very similar–having familiar faces here definitely helped.” After the regrettable terms Buckendahl left Oregon on, Buckendahl’s parents could not have been happier for her to find a place that made her feel comfortable. Despite the distance, Amy knew her daughter made the right choice. “I remember when she called me she was like, ‘I’m going to commit,’” Amy Buckendahl said. “‘This is exactly where I need to be. I feel like I’m home. It’s like a family. This is perfect, I feel comfortable here. I belong here.’ I started crying.” Since coming to Athens to play volleyball, Buckendahl has felt the difference of playing for the Bulldogs. Buckendahl will enter her senior season with the Bulldogs this upcoming fall, and since her time here, Stemke has seen her mature. “I think the biggest growth that she has seen is taking her individual goals and blending them with the team goals,” Stemke said. “She has become such a team player. I think that takes a lot of maturity, but she has worked hard on and off the court.”

DOGS OFF THE LEASH EVERYTHING you want under ONE roof

Mon - Thurs: 11am - 11pm Fri - Sat: 11am - Midnight Sun: 11am - 9pm

1155 Mitchell Bridge Rd. |

706.850.3020

Marker Seven Costal Grill

UGA grad Erik Compton ties for 2nd at U.S. Open BY NICK SUSS @nicksuss Of the eight former Bulldogs who qualified for the 2014 U.S. Open, Erik Compton was perhaps the least-heralded one. Though Compton was a twotime All-American while at Georgia, it was his teammate Bubba Watson who received most of the hype heading into the tournament, and rightfully so. Watson was coming off his second Masters victory in three years and Compton was competing in just his second major championship ever. Compton was even overshadowed by the list of the other six Georgia graduates in the field, a list that included four men who had won a professional event in the last year. But after his performance at the 2014 U.S. Open, Compton won’t soon be forgotten. As one of just three participants to field a score under-par for the entire tournament, Compton’s 1-under 279 tied him with Rickie Fowler for second place in the event. Only the German-born Martin Kaymer posted a better score, as he cruised to victory with a 9-under 271. Although he shot under par in three of the weekend’s four rounds and entered Saturday’s third round in second place, fellow Georgia product Brendon Todd finished the weekend tied for 17th at 4-over after an abysmal Saturday showing knocked him out of contention. Todd’s 9-over third round was 10 strokes worse than his next-worst show-

Erik Compton was one of just three participants to shoot under par for the tournament at the 2014 U.S. Open. Courtesy Yahoo Sports Twitter ing in the tournament. Three other former Bulldogs – Chris Kirk, Harris English and Russell Henley – all made the cut but faded away over the weekend. Kirk finished at 7-over, English at 11-over and Henley at 17-over. Henley’s weekend was marked by his own Saturday struggles, as he shot a 12-over on Saturday alone. Watson, as well as Hudson Swafford and Kevin Kisner, did not make the cut. Former Bulldogs ink NFL contracts After four successful years as members of the University of Georgia football team, both quarterback Aaron Murray and

tight end Arthur Lynch were drafted into the NFL, by the Kansas City Chiefs and Miami Dolphins respectively. Now both can look forward to another four years, this time under contract. Murray and Lynch each signed four-year contracts with their respective teams. Lynch locked up a deal worth 2.411 million dollars and Murray a deal worth 2.402 million dollars. Lynch and Murray were fifth round picks drafted eight picks apart with Lynch being selected 155th overall and Murray 163rd. Murray was selected one pick before Alabama quarterback A.J. McCarron and 15 picks before former teammate an LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger.

Terry believes business is part of the community. A little bit of the Gulf Coast comes to Athens

NEW LUNCH AND DINNER MENU Sunday Funday! Join us for: Mimosa Carafes, Margarita Pitchers & Brunch Drink Specials! Watch the world go by in Five Points.

At the corner of Lumpkin & Milledge MARKER7COASTALGRILL.COM | 706.850.3451

Major in

REAL ESTATE

It’s more than valuing property...

www.terry.uga.edu/realestate


The Red & Black

Thursday, june 19, 2014

Variety B5

CEO Chris Herron talks creativity behind creature comforts of brewing beer BY SHELBY EGGERS @shelbybeggers

once we found that out.

For the past two years, Adam Beauchamp and David Stein were working toward their dream of owning their own brewery. Even with an idea and the proper skill set, it was not until a serendipitous meeting with Chris Herron, the now CEO of Creature Comforts Brewing Co., did everything seem to fall into place. Opening their doors for the first time in May, this brand new brewery located in the old Snow Tires Company building on West Hancock Avenue has the people of Athens buzzed with excitement (and beer). They have three beers on tap, Reclaimed Rye, Athena Berliner Weisse and Tropicalia IPA, and a fourth beer, their signature beer, Bibo, is to be released this Saturday, June 21, at their Southernly Love Beerfest event with 7venth Suns Brewery from Dunidee, FL. Chris Herron sat down with The Red & Black to discuss how he became involved with the other two founders, who they are as a company and their hopes for the future of beer. How did you become involved with the other founders, Adam and David? CH: Before I moved here, I was living in Connecticut. I worked for the last 13 years with corporate breweries and big, multi-national suppliers. Ten years ago, I started dreaming of owning my own brewery. Last February, I was speaking with a consultant in British Columbia to try to learn more about the operational side of a starting a brewery. I was looking to start in Georgia, and I needed help finding people who know how to make beer. At the same time, Adam and David happened to call the same person, looking for someone to help with the business side. The guy put us in touch and we hit it off great. A week later, we all partnered up and merged everything together. Why did you want to start a brewery in Georgia specifically? CH: I think Georgia has an underdeveloped craft beer market. We have a lot less craft breweries here per capita. We are probably 48th in the country when it comes to breweries per capita for a lot of different reasons. There are some challenges here that make it tougher to own a brewery than in other states. But we have overcome that and we are very happy to be here. There is a really good demand here, and we are

Was this motto of a curious spirit something that you, Adam and David all decided together? CH: Yes, the very first thing that we did when I came on was talk about who we were as a company, what our mission was going to be and where we wanted to go. Adam and David had thought a lot about it already, but we were firm believers that, with me coming on, it needed to be all of our company. We didn’t have a tag line yet, and I was reminded of the old saying, “It’s easier to remember a truth than a lie.” We hinged on that and wanted to make sure that this brand was true to us. That’s why I mentioned the six pillars, one of which is authenticity. We wanted to make sure that it was an authentic brand. When people met us, they sensed that passion and curious spirit. We didn’t want to try to be a cool brand. We wanted to be a brand that was true to who we were.

Chris Herron, the CEO of Creature Comforts, partnered with Adam Beauchamp and David Stein, and in April, they opened their brewery to the public. They have four beers on tap. Three of them have been out since their opening, and the fourth will be released on Saturday. JOHN ROARK/Staff probably 10th in country in regards to consumption per capita. Also, Georgia is my home. I am from Atlanta originally, and Adam and David went to the University of Georgia. So, we just wanted to fill that gap and bring some more awesome craft beer to the people in Georgia. Do you work closely with Adam and David when deciding what kinds of beers to brew? CH: They definitely do all the recipe formulation, but I am involved in the process. We are working on an imperial stout that we have going into some barrels. We sit down and go through the blendings to see what the right mix is. At the end of the day, they are the decision makers, and I want them to be the decision makers when it comes to the beer – that’s their expertise, that’s what their awesome at. They’re nice enough to include me in the process. What have been your biggest obstacles thus far and what are some challenges that you will have going forward? CH: The biggest struggle has been the intricacies and details of opening a full production facility. There are a lot of legalities when working in the alcohol industry. We are still figuring out how to put the pieces together. For the future, the challenges will be

managing growth. We have been very lucky. The city has been very welcoming to us and has embraced the brand and the beers. We have gotten a lot of really good press locally and nationally. Our mission is to be industry respected, consumer loved and commercially successful third. Staying ahead of the curve so that other breweries see us as people that are passionate about trying to make good beer and extend what good beer can be. It’s a constant challenge of how you stay on the cutting edge of the beer frontier and generate enough revenue at the same time. You have three beers currently available to the public, and your fourth, Bibo, is it still in the works? CH: Yes, the notorious Bibo. Well we have six pillars that guide us as a company: authenticity, balance, community, creativity, professionalism and quality. We haven’t put out Bibo yet, because the quality of the first batch wasn’t what we hold ourselves to as a brewery. As a result, we had to let that batch go and start over. Pilsners, the style in itself, takes longer than other ales (four to five weeks). So we ended up starting over when we opened. Now, we have an amazing batch that is ready to be released. It will be released at our Southernly

Taziki’s opens, Transmetropolitan reopens BY CARLY RALSTON @carlyaralston The Classic City gets a taste of the old and new this summer. Taziki’s, a Mediterranean restaurant, has just opened, and Transmetropolitan, a well-known restaurant in Athens, just reopened its doors at its new location on Oglethorpe Avenue. T a z i k i ’ s Mediterranean Café is using the summer as a time to prepare for when students are back in the Fall. The restaurant opened June 3rd on Prince Avenue. “All food, sauces, and prep are done daily,” said John Thigpen, the general manager at Taziki’s. “We’re watching trends to see what we need daily, but we would rather have too much than too little.”

Thigpen moved from Atlanta to help Bob and Whit Richardson, the father son duo who own the restaurant. “We chose Taziki’s for the food, how good the food is—we believe in the food,” Richardson said. Taziki’s serves “fresh, healthy new items” with specials daily. Depending on the success of Taziki’s, they’re open to the idea of expanding, possibly in the Athens area. “Our attitude and motto is to hire good people and enable them to do what they think is right,” Richardson said. “We’re so blessed to have great customers and great employees.” Transmetropolitan on Oglethorpe is back in business under a new franchisee. Ashley Christiansen and her husband have reopened

the restaurant as a franchise from the previous owners. Christiansen’s focus is being creative. Transmet will have the original menu but will also feature some brand new, homemade desserts. “With Transmet, I was permitted freedom to do what I wanted. The menu was great, so why change the food?,” Christiansen said. With a phenomenal staff working with her, Christiansen has big plans for the future – she wants to incorporate weekly events, such as trivia or a martini movie night. Due to the remodeling of the restaurant and the addition of a patio, nights like these are sure to be a success. “I think we’ll be here for a long time, we’re only going to get better,” Christiansen said.

Love Event this Saturday. They are an amazing brewery that is on the front foot of where beer is going. They are bringing six of their beers, and we are going to have our four beers as well as three unique offerings at the event. How did you come up with the name Bibo? CH: Our philosophy here is “Creature Comforts Craves Curiosity.” We are driven by curiosity in our lives. We believe that if you live a curious life, it will lead you to find things that you are passionate about. In following things that you are passionate about, it will lead you to being happier. When you’re happier, you can enjoy the creature comforts of life. That’s where this brewery comes from – this is our home, this is our happy place, this is our creature comfort. This is all we’ve ever wanted to do. In that same curious spirit, we wanted to come up with a curious name. We draw inspiration from inventors, artists and explorers, and we thought one of the most curious minds was Einstein. Bibo was Einstein’s pet parrot, and we thought, “What a curious creature.” You can just imagine this little parrot, sitting on Einstein’s shoulder, repeating “E=MC squared.” Then, we found out that Bibo means “I drink” in Latin which made it even cooler, so we were all in on the name

Do you have any short-term goals? CH: Our short term goals include getting up our barrelaging program and getting more beers on tap here. Also, to settle in a bit. We have been trying to figure out how we fit in the Athens community. One of the ways we have done that is hosting the Athens Farmers Market in our facility starting July 2. Another way is through our “Go Eat Local” program. When you come on the tours, you get a wrist band with a tab for each beer, but there is also a tab that says “Go eat local.” We don’t have food or snacks here and we don’t ever plan on having food here. Our goal is to be a brewery where people come to learn about beer, respect beer, drink responsibly and then go out and enjoy food from the amazing restaurants down here, listen to music and check out some of the other awesome great bars downtown. We hope to be a hub of attraction to bring people to downtown Athens.Our goal is to be an active part of the community and make sure we bring enough beer for everyone. We are only a couple months in and we are still new at this. We have intentionally held back capacity, because in August we are getting our canning line. For a new company, Creature Comforts has come a long way. With more than a combined 20 years of experience among the staff, it seems we can expect a lot more creativity and craft beer from them in the future. See full interview online.


B6 Listings

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Red & Black

Events THURSDAY, JUNE 19 TRIVIA Trivia with a Twist When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Johnny’s New York Style Pizza LOCAL

Flagpole Athens Music Awards When: 8 p.m. Where: Morton Theatre Price: $8 in advance; $10 at door; $5 with AthFest wristband For more: www. flagpole.com VHS Filmfest When: 6:30 p.m. Where: Cine Barcafe Price: $5; free with AthFest wristband For more: www.athenscine.com Seat in the Shade When: 5 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free For more: www.hendershotscoffee.com

Comedy Show When: 10 p.m. Where: Hi-Lo Price: Free For more: www.hiloathens.com

Shuffle Club Price: Free For more: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub

MUSIC AthFest Vinyl Compilation Listening Party When: 6:30 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: Free For more: www. theworldfamousathens. com

The Swank, Burns Like Fire, Lowdive, DJ Mahogany When: 10 p.m. Where: Max For more: 706-2543392

King Eddie, Tall Tall Trees, La Hot Club D’Athenes When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $7 for ages 18-20; $5 for 21 and up For more: www.caledonialounge.com

Borderhop Trio When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: Free For more: www.terrapinbeer.com RaveCode2.0 When: 10 p.m. Where: Barcode For more: 706-613-5557

New West Kickoff Party: Dega, Floating Action, Immuzikation When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Price: $3 For more: www.40watt. com

FRIDAY, JUNE 20

Left Out Fest: The Hernies, Dude Magnets, Sad Dads, Scooterbabe, Salsa Chest, Jo Rb Jones When: 10:30 p.m. Where: Little Kings

Seat in the Shade When: 5 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free For more: www.hendershotscoffee.com

LOCAL

The Life, Love & Hate of a Free Jazz Man and his Woman When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Cine Barcafe Price: $10; $5 with AthFest wristband MUSIC

Full Service Car Wash With Oil Change $24.95 (up to 5 qts.) for oil change

Todd Cowart When: 8 p.m. Where: Butt Hutt BBQ Price: Free For more: www.butthuttbarbecue.com

Local ska, rock and reggae band Lowdive will play at The Max Canada Thursday night with The Swank, Burns Like Fire and DJ Mahogany Courtesy Facebook

Jammin’ Jog 5k and Half-mile Fun Run When: 8 a.m. Where: Dudley Park and the Greenway For more: www.jamminjog.com

Tuesday 50¢ Traditional Wings Dine In Only! 3pm to Close Orders of 6, 10, or 16 *w/purchase of a beverage

LOCAL

Athens Farmers Market When: 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Where: Bishop Park For more: www.athensfarmersmarket.org

Athens Music History When: 10:30 a.m. - noon Where: Athens Welcome Center Price: $15 For more: 708-208-8687

Introduction to Coyote When: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Where: Orange Twin Conservation Community Price: $35 For more: www.wildintelligence.org

196 Alps Road, Beechwood Center • 706.354.6655 • buffaloscafe.com/Athens

11987

Timmy & The Tumblers, Little Gold, Hot Fudge When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Creature Comforts Brewery For more: www.creaturecomfortsbeer.com

MUSIC

Partial Cinema, MamaFiki, DJ Tony Reed When: 10 p.m. Where: Cutter’s Pub Price: Free For more: 706-353-9800

UnAthFest: Dustin Wilkes, David Nickle, Daniel Fluitt, Beauty and the Beard, Michael Bowman, Devils and Dust, Scott Low and the Southern Bouillon, Ken Will Morton Band, The Bearfoot Hookers When: 2 p.m. Where: Georgia Bar For more: 706-546-9884

Mary Sigalas When: 8 p.m. Where: Highwire Lounge Price: Free For more: www.highwirelounge.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 21 LOCAL

Athens Music History Tour When: 10:30 a.m. Where: Athens Welcome Tour Price: $15 For more: 708-2088687

SUNDAY, JUNE 22

West Broad Market Garden When: 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Where: West Broad Farmers Market For more: www.athenslandtrust.org

(regular value $38.95, you save $14.00)

4350 Lexington Rd., Athens, GA (across from Wal-Mart)

Candid Coal People When: 10 p.m. Where: Silver Dollar For more: 706-353-3093

DJ Immuzikation When: 11 p.m. Where: The National Price: Free For more: www.thenationalrestaurant.com

Slush Fund Day Party: Davin McCoy, Cute Boots, Life is a Flower, Life is a Gun, The Head, The Empties, PLS PLS, Sealand When: Noon Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Free For more: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub Breakfast of Champions: White Violet, Semicircle, Christian Lee Hutson, Ruby the Rabbitfoot When: 11 a.m. Where: Normaltown Hall Price: Free For more: www.facebook.com/normaltownhall

Rollergirl Bootcamp When: 8:30 a.m. - noon Where: Fun Galaxy For more: www.classiccityrollergirls.com

TRIVIA Brewer’s Inquisition When: 7 p.m. Where: Buffalo’s Cafe Price: Free For more: www.buffaloscafe.com/athens MUSIC

When: 9 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Free For more: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub MUSIC Bruce Hornsby and The Noisemakers When: 7 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $25 For more: www.georgiatheatre.com Pickin’ with Adam Poulin & Holly Belle When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free For more: 706-546-4742

TUESDAY, JUNE 24 LOCAL Bad Movie Night: Uninvited When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Cine Barcafe Price: Free For more: www.athenscine.com MUSIC

The New Sound of Numbers, Phoenicians, DJ Mahogany When: 8 p.m. Where: The World Famous For more: www. theworldfamousathens.com

Cyndi Harvell When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar For more: www.hendershotscoffee.com

MONDAY, JUNE 23

Neko Case, Laura Veirs When: 7 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $30 For more: www.georgiatheatre.com Wieuca When: 7:30 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 For more: www.meltingpointathens.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25 KARAOKE

LOCAL Open Middle Eastern Music Circle When: 7 p.m. Where: Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Athens Price: Free For more: rajniqamar@ gmail.com

Hip Hop Open Mic When: 7 p.m. Where: Max Price: $5 For more: 706-2543392

TRIVIA Rock and Roll Trivia

University

1 stu 5% disc deNt ouN t

3-2-ia1l!

spec

Garden Apartments 3-2-1

moves you in!!!!

$300.00 off 1st New Business Lounge! Dog Park! Professional Management! Two Pools! On Bus Line!

New fitNess ceNter!

See for Yourself! Call for a Tour Today! 2360 West Broad Street Athens, GA 30606

socc e & teN r N cour is ts!

month’s rent

$200.00 off second and the application is $1.00.

189 Baxter Dr. Athens, Ga 30606 706-549-4884 universitygardenapts.com


The Red & Black

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Showcase B7

Showcase

CHRISTINA CANNON/Staff

For the last three weeks, I have called the University of Georgia campus in Costa Rica home. From kayaking to zip lining, it has been one of the best experiences I’ve ever had. Aside from all of the fun, the education has been extremely valuable and one I couldn’t have gotten anywhere else. Environmental journalism is a relatively new focus among study abroad programs and is a first for UGA Costa Rica. With Costa Rica containing five percent of the world’s biodiversity, UGA’s satellite campus is a great location for journalism students to become the mediator between the science realm and audiences worldwide who could benefit from the research taking place in Costa Rica. With data collection happening daily on campus, it is easy for journalism students to tag along with researchers and practice their interviewing, writing and media production skills while simultaneously telling important stories about the environment. For my specific trip, the programs were focused on art, astronomy, journalism and graphic design. Over the course of 23 days, we traveled from the Monteverde rainforest to Arenal Volcano and then to Samara beach. We even got to stay with a Costa Rican family for a few days. The cultural immersion will leave you with a greater understanding of yourself, your education and the world you live in. — Christina Cannon

Above: The view of the Gulf of Nicoya in Monteverde de San Luis, Costa Rica. Left: Oldemar Salazar beats coffee beans during a demonstration to remove the husk as part of the milling process. Below: The beans must be dried and separated from their parchment and silver skin before roasting Bottom: Kaitlyn McManus and other University students visit the Spiderbridge at the Arenal Observatory Lodge.


B8 Listings

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Red & Black

AthFest Events THURSDAY, JUNE 19 Floating Action, DEGA, Ruby the Rabbitfoot, Immuzikation DJ set When: 10 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Ages: 18 and up For more: www.40watt. com

FRIDAY, JUNE 20 Seven Handle Circus, Judah & The Lion, Family and Friends, Reptar When: 5 - 9 p.m. Where: Pulaski Street Stage Price: Free Ages: All For more: athfest.com Dana Swimmer, Kick The Robot, Stokeswood When: 6 - 8:30 p.m. Where: Hull Street Stage Price: Free Ages: All For more: athfest.com

Brothers, Roadkill Ghost Choir, The Woodgrains, New Madrid, David Barbe & The Quick Hooks, Dead Confederate When: 9 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Ages: 18 and up Price: AthFest wristband only For more: georgiatheatre.com

Halem Albright Band, Lefty Hathaway Band, Mama’s Love, Ike Stubblefied featuring Eddie Roberts of The New Mastersounds When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Ages: All Price: $10 or free with Athfest wristband For more: meltingpointathens.com Sea of Dogs, Boycycle,

Atlanta punk band, The Coathangers, will play Friday night at the 40 Watt after Axxa/Abraxas, Murk Daddy Flex and Shade. Courtesy Fanatic Promotion Jinx Remover, Deep State When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Ages: 21 and up For more: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub

Shade, Murk Daddy Flex, Axxa/Abraxas, The Coathangers When: 10 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Ages: 18 and up For more: www.40watt.com

Les Racquet, Sweet Knievel, Dank Sinatra When: 10 p.m. Where: Green Room Ages: 21 and up

For more: greenroomathens.com 8 Track Gorilla, Summer Hymns When: Midnight Where: The World Famous Ages: All For more: theworldfamousathens.com Lassine Kouyate (Adam Klein), Dave Marr, Clay Leverett & Friends, Grassland String Band, Candid Coal People When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Ages: 18 and up For more: newearthmusichall.com Showtime/Lowdive, This Frontier Needs Heroes, Sam Sniper, Darnell Boys, Efren When: 9 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge

Ages: 18 and up For more: caledonialounge.com

The Rodney Kings, Strays, Monsoon, Cottonmouth, Cult of Riggonia, Muuy Biien, DJ Blowpop When: 9 p.m. Where: Go Bar Ages: 21 and up For more: 706-5465609 Four Eyes, Jacob Morris, Spoils, Timmy and the Tumblers When: 10 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre and Bar Ages: 21 and up For more: flickertheatreandbar.com Stallone, Armazilla, Moreland Wrecks, Without Form and Void When: 9:45 p.m. Where: Max Ages: 18 and up For more: 706-254-3392 Little chief, Sam Burchfield, Walden, Benjamin Butler When: 10 p.m. Where: Cine Ages: All For more: athenscine. com Paul Lombard, Po’ Boys When: 10 p.m. Where: The Globe Ages: 21 and up For more: 706-353-4721 Honeychild, Hope For Agoldensummer When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Ages: All For more: hendershotscoffee.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 21 Silver Eagle Mining Co., Wieuca, March,

JUN 19 .................................... Kinky Waikiki - Rooftop JUN 19 ...... DJ Z-Dog The Booty Hunter - Rooftop LATE JUN 20 ............. ATHFest presented by Team Clermont and Georgia Theatre: Dead Confederate, David Barbe and the Quick Hooks, New Madrid, The Woodgrains, Roadkill Ghost Choir, Brothers JUN 21 ............ ATHFest presented by Team Clermont: Turquoise Jeep, Cottonmouth, Ginko, I Am the World Trade Center, k i d s, Gyps, Programs, Acapoco JUN 23 ........Bruce Hornsby and the Noise Makers w/ Chess Boxer

Saint Francis, Jubee & The Morning After, Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, Elf Power, Kishi Bashi When: noon - 9 p.m. Where: Pulaski Street Stage Price: Free For more: athfest.com Stay The Sea, Adam Klein & The Wild Fires, Six String Drag, Party Dolls, Dirty Bourbon River Show, Nicholas Mallis & The Borealis, Ruby The Rabbitfoot When: 12:30 - 8:30 p.m. Where: Hull Street Stage Price: Free For more: athfest.com Grand Vapids, Betsy Franck, Eureka California, Small Beige Girl When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Ages: 21 and up For more: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub

Acapoco, Programs, Gyps, k i d s, I Am The World Trade Center, Ginko, Cottonmouth, Turquoise Jeep When: 9 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Ages: 18 and up Price: AthFest wristband only For more: georgiatheatre.com

Tia Madre, Woodfangs, Futurebirds When: 10 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Ages: 18 and up For more: www.40watt. com Those Cats, The Fritz, LINGO When: 10 p.m. Where: Green Room

Ages: 21 and up For more: greenroomathens.com Powerkompany, DJs JLP and Kishi Bashi When: 11 p.m. Where: The World Famous Ages: All For more: theworldfamousathens.com Wired Music Festival When: 2 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $10 advance; $15 at door; $5 with Athfest wristband For more: wiredmusicfestival.com Velveteen Pink, Double Ferrari, TaterZandra, The Powder Room, Cinemechanica When: 9 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Ages: 18 and up For more: caledonialounge.com Harsh Words, Never, Shehehe, Karbomb When: 10 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre and Bar Ages: 21 and up For more: flickertheatreandbar.com Bacharach to the Future (Burt Bacharach Cover Band), Wild of Night, Coombsbot, DIP, DJ Mahogany When: 9 p.m. Where: Go Bar Ages: 21 and up For more: 706-546-5609 New Human Being, Spirit Hair, Redneck Greece Deluxe, The Salt Flats When: 9:45 p.m. Where: Max Ages: 18 and up For more: 706-254-3392


The Red & Black

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Puzzles B9

DRINK AND DINING GUIDE FRIDAY

THURSDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Your weekly guide to Athens’ daily deals.

MONDAY

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Where: 256 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 549-0166 Website: allgoodlounge.com

********* HAPPY HOUR DRINK AND FOOD SPECIALS - Monday to Friday 3:00 – 7:00 - $12.99 Coors Light Towers all day/every day ********* $2 Bottle Miller Lite $3.50 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life

$1 Off Terrapin Mosaic Drafts and $3 Tequila Shots 3 – Close 25¢ Boneless Wings

Where: 196 Alps Rd., Suite 49 Phone: (706) 354-6655 On Facebook: facebook.com/ BuffalosCafeAthens

$2 Bottle Miller Lite $3.50 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life

$1 Off Margaritas $2 Specialty Martini's Live Trivia 7pm $2 Off Terrapin Pints $2 Bottle Miller Lite $2 Bottle Miller Lite $10 Pitchers Blue Moon, $2 Bottle Miller Lite $3.50 Wells $3.50 Wells Yuengling & Bud Light $3.50 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life $4 Pitcher Miller High Life $2 Bottle Miller Lite $4 Pitchers Miller High Life 3 – Close All You Can Eat: 3 – Close All You Can Eat: $3.50 Wells 3 – Close Traditional Wings $13.99 Traditional Wings $13.99 10% Student Discount 50¢ Traditional Wings Boneless Wings $12.99 Boneless Wings $12.99 on Food

$1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily

Where: 175 N. Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 353-2439 Website: greenroomathens.com

MARKER SEVEN COASTAL GRILL

Where: 1195 S. Milledge Ave.

Phone: (706) 850-3451 Website:

Happy Hour 4-7pm $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells

Oyster Lovers 3-6pm Buy a dozen get a dozen half off.

Oyster Lovers 3-6pm Buy a dozen get a dozen half off.

Late Bird Drink Specials 2-6pm $3 Mimosas, $4 Bloodys $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells

Happy Hour 4-7pm $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells

Happy Hour 4-7pm $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells Oyster Lovers 3-6pm Buy a dozen get a dozen half off

Happy Hour 4-7pm $2 Domestics $3 House Wines $4 Wells

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life

HAPPY HOUR $1 Pints of High Life all day

8pm - Trivia $7 Domestic pitchers, $1 High Life pints

Happy Hour 4-7pm Complimentary happy appy and $1 off all drinks and beers

Two’s-day! Dinner for 2 special $40 per couple includes a bottle of wine, 1 appetizer, 2 surf n turf entrees and 1 dessert, Happy Hour 4-7pm

Twin Lobster Dinner 2 1lb lobsters w/vegetables $24, Happy Hour 4-7pm

marker7coastalgrill.com

Where: 320 E. Clayton Suite 201 Phone: (706) 613-0892 Website:

$6 Frozen drinks, $13 House wine bottles

$3 Well drinks & shots

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

$2 house shots from 9 pm till 11

Sunday Brunch Brunch menu available from 11am-4pm (dinner after 4) $3 Mimosas and Bloody Marys all day & Industry Day all Day

mellowmushroom.com

Ladies’ Night Half off wine bottles ($30 or less) with any food purchase of $10 or more, Happy Hour 4-7pm

Where: 414 N. Thomas St. Phone: (706) 353-TUNA Website:

Happy Hour 4-7pm Complimentary happy appy and $1 off all drinks and beers

squareonefishco.com

5

9

8

3

1

6

2

4

7

5

4

7

3

2

9

1

6

8

7

4

3

5

2

8

6

9

1

9

8

1

6

4

7

2

5

3

2

1

6

9

8

3

4

1

5

8

3

2

6

7

Difficulty: 10

6

2

7

4

1

5

9

9

4

2

7

6

8

1

4

6

3

8

9

7

5

7

9

5

1

3

4

2

3

7

9

5

4

1

8

5

8

1

6

7

2

3

8

3

6

3

5

2

7

6

2

3

5

9

6

7

4

8

1

5

6

3

4

7

8

1

2

4

5

6

9

Difficulty: 18

9

8

7

1

3

2

3

7

8

6

4

5

4

2

9

5

8

1

7

8

6

4

1

2

9

3

3

8

1

9

7

5

6

5

4

3

6

9

2

1

7

9

1

2

6

5

4

6

4

2

8

7

3

4

9

1

2

8

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

1

4

3

2

7

4

8

3

1

9

3

2

8

5

6

8

9

3

4

6

5

7

2

4

1

3

8

4

5

6

1

9

2

7

2

6

8

8

6

5

9

2

3

1

7

4

7

5

8

2

4

9

1

Difficulty: 18

2

9

7

4

8

3

6

6

2

1

7

3

8

4

1

3

5

8

9

6

7

8

4

6

9

5

1

2

3

7

9

5

6

4

8

Booze, because no good story ever started with a salad. 706.410.2003

9

7

5

4

2

5

5

7

4

7

4

2

8

9

9

1

6

1

5

7

3

6

8

9

5

1

6

2

7

2

8

3

3

5

5

6

9

1

7

1

Difficulty: 10

4

9

3

256 E. Clayton St • 706-549-0166 • Mon-Sat Noon-2AM

9

8

4

1

2

5

3

5

6

2

3

1

7

9


puzzles

B10 Puzzles

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Red & Black

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 19 ACROSS 1 “Hey __”; Beatles song 5 Sacramento’s state: abbr. 10 Vatican leader 14 Words of understanding 15 In the know 16 Pitcher 17 Repast 18 Put on the __; shelve for now 20 Find a total 21 Bring on board 22 Perils 23 Circular 25 Not long __; recently 26 Goes down smoothly 28 Stockholm’s nation 31 Gives to a borrower 32 Destined 34 Spanish hero 36 Breakfast order 37 Quick 38 Imogene __

35 Facts & figures 37 Orange peel 38 Pantry shelf stackables 40 Native New Zealander 41 Skier __-Claude Killy 43 Delta Airlines competitor 44 Uses up 46 Sandbank 47 Feels sick 48 Make a tiny cut 49 “__ in a Bottle”; Jim Croce song 50 Scrabble piece 52 Quayle and Marino 53 Hold __; keep 55 Bit of soot 56 Edison’s initials 57 Jacuzzi

DOWN 1 Iwo __; WWII battle site 2 Secondhand

3 Exact likeness 4 Snakelike fish 5 Rustic homes 6 Prize 7 Wedding veil fabric 8 Irritate 9 Shortest month: abbr. 10 Dot at the end of a sentence 11 Possesses 12 Take quick look 13 Goes astray 19 Egged on 21 Colors 24 Likelihood 25 Filled with wonderment 26 Winter vehicle 27 Legal, for short 28 Mix in a bowl 29 Cost-effective 30 Friendlier 32 Eat nothing 33 Make fun of

39 Political party’s interpretation 40 “Last one in’s a rotten __!” 41 Loses one’s footing 42 Room to maneuver 43 Goes in again 45 Climbed 46 Storm center 47 Reach across 48 Sword fight 51 Mainly 56 Goofs 57 Sea duck with soft down 58 Author Bellow 60 Frozen waffle 61 Cinnamon __; tasty pastries 62 Luau dance 63 Lowly laborer 64 In __; chic 65 Morning grass blade moisture

DOWN 1 Mayo container 2 Highest cards 3 Unruly child 4 Follows as a result of 5 Goes out with 6 Nanny or billy 7 Give off fumes 8 Steer clear of 9 Gentle wind 10 Wheel rod 11 Dock 12 Pierce 14 Great joy 21 Praise highly 25 Brown with an orchestra 26 Passenger 27 Saying 28 Funeral song 29 Marshmallow Easter candies 30 Frothy drinks 31 Neighbor of India

32 Linda Lavin TV series 33 Like a pricey coat’s interior 35 __-crazy; tired of confinement 38 Slumberers 39 Language heard in Madrid 41 Pigpen 42 Sign of an old wound 44 Late Mandela 45 Not thickly populated 47 Use one’s nose 48 Profound 49 Yen 50 Therefore 52 Street uprising 53 In a lazy way 54 Praise 55 Christmas 59 Ordinance

38 Obviously 40 Perish 41 __ oneself; prepared for bad news 43 Female deer 44 James __; 007 45 Meeting of bishops 46 Ruby or scarlet 47 Steed 48 Containers on a florist’s shelf 50 Actress Arthur 51 Turns inside out 54 Trash cans 58 Hideaway 59 Had a bug 61 Let fall 62 Out of __; misbehaving 63 Just right 64 Frozen waffle 65 Iditarod vehicle 66 Poor 67 Underground plant part

DOWN 1 Oliver Twist’s request 2 Neat as __ 3 Loaned 4 Carve in glass 5 Evening coffee, perhaps 6 Skin growth 7 Years lived 8 Rescue; save 9 Facade 10 Made peanuts ready for eating 11 Reason to wed 12 Primates 13 Cravings 21 Prior to 23 Kaye or DeVito 25 Founder’s Day marches 26 Punctures 27 Actor Hamlin 28 Jordan’s capital 29 __ to; because of 31 Passion

32 Harness straps 33 Uppsala native 35 Elderly 36 Tavern order 38 Fragrant wood 39 Singer Stewart 42 __ up; hidden 44 Roomer 46 Dwell; live 47 That woman 49 Indelible mark 50 Terribly 51 Misfortunes 52 Tack 53 Climbing plant 54 Rosary piece 55 Consequently 56 Trademark 57 Espy; notice 60 Peggy or Bruce

39 Knocks to the ground 41 Letters on a lover’s envelope 42 Water vapor 44 Endures 46 Samuel’s teacher 47 Can wrapper 49 Evaded the grasp of 51 Grassland 54 Cheney or Biden, for short 55 Leader of the Huns 56 Result of a high fever, perhaps 60 Iowa export 61 Give work to 63 “You’ve __ be kidding me!” 64 Patella’s place 65 Secure a boat with an anchor 66 Loathes 67 Stitches 68 Dines

69 Lovers’ meeting

32 Free-for-all 34 Floored 35 Powerful wind 36 Slide sideways, as on icy roads 38 Soda crackers 40 “__ Magnolias”; Sally Field film 43 Injure by rough treatment 45 __ of hand; magic trick 48 Lullaby composer 50 Tumult 51 Fills a suitcase 52 Make amends 53 Scatter 54 Swerves 56 Let fall 57 __-bitty; tiny 58 Univ. of Utah athletes 59 Majority 62 Debtor’s note

39 Pass away 40 Penny-pincher 41 Singer Jackson 42 Hooky player 44 Hombre’s wife 45 Silent assent 46 Sudden muscle contraction 47 Up and about 50 At that time 51 Wedding words 54 Club joiner’s ceremony 57 Read quickly 58 Green citrus 59 Dinner course 60 Huff and puff 61 Drove too fast 62 Women’s dress shoes 63 Additionally

FRIDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 20 ACROSS 1 Poke 4 Borders 9 Hits with a stun gun 13 Unit of land 15 Ruth’s Israelite mother-inlaw 16 Way out 17 Authentic 18 Primly reserved 19 “Not guilty,” for one 20 Figurine 22 Sage or thyme 23 Foot digits 24 __ as a fox 26 Half of the diameter 29 __ grandfather; dad’s dad 34 Dumbhead 35 Monica of tennis 36 Inventor __ Whitney 37 Word of disgust 38 Soak

SATURDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 21 ACROSS 1 Man or boy 5 One of seven for Snow White 10 Kill 14 __ house; realtor’s event 15 Avid 16 Actress Lange 17 “__-a-round the rosie, a pocket full of posies...” 18 Statement of beliefs 19 __ though; albeit 20 Plead with 22 Perpetual 24 Sound of a dog’s bark 25 Part of a flower 26 Use a razor 29 Water barrier 30 Approaches 34 Not wild 35 “__ Father, Who art in...” 36 Fergie’s ex 37 Ulna’s location

Do Your Part, Become a Plasma Donor Today Please help us help those coping with rare, Ask about our Specialty Programs! chronic, genetic diseases. Must be 18 years or older, have valid I.D. New donors can receive $30 today and along with proof of SS# and local residency. $70 this week! Walk-ins Welcome. New Donors will receive a $10 bonus on their 2nd donation with this ad. @BPCAthens

Book your appointment online today.

www.facebook.com/BiotestPlasmaCenterAthens

085RedandBlack4.9x1.indd 1 MONDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 23

Biotest Plasma Center 233 West Hancock Ave. Athens, GA 30601 706-354-3898 www.biotestplasma.com

1/9/14 11:31 PM

ACROSS 1 Entertain 6 Lawn trees 10 Recedes 14 Actor Robards 15 Dory or dinghy 16 Ark builder 17 Give a heads-up to 18 __ Lee; frozen dessert brand 19 Contemptible 20 Blushed 22 Lifted up 24 Common metal 25 Refuse to recall, as a bad experience 26 Bicycle built for two 29 Picture portion of a telecast 30 Silken band 31 Actor Matt __ 33 Unexpected obstacles 37 Pistols This Friday. . .

ROOTS, ROCK N’ ROLL!

A little country, and a LOT of rock!

This Saturday. . .

DJ MIXX

COME DANCE WITH US!

DOWN 1 Slightly open 2 Man or boy 3 Not brand new 4 Filthy 5 Went into 6 Actor Buddy __ 7 Burden 8 Deface; spoil 9 Gazed fixedly 10 Vicinity; area 11 Idaho’s capital 12 Hay bundles 13 Lean-tos 21 Wanderer 23 Ridicules 25 Skating ovals 26 Clothing 27 Border on 28 Reasonable bedtime 29 Outspoken

P U Z Z L E S P O N S O R


puzzles

The Red & Black

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Puzzles B11

TUESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 24 ACROSS 1 Orchestra 5 Exposed 10 Taxis 14 Follow orders 15 Met production 16 Unit of land 17 Sky color 18 Temperature regulator 20 “Ready, __, go!” 21 Icy precipitation 22 Powerful winds 23 Circular 25 Tax-deferred retirement acct. 26 Hut 28 Aviator Earhart 31 Young horses 32 Clutches 34 Failure 36 “The Buckeye State” 37 Intentions; aims 38 Relinquish

39 Egypt’s boy king 40 Apartments 41 Down the __; irretrievably lost 42 Large number of things 44 Century 21 or ERA 45 Over the hill 46 Synagogue leader 47 Monastery head 50 Breathe heavily 51 TV’s “Murder, __ Wrote” 54 Crawling along like a snake 57 Remain 58 Hardy cabbage 59 Sudden forward rush 60 Windy day toy 61 Get rid of 62 Derisive smile 63 __ tea; cold beverage

DOWN 1 Hope & Barker

2 Capable 3 Refusal to support either side in a war 4 Coloring liquid 5 Study of plants 6 Crop pest 7 Film spool 8 Miscalculate 9 Aswan, for one 10 Informal 11 Play divisions 12 Sassy child 13 __ up; arranges 19 Monsters 21 Hovels 24 Aware of the shenanigans of 25 Little rascals 26 Edinburgh man 27 Boring 28 Feels achy and feverish 29 Starry-eyed 30 Review of the financial

Terry believes business is part of the community.

books 32 Spur on 33 Fink 35 Declare untrue 37 Pleased 38 __ Louie; “The King of Salads” 40 Dirtiness 41 Money owed 43 Cheered 44 National Park officer 46 Stove 47 Inquires 48 Uninteresting 49 Liver secretion 50 Evergreen tree 52 Despise 53 Watched 55 Golfer Ernie 56 Baseball score 57 Zoom down snowy slopes

Major in ACCOUNTING It’s more than numbers…

WEDNESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE JUNE 25 ACROSS 1 Lower limb 4 Each __; one another 9 Daddy 13 Sound of a pistol firing 15 Tomb 16 Mountain goat 17 Celebrity 18 __ about; extols excitedly 19 Greenish-blue 20 Monthly mailing from the bank 22 Doing nothing 23 Part of a tooth 24 Primate 26 Bits of parsley 29 Fabric 34 Assumed name 35 Actor Tyrone 36 Mineral spring 37 Prohibits 38 Lubricated 39 Gullible ones

40 At the __ of the day; ultimately 41 Drive too fast 42 Commandment verb 43 Brave firemen, at times 45 Locations 46 That girl 47 Reserve, as a hotel room 48 Greek letter 51 Adjective in a paper towel ad 56 Hammerer’s target 57 Unspoken, but understood 58 Hit the __; leave 60 “My Country, ‘Tis of __” 61 Jagged 62 Japanese wrestling form 63 Remove from power 64 Talk out of 65 Hair covering DOWN

1 Pounds: abbr. 2 Polishes off 3 Pesky insect 4 Mean fairy tale woman 5 Hobo 6 “I __ a Dream”; MLK speech 7 Level; balanced 8 Said again 9 Compassionate person 10 In the sack 11 Ring out 12 Wheel rod 14 “Thanks, Juan!” 21 Pulls hard 25 __ person; apiece 26 Fencing sword 27 Glider or 747 28 Watermelon casings 29 Beauty spots 30 Filled with amazement 31 Sir __ Newton 32 Classic gift for the teacher

33 Goes on & on 35 Wharf 38 Did surgery 39 Salt containers 41 Take to court 42 Messy person 44 Alpine home 45 Redcap 47 Idaho’s capital 48 5 __ 10 is 2 49 Hawaiian island 50 Connections 52 Unclothed 53 Glasgow native 54 Person, place or thing 55 Make gentle 59 __-com; Web business

! e m i t r e Summ

Keep up to date with all the events, concerts, movie times and more!

Always UGA • Always ATHENS • Always FREE • Since 1893

Need a roommate or a job? Got something to sell, rent, or trade? Place your ad ANYTIME at: redandblack.com/classifieds The Red & Black publishes once per week on Thursdays during each semester according to the university schedule. The Red & Black does not verify, investigate, or endorse any classified ad. Readers are urged to use caution when responding to an ad.

EMPLOYMENT GET $5 CREDIT at Two Story Coffee in Five Points for completion of a 5-minute survey on wellbeing. One survey per student. Student ID required. Sponsored by Teleios, Inc. Access online at https://www.sur veymonkey. com/s/teleioscollegesurvey or on your phone. Thanks very much. Spry, alert 98 year old Athens female needs trustworthy, female helper 2-3 hrs/evening. 3 evenings per week. Assist with light evening meal and going to bed. Preferred Nursing or Gerontology student with experience/ interest in aiding elderly. $10.10/ hr. Interview 706-202-4324, Clark. Professor needs co-ed to chauffeur her mother on errand 4 hours/week, $10/hour. We buy lunch too! Must be reliable every week beginning in May. We have car. Call 706-540-3865

HOUSING 2Br 1Bth House. 630/month Pets ok. Fenced in backyard. 130 Sunset Dr. Washer/Dryer. apprx 950 sq.ft. Available Jun 2014. Call Adam 706-296-5838

1 Bdrm Apt in house. $370 Utilities included. Furnished. NO smoking. Very Quiet. High Speed Internet. 284 Valleybrook. 706296-5838 Adam FOR SALE/RENT! 2BD/2BT condo in the WOODLANDS- Available August. Open floor plan, ground level. Appliances included, hard wood floors, new carpet. Gated community with amenities. More info, contact Ben- bmoorman@ uga.edu. 4bd-4ba at campus, walk to class, near Brumby Hall, large kitchen-den, washer/dryer, screen porch-swing, fire-pit, 194 Talmadge St. $1800. Aug 1st. 706714-1100 2 BR/ 2 1/2 BATH COTTAGES FOR RENT IN THE GATED WOODLANDS COMMUNITY. 12 MONTH LEASE, BUT ONE IS AVAILABLE FOR 15 MONTHS STARTING JUNE. $900./MONTH. CALL ELLEN @ 404-210-9437 OR STEVE @ 404788-6905. Live Downtown across from the UGA Arch! Spacious floor plans with hardwood floors & stainless steel appliances! Now Leasing for Fall! 706-613-2742 Visit www.Fredshp.com for more information!

Sharp Bungalow near Foley Field. 2-3 bedrooms, 2 baths, new paint, landscaping, LR, DR/study, CHAC, fans, fireplace, W/D, attic storage, porch, yard, off-street parking. pets. Aug. 1. $1200. 706549-8144

SUBLEASES TWO MONTHS FREE! Looking for someone to take over my lease at The Club on Riverbend. Four bedroom, four bath for $342/month. Everything included. More Info contact me at 678-978-8822. $450 bedroom and bathroom. Utilities not included, about $40 a month. 5 minute walk from Tate/ SLC. Also able to walk dt. Summer/Next year school lease 952956-4658 2 bedroom, 3 and 1/2 bath, 2 cloets, full kitchen/dining, back deck and brand new washer/dryer. 5 min to downtown/campus. Vball/ tennis/basketball court,gym. 385/ month 678-416-9631 Subleasing a room in a 3 bedroom 3.5 bathroom townhouse at The Ikon for $504 plus utilities. The home is furnished therefore you don't need to bring your own furniture. 770-401-2738

Subleasing a bedroom in a 4/2 (furnished) at the U for June-July. Rent is $299/month including all util. (Cable/internet, electricity, water) Very close to campus. 3 male roommates. 229-444-5200

1 Bed/Bath in Townhouse S. Lumpkin with 2 F UGA Alums. Furnished, 4 DVRS, Piano, Outfitted Kitchen 500 1/3 utilities. www.2305slumpkin.com. 706495-2386

$450/mo. 1BR/BA in 2BR/2bath townhouse in 5Pts. Furnished if needed. W/D included. Other resident is a female graduate student. Next to the baseball field, walking distance to campus. Avail now. 301-518-2808

$450 / 1300ft James Town Condos, Furnished (Besides Room), UGA FH bus, quite area, backyard, free Wifi, pool, Starting August 2014, can be available anytime before then. 706-461-4351

Spacious 2BR, 2.5BA apartment near downtown available for sublet starting May. $400/month/ room. One or both rooms available. 2014-15 school year lease optional. Price negotiable. Call/ text 704-807-0798 if interested.

ROOMMATES In need of studious roommates. I have two available rooms each 345, plus utilities. House is located 10 min off campus in a quite neighborhood. Questions/pics?Kristi Nunez 678-477-5752 Take over my lease in a new house with 3 male roommates. Own room and bathroom.$450 plus utilities. June already paid for, so just utilities this month. Appleby Dr. 678-793-2716

SERVICES Looking to become a better musician? Take guitar or drum lessons from Alex Nicholson! All levels - Beginner to expert. Call 706-818-4818 or email aylex17@ yahoo.com

Indicates images available a t : re d a n d b l a c k . c o m / c l a s s i f i e d s red&black classifieds

RATES

(per wk., 0-24 words)

Employment ........................... $20/wk Seeking Job ............................. $10/wk Roommates ............................. $10/wk Housing .................................... $20/wk Subleases ................................. $10/wk For Sale ...................................... $10/wk Computers & Electronics................................ $12/wk Wanted ...................................... $10/wk Auto ............................................ $10/wk Services ..................................... $10/wk Entertainment/Tickets ......... $10/wk Travel .......................................... $10/wk Yard Sales .............................$10/entry Events ........................................ $10/wk Announcements .................... $10/wk Personals .................................. $10/wk Lost & Found ..................................Free

FREE ADS - up to 25 wds.

Need a roommate or a job? Got something to sell, rent, or trade? Place your ad ANYTIME at: redandblack.com/classifieds The Red & Black reaches thousands each week!

FIND the perfect place to live! redandblack. com/classifieds

Available for current UGA Students. (Merchandise must be price. One item per hsld per week. Ads must be received from UGA e-mail address only. No walk-ins or standard mail accepted.)

PLACE AN AD

• Visit redandblack.com/classifieds • Call 706.443.3011 • Email classifieds@randb.com •D  eadline to place ads is 3:00pm every Tuesday for the Thursday edition. • All ads must be PREPAID • Set up an account to review your placement history or replace old ads


LAST Only a few units remain!

CHANCE Don’t miss out... LIVE BIG at

l l l l l l

“G” Pool with Lazy River 25+ Person Hot Tub 30,000 sf Pool Deck w/ Cabanas 20 ft Outdoor TV Off-Leash Dog Park Private Shuttle Service

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

l l l

l l

l 4 & 5 Bedroom Townhomes Gated Community on 35 Acres l Individual Bedroom Suites w/ Massive Clubhouse 24 Hr. Cutting Edge Fitness Center Private Bath and Walk-in Closet l Granite Countertops Throughout w/ Personal Trainer & Classes l Stainless Steel Appliances 24 Hr. Study Lounge l In-Unit Full Size Washer/Dryer Optional Rental Furniture

Search YouTube: “Athens Ridge Virtual Tour”


June 19, 2014 edition of the Red & Black