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MOST LIKELY TO GET ROBBED TIME OF DAY:

Thursday, April 10, 2014 Vol. 121, No. 29 | Athens, Georgia redandblack.com

TYPE OF WEAPON:

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ROBBERIES

Stick ’em up

STRONG ARM

Where, when and how robbers strike in Athens

PLACE:

OUTSIDE

147 INSIDE

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN ROARK AND CAITLIN LEMOINE/Staff

BY CAILIN O’BRIEN @cailinob18 Three suspects allegedly pushed a man into a downtown alley, reached into his back pocket and stole his wallet in early April. That same day, suspects snatched a debit card from an Athens woman sitting in her car and a gold necklace from another woman leaving Bootleggers Country and Western Bar on Commerce Road. Athens-Clarke County can’t avoid robberies. Residents and University of Georgia students reported 97 armed robberies between August 2012 and April 2014. Another 89 ACC residents and UGA students reported experiencing a strong-armed robbery. In total, criminals committed 236 robberies in Athens between 2012 and 2014, according to data compiled by The Red & Black. Those numbers sound scary, but they don’t mean people should become paranoid. ACC police Sergeant Jeff Clark told The Red & Black a robbery won’t happen at just any time or place. “It’s about opportunity,” he said. Robbers haven’t attacked Doug White in his 20 years in Athens — and they haven’t gone after his friends, either. But he said it could still be easy to stumble into trouble in this college town. “Always keep looking behind you, keep looking next to you and beside you,” he said. Who dunnit? To figure out when the best opportunities for robbery are, you have to learn the tricks of the trade. “There are so many young people [in Athens] who are just out of high school and are naïve, and people know how to prey on them,” White said. “It’s like, almost a business.” Clark said a few criminals in the Classic City tend to keep that business running. “There’s generally a small group of about 20 people and when

their names are mentioned, a red flag goes up,” he said. “And, you know, we normally see a decrease [in robberies] when those individuals are in jail, but they’re not going to be in jail forever. They eventually get out of jail and you see the numbers shoot back up.” Clark couldn’t tell The Red & Black which names bring up flags, but he said one robbery arrest on a person’s record could indicate a problem. “Past behavior predicts future behavior,” he said. “If you rob before, nine times out of 10, you’re going to do it again.” The Athens court system has seen its share of repeat offenders. Laquan Williams, 23, was booked into Clarke County Jail on April 3, facing charges he accrued after he allegedly stabbed and beat a homeowner until he became blind in one eye during a home invasion last year, according to an Athens-Banner Herald article. Williams already faced charges of armed robbery, aggravated assault with the intent to rob, three counts of financial card fraud and false imprisonment when he was arrested on Feb. 21 in connection with an armed robbery last September in front of the Sigma Chi fraternity house on Lumpkin Street, according to a previous Red & Black article. He was also arrested twice in 2013 and 2009 on similar charges. Ryne Forte, 22, has also been in and out of Clarke County Jail. ACC police arrested Forte on Nov. 16, 2013 after he allegedly robbed two UGA students at gunpoint on Oconee Street. Forte had already pleaded guilty to simple battery, disorderly conduct and criminal trespass on Oct. 2, 2013. He broke his 12-month probation when he allegedly held a gun to the students. A “new crop” of career criminals has come on to the scene recently, Clark said. “I used to be on patrol and the guys I dealt with when I was on patrol . . . for some reason, they’re not committing the crimes, [anymore],” he said. “Either they’re in jail or they just, you know, they stopped committing crimes. This is a newer batch.” See ROBBERY, Page A3

FOOTBALL

Friends no more: Wideouts battle backs on G-Day BY NICK SUSS @nicksuss Chris Conley likes J.J. Green, and Green likes Conley. The two of them would be considered by most to be friends. But on the field, the two have no reservations about showing each other up. In the middle of the team’s second Thursday practice of the spring season, the senior wide receiver and the sophomore defensive back traded off making impressive plays against one another. First, in a red zone drill, Green blanketed Conley, making it next to impossible for a pass to be completed, and then batted the ball away. When Conley was asked about that play after practice, confident denial was his only course of action. “First of all, he didn’t cover me,” Conley said. “Second of all, I love J.J., he’s a tough guy, he’s a hard worker and he’s making that transition really well. But I’ve got to teach him that it doesn’t matter if you’re my friend, I’m still going to kick your butt during practice.” Though Green knew Conley was obviously joking about this, Green couldn’t help but to join in talking smack. “Conley knows better than to say that,” Green said. Some minutes after that play, in a full-team scrimmage, Conley had the opportunity to block Green on a toss sweep play. He did. He blocked him 25 yards down field and made it look effortless. If anything, this sort of experience is exactly what Green wants. After changing positions in the winter from running back to defensive back, Green was thrust into the center of an already-existing rivalry between Georgia’s wide receivers and defensive backs. Lining up against one another play after play, day after day, these two position groups have built up a healthy sense of competition that makes practice all the more productive. “We know we can’t let the DBs get the best of

Senior wide receiver Chris Conley (right) aggressively matches up with teammate and newly-converted defensive back J.J.Green in Georgia's spring practices, despite being friends off the field. SEAN TAYLOR/Staff us,” redshirt sophomore wide receiver Kenneth Towns said. “Defensive players, you know, they like to talk trash. So when we go out there, we just try to get the best out of them every time. We just gonna make each other better offense and defense.” Now working with the first team defense as the “star,” or the nickel cornerback tasked with covering the offense’s slot receiver, Green acknowledges and welcomes this fact. “Playing the slot, you guard their best wide receiver,” Green said. “So I guess guarding Conley’s going to make me even better to get ready for all the rest of the wide receivers in the SEC. You know Conley’s one of the best. At practice, he just makes me better.” But Conley isn’t the only wide receiver who gives Green a hard time on the practice field. Though every wide receiver when questioned about Green’s transition to defense is complimentary of the former running back, the receivers do admittedly taunt and tease Green since his position change. “They call me a traitor cause I’m on defense now, not on offense,” Green said. “They say ‘you traitor.’ So they try to come after me, but it’s all fun and games.” One player in particular, redshirt sophomore Blake Tibbs, has been particularly vocal in his teas-

ing of Green. Tibbs has come up with a nickname for Green of which Green neither enjoys nor approves. While this nickname started as just something Tibbs would call Green, the epithet has since spread across the offense. “We just mess with him, tease him a little bit,” Tibbs said. “Tell him he needs to come back over here or we try to pick on him when we’re on the field or something.” Green doesn’t fight back against this incessant schoolyard picking, but rather tries to pretend that it isn’t happening at all. “I just sit there thinking like ‘I don’t even know who that is,’” Green said of when he is confronted with this nickname. Towns, who often lines up as a slot wide receiver and as a result practices often against Green, takes a different kind of offense to Green being on defense. As Green is a former offensive player, Towns said he believes Green knows the offensive plays. Green thinks this is ridiculous. “Going against offense, the coaches will be like ‘J.J. knows the plays,’” Green said. “I don’t know the wide receiver routes. The only things I know are the run plays and the screens. And that’s it.” See RIVALRY, Page B6

NEWS, A2 • VIEWS, A4 • VARIETY, A10 • SPORTS, B1 • G-DAY, B3 • PUZZLES, B12 An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia and Athens Communities

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A2 News

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

With $12 million, Foley Field to join list of accessible facilities BY BRITTINI RAY @brittini_ray Weeks after officials struck down student petitions for Arch accessibility, the University of Georgia’s Athletic Association plans to renovate UGA’s Foley Field to increase accessibility for disabled patrons. The Athletic Association Board of Directors approved a $12 million expenditure for renovations during its quarterly meeting in February. The improvements to Foley Field will include a larger locker room for athletes. Upgrades to the facility’s training rooms is also on the list of anticipated renovations for the baseball complex. The association also plans to renovate the complex to address modern code issues, said Josh Brooks, UGA’s assistant athletic director for internal operations. “We will be addressing many of the code issues that are more modern code issues than when the stadium was built,” Brooks said. “Some of that has to do with the seating area for [Americans with Disabilities Act] issues and some other additional options for ADA to be able to sit.” The baseball complex was last renovated in 1990, the same year the federal government adopted the Americans with Disabilities Act. Amendments were later made to the bill to ensure that public facilities accommodated disabled patrons. Foley Field will become one of 16 athletic facilities that are disabilityfriendly on UGA’s campus, including Sanford Stadium and Stegeman Coliseum, homes to UGA’s most popular sports. The renovations will also add an elevator to the baseball complex, Brooks said. “We will also be adding an elevator into the facility,” Brooks said.

FOLEY FIELD RENOVATIONS WHAT: Larger locker room, upgraded training rooms and addition of an elevator WHEN: Remodeling will begin in May 2014 HOW: $12 million approved for renovations WHY: Better accommodate disabled patrons

The University of Georgia's Athletic Association Board of Directors approved $12 million for Foley Field's renovations at its February meeting. FILE/Staff “Foley Field does not have an elevator.” Some students believe that UGA officials should take a note from the association’s playbook. KC Smith, a senior advertising major from Acworth, said she liked the Arch accessibility campaign. “I think that should have taken priority,” Smith said. “I know its two different entities. Yes, it’s cool that you can go watch a baseball game, but I think the University should have taken more time with the Arch. I think it’s a good step in the right direction for the Athletic Association but then again I think it’s more important to have the Arch more accessible.” According to a statement, UGA

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officials denied Arch accessibility in March, citing the Arch’s historical landmark status. “The Americans with Disabilities Act requires reasonable accommodation be provided to public facilities for access by disabled persons,” according to a statement from the UGA administration. “Because the Arch qualifies as an historical landmark, however, the National Historic Preservation Act requires the University to consider whether alterations can be made without threatening the historical significance of the site. Previous reviews have determined that the Arch is accessible in its current configuration. People with disabilities may approach the Arch

from the campus side, touch it, and have their photo taken beneath it.” Renovations to the sports complex will also include an expanded concourse as well as a concession area. The changes in architecture will not include new netting to help curb damages from foul balls, Brooks said. Accidental damage to vehicle reports increase during the baseball season, according to UGA police. “I can say that [this issue] happens every year,” said UGA Police Chief Jimmy Williamson. “Ranging from the single digits to the teens, [it happens]. It’s not just baseballs. There are also rocks from spun from lawn mowers and tree branches hit windows. When it happens we take reports and refer people to UGA insurance.” As of this semester, there have been three police reports filed for baseballs damaging vehicles. Foley Field is scheduled to undergo renovations at the end of the 2014 baseball season, which ends in May.

WUGA-TV faces revisions in programming, staff BY STEPHEN MAYS @stephen_mays The University of Georgia’s public television station, WUGA-TV, will undergo programming adjustments and staff reductions. The change comes at the instruction of senior administrators, including the provost, after receiving data requested by UGA P re si de n t J e re Morehead on how the station serves the educational purposes and the academic reputation of UGA. WUGAFM, UGA’s radio station, was not affected. The station telecasts news, documentaries and PBS programming 24 hours a day, seven days a week to the Athens and Northeast Georgia areas. Effective July 1, the station will discontinue local program production. The change will also mean that only the World Channel from the national Public Broadcasting System will be carried. Although the World Channel will be aired around the clock, six of the station’s staff members positions will be eliminated effective June 30. “As far as the viewer is concerned, it is a minimal change because, except for hourly news breaks on weekdays and occasional specials and documentaries, 99 percent of programming already comes from the World Channel,” said Tom Jackson, vice president for public affairs, in the news release. “This

As a result of WUGA-TV’s reduction in staff, the number of student interns have changed. The station said it values its student involvement. KENDYL WADE/Staff move helps us honor our obligations as financial stewards to ensure funds are used most efficiently to further the academic mission of the University.” The station, which signed to air in May 2011, also utilized unpaid student interns. The number of interns fluctuated, so those positions have also been changed. “I know that a number of them have indicated that they would like to continue working with the radio side, so they’ll just continue their internships on the radio side during the summer,” Jackson said. The findings revealed that the time needed to increase student involvement, local programming and the resultant market was

greater than relative costs of operation. Grady Newsource, which will continue to air throughout Clarke and Oconee counties on Charter Cable channel 15, is one such local program not lost to the changes at WUGA-TV. The six employees affected by the changes will receive transition counseling from UGA Human Resources. An

estimated $565,000 will be saved annually. “The part of the reduction that is state funding will go back to the university’s general budget," Jackson said, "and the portion that is private funding will lessen the demand on those respective organizations — the UGA Foundation and the Georgia Athletic Association.”

CORRECTIONS AND OMISSIONS: It is the policy of The Red and Black to correct errors and omissions. We welcome e-mails from readers pointing these out; please send such notices to CORRECTIONS@ RANDB.COM. Recent corrections may be found at REDANDBLACK.COM.

Hilary Butschek Editor-in-Chief editor@randb.com Cy Brown Managing Editor me@randb.com


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

News A3

Student death ruled accidental drug overdose BY LAURA JAMES @laurajames225 After conducting an investigation, medical officials have determined that University of Georgia student David Peacock Braun’s death was caused by ingesting a dangerous amount of a prescription drug. The Georgia Bureau of Investigation Medical Examiner’s Office and the Athens-Clarke County Coroner’s Office concluded that David Braun, 21, ingested a “lethal dose of fentanyl,” UGA police said in a press release, which led to his accidental death. Fentanyl is a prescription pain medication known to be 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine. “To think that that’s the kind of accident that killed David is just so painful,” said Jon Braun, David Braun’s father. David Braun’s parents of Marietta learned of the cause of their son’s death a couple of days ago and did not know of the cause prior to that. “We knew what the original statement was that there was no note or there was no struggle and that the results were pending, so that’s where we left it,” Jon Braun said. “We’re still grieving. It’s so senseless. That’s really important that people understand that we never get to be with him or see him again.” David Braun’s parents did not know for sure where their son obtained fentanyl and plan to meet with police to find out more details of the investigation. “At this point, there’s still a lot of uncertainty about the details, but it’s obvious that David is gone and they have a cause of death, but some of the particulars are still up in the air,” Jon Braun said. Police said there has been an increase in fentanyl-related overdoses in the UGA population in recent months. The drug is commonly mixed with heroin and is considered to be a factor in many overdose related deaths. “The fact that heroin and harder drugs are being used in many different places among many different social groups means that there are, unfortunately, probably some people on campus who may be making the same kind of decisions that could be fatal,” Jon Braun said. “If anything positive can come out of David’s death, if we can stop that

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University of Georgia student David Peacock Braun, 21, was found dead on Jan. 14 in his Vandiver Hall dorm room. Courtesy Harriet Peacock from happening, that’ll comfort us somewhat.” His mother, Harriet Peacock, hopes no one has to experience this sort of pain. “He was our joy,” Peacock said. “This should never happen to anybody. No students, no parents, no one.” UGA police found David Braun on campus in his Vandiver Hall room on Jan. 14, after police met a locked door to his room and went in using a key. The deceased student’s suitemate Tevin Reeves said he alerted housing officials after he had not seen David Braun since Jan. 10 or Jan. 11. Reeves said he had smelled something coming from his suitemate’s room, which led him to reporting his concern. UGA will hold a memorial

service for all of the deceased members of the UGA community, including David Braun, on April 29 at 7 p.m. in the UGA Chapel. “We’d love to meet and talk to anyone who knew him,” Jon Braun said. Jon Braun and Peacock said several people gave money to the Nature Conservancy of Georgia in their son’s honor after they requested in the obituary people to do so in lieu of sending flowers. But his parents plan to do something more long-term in honor of their son. “We’ve been thinking a lot of how can we honor his memory,” Jon Braun said. “Once we decide, I think that would be something important for both of us to do.”

ROBBERY: Location plays role in successful crimes ➤ From Page A1 Clark said it’s impossible to pinpoint when a new cycle of career robbers will take over, but the drug trade is generally a good barometer. “Most of our crimes revolve around drugs,” he said. “Every year you see newer guys come out selling dope or buying dope. Everything really revolves around marijuana and crack cocaine.” Where’d it go down? Most criminals looking to make a career in robberies in ACC have found the most success on the streets. A total of 143 people were robbed walking along Athens streets between 2012 and 2014, more than half of all robberies during that time. Still, Perla Trejo, a sophomore pre-business major from Chatsworth, said she usually feels safe strolling the streets of Athens, even after a night downtown. “There’s lots of people walking around downtown,” she said. “I think I would not feel safe, like, in North Campus, because it’s always dark and lonely, you know?” Trejo’s confidence in her personal safety on the streets is encouraging. About a third of the street robberies included the threat of a weapon, 50 out of 143. The majority — 63 — were classified as strongarmed robberies. Criminals often target students walking home from downtown. Students’ intoxicated states makes them easier victims, Clark said. “Usually, we don’t see any violent robberies when students are drunk,” he said. “It’s usually like a snatch — kind of like a pickpocket.” ACC residents and UGA students are more likely to experience an armed robbery in their homes than walking down the street, proportionately speaking. Of the 42 robberies in homes between 2012 and 2014, 24 involved weapons of some kind. Guns were used to commit 19 of those robberies. Home invaders typically break into homes they know to contain drugs, Clark said. “When we get a home invasion, one of the first things we think about is: what was in that house?,” he said. “We look at each situation differently. We look at the location and what the homeowners do. Lots of times the investigation leads us to believe this was drug-related.” Still, Lauren Tricksey said she’s eager to continue living on campus. “Here we’re all around and there’s people constantly walking by, but in an apartment you can be walking to your room at night and nobody else is around,” said the second-year middle school education major from Atlanta. Tricksey lives in Vandiver Hall in the East Campus Village. Vandiver and all other residence halls in ECV have security measures such as a hand scanner or a front desk to help ensure the safety of the students living there. These measures aren’t always enough. On Jan. 26, four men burglarized a suite in Busbee Hall and allegedly led the students inside to believe they had a weapon, according to a previous Red & Black article. The four walked into Busbee after another student held the door open for them. Tricksey said something similar could happen in Vandiver, but she’s not worried.

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“At nighttime, the doors could be left open and people just let people in, but, I mean, me and my roommates, we keep our doors locked,” she said. @BPCAthens www.facebook.com/BiotestPlasmaCenterAthens “So I never feel really unsafe.” Tricksey said even reading news about breakins like the one in Busbee doesn’t faze her much. 085RedandBlack3.22x1.5.indd 1 “The robberies that I’ve heard of, a lot of them can be avoided,” she said. “So, I feel like if you take the necessary precautions, then you won’t find yourself in that situation.”

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What’s that risky business? Businesses are at a lower risk of robbery than pedestrians or homes — but the robbers who do break in are more likely to be armed. Of the 32 robberies reported from Athens businesses from 2012 to 2014, 17 involved a gun and six involved another weapon. Clark said some stores are more at risk than others. Stores that are further away from police officers, shaded, or ill lit make easy targets. Relatively empty stores also tend to invite robberies. “You don’t really see a lot of businesses downtown being robbed just because so many people are in this area,” he said. “Robbers, they don’t like to be seen; they want to make sure they get away.” Kevin Lee manages Firehouse Package Store on a secluded portion of West Broad Street, an area relatively heavy in robberies. Lee, who often works alone until around 11 p.m., said he has experienced an armed robbery. He used to get scared working at night alone, but now he knows how to handle any criminals with guns wanting his liquor or money. “Just let them have it,” he said. “If you’re against it, it’s just more dangerous.” White has worked at several businesses that may attract armed robberies in Athens over the past 20 years. Often, White worked alone. He said despite the high likelihood these businesses would be robbed at gun point, he and the other employees received little or no training in dealing with violent crimes. “I would say out of the last 10 places, maybe one actually said ‘this is what you do,’” he said. “And that was 15 minutes within my training. It was ‘this is where we keep the .38 Special.’ And that was it.” White said the gun was kept as a last option. “You would rather hand the money over, peace out, adios, and then you call the police,” he said. White said he’s never needed to defend a store from an armed robber, but feels employees working in high-risk shops may benefit from a 30-minute training session on how to deal with these types of robberies. ACC keeps a watch on businesses they know to be easy targets, Clark said. He said officers try to ensure employees working at those locations never have to cope with a gun in their shop, especially during late-night hours. “Typically, a lot of our convenience stores close down at midnight,” Clark said. “But we do have some that stay open 24-hours a day and usually we demand that they have two clerks working so that does not occur.” Most robberies occur between 1 and 3 a.m., according to data compiled by The Red & Black. Even with ACCPD’s precautions, Athens won’t ever be robbery free. But experts say they can be avoided with caution. “You really, really have to keep your head on a swivel around here,” White said.

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Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

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WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Red & Black wants to know what you think — so let’s start a conversation. Email: opinions@randb.com or letters@randb.com Facebook: Like The Red & Black Twitter: @redandblack

OUR TAKE

Anonymity a sinister change to social media

W

e’ve all been told horror stories about sharing private information in the not-so-private world of social media, but our mothers’ warnings are antiquated at best. Little did your teachers, parents and advisors know, social media would take a turn toward anonymity. Smartphone applications such as Yik Yak, uMentioned and Gaggle allow for anonymous posting in order to bring out the best and worst, the most humor and the most depravity young adults have to offer. So while you’re censoring your Facebook account of red solo cups and embarrassing videos (karaoke at 1 a.m. is never a good idea) before that big interview, you have the freedom to post what you really think on Yik Yak, no matter how explicit it may be. Anonymous social media seems to be a haven for everything your mother told you not to say. Though we feign maturity in the classroom and at work, when left to our own devices (and electronic devices) we revert to childish gossip and “Spongebob Squarepants” quotes. Kristin Shotwell, a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is facing the consequences of a laissez-faire attitude toward online responsibility firsthand. Somewhere within 80 miles of Athens (according to the account), someone has created a Tinder profile using photos of Shotwell that were shared on Facebook. This is a case in which anonymity has gone too far. Tinder, a popular dating app that links to your Facebook profile, is not intended to be anonymous, yet there is little monitoring to be sure users are who they say they are. Shotwell's uneasiness about this fake profile has compelled her to seek out the creator of the Tinder account. Her search led her to the Birmingham area, though she was unable to comment at the time of publication. According to an article in The Red & Black earlier this week, Christopher Travers, the American marketing head for uMentioned, was much more optimistic about the possibilities of anonymous social media. “Anonymous social networking is absolutely going to define 2014,” Travers told The Red & Black. And if his prediction comes true, we can only hope that online anonymity will not live on as the negative influence it started out as. — Laura Thompson for the editorial board

COURTNEY WILLETT/Staff

SGA

Amanda Horne

DJB’s proposal opens doors to new students

@HEARDATUGA

A

Campus quotes reinforce millennial stereotypes

s Student Government Association elections have ended, the votes have been tallied and a new cabinet has been elected. DJB, formally known as Drew Jacoby, Jim Thompson and Brittany Arnold, secured the executive win with 63.46 percent of the vote. Now, the three will strive to implement their many plans to make the University of Georgia a better place for students. One of their most monumental goals is to pass legislation to allow mentally disabled students the opportunity to attend UGA. Thompson, the vice president-elect, came up with the idea to start a LIFE program at UGA. Based on the success of the program at Clemson University, this legislation is intended to allow students with disabilities, such as down syndrome and autism, to have the opportunity to receive a twoyear degree and enjoy a traditional college experience. “One day over winter break, my friend posted a video of a student opening his acceptance letter to the ClemsonLIFE program,” Thompson said. “After finishing, I began researching similar programs, and was saddened to learn that UGA does not offer a similar program. In that moment, I committed myself to bringing the program to UGA.” ClemsonLIFE has had great success at Clemson, and has grown from a few students to more than 20. The program teaches participants independent living skills such as safety, cooking and nutri-

Zach Hawkins Guest Columnist

tion, as well as basic mathematics, literature and budgeting. Students will also be put in a job placement program where they can learn to work while receiving classroom instruction on job skills. The success at Clemson could certainly carry over if the right people are there to make it happen. Implementing the program at UGA will take time — significantly more than the single year Thompson will hold office. The first steps will be to find a college inside the University to give the LIFE program a home, speak with University Housing to try to work out housing arrangements for program participants, and fundraising to get the program started. “I am positive this is an initiative that will carry forward long after I graduate. I’m just excited to play a role in the initial planning,” Thompson said. This program is a much needed change on campus. It may take many years, but students with disabilities should be allowed to come to UGA and experience all of the things it means to be a Bulldog. — Zach Hawkins is a sophomore from Peachtree City majoring in international affairs

Guest Columnist

I

n the past few weeks the University of Georgia has become famous, well infamous really, in the BuzzFeed community. The news and entertainment site recently picked up a story about our stomping ground — Athens. But was the story about our outstanding level of student involvement in the community? Or our excellent number of students who expand their learning prospects by studying abroad? Nope. None of the above. It was about a Twitter feed created by someone on campus called Heard at UGA. It’s an interesting idea, students (or really anyone on campus) can send a quote to the Twitter account and they’ll retweet whatever lovely things the people on our campus have to say. From, “I’ll hook up with him just to get the free t-shirt” to “I’m off my antibiotics, guess who’s getting drunk tonight?,” the account provides a good laugh and frankly makes you feel better about the state of your life in comparison. We have all eavesdropped on questionable conversations long before someone made it into a Twitter handle. But this felt different to me. As a community, we have decided to drop into private conversations, laugh at the plight of someone we don’t even know and then broadcast it to the community at large. Maybe it’s because I was truly embarrassed by some of the tweets from my fellow students, but after I stopped laughing I felt a little dirty. Not only was I judging complete strangers, but I thought it was funny that our student body is perpetuating the stereotype our predecessors have about our generation: That we’re a group of alcoholic, sexually immoral, unmotivated partiers. Suddenly “I’m sober and talking to you, aren’t you proud of me?” seemed more like airing our dirty sheets to the world than something to entertain me during my walk to class. Can I stop it? No. But I’m going to quietly unfollow and pretend that our new exposure never actually happened. — Amanda Horne is a junior from Cartersville majoring in political science and economics

OPINION METER: The week that was

FARM FRESH Now that the

weather has warmed up, you can take to the great outdoors for your weekly grocery shopping. The Athens Farmers Market has started up, bringing locally-grown produce to both Bishop Park and City Hall.

BRAVES COUNTRY This week marked opening day at Turner Field, a seasonal landmark among sports fans throughout Georgia. Dig out your Braves gear and practice your chop, it’s time for another season spent at Turner Field.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

Editor In Chief: Hilary Butschek Managing Editor: Cy Brown News Editor: Kendall Trammell Associate News Editor: Taylor West Sports Editor: Tanya Sichynsky Associate Sports Editor: Connor Smolensky Variety Editor: Ben Dell’Orto Associate Variety Editor: Courtney Willett Opinions Editor: Laura Thompson Photo Editor: Taylor Sutton Chief Photographer: Randy Schafer Multimedia Editor: Gabe Ram Design Editor: Caitlin LeMoine Social Media Editor: Jana French Editorial Adviser: Erin France Editorial Assistant: Jennifer Pointer Staff Writers: Shannon Adams, James Anhut, Michelle

G-DAY Never fear, football fans, Saturdays spent cheering on the Bulldogs in Sanford Stadium are back. The annual G-day spring game will pit the red squad against the black squad to preview the greatness sure to come this fall.

AUTISM AWARENESS April is a time to celebrate Autism Awareness Month. Though the celebration doesn’t always garner a lot of recognition at UGA, SGA executive officers plan to change things by implementing a program for special needs students.

Our Staff

Baruchman, Rachel Brannon, Taylor Denman, Nikki Eggers, Justin Fedich, Daniel Funke, Marena Galluccio, Elizabeth Gerber, Jake Goodman, Evan Greenberg, Charlette Hall, Raleigh Harbin, Lesley Hauler, Sydney Herwig, Justin Hubbard, Danielle Jackson, Laura James, Jeanette Kazmierczak, Hunter Lacey, Sarah Lane, Savannah Levins, Mariya Lewter, Brad Mannion, Stephen Mays, Lauren McDonald, Samantha O’Brien, Cody Pace, Scott Powell, Kevin Riley, Tyler Serritt, Kennington Smith, Nick Suss, Jaylon Thompson, Manfredi Tosini, Mariana Viera, Joseph Youorski Senior Reporters: Cailin O’Brien, Nicholas Fouriezos, Nick Watson Staff Photographers: David Bristow, Christina Cannon, Shanda Crowe, Orlando Pimentel, Heather Pitts, Diondra Powers, Taylor Renner, Hannah John Roark, Pap Rocki, Erin Smith, Damien Salas, Ashleigh Shay, Polly Turrentine Staff Videographers: Emily Erdelyan, David Glenn, Rainey Gregg, Jaime Lee

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General Manager: Natalie McClure Office Manager: Ashley Oldham Student Business Assistant: Chandler McGee Classified Manager: Siah Burton Distribution/Maintenance Manager: Will Sanchez Circulation Assistant: John Berrigan Distribution Team: Drew Allen, Coleman Barrie, Nicholas Parker, John Ward, Hunter Whitfield The Red & Black is published each Thursday throughout the year, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a non-profit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

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POLITICS

Gov. Deal speaks at UGA, expresses understanding of post-graduation plight

A

s Georgia continues toward educational and economic reform, the Peach State’s future continues to look bright. Expect some major changes in the near future as Gov. Nathan Deal works to keep Georgia the No. 1 state in the nation for business. At the 23rd Annual Public Service and Outreach Meeting, Gov. Deal addressed Georgia’s economic future and his plans to improve the economy and education. Though Georgia’s economy will continue to grow, the state still has a lot of work to do. As college students preparing to enter our prospective careers, changes in the economy or the workforce can have a significant influence on our post-graduation employment. The career choices we make today will make the difference between financial security and years of debt in the future. As careers continue to become more and more demanding, the importance of education continues to grow each year. As Deal pointed out, “In just six short years, 60 percent of the jobs in our state are going to require

Sam Woo

Guest Columnist

some form of post-secondary education.” This reaffirms that Georgia is quickly changing. Simply earning a degree does not make the cut for employers anymore. Job candidates have to stand out and remain competitive as more return to school. One of the ways Deal plans to combat unemployment and stimulate economic growth is with education reform. “I do believe that one of the primary purposes of education is employment. Anyone who is in our institutions should have that type of focus, so that when they graduate they are sitting in office chairs, instead of in their parents’ basement couch,” Deal said. Even after graduating from college, many graduates find themselves unemployed and struggling to make ends meet. As students, our choice of major can make or break

our careers. Ignoring the importance of education in the workforce can be the difference between the office chair and the basement couch. Unemployment continues to be an issue for the state as the population continues to grow and jobs shift toward specialization. “We identified certain areas of jobs in our state that we could not currently fill with the workers that we had,” Deal said. It does not make sense for jobs to remain vacant in a state with relatively high unemployment. Fortunately, Deal believes he can help lower unemployment and fill job vacancies. “We have seven areas of study within our technical college system that if someone will pursue those degrees, 100 percent of the cost of that will be paid for by the HOPE grant,” Deal said. Education for the following careers is now covered by the HOPE grant: long-dis-

tance truck driving, practical nursing, early childhood education, diesel mechanics, welders, health technology and general information technology. Deal’s new policy is an important lesson in job security. Many find themselves applying for unemployment after being laid off or being unable to find a job. By choosing a career in one of the high-demand fields, you can likely guarantee a secure job after graduation. On the other hand, choosing a career in a low-demand field puts you at risk of joining the thousands in the unemployment line. Education is expensive and time consuming, but it opens a new door for job opportunities. By providing financial incentives for postsecondary education, Deal is likely to entice workers to seek careers covered by the HOPE grant. Filling vacant job openings and incentivizing workers to be self-sufficient is particularly important as the state attempts to reduce the number of Georgians collecting unemployment benefits. Deal said Georgia has saved $3.4 million since 2010 by lowering the number of

BEER

Athens, student culture allows craft breweries to multiply

—Sam Woo is a freshman from Marietta majoring in business administration and international affairs

graduation invitations

Assistant Variety Editor

TELEVISION

T

here is an ongoing list of the things that University of Georgia students love about Athens. Out of these — access to alcohol and breweries — is probably one of the first that comes to mind. In Athens, many enjoy the ability to take a tour of Terrapin Beer Company, enjoy the 39 different beers that rotate at Copper Creek and are now looking forward to Athens’ newest brewery, Creature Comforts. We have watched as these brewers have thrived in the Athens scene and have relished in their success. However, in a column from the New York Times, journalist Steve Hindy explains that craft breweries face more challenges than other small businesses. Hindy writes this is due to the three-tiered system breweries have to comply with and franchise laws that must be followed. So what makes Athens breweries different? Terrapin’s success has been rampant throughout downtown bars and restaurants. The beer is also sold in 10 states in the Southeast and East Coast areas of the United States. In each of these states, there are numerous distributors that make access to Terrapin easy. Terrapin’s famous Rye Pale Ale, for instance, has been an award-winning beer for years and is sold all over the U.S. Another aspect that has led Terrapin to success is the evening tours the brewery offers. These tours offer tasting for guests, live music and a 2-acre backyard that is an attractive hangout for tourists. The tours are offered Wednesday through Saturday and have become quite popular among the UGA student population.

Courtney Willett

students enrolled in remedial classes by more than 12,000. “That’s what we want. We want young people that are coming out of high school that do not have to take remedial classes,” Deal said. The need for remedial classes is an expensive and unnecessary expense for Georgia taxpayers. Ideally, students should leave high school fully prepared to enter college or the work force; however, thousands of high school graduates fail to receive the necessary education to succeed. Eliminating remedial classes will save the taxpayer’s money and better prepare our fellow students for the future. As expectations grow, it is crucial that students develop skills outside of the classroom. For every college degree, there are thousands of equally qualified applicants seeking the same career. Standing out and building your résumé has never been more important, and it is admirable that Deal recognizes this fact.

Misguided audience seeks cancellation of ‘Colbert Report’ Ashley Harter

Guest Columnist

Students have also witnessed the success of Copper Creek Brewing Company. Because it was the only microbrewery downtown before Creature Comforts moved into the old Snow Tire building, it attracts numerous locals. The curiosity of trying a new beer brewed right in a restaurant has led many people to sample these brews. And these beers are not bottled, they’re only available in the restaurant. This attracts many people because they can only access them inside. What may also contribute to the success of breweries in Athens is the growing popularity of home brewing. More and more people are trying their hand at brewing their own beer, and they visit breweries to watch the pros do it on a larger scale. But most of all, breweries in Athens will continue this success simply because of their deep roots in Athens culture. When a town consumes as much alcohol we do, it’s easy to see that breweries have the ability to thrive. With such a prevalent music and bar scene, the existence of breweries is not only important but essential. Athens is a bubble of great beer and entertainment, so I can’t see the success of breweries ending anytime soon. —Ashley Harter is a sophomore from Canton majoring in English

S

tephen Colbert has made an incredibly successful career parodying right-wing conservatives and toting the fine line between ironic satire and dark truth. But his recent anti-Asian slur has resulted in a Twitter movement to “#CancelColbert.” People have somehow forgotten that Colbert is pure satire and so, his jokes are criticisms of society rather than his own personal beliefs. In an article for “Psychology Today” Shawn M. Burn makes the compelling argument that while the material of satirical comedians such as Colbert is offensive, it is up to the audience to properly interpret the subject matter. Burns writes, “As I sometimes say to my students, the problem with humor that capitalizes on group stereotypes, even meta-disparagement humor, is that it’s potentially dangerous when consumed by the uninformed or non-critical.” Stephen Colbert’s slur was not meant to degrade the Asian population, but rather to criticize conservatives who put minorities on a pedestal in an effort to appear to be more accepting and unbigoted. This form of “loving racism” was highlighted in Colbert’s joke — his own character was completely unaware of his own prejudice. Burns explained, “The ridiculous Colbert character doesn’t believe he is prejudiced even declaring he ‘doesn’t see color’ and can’t discern the ethnicity of his guests or himself. In this way the ‘bit’ illustrates how many prejudiced people are oblivious to their prejudices (an idea documented by many studies on aversive racism and implicit bias).” The entire #CancelColbert movement is grossly misinformed. Yes, Colbert’s joke could be interpreted as racist out of context, but that is not Colbert’s fault; he is a satirist and should be understood as such. Burns refers to Colbert’s humor as “too meta” for the average audience. In reality, no one is watching Comedy Central with the mindset required for such humor. The point of this particular parody is to highlight society’s shortcomings in a humorous manner. Colbert is meant to make the audience selfreflect and become aware of their flaws. Satire is a very hard form of humor to pull off. There is a fine line between parody and blatant offense. Even when satire has been properly executed, the majority of society still has issues properly understanding its meaning. Other parody programs such as “Saturday Night Live” and “The Daily Show” join ranks with “The Colbert Report” in terms of borderline-offensive satire. However, if we canceled every satirical show that appeared insensitive or offensive, television would be quite dull. While there is a racist presence in the media, Colbert is not a participant. Colbert clearly mocks those who are prejudiced. The people who are offended by Colbert’s obvious parody are the same kind of people who get their news from a late-night Comedy Central program. —Courtney Willett is the assistant variety editor for The Red & Black

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A6 News

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

UGA receives big share in 2015 budget

$11.5 million allocated

BY MICHELLE BARUCHMAN @mlbaruchman

SCIENCE LEARNING CENTER

1

$44.7 million allocated

The 2015 Fiscal Year budget, recently passed by the Georgia General Assembly, will benefit institutions within the University System of Georgia, including University of Georgia. John Millsaps, associate vice chancellor for media and publications for the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, said $1.939 billion were appropriated to higher education, an almost 3 percent funding increase. “The funding that the Georgia General Assembly appropriates to the University System is a lump sum that the Board of Regents then allocates out to the institutions to operate their academic missions,” Millsaps said. “When you have funding coming to institutions that will be used to do things like ensuring continuation of academic programs and hiring of quality faculty, it is used do all the things you need to do to run the institution for the benefit of the students in the academic program.”

The building will be an approximately 122,500-square-foot facility to replace the science buildings on campus as well as increase the amount of lab space available for UGA students. “The Science Learning Center was our highest capital project this year,” said Tricia Chastain, director of state relations. “It’s been a priority at UGA for a long time to replace those science buildings. Both biology and chemistry opened in the 1960s, so not only are they old buildings that need to be replaced, but there is also an issue of lack of space. Many students are on waitlists for long times trying to get lab classes they need in order to graduate so this will address both of those issues.”

BALDWIN HALL RENOVATION AND EXPANSION ATHENS CAMPUS

HIGHER EDUCATION SPENDING JULY 1, 2014 — JUNE 31, 2015

SOURCE: University of Georgia Office of Government Relations

TURFGRASS RESEARCH AND EDUCATION FACILITIES IN ATHENS, TIFTON AND GRIFFIN 3

2

“Of that $11.5 million, there is about 1.1 or 1.2 million is going to a greenhouse facility here in Tifton,” said Joe West, assistant dean for UGA Tifton Campus.

EXTENSION AND AGRICULTURAL AND EXPERIMENT STATION ATHENS CAMPUS

$4 million allocated for repairs/renovations

VETERINARY MEDICINE DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY

Total funding for the University of Georgia:

1

$1.35 million for equipment

$111.6 million

HVAC SYSTEM REPLACEMENT IN TIFT BUILDING ON TIFTON CAMPUS

“In last year’s fiscal budget, we got $4.7 million appropriation for renovation of the original and historic building on the campus, the Tift Building, built in 1922,” West said. “We’re getting ready to undertake renovation of that building starting in May. They put an additional $300,000 in this years budget to supplement what we had already gotten in last year’s budget so we could complete the project.”

SYSTEMWIDE $40 million allocated

7

“There is $40 million in the budget for major repairs and renovations, which is the money that campuses will receive to help make sure that the buildings that we have are maintained properly,” Millsaps said.

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

News A7

Gun bill awaits signature of Gov. Deal Undocumented students fight for in-state tuition BY NICHOLAS FOURIEZOS @nick4iezos

A gun rights bill, notable for its lessening of gun restrictions in schools, bars, churches and government buildings, will become state law if signed by Gov. Nathan Deal after passing through the Georgia state legislature at the end of March. House Bill 60, also called the Safe Carry Protection Act, is the attempt to expand Second Amendment protection to the places where citizens learn, drink, pray and participate. The bill allows licenseholders to carry guns in bars and into airports, before security checkpoints. They can also bring guns into government buildings where security personnel aren’t present. Georgia would become one of about 20 states which allow guns in churches if the bill is signed into law. John Monroe, a gun rights attorney from Roswell, said he has already been approached by churches looking for “model language” to give permission to gun-toting parishioners. “It’s crazy that the state would say, ‘Here’s an activity you can do legally across the state, but you can’t do it in a church,’” Monroe said. “It’s shocking that churches would tolerate such an intrusion on their affairs, which have First Amendment protection.” Public or private schools –— from elementary schools to universities — may designate a staff member to carry a gun for protection purposes. The Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence said precursor to the bill was “outrageous” and “irresponsible,” while the National Rifle Association called the bill a “historic victory for the Second Amendment.” What began as a state reform bill bears implications for the national gun debate, and is being dubbed by some as the “guns everywhere” bill. The right to carry firearms in places of worship is of particular interest to both Second Amendment supporters and anti-gun legislation advocates. While the bill stopped short of allowing carry in all circumstances, it gave church leaders

BY BRITTINI RAY @brittini_ray

Georgia House Bill 60, if passed, would allow gun owners to carry guns in bars, schools and churches if allowed. RANDY SCHAFER/Staff the right to allow guns on their property. If a permit-holder carried a gun on church property without permission, under the new law, he or she could only be fined $100. In the past, such an offense would be a misdemeanor and would include up to a $1,000 fine and possible jail sentence. The reforms give more freedom to churches, but many local religious leaders aren’t keen on allowing members to pack heat. “I don’t see guns as needed, as wanted, in church,” said Franciscan Brother David Hyman, a campus minister at the University of Georgia Catholic Center. “I can’t really fathom why anyone would say, ‘Yeah, we want guns in church.’” Another issue for churches is that their homeowner’s insurance might not cover any accidents which might occur as a result of guns being on their property. Angela Denton-Rachel, the director of ministries at Christian Campus Fellowship, said the organization’s insurance stipulates that no alcohol or guns be on the premises. “We wouldn’t be covered if anything happened,” she said. Parishioners could choose to not attend a church which permits guns, but wouldn’t have any other recourse if they felt uncomfortable with guns being allowed. Cindi Singleton, a

sophomore human development and family science major from Buford, said she didn’t think that was a problem, as long as the decision was focused on safety. “My sister went to a church in East Point [in Atlanta] and the neighborhood was not a good area,” Singleton said. “In a situation like that, if my sister walked out of the church and was robbed, she wouldn’t be able to protect herself.” The bill was passed in the final hour of Georgia’s legislative session last week. Of Athens’ elected officials, Rep. Regina Quick (R-117) and Sen. Bill Cowsert (R-46) voted for the bill, while Rep. Spencer Frye (D-118) voted against it. Quick, Coswert and Frye were unable to be reached for comment. Other changes in the bill were the prohibition of creating a state-wide database of Weapons-Carry-License-holders and the elimination of the fingerprinting requirement for renewing licenses. They added to an already comprehensive list of reforms meant to loosen gun restrictions which some see as a safety hazard. “When you look at the places where mass shootings occur, they almost always happen in places where guns aren’t allowed,” Monroe said. “It’s purely anecdotal, but name all of the most recent mass shootings.”

Immigration is resurfacing as a topic of debate among University of Georgia students, as 39 undocumented students sue the state of Georgia for in-state college tuition. “They have a right to sue,” said Macey Kessler, a junior digital broadcasting major from Suwanee. “If they’re qualifying under federal law as U.S. citizens and meeting requirements, then they should get the same in-state tuition.” Rigoberto Rivera, 24, and 38 other immigrants filed a lawsuit against the state, claiming that Georgia failed to follow its own rules by denying them in-state tuition. Their argument revolves around the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The program was enacted by the Obama administration to grant several undocumented residents temporary immunity from deportation and to classify them as legal U.S. citizens. Under the program, Rivera receives temporary legal rights that allow him to work in Georgia and obtain a state driver’s license. “It’s like the government of Georgia is saying you’re good enough to get a job, but not good enough to be getting an education,” Rivera said in a GPB News article. Despite his temporary status, Rivera feels limited in educational prospects. Rivera and other students in the Deferred Action for Childhood Program can attend state schools but will have to pay out of state tuition, which is significantly more expensive than in-state tuition. The University System of Georgia’s Board of Regents requires students

to be legal U.S. citizens in order to receive in-state tuition and refuses to grant Rivera in-state tuition. Graham Hines, a junior Chinese and film major from Augusta, said he thinks the policy makes the Board of Regents look stingy. The University System of Georgia also prohibits students in the program from attending any institution that has failed to enroll all of its academically- qualified applicants in the past two years, which includes Georgia as well as the Georgia Institute of Technology. UGA charges out-ofstate students $13,119 per semester, which is more than triple the tuition rate of in-state students. In-state students pay $4,014 per semester for tuition. “If they meet all the legal qualifications and they are residents of Georgia, then they should be given the same treatment,” said Robert Goslee, a senior international affairs major from Canton. Rivera graduated from Roswell High School and lives with his parents in Roswell. Some UGA students believe that Rivera’s long residency in Georgia earns him the right to receive in-state tuition. “I don’t really know why it’s a problem all of a sudden.” said Danimarie Roselle, a junior magazines major from West Caldwell, N.J. “He’s been here most of his life and he graduated from high school in Georgia. If he graduated from high school in Georgia, he lives here. He should be able to claim in-state tuition.” The Board or Regents has 60 days to respond to the lawsuit.

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A8 News

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

FREE SPEECH ZONES

Speakers’ rights safe in Tate BY MICHELLE BARUCHMAN AND DANIEL FUNKE @mlbaruchman @dpfunke

“There’s a fine line between saying

It’s not uncommon for students’ beliefs to be questioned while walking through Tate Student Center Plaza. Najla Abdulelah, the president of the Muslim Student Association, said her religious beliefs have been challenged by evangelical groups in the plaza. “I get randomly stopped by the Christian ministries and it is different people, not just the same person, who always have something to say — always,” Abdulelah said. “They always want to drive home the point that they think Islam is all about terrorism. They say ‘Islam is violent, therefore you are wrong, and this is how you can correct it,’ which is by converting.” Bobby McCreery, an ordained minister at Cleveland Road Baptist Church, has stopped Abdulelah before and frequents the plaza in an effort to spread his Christian ideals. “I come out here to preach the truth of God’s word and leave the results up to him,” McCreery said. While McCreery and other religious advocates voice opinions that could offend those passing through Tate Plaza, it is their first amendment right to do so. Dean of Students Bill McDonald said UGA tries its best to uphold the first amendment right to free speech by not restricting content used in demonstrations. “At the end of the day, when it comes to free speech, we guarantee it and the exercise of it within the educational environment,” he said. Free speech zones are places on campus where people can demonstrate and express their views or beliefs. There are two free speech zones on campus — Memorial Hall and Tate Plaza. McDonald said the only way an advocacy group would be denied access to free speech zones would be if the demonstration violated UGA’s educational mission. “All we try to do is regulate time and place, but as far as the content we remain neutral in that we’re not involved in the content, unless it impacts some other type of institutional policy. The institution remains neutral in whatever the issue is,” he said. “All we’re making sure is that it doesn’t interrupt the educational mission.” Examples of violations could

how you feel about things and harassment, especially on a university campus, and I am paying to be here after all.”

Najla Abdulelah

President of the Muslim Student Association

include blocking student access to the Tate Student Center, interrupting normal classroom instruction with loud music or unauthorized sale of goods, McDonald said. But ultimately, all an interest group must do is sign up for a time and place to demonstrate. Religious confrontations do not constitute the only time students have felt uncomfortable in Tate Plaza. An anti-abortion advocacy group used large, blown-up images of aborted fetuses in the plaza as a part of its political message at the beginning of March. “The University recognizes people may have been uncomfortable walking through [the anti-abortion display], the University recognizes people may disagree or agree,” McDonald said. “We were interested in protecting rights, we were interested in making sure we’re living up to constitutional rights and the educational mission for the institution.” The demonstration was lead by the Justice for Life anti-abortion group, which was invited to campus by Students for Life at UGA, an antiabortion student advocacy group, in an attempt to initiate a “constructive dialogue” with people. The graphic images portrayed dead babies covered in blood and elicited a significant response by the student body. Pro-abortion rights protesters surrounded the displays with sheets in order to block students’ view of the display during much of the duration of JFA’s presence. McCreery said he disagrees with women who choose to get abortions. “I don’t think that people are entitled to murder people,” he said. “I think abortion should be criminalized. I think people who pay for abortions and people who abort the children should be thrown in prison. If their belief leads them to murder, then no they are not entitled to it. When you’re a Christian, you love what God loves and you hate what God hates.”

Najla Abdulelah, president of the Muslim Student Association, said she has been harassed by Christian preachers while tabling in Tate Plaza. JOHN ROARK/Staff

SPEECH ON CAMPUS WHO: Can be utilized by all individuals or organizations WHERE: Memorial Hall and Tate Plaza

And he said he would have pushed for an even stronger display at the anti-abortion demonstration. “I wish they could have a 100-foot sign instead of a 20-foot sign,” McCreery said. “For someone who has had an abortion, my message to them would be that the grace of God is so great, that he sent his son into the world to save all kinds of sinners.” However, several students who participated in the protest felt the images were taking anti-abortion advocacy too far and infringed on their own first amendment rights. “This protest was not about attacking anyone’s freedom of speech — it was about protecting women on UGA’s campus,” said Manisha Banga, a freshman English major from Duluth. “The images erected on our public plaza that day were graphic, triggering and inappropriate.” Banga said the issue resided in students’ compromised safety in Tate Plaza. “The disproportionately small warning signs were useless,” she said. “Tate Plaza should be a safe space for students. This week, it wasn’t.”

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And Abdulelah agreed. “I am anti-abortion and, for myself, I would not have one,” the senior from Alpharetta majoring in international affairs said. “But I am also pro-choice and I would not impose that on someone else or enforce it simply because of my religious beliefs.” However, Will Crook, a freshman management and psychology major from Johns Creek, said evangelical groups do not constitute a threat to students’ first amendment rights. “[Christian groups] are just using their right to free speech,” he said. “It’s annoying and I wish they would stop but they aren’t infringing on anyone’s right to free speech.” Abdulelah said the hate on campus comes from a minority of people, but the majority chooses to not say anything, which is the issue. “There’s a fine line between saying how you feel about things and harassment, especially on a university campus, and I am paying to be here after all,” she said. The controversy surrounding demonstrations the plaza prompted many to wonder what kind of process an advocacy group must go through in order to assemble in Tate Plaza. Abdulelah said at some point free speech can become offensive. “I appreciate the area for public speaking, and it is really awesome that we have it but I shouldn’t have to be harassed about who I am,” she said. “When it becomes harassment, it’s not serving its purpose. It’s not facilitating conversation or encouraging discussion, it’s just encouraging animosity and hate between these groups.”

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

News A9

Bike repair stations seek to make riding safer BY MICHELLE BARUCHMAN @mlbaruchman

The Athens Regional Health System is one step closer to having accredited residency programs, which will help keep talented doctors in Georgia. KENDYL WADE/Staff

Athens Regional accreditation peaks interest for Georgia medical students BY MICHELLE BARUCHMAN @mlbaruchman The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education awarded the Athens Regional Health System institutional accreditation to advance in the development of a residency program. Mike Pilcher, director of systems relations in the Athens Regional Health System, said the hospital is going through a process to fully implement the new program. “We built a team, like any other hospital applying for residency, of professionals, including our physician director as well as other professional directors familiar with that process and how to maneuver through it,” Pilcher said. The next step, said Eric Quirion, director of graduate medical education at Athens Regional Medical Center, is to hire individual program directors for each of the five residency programs. Dr. Catherine Apaloo was appointed as the internal medicine program director Dr. James Pippim will be the director of the transitional year residency program and the hospital has signed a letter of intent with an OB-GYN program director. Quirion and his team are still recruiting for a Family Medicine Program director and General Surgery Program director. “Once they are on board, then they will start completing what is called a program information form, or the PIF,” Quirion said. “The program directors complete the application and develop the curriculum that the residents will go through while on-site here at the hospital.” The program directors submit the application to the ACGME, to review. “If everything looks good, they schedule a site visit for us, where they come out and visit the hospital, where they make sure that what we put on paper is actually what we have on site,” Quirion said. “They review the findings of their site visit. And after that, if everything goes well, they give us a letter of accreditation and let us know that we are ready to start recruiting and training residents once they have completed medical school.” Quirion said the ACGME is trying to move more quickly than usual. “We are hopeful that we will have everything in place to start our first class of residents on site for 2016,” Quirion said. Quirion said he has already begun to receive phone calls from people interested in join. “I got a phone call last month from someone in Vermont who wants to come down and do a rotation with us,” he said. Quirion said the first class of the Georgia Regents University and University of Georgia Medical Partnership will graduate in May. Students had their matching last month, and many plan to stay near the east coast. “From my conver-

sations with them, a lot of them have said that when they finish their residency, they want to come back to Athens to practice,” Quirion said. And Jonathan Murrow, head of graduate medical education development for Athens Regional Medical Center, said he anticipates beginning these programs in July of 2016. “These programs are being started in order to address the work force needs for the state of Georgia,” Murrow said. “There are areas where there is a current or anticipated shortage of doctors. We’ll be recruiting trainees from across the country, with the idea of them staying in Georgia to practice once they finish their training program.” Murrow said the program would have two main areas of influence. “With the development of the programs, we are hiring the program directors as well as teaching faculty,” he said. “Many of them are

physicians who have relocated to Athens to teach and set up programs and also to practice medicine. The second thing is that the programs, once they are under way will have 102 trainees at Athens Regional. What we are hoping to do in Athens is to set up programs that will be competitive for graduates of other medical schools across the country so that we can bring those talented individuals to Athens and keep them in the state of Georgia.” Murrow said the program will be competitive in different ways. “It’s going to be a brand new program, so it will take into account the most modern ways in which not only practice medicine but also teach medicine,” he said. “We are looking to be creative in how we teach our trainees about population health and public health, conducting research and about looking at patient centered ways of care.”

A new initiative launched on campus will allow the University of Georgia community to travel on bicycles more safely and frequently. “I have seen the need for more accessibility for students on campus to be able to ride their bikes and be able to make repairs,” said Joseph Robinson, a graduate assistant director for outdoor recreation. “The bike repair stations make it more comfortable and accessible as well as safer for students to be able to come on campus and ride.” Robinson, along with Lance Haynie, assistant director for UGA Outdoor Recreation, received funding through a grant from the Office of Sustainability. Robinson has been involved with this initiative since January 2013, when the first station was put in at Ramsey Student Center for Physical Activities. After the success of the first station, Robinson and Haynie wrote and submitted a proposal to include more on campus. “We were really trying to be strategic about where those were going so that it met those kinds of high traffic areas as well as being in a variety of locations around campus,” Haynie said. “We are satisfied with our progress right now, but if a demand does rise and we get feedback that there needs to be a few more, we definitely are open to that idea.” Finding the demand Robinson surveyed the local biking community and was able to identify three locations on campus where they decided to place the stations. The stations are located at Myers quad, the Zell B. Miller Learning Center and the Main Library, in addition to the original location at Ramsey. Robinson said while he doesn’t have specific plans to add more locations, he would consider it if there was support to do so. “We plan to collect some data and find out just how often the bike repair stations are being used and how useful they are to students,” Robinson said. “And if there is a demand for more, we may do this again, but at this time we are putting it out there and seeing how it does.” Robinson said a reason for the lack of bike riding is from minor damages, fixable with the repair stations. “They may have small issues going on with them and when I spoke to a lot of students and asked if they had bikes on campus, they said that they did,” he said. “But when I asked them

The University of Georgia has three new stations to fix bikes. JOSH JONES/Staff if they ride it they said things like ‘well it has a flat tire or this is loose or that is messed up’ and they just don’t have the resources to fix it. So by giving them those resources, it’s a way for bikes to be able to get repaired and get on the road.” Serving the community Robinson said the stations benefit more than just students living on campus. “There’s a decently large community of bikers that are off campus that will ride their bikes to campus and then walk around campus and ride their bikes homes, so it’s also for those students as well,” he said. Lumpkin Street, from Pinecrest Drive to Baxter Street, was ranked No. 1 in terms of bike crashes, according to a 2013 analysis by the UGA Traffic Safety Research and Evaluation Group. “When you jump in your car, it’s not the same as jumping on a bike,” said Dexter Adams, director of the grounds department in the Facilities Management Division. “If conditions aren’t comfortable and you don’t feel safe, we’re going to opt for other venues of transportation. We need to make it comfortable, people need to feel safe biking and that’s what we’re working on.” Adams said the stations would aid in the safety of bike users. “I see it as a program that could and should grow out to be convenient and encourage bicycle use on campus,” Adams said.


A10 Variety

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

Spring signals return of farmers markets in Athens BY JOE YOUORSKI @jyouorski Farmers markets and organic foods are becoming increasingly more popular and commonplace in cities across the United States, and Athens is no exception, with two large farmers markets finding comfortable local homes. “We’re really trying to push people to realize that we have some great food producers in this area that really deserve the support of the community in which they operate,” said Jan Kozak, market manager of the Athens Farmers Market. The Athens Farmers Market has two locations, Saturdays at Bishop Park and Wednesdays at City Hall. The first began last Saturday, but the Wednesday market will open April 9. The City Hall market is smaller, given the downtown space it operates in, but the Saturday market at Bishop Park has a large, almost festival-like feel to it, with live music, cooking demonstrations and some vendors offering made-to-order dishes of food. The other large market is the West Broad Farmers Market, started by the Athens Land Trust. The two operate in cooperation, with both seeking to aid local food producers and the community, and Kozak played a role in starting the market.

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Shoppers go to farmers markets for organic produce and to support local farmers. TAYLOR RENNER/Staff “More markets is better for the community,” Kozak said. “To me, it’s not about the Athens Farmers Market reaching everybody in Athens that there is to reach, because there are some realities that make that impossible. So a market like the West Broad market appealing to the community that’s in that area is a really great thing.” Alongside hosting a place for local vendors to sell produce, the West Broad Farmers Market also offers educational programs, such as workshops on sustainable agriculture and health, for the community. “One of the things that we really pride ourselves on is the educational component of our market,” community agriculture program director Christina

Hylton said. “Not everyone knows about organic food or the organic movement.” The West Broad Farmers Market will open for its second year on May 3 and will begin hosting a weekly market every Saturday through December on West Broad Street. A smaller market will be available each Tuesday. The organizers will also be opening up a market section that will accept WIC checks in order to give people in unstable financial situations a way to acquire healthy and safe foods. “The whole idea of our farmers market is to address issues of access to healthy and affordable food,” Hylton said. The market’s organizers seek to give the market a broad, supportive niche in the community through their food and educational programs, but also by giving a place for artisans to sell homemade works, and offering help for vendors to get their produce certified as naturally grown if they don’t have the certification yet. “We try to bring the community together, not just through food and purchases, but also through dialogue and conversation,” Hylton said. For Athens to have room for two large and swiftly expanding farmers markets demonstrates the strong reception of the organic food movement in town. With both markets providing helpful programs in the community and profitable spaces where vendors can operate, the markets seek to bring with them a great deal of benefits alongside the healthier eating choices they make available. “I think that the organic food sector is one of quickest growing sectors in the food industry,” Kozak said.

Kelly’s owner offers spice with a smile BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey

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It was 7 p.m. and there was nothing left except the curry chicken. Soon enough that, too, would be gone. The steady flow of customers continued, but all were soon cast with the same look of pause, an amused disappointment, as they came to the jolting realization that Kelly’s Jamaican Foods was out of meat. Some settled for a dinner of veggies. “They love the food and they love me,” Kelly Codling, owner of Kelly's, said. “Really truly, a lot of people tell me ‘You have good food, but I come here just because of your personality.’ That made me feel real good and let me know that I’m going somewhere.” For Codling, that somewhere turned out to be Athens. •••

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Born in Trelawny parish — the same area of Jamaica that produced world-class sprinter Usain Bolt — Codling has been serving his spicy food to locals since 2002. For more than a decade, the scents of jerk pork and barbeque chicken cooking on the restaurant’s large outdoor grill have drawn in the hungry for dinner and especially lunch. Sides — all with varying degrees of heat — range from spicy cabbage to collard greens and sweet cornbread. The owner, however, began as a housepainter who followed his mother and siblings to the United States at the age of 18. After stints in a handful of different cities and a decline in his opportunities to paint, Codling decided to open a restaurant in Stone Mountain. “I learned [to cook] from my grandmother and my mom,” Codling said. “My grandmother,

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music broadcast from beachhits.com •••

After operating several restaurants around Georgia, Kelly Codling settled in Athens. CHRISTINA CANNON/Staff I was always around her. She does not measure nothing. She will dash, a little bit of this and that. She said, ‘You measure and it’s not going to taste good. You got to dash and taste.’” However, the restaurant business requires not only countless hours of commitment but also represents a fairly risky venture. According to a study conducted by Cornell University, around 60 percent of restaurants fail within a year of opening. What kept Codling going through that period? “Hard work, perseverance, faith and a lot of word of mouth helps,” Codling said. “Starting from scratch, I started out with just a jerk pan and a couple bags of chicken. And it just took off.” But even with a whole host of positives going for his restaurant, business wasn’t always booming for the Jamaican-born cook. After making the decision to relocate to Athens — a decision both he and his wife, a UGA graduate, agreed upon — Codling’s arrival was greeted by an extreme lack of exposure in large part fueled by the deception of a rival Jamaican restaurant owner. “I bought the restaurant from a lady with the intention I would be the only Jamaican restaurant [in Athens], which is what she told me. Unfortunately, she had other plans. Her intention was to sell that place and open another

restaurant called Jamaica Me Crazy. She told me she was getting out of the business,” Codling said. “The guys who used to work with her, they were telling the customers the restaurant was going to close and that the only Jamaican restaurant would be Jamaica Me Crazy on Broad Street.” Kelly’s Jamaican Foods, a popular place that had kept afloat on the outskirts of Atlanta for almost six years, was in danger of sinking. “For at least a good five, six months, my business went down the drain and I kept wondering what happened,” Codling said. “Then one day I got a call from the Classic Center, they wanted me to do A Taste Of Athens...Went and saw some old customers, who were very surprised. They said, ‘Kelly what happened to you?’ They said ‘The lady told us you were closed.’ I said, ‘No, I’m still there.’” As it turns out, all it took was one taste and some former customers spreading the good word to put the restaurant back on its feet. “In the morning after A Taste of Athens, when I opened the doors there was a line from here to the head of UGA. And that was it, it just kept going,” he said. With the rocky start now a distant memory, Codling prepares for the restaurant to celebrate its 14th year in Athens on April 19 with half-off food specials and a live

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These days, many consider Kelly’s a staple lunch destination for Athens food enthusiasts. And if you ask the regulars, there are plenty of reasons why they keep coming back. “Locally-owned, good food, good people, reasonable price,” said Keith McAleese, who along with a small group of friends has been eating at Kelly’s every Thursday for the past seven years . “You can’t beat fresh ingredients, and it’s definitely different. Unique. I don’t think there’s another Jamaican place in town, not like this.” And of course the personality of the man behind the counter can go a long way in selling food. “[The difference] is Kelly. If you’ve ever walked in and he’s been there, he’s that guy that’s always smiling,” said Matthew Fuller, a senior from Watkinsville. “He’s probably the most personable guy to talk to or hold a conversation with.” ••• It’s past 8 p.m., and the restaurant has been mostly empty for a while now — a far cry from the weekday lunch rush. The sky has already faded to a pale orange, the easy cadence of reggae music playing softly in the background. “Those are my CDs,” Codling said. “I play a lot of Bob [Marley]. Dennis Brown. I’m kind of old school. A lot of wisdom in those tracks.” He stops for a minute and surveys the kitchen — his kitchen. The restaurant, with his name in bright letters on the sign out front, has come to embody so much of the current chapter in his life. Hardship. Triumph. He leans on the worn wood of the counter, the lights low and the once-bustling restaurant is now calm. “Don’t you ever let no one change you from your dream,” Colding said. “If you have a dream, follow your dream. I believe in that. I followed my dream and it’s working. You know what I’m saying? You can always do something without money. Don’t let people tell you ‘You have to have money, have this, have that.’ If you’re determined to do it, it can be done. Because I started from zero.” You may come to Kelly’s Jamaican Foods during off-peak hour and find yourself without any jerk chicken to buy. But you are guaranteed to find Codling smiling.


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Variety A11

Humans of UGA snapshots life BY COURTNEY WILLETT @courtney_say Inspired by the Humans of New York movement, seniors Karishma Merchant and Jawad Nasir founded Humans of the University of Georgia to create a fresh perspective on Athens. Within the first week, the Facebook page received 600 hits and its popularity has steadily grown since then. “What Brandon [Stanton] does in New York is just go up to random people all over and from all walks of life. He asks what they want to say and what they’re going through,” said Nasir, an exchange student from Pakistan studying finance, economics, and marketing. “UGA itself is a very diverse campus and I feel like the kinds of people we meet and the kinds of things they have to say really embody the UGA culture.” Humans of UGA seeks to embody all aspects of Athens culture. It offers a way for students to express themselves and explain themselves; Humans of UGA promotes a sense of understanding throughout the vast student body. The group’s spontaneous take on conversation and interaction combined with candid photos creates a sense of authenticity. “You go to downtown Athens and you find so many things that are pop culture and things that were there in the past. There’s a lot of that in UGA and somehow that hasn’t really been documented as much,” Nasir said. “We believe that if you get those diverse people that think like that and get their

Karishma Merchant and Jawad Nasir (not pictured) founded Humans of the University of Georgia to show the flavor of students. Courtesy Humans of UGA Facebook thoughts on a photograph, that would mean a lot.” Humans of UGA recently received a lot of hype following its documentation of the controversial Tate abortion demonstration. Its photos depicted protestors with a caption that described their individual argument and belief system. The group mainly take daily photos that capture the essence of life in Athens. “This guy in the Thor costume came into my entrepreneurship class and was a guest speaker. He dressed up in the costume and he came to class. He said that he did it because he wanted to get out of his comfort zone, and once you get out of your comfort zone and you become uncomfortable, you become comfortable in what you’re doing,” Nasir said. “He was doing it because he wanted to do it. We’re so bounded by social pressures that we don’t do what we want to do.” Humans of UGA creates a microcosm amid a large student body. By focusing on

individuals in particular, the 30,000 students combine, forming one human being with its own ideas. “We’re just trying to forward how photography and story-telling go hand-in-hand. There’s so many people who want to say so many things and they don’t get the chance,” said Merchant, a senior from Lawrenceville studying marketing and international business. “We’re giving them the chance to [promote themselves].” Both founders are graduating this semester and are passionate about keeping the program running. Applications will be up within the next week for students willing to devote time to the program’s vision. “Our long-term goal is to pass it down to people who are as passionate as us to make Humans of UGA so famous and so renowned on campus so that you and another partner can come to campus and approach someone and start talking and posing and doing whatever they want to do,” Merchant said. “That's our vision.”

The UGA Theatre production of "Spring Awakening" will run from April 10-19 in the Fine Arts Theatre. Tickets are $16, $12 for students. Courtesy Charlotte Wilson

‘Spring Awakening’ captures rock ‘n’ roll spirit in theatrical performance BY SHELBY EGGERS @shelbybeggers To close out its 2013-2014 season, the University of Georgia Theatre will perform “Spring Awakening,” a musical adapted from a 1891 play by German playwright Frank Wedekind. It tells the story of the struggles of teens who are sexually repressed in modern times. “The message is a lot about adolescence. It’s about growing up and finding your way even if adults aren’t giving you their support. The show teaches you to just live your life and let your experiences happen naturally,” said Ebeth Engquist, a junior English major from Alpharetta. A recent success on Broadway, “Spring Awakening” offers a look at the plight of teenagers who are sexually oppressed by their parents and peers to the sound of raging rock ‘n’ roll. “If you hate musicals, but you love contemporary music, you’ll love this show,” said David Saltz, head of the Department of Theatre and Film Studies. The rock ‘n’ roll music, composed by Duncan Sheik, gives this Victorianage show a modern feel. Sheik will be at UGA for a Q-and-A after Friday’s performance. “We wanted to choose a musical that would tap into the music scene

Music Notes: April 10-11 Though concerts are largely taking a backseat to G-Day on Saturday, there are plenty of great groups to see early in the weekend. Especially keep an eye on Friday, where making a choice of which show to see will be no easy task from the three ace bands described below.

THURSDAY, APRIL 10 Majestico This Nashville artist is rather unusual, but his music is not. A hybrid between psychedelic music and hard rock, his shouty vocals blend perfectly with the guitar riffs leading to a heightened sense of panic and urgency. It’s only fitting that he plays in the Green Room. The 21+ show begins at 9 p.m. and tickets are $5.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11 Ben Taylor The son of legendary artists James Taylor and Carly Simon stops by The Melting Point this Friday. Despite the comparisons of his music to his parents’, Taylor is here to prove he’s in his own lane with poi-

gnant acoustic songs that show his breadth of knowledge about the folk genre. The show begins at 8 p.m. and student tickets are $10 at the door or $15 in advance for non-students. Dana Swimmer Athens own Dana Swimmer is taking the stage at the 40 Watt on Friday to play some of its music which is self described as “dad rock.” Its debut album “Veloce” was released in early 2013 and contains tracks perfect for sunny spring days with reverb-drenched vocals and hypnotic melodies. The show begins at 9 p.m. and tickets are $5. Curren$y This New Orleans rapper had all four of his albums chart inside the top 10 of the Billboard Top Rap Albums chart. After signing to Warner Bros. Records in 2011, he released “The Stoned Immaculate” and released a mixtape almost two months ago which he’ll be promoting with a show at Georgia Theatre. The show begins at 10 p.m. and tickets are $20. —Compiled by Andrew Plaskowsky

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in Athens,” Saltz said. The show is directed be guest director, Richard Garner who has worked extensively with Georgia Shakespeare and Atlanta’s Alliance Theater. He has also received numerous awards including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Georgia Theater Conference and the 2012 Suzi Bass Award for Best Director. “Richard has been a blast to work with,” said Connor Brockmeier, a senior from Woodstock, double-majoring in theatre and English. “He has a razor-sharp eye that’s made sure that everything happening on stage happens for a damned good reason. He has a gift for pulling truthful, meaningful performances from all of us.” Although not suitable for all ages, “Spring Awakening” is a musical to which all University of Georgia students will have something to relate. The show is popular among students because of its fun and infectious music. Fans may remember singing along to songs such as “Mama Who Bore Me” and “The Song of Purple Summer.” The show became popular after a stint on Broadway in New York and has won eight Tony Awards. The Tonys include one for Best Musical, Direction, Book, Score and Featured Actor.


A12 Variety

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

Athens Rails Girls seek to close gender gap in web development BY CHELSEY ABERCROMBIE @comma_freak Rails Girls, an international organization dedicated to educating girls in the Ruby on Rails coding language, came to Athens last weekend with the help of community members and Rails Girls members alike. “This is something I’ve wanted to do for a while in Athens,” said Jordan Burke, the chief technology officer and lead developer at Vitamin C, a web development company based in the Four Athens building. Burke is a member of the Athens chapter of Rails Girls, which organized the event. Over the course of two days, students and locals were welcomed to learn the basics of Ruby on Rails from Athens and Atlanta-based coaches, some of whom are members of the Atlanta Rails Girls chapter. Attendees came from as far away as Pittsburgh to participate over the weekend. “I would say it’s probably about 50-50 mixed,” Burke said, referring to the number of University of Georgia students versus community members who attended the Rails Girls weekend. “All the attendees except for one are female.” Coaches worked closely with participants to help them understand Ruby on Rails and design a web application. Invented in 2004, Ruby on Rails or simply “Rails,” is a coding language widely lauded in the programming community for its simplicity and accessibility to people learning how to code for the first time. Much of Ruby on Rails’ appeal comes from the fact that it’s an open source coding language, meaning anyone can download, view and learn it. While Rails Girls is an international organization, many coaches see their role as an act of giving back to their local communities. “When I began to learn this stuff, I would go online and find people who had more experience, ask them questions,” said Jonathan Wallace, a Rails Girls coach and web developer from Watkinsville. “They would respond and help me out and help me through problems that I might face, so for me this is a chance to do that and give back to the community and people who are just starting in this, the same that others did for me.” Male participants are allowed to take part in Rails Girls events, but the primary goal of the Rails Girls organization is to get more females fluent and interested in programming and coding. The first night of the event included a viewing of a documentary by She++, an organization of female computer science students at Stanford

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Coaches work with aspiring web developers during Friday's session at FourAthens. DAVID C BRISTOW/Staff University who seek to empower women in technological fields. “By 2020, there will be three jobs for software developers for every American there is to fill them,” Burke said. “If we increase proportionally the number of female computer science undergraduates by 2020, there will still be two jobs per every graduate.” Such an absence of skilled workers can cause profitable companies to move businesses away from the United States, which can have a detrimental effect on the American economy as a whole. “It’s a huge growth field,” Wallace said. “There’s such a demand in the industry in general that I feel like if we grabbed everybody we still wouldn’t have enough people to get it done. We can’t artificially limit who we reach out to.” Kylie Stradley, a 2011 graduate from Georgia Tech and a Rails Girls coach from Atlanta, scratches her head over the disproportionality of females to males in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields. “Women are almost 60 percent of college graduates, but we’re only about 18-20 percent of college graduates in STEM fields, which is kind of weird,” Stradley said. “Don’t you think it would be a bit closer to our graduation rates?” Stradley became a Rails Girls coach after other Rails Girls coaches helped her learn the language and she discovered the open nature of their community. “They helped me get my system set up, they helped me understand what I was actually writing instead of typing random things and having no idea what’s going on,” Stradley said. “I ultimately picked Ruby on Rails and stuck with Ruby on Rails

because we have a really friendly, open community.” Stradley believes in the importance of women learning to code and program if that’s their desire. “We always have people saying girls can’t or shouldn’t do things, so it’s important to me to let everyone know that girls can and should be trying to do whatever they want,” Stradley said. “If you want to learn it, you should.” Elizabeth Vitale, a graphic designer from Watkinsville and a Rails Girls participant, pointed out there was a time when education in the STEM fields did not address women at all. “I went to a women’s college, and we didn’t even have anything remotely related to fields of technology,” Vitale said. Vitale attended the weekend to learn new skills that will help her in her professional life. “I’m hoping to get a basic understanding of programming and be able to apply it to my job, my profession, and also to be able to communicate more effectively with people who do use the technology,” Vitale said. Even in 2014, the number of female STEM students is staggeringly low compared to males. “There are few women in my computer science classes right now,” said Nagi Argiriou, a third-year computer science major from Brunswick. Argiriou, who first learned about the Rails Girls event on Facebook, attended out of curiosity and also in hopes of applying her knowledge of Rails to her job at WUOG, UGA’s radio station. “I think it would be great to reach out to that whole half of the population and say it’s here,” Argiriou said. While the organization does allow male participants, Stradley thinks the focus on prioritizing female participation benefits a section of the population that is finally catching up with its male counterpart in the world of technology. “It helps a lot, because a lot of guys have been working in these languages for a long time, and even if they’re new to Rails they might be bringing in a lot of information from other languages, maybe showing off a bit, things like that, and that can be really intimidating when you’re brand new,” Stradley said. “That’s why we try to keep it primarily female-focused, but obviously if someone wants to learn they can come and learn.” In the course of two days, participants also experienced the community the Rails Girls organization has created around itself — a group of women and men focused on empowering and inspiring peers to learn and innovate. “I really like the community and the people here,” Argiriou said. “They’re very passionate, and you can tell. You can tell they really like to help other people, and I think that’s great.”

Shehehe seeks complexity on sophomore album BY ANDREW PLASKOWSKY @aplaskowsky

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Over the years, local band Shehehe has seen members come and go, but the unexpected addition of vocalist and rhythm guitarist Noelle Shuck further solidified the fact that Shehehe is unlike the typical Athens band. Either by luck or by chance, Shuck was working on a Cheap Trick graphic layout for her University of Georgia exit show when she met the band’s drummer Jason Fusco, a bartender at the time. “He asked me if I could play an instrument, and that’s how I ended up joining the band,” Shuck said. The band itself grew from three members, vocalist Nicole Bechill, Fusco and former bassist Jeff Hannan, into a five piece band with the inclusion of Shuck, bassist Derek Wiggs and lead guitarist Adam Hebert. In early 2013, the band recorded and released its debut LP “New American Jet Rock,” named after its self-described genre, before the addition of

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Hebert. Though the band didn’t originally intend on recording a full length album, it just happened. “Well, we went in thinking it would be a quick five-track EP, but we ended up doing that so fast that it just evolved into the full length album it is,” Shuck said. As the Athens music scene sees women underrepresented in the writing and recording process, Shuck and Bechill are happy to go against the norm of the mostly allmale Athens rock bands. “There’s been a lot of women in rock history that are inspiring, like Poison Ivy from the Cramps, Blondie, and Joan Jett and the Blackhearts,” Shuck said. “Being a woman

in rock today as a functioning member of the band is so important especially since women are often placed decoratively onstage.” This Friday, the band will play a set at the Green Room. Its success in the last year is due in part to help from Rick Poss, one of the group’s fans who happens to be heavily involved behind the scenes at the Georgia Theatre. “Whenever a band comes along that he thinks we’d play well with, he tries to put us on. We played with the Black Lips in January and that was so huge,” Shuck said. Following this month, Shehehe will head back into the studio to record its second album. While the lineup has certainly

changed, don’t expect the style to change much. Rather, the record will be a more complex continuation on what was started in “New American Jet Rock.” “Our new lead guitar player Adam Hebert has a very different style compared to the lead guitarist on our debut. That alone lends itself to different sounds. Even the writing style has changed,” Shuck said. “I would say it’s less straightforward, but it’s still going to be punk rock and early ’70s inspired.” The recording process will give way to its debut performance at this year’s AthFest, although it hasn’t been announced quite yet. After performing last year at MAXfest at The Max Canada the night before AthFest began, Shehehe is ready to make waves at the larger festival.

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Variety A13

Events THURSDAY APRIL 10 LOCAL Mother: The Collective Dance Experience Wen: 7-11 p.m. Where: Buffalo’s Cafe Price: $15 Contact: www.athenshasart.com Great Southland Stampede Rodeo When: 6 p.m. Where: UGA Livestock Instructional Arena Price: $10-15 Contact: www.greatsouthlandstampederodeo.com

KARAOKE & OPEN MIC Dr. Fred’s Karaoke When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: 706-546-5609

Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $10 Contact: www.40watt. com Georgia Trail Summit When: April 11-12 8:30 a.m.-6.p.m. Where: The Classic Center Price: $60/April 11-12 Contact: www.georgiatrailsummit.com

ART 90 Carlton: Spring When: 6-9 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

MUSIC Ben Taylor and Julie Holmes When: 8 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: $15 (adv.), $18 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

SUNDAY APRIL 13 ART Spotlight Tour When: 3 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

TRIVIA Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: The Capital Room Price: Free Contact: www.thecapitalroom.com Trivia When: 9 p.m. Where: Amici Price: Free Contact: 706-353-0000

UGA

MUSIC Leaving Countries, Julie Holmes When: 10 p.m. Where: Boar’s Head Lounge Price: Free Contact: 706-369-3040

Tedeschi Trucks Band When: 8 p.m. Where: The Classic Center Price: $35-69 Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Padre, Sleepy Kitty and Semicircle When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Bob Garza When: 9:30 p.m. Where: New Earth Price: $10

FRIDAY APRIL 11 UGA Sibley Lecture When: 3:30 p.m. Where: UGA School of Law Price: Free Contact: hmurphy@ uga.edu

Spring Awakening When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Building Price: $12 (student) 16 (non-student) Contact: www. drama.uga.edu

LOCAL Zumba After Dark When: 7 p.m.

SATURDAY APRIL 12 MUSIC Live Music at Athens Farmers Market When: 8 a.m. Where: Bishop Park Price: Free Contact: www.athensfarmersmarket.net Joe Cat, Kendra Camedeca, James Hunter & Southern Pride When: 7 p.m. Where: Nuci's Space Price: Free Contact: www.nuci.org

The Howlin Brothers, Hog-Eyed Man When: 8 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: Free Contact: www. theworldfamousathens.com

LOCAL Really Really Free Market When: Noon-2 p.m. Where: Reese & Pope Park Price: Free Contact: reallyreallyfreemarketathens@ gmail.com Cherokee Rose 5K When: 9 a.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Price: $25 Contact: 706-548-7225

12th Anniversary Event When: 4:30-8:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: $20 Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com

UGA Spring Dance Concert When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA New Dance Theatre Price: $10 (students), $16 Contact: www.pac. uga.edu

MUSIC Amos Lee and Rayland Baxter When: 8 p.m. Where: Classic Center Price: $27-49 Contact: www.classiccenter.com Athens School of Music 10 Year Ensemble Show When: 5 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: $5 Contact: www.athenschoolofmusic.com

LOCAL Aerial Theater 3000 When: 2 p.m. Where: Canopy Studio Price: $6-15 Contact: www.canopystudio.org Classic City Brew Fest When: 6 p.m. Where: Foundry Park Inn & Spa Price: $40 Contact: www.classiccitybrew.com

Jacksonville, Fla. band Tedeschi Trucks Band will make an appearance at the Classic Center with its blues-rock show in tow on Thursday. Courtesy Tedeschi Trucks Band “Democracy and Nonviolence in Iran” When: 3:30 p.m. Where: UGA School of Law Price: Free Contact: www.law.uga. edu Social Entrepreneurship When: All Day Where: Miller Learning Center, Room 101 Price: Free Contact: www.thinc. uga.edu 2014 Thinc. Prize for Innovation When: 6 p.m. Where: Miller Learning Center, Room 102 Price: Free Contact: www.thinc. uga.edu

MUSIC Adam Poulin & Friends When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: 706-546-4742 The Hoot When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: Free Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

TUESDAY APRIL 15 TRIVIA Entertainment Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Price: Free Contact: 706-353-0305 Trivia at The Rail When:10:30 p.m. Where: The Rail Athens Price: Free Contact: 706-354-7239

MUSIC Thee Silver Mt. Zion Memorial Orchestra, Amen Dunes When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Price: $11 (adv.), $13 (door) Contact: www.40watt. com Project Safe Benefit When: 8 p.m. Where: New Earth Athens Price: Free Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

MUSIC Bret Mosley, Matt Templeton When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Nelo and Melodime When: 8 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: $8 (adv.), $10 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

UGA “Never Get a ‘Real’ Job” When: 4 p.m. Where: Miller Learning Center, Room 102 Price: Free Contact: www.thinc. uga.edu “Advancing the Startup to Scaleup Movement” When: 12:30 p.m. Where: UGA Tate Student Center, Theater Price: Free Contact: www.thinc. uga.edu Tuba Performance When: 6 p.m. Where: Ramsey Concert Hall Price: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu

WEDNESDAY APRIL 16 ART Tour at Two When: 2 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

Cole Swindell, Adam Craig When: 9 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $15 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

The People’s Blues of Richmond When: 11:55 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: Free Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

TRIVIA Trivia When: 9 p.m. Where: Copper Creek Brewing Company Price: Free Contact: 706-546-1102

UGA “Have You Had a Spiritual Experience?” When: 6 p.m. Where: UGA Tate Student Center, Room 143 Price: Free Contact: www.eckankar-ga.org

MONDAY APRIL 14 KARAOKE & OPEN MIC Open Mic Night When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com “gOpen Mic Night” When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: 706-546-5609

UGA

APR 10 .................................................. SOJA APR 10 .......... Old School Dub Voyage – FREE APR 11 .......... Greg Street presents Curren$y APR 13 ......... My Athens Family and Kids Day APR 14 ...Americana Mondays Rooftop Series presents: Monkeygrass Jug Band APR 15 ......... My Athens Family Gallery Party APR 16 ............. 106.1 WNGC Welcomes Cole Swindell w/ DJ Rock, and Adam Craig

11809


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Sports

Sports B1

➤ OUR WEEKLY PODCAST: SUSS-PACE JAM With basketball season over, check out this week‘s podcast featuring discussion about the UGA football team‘s annual G-Day spring game. GO TO REDANDBLACK.COM

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON AND CAITLIN LEMOINE/Staff

FOOTBALL

Slew of new talent highlights defensive coaching staff BY CODY PACE @CodyPace New defensive coordinator Jeremy Pruitt brings a lot with him to Athens. His three consecutive national championships are the most notable things he brings. The wins are what got people most excited about the arrival of Pruitt, but also greatly helped the players buy into his system. “He’s won championships, he’s coached some of the best and that’s the kind of guy that you want to play for,” senior cornerback Damian Swann said. “I was very exited to know that he was going to be coaching my position. I think I have a great opportunity to play and be good at what I do.” Beyond that, Pruitt brings change. He’s changed the coaching structure. No longer will there be a secondary coach — Pruitt will handle that himself as he did at Florida State. Instead, he’s brought in an extra coach to help with the front seven. He’s changed the way the team practices. Pruitt has injected energy into the Georgia practices by having the defense have drills all over the field and run from drill to drill. The team holds fewer drills, some of which last longer now, and the team splits off so everyone is participating in drills and not standing around watching. “The practice schedule is one of the first things we were able to change and do differently,” Swann said. “There’s so much energy going on with running back and forth from drill to drill and everybody’s getting a lot of reps and that’s what’s going to make a lot of guys great, being able to get those reps and not just sitting back and just watching the whole practice. Everybody’s doing something, everybody’s moving.” Pruitt has also changed the dynamic between offense and defense, thanks in part to his relationship with offensive line coach Will Friend. Friend and Pruitt were roommates at Alabama. Friend was a big part of recruiting Pruitt from Florida State, and their friendship has created a friendly rivalry not only between the coaches, but between their units as well. “They definitely talk trash to us offensive guys in some of the drills,” senior offensive tackle Kolton Houston said. “We talk trash back to them. You know, it’s fun out there. They bring a lot of excitement and they’re a lot more personable in one-on-ones so its fun out there.” See COACHES, Page B7

TRACY ROCKER Defensive Line and Will Linebacker

Jacob Park is the only early enrollee on UGA’s football team in 2014. Last year UGA had 13. Courtesy of Pfc. Thomas Love

EARLY ENROLLEE

MIKE EKELER Inside Linebackers

KEVIN SHERRER Sam Linebacker and Star

JEREMY PRUITT Defensive Coordinator and Secondary

Jacob Park moves south for bigger football culture BY CODY PACE @CodyPace A large New York Yankees tattoo adorns most of the left bicep of early enrollee quarterback Jacob Park. Redshirt sophomore quarterback Faton Bauta, a Yankees fan himself who lived in New York until his senior year of high school, does not approve. “[Bauta] thought I was from the city when I got it,” Park said. “I was like, ‘No, I moved when I was 6.’ He was like, ‘Aw, you’re not a true New Yorker.’ He kind of picks on me every time he sees me because I got a tattoo.” Park was born in Watkins Glen, N.Y., where he lived until he was about 6. When his dad saw he had a knack for football, the Park family uprooted itself and moved near Park’s grandparents in Goose Creek, S.C. “Up north, football’s not really a big sport, it’s more wrestling and basketball,” Park said. “We all

started to get big into football, me and my brothers, so [my dad] thought we’d have a better opportunity to play in South Carolina where football’s bigger.” And Park’s father might have been onto something. As a dual-threat quarterback at Stratford High School in Goose Creek, Park had offers from Alabama, Auburn and Florida State, as well as Georgia to choose from. However, he committed to Georgia early in the recruiting process. By the time National Signing Day rolled around in February, he had been committed for nearly eight months and was already on campus as an early enrollee. The choice to come to Georgia early had Park choosing between his senior prom and the chance to get a head start on his college football career — needless to say, he chose football. See PARK, Page B8


B2 Sports

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

UGA golfers to play against former teammates in Masters BY TANYA SICHYNSKY @tanyasic A year ago the Georgia men’s golf team took to the greens of Forest Hills Golf Club, just 4.1 miles removed from the rolling hills of one of the most esteemed courses in the country. With only a few days left before the first round of the 2013 Masters Tournament, Augusta National Golf Club patiently awaited the arrival of the best golfers in the world. The Bulldogs finished third in the Insperity Augusta State Invitational last April, led by then-junior Keith Mitchell who shot 2-under 70 on the final day of the tournament. Though the Bulldogs were but a nine-minute car ride down the azalea bushlined roads from Augusta National, Mitchell and teammate Michael Cromie’s ties to the Masters were closer than just their physical proximity.

Keith Mitchell (above) will get a chance to see former teammates Russell Henley and Harris English play in the Masters this weekend in Augusta. FILE/Staff Georgia has produced four current PGA Tour competitors in Russell Henley, Harris English, Chris Kirk and Bubba Watson, all of whom have qualified for the 2014 Masters. “Having had that experience against golfers who now are win-

ning PGA events, the current guys know that they have what it takes to make it too, just like their Georgia teammates did,” said Steve Colquitt, sports information director for UGA men’s golf. English and Henley share more with the two Bulldog seniors

than just an alma mater. The four shared a year’s worth of wins and losses, including a disappointing finish to the 2010-2011 season when Georgia fell 3-2 in the finals of the NCAA championships to Augusta State. English and Henley were seniors on UGA’s

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men’s golf team during Mitchell and Cromie’s inaugural seasons at UGA. In fact, Mitchell credits his choice to join Georgia’s program in part to English, someone he’s called a friend since he was 12 years old growing up in Chattanooga, Tenn. “Harris is one of the reasons I came to Georgia because he was kind of one of those guys I looked up to when I was younger,” Mitchell said. “He kind of introduced me to Georgia and coach [Chris] Haack and all the good things about it.” Henley, a team captain at the time, provided Mitchell with a constructive but stern mentorship that complemented the friendship English had established. “[Henley] was always great, helping me from a different perspective of Harris,” Mitchell said. “Russell was ... kind of giving me the harder side when I was messing up or

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doing something wrong.” Both Mitchell and Cromie’s games benefited from the relationships. “Playing with those guys … my freshman year, and I mean I wasn’t beating them regularly but I was beating them occasionally just in qualifying rounds and what not, just learning a bunch from them,” Cromie said. “Seeing what they’re doing definitely gives you a bunch of confidence going forward. You think, ‘If they can do it, then you can do it.’” For Cromie, that “it” is a chance to compete on the PGA Tour following his graduation next fall. He could be well on his way. Cromie shot 9-under 207 to win the Linger Longer Invitational and secure the Bulldog’s first team victory of 2014 just last month. It wasn’t long before he heard from his former teammates . “I got congratulatory texts from them this past week,” Cromie said of Henley and English. “They’re just the same old guys as they were. I think that’s what makes it so great. They’re just good guys and they don’t let anything get to their head.” Henley and English are paired together for this year’s Masters, which begin on April 10. Both have notched two PGA Tour wins since leaving Georgia, including Henley’s first-place finish at the Honda Classic on March 2, which guaranteed his invite to Augusta. English will compete at the Masters for the first time in his young professional career, as will Kirk. “For me personally, seeing our guys have success on the PGA and Web.com Tours makes me feel like a proud uncle,” Colquitt said. With tournaments school work to tend to, Cromie has yet to take the stands at the Masters as a spectator. Instead, he puts cleat to grass annually at Augusta National when the Bulldogs play the course non-competitively as a team. “I’ve played it four years now,” Cromie said. “We don’t play any tournaments there, but we get to go play there once a year.” The greens of Augusta National are arguably the Mecca of golf, a course capable of launching a young golfer’s career to unparalleled heights. Team play gives the Bulldogs a point of reference when comparing their potential success to those that have already achieved it. “It might’ve been my freshman year when I shot 75 out there,” Cromie said of his best score on the course. “I think I get caught up in the aura of everything. But I know a couple guys go out there every year and shoot under par.” Watson, English, Kirk and Henley tee off at the Masters on Thursday, and Cromie wouldn’t dare venture too far from his TV. Mitchell, will do his best to make it down to Augusta on Friday and support English like he did for Henley last year. For Mitchell, seeing his former teammates contend for a green jacket does more than appeal to the fan of the game within. As a player himself, it’s a reminder of the opportunities ahead. “You grow up watching people like Tiger [Woods] and so on on TV and they just seem like superstars and these untouchables,” Mitchell said. “When you have your friends out there actually competing and often times beating them and you know their games, you’ve experienced things with them, it makes everything a lot closer [in] reach.”


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B4 G-DAY

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

G-Day preparation: Tackling Georgia football’s 4 biggest questions this spring Editor's note: The Red & Black's football beat writer Nick Suss and sports editor Tanya Sichynsky each answer one of the many burning questions pertaining to UGA football leading up to Saturday's scrimmage and the 2014 season. See a full list of questions below.

Who will be the spring’s breakout player? NICK SUSS: There are plenty of options to choose for a breakout player coming out of the spring. Sophomore defensive backs J.J. Green and Brendan Langley have looked outstanding through spring practice and will likely figure into the defensive rotation as a result. Redshirt sophomore guard Greg Pyke has gone from a non-factor to a likely starter in just weeks. But my pick for breakout player is a little further off the radar. Blake Tibbs, a redshirt sophomore wide receiver from Lithonia, plays at one of the deepest positions on the roster and sits behind a quartet of upperclassmen wide receivers in seniors Chris Conley and Michael Bennett and juniors Malcolm Mitchell and Justin Scott-Wesley. But his performance this spring has merited his mention in the rotation of wide receivers. When Mitchell, Scott-Wesley and Bennett all went down with injuries in 2013, Tibbs watched idly as other young players like sophomore Reggie Davis saw playing time. But if this spring is any indication, Tibbs is one of the front-runners to earn a spot in the rotation come fall. Tibbs has been working the “Z” position this spring, or playing the receiver position that runs on the long end of the field. Tibbs has been working this position along with Davis and with Conley, who has also been working in the slot. Likely to compete with Mitchell when he returns healthy, Tibbs will have his work cut out for him when the season begins. But if he can play in the fall as he has in the spring, Tibbs is poised for a breakout season.

Who will take over as Georgia’s new backup quarterback? TANYA SICHYNSKY: How farfetched is it to label Faton Bauta as the sage among Georgia’s options at backup quarterback? It may sound a bit inappropriate, as Bauta is but a redshirt sophomore and boasts an unimpressive 30 rushing yards as his only statistic since joining the Bulldogs in 2012. But, those few rushing yards may be the most important indicator in determining Bauta as the most reasonable choice for Georgia’s No. 2 guy. Bauta's a dual-threat quarterback, but that does not immediately deem him incapable of success in offensive coordinator Mike Bobo’s pro-style offense. Bobo called a few designated quarterback runs last season with a guy that’s about as pocket-passer as it gets in Aaron Murray, and showed that doing so can give the Bulldogs some unexpected versatility on offense. At this point, Bauta needs to do little else but finish out the spring and prove that his arm is reliable enough to wait behind Hutson Mason’s. His familiarity with the playbook trumps both freshman Jacob Park’s and redshirt freshman Brice Ramsey’s, making him the smartest and most prepared option. Health barred Bauta from participating in last year’s G-Day, and he still managed to beat out Christian LeMay and Parker Welch for the No. 3 spot in 2013. This Saturday’s scrimmage is the perfect opportunity for Bauta to prove he is skilled enough to be Georgia’s quarterback of the future.

What is the most important repercussion of any suspensions handed down at the beginning of Georgia’s season? NS: Losing safety Tray Matthews, defensive linemen James DeLoach and Jon Taylor and wide receiver Uriah LeMay for any number of games each sounds like a sentence for a couple of losses. But it doesn’t have to be. No disrespect to LeMay, but he likely wouldn’t have figured into the rotation. Similar things can be said of Taylor. Then there’s Matthews. The sophomore has starting experience and is among the most talented defenders on the roster. That being said, the defense showed last year it can perform without Matthews. While Matthews appeared in eight games as a freshman in 2013 and started in six, his multiple absences allowed for players like sophomore Quincy Mauger and senior Corey Moore to earn playing time. With that and the time sophomore cornerback Brendan Langley has spent at safety in the spring, Matthews’ suspension likely wouldn’t be the worst thing to happen to the Bulldogs’ defense. DeLoach’s case is the most intriguing. Since the new defensive staff is still feeling out which players it has, it is unclear whether DeLoach is actually expected to start against Clemson. Regardless, DeLoach is an undersized defensive lineman being asked to play five-technique, or line up directly across from an offensive tackle. I see a mismatch being created between the 265-pound DeLoach and a 300 pound offensive tackle. While it is possible that disciplinary action could adversely affect the team's depth and eliminate two starters from the first two games of the season, it shouldn’t affect the team enough to drastically alter its success.

Which former “Dream Team” recruit will begin his dream season Saturday? TS: Conley seems like the most appropriate choice because of how close he’s come to being that guy for Georgia in the past. For a receiver whose most memorable moment — both for fans and likely for himself — remains on the Georgia Dome's 5-yard line, Conley is more than inclined to lead Georgia’s receiving corps in his senior season. After Mitchell and Scott-Wesley's 2013 seasons were cut short due to injury, Conley had the opportunity to more than double his productivity from his sophomore year (24.4 receiving yards per game), averaging 59.2 receiving yards per game. Conley led Georgia’s receivers in 2013 and will likely do so again this season, even with guys like Mitchell and Bennett returning to the lineup. Why? Because Conley just isn’t dropping passes this spring. He’s been a favorite target of Mason’s and has performed exceptionally well in practice and in the Bulldogs’ two scrimmages. As one of the few receivers to take ingame snaps alongside Mason at the end of last season, Conley is destined to be the quarterback’s “Chosen One” for 2014.


The Red & Black

PREDICTIONS

Extreme makeover: Georgia football edition Georgia football has undergone some major cosmetic alterations this offseason that might even make Joan Rivers say, “Not my taste, but OK.” So what remains the same? In short, not much, but this isn’t necessarily a bad thing for the Bulldogs, and it will all be evident when the team takes the field for G-Day on Saturday. With regards to defense, the Bulldogs have almost a completely new look thanks to defensive coordinator Jeremy Pruitt. Bulldog fans got what they wanted when Pruitt came in. The only thing that could have been better for Georgia fans was if Nick Saban was hired to coach Canadian youth football in Calgary. Pruitt’s résumé is stunning: seven years of Division-I coaching and three national championships. That’s enough to pacify the headhunters, who also regularly turn on head coach Mark Richt and offensive coordinator Mike Bobo after Georgia’s first SEC loss each year. In nine games where Georgia allowed opponents to rush for more than 100 yards, the Bulldogs were 4-5. On the flip side, Georgia was 4-0 when allowing less than 100 yards on the ground. This is not to say that Georgia is expected to hold teams like Clemson and Auburn to less than 100 yards rushing, but the new multiple defense scheme Pruitt brings to the table could give Georgia the chance it needs. The potential of adding a lineman essentially nixes the nose guard, turning players like Ray Drew into a run-clogger up the middle. Georgia has also seen guys such as junior James DeLoach shift from outside linebacker to defensive end this offseason to add some pressure with regards to the pass rush. The hope is that the new scheme will cut down on the run and possibly pad the sack numbers, but where does that leave the secondary? The defensive backs have some new faces, not least of which is former tailback J.J. Green. Green was recruited as an athlete out of high school, and Pruitt plucked him from Bobo and is now using him as a corner-

G-DAY B5

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Hutson Mason in the driver’s seat of Georgia’s 2014 destiny

a pick and lost 31 yards on four sacks. The good news is that these are, theoretically, maturity problems. Put some bandages on those boo-boos. Through all the rubble, there is a shining diamond starting its junior year at halfback. Todd Gurley may be better described as a rock than a diamond, but he is almost the only consistency for the Bulldogs this season. Maybe he’s all they need. Gurley may not be tested too much on G-Day, but he is Georgia’s cornerstone on offense. If Mason struggles to pass well, Gurley will be relied on to pick up the slack with the running game. Saturday’s scrimmage will be a look at something Georgia has been trying to sculpt the past few seasons: run-first, run-second, run on third and fourth if you can. G-Day is great. It’s a little taste of football right when you miss it the most. You don’t have to take an aspirin to help the cardiac distress that normally accompanies Georgia games. GDay is a sort of reminder that it isn’t last season anymore — it’s a new year. And that’s awesome for Georgia fans, because last season was a drag.

It has been said that Georgia's senior quarterback Hutson Mason has been handed the keys to a Ferrari, in this case the Georgia offense. All that Mason seemingly has to do is not play poorly, or crash the Ferrari, and this Georgia team will be successful and maybe even contend for a championship. But from my limited experience of watching people drive really fast, really powerful cars — watching The Fast and Furious movies about 80 times has made me quite the expert — you can’t just drive a great car and hope that you won’t crash it. You need to grab the steering wheel. If Hutson Mason can actually drive the Bulldog offense up and down the field, Georgia will have a successful 2014 season. Even if that means Mason gets in a few minor accidents along the way. Georgia will have a good offense next year. The team will bring back sophomore tailback Todd Gurley, a slew of pass catchers and a few new recruits to build off what was a very good offense last year. But if anyone thinks Georgia is going to be successful by giving the ball to Gurley on every down, or firing off little screen passes to senior wide receiver Chris Conley for short yardage, they would be a mistake. Last year at the beginning of the Georgia Tech game, Georgia tried to employ this same idea of Mason just not crashing the car. It didn’t really work. Georgia trailed for much of the game, and only got back into the game when Mason began to make throws down the field. Also this idea that teams can win by having a quarterback simply not cost them the game is a little wrong. A quarterback has to win the game. AJ McCarron, the Dom Toretto (or Vin Diesel if people don’t get the reference) of not crashing the car, won Alabama the 2012 BCS National Championship by consistently making throws to keep the LSU defense off balance. Also when Alabama was in the 2012 Southeastern Conference Championship Game, McCarron was the one who made the game-winning touchdown pass to Amari Cooper, even if it was against single coverage. While it might be unfair to expect Mason to play up to the Aaron Murray level, there were a couple of times Murray almost crashed the Ferrari. Specifically the 2012 game against Florida when Murray threw three interceptions in the game. It would have been easy for coach Mark Richt to take the game out of Murray’s hands, but Murray kept throwing, and ultimately hooked up with Malcolm Mitchell for the game winning 45-yard touchdown pass. Hutson Mason is going to have to make some mistakes for this team to be successful. Mason can’t rely on the defense and offensive line the way some of those Alabama teams did. When Mason makes those mistakes, hopefully he will grow from them and become a better quarterback. At the end of the day, a car is as only as good as its driver.

—Taylor Denman is a sophomore from Suwanee majoring in journalism

—Connor Riley is a sophomore from Roswell majoring in digital and broadcast journalism

Georgia football's 2014 facelift under Mark Richt (right) centers around Jeremy Pruitt (left) and his multiple defense. DAVID C BRISTOW/Staff back and safety. By all accounts, Green has done fairly well with coverage this spring. As with most undersized defensive backs, he has struggled to shake his blocks when the offense keeps it on the ground. Let’s not forget the safeties. Personnel is not the major transformation, but rather experience. Tray Matthews missed a handful of games with injuries only to have his best tackling game of the season against Auburn overshadowed by a play that is hard for Georgia fans to watch. Now, it appears to be up to no one but Matthews and safety Quincy Mauger to reel in some more jump balls. Or just bat them down. There is an obvious changing of the guards in quarterback Hutson Mason. When former quarterback Aaron Murray went down on senior night, Mason got a taste of what it’s like to be Mr. Football at the University of Georgia. Overall the experience was good for him, even if he wasn’t at his best. There were several blunders against Georgia Tech including a badly underthrown ball that was picked and 25 yards lost on five sacks. Then there was Nebraska, a game the Bulldogs probably wish they could have back. Mason threw for 320 yards in the Gator Bowl, but allowed

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B6 G-DAY

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

Offensive linemen return from injury RIVALRY: Converted defenders and wideouts battle in the secondary BY NICK SUSS @NickSuss

an injury is sophomore guard Brandon Kublanow. Kublanow suffered an arm injury After missing approximately two earlier this spring and although he has weeks of practice due to a concussion, returned, he is still wearing protective senior offensive lineman Watts Dantgear on his arm. zler returned to practice Tuesday. “It’s fun to have him back. I’m Since he had missed so glad we’ve got him back, but much time, Dantzler was somehe’s kind of got that RoboCop what limited in practice as, arm,” junior offensive tackle according to his teammates, the John Theus said. “It hasn’t afcoaches didn’t want him to work fected him too much yet. He’s to his fullest strength so soon strong, but it is fun to have him after his injury. back.” “I think they eased him in With Kublanow having a little,” senior offensive tackle received some attention in the Kolton Houston said. starting lineup at the beginning One thing the injury afof spring, his return is promisfected in Dantzler, according to DANTZLER ing for an offensive line looking senior center David Andrews, to replace two starters at the was his reaction time to the quick guard position. movements of practice. According to Andrews, Kublanow “Speed of the game’s gotta get is the kind of player who could start back up to him,” Andrews said. “You on this team if he can learn to play the lose that, especially being out for same way every day.​ about two weeks. So he’s got to pick “Kublanow’s just one of those that back up and he will. He was a players that knows he’s got to be conlittle bit limited today so I think he’ll sistent,” Andrews said. “He does some be more of a full go on Thursday.” good things and I think he could be Among the other players on the a good player for us, but at times you Georgia offense line recovering from just need to be more consistent.”

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➤ From Page A1 Green’s situation isn’t wholly individual on this team and he certainly isn’t the only player at the heart of the competition between the two position groups. Redshirt freshman Tramel Terry has never even touched the field in game action but has already switched positions from wide receiver to defensive back, making him one of the few players on the team who can sympathize with Green’s predicament. Terry brings up one facet of the rivalry that complicates the competition: defenders are slightly restricted in what they can do in practice while receivers have free reign to do whatever they can to win. “It’s kind of hard on the defensive side, I’ll tell you, because we’re not here to tackle them,” Terry said. “We’ve got to thud. So it’s kind of hard on us because they’ll try to stiff arm us and juke. It’s really difficult for the defense. It’s not an excuse at all. You’ve still got to thud and get after it.” Getting after it is something Green hasn’t had trouble with in his transition to defense. Many of his teammates, both offensive and defensive, have described him as a “ball of energy,” active and eager to hit anyone and anything that crosses his face. This eagerness helped Green in the first of the team’s three full-length scrimmages of the spring when, as he boasted, he led the defense in tackles with seven, despite only a

Georgia sophomore J.J. Green will play defense this season after rushing for 384 yards and three touchdowns in 2013 at tailback. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff few weeks on defense. While Green is all over the place, willing and able to hit any one teammate and prove his value to the new defensive coaching staff, he has gone as far as to say his favorite hit was against sophomore tailback Brendan Douglas and he would love to hit junior tailback Todd Gurley. However, he hasn't been able to bring the powerful junior down just yet. “I gave him a little stiff arm,” Gurley said. “You can ask him about that.” Another man he hasn’t had the opportunity to tackle yet is

Tibbs, the man who conjured up the silly nickname.​ Both Green and Tibbs are aware of the fact that they haven’t been able to go one-onone yet. Despite this, Tibbs is waiting for the day he gets to face off against his former partner on offense. “I’ve seen him hit a couple of people,” Tibbs said. “I told him in the scrimmage if I get a hold of him … He’s short, a little muscle. And as a teammate, that’s one thing I like about him. Even though he’s on the other side, he’s going to make a play for us.”

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

G-DAY B7

COACHES: Georgia defense brings in new staffers from both professional and college ranks ➤ From Page B1 Equally important to the change and experience that Pruitt boasts is the cast of assistants he was able to bring in to surround him. With complete overhaul of the defensive staff, Pruitt brought in Mike Ekeler, Kevin Sherrer and Tracy Rocker to round out the staff. All of these guys, Pruitt said, had a tough situation to come into. With the timing of the departure of former defensive coordinator Todd Grantham, this staff had to reassure its recruits of the program’s future. Then came mat drills and spring break. As busy as they were, the staff didn’t have a lot of time to get to know the players that were already with the program. “When I got here, you see everybody without equipment and you go through mat drills and all of a sudden now we’ve put on equipment, everybody looks different so I’m like, ‘Who is he, who is he?’” Rocker said. With the spring season almost over, Rocker, who is in charge of the defensive line and Will linebacker, has already had an effect on his new players. Of all of the assistants, he’s the most like Pruitt. He has valuable experience as a former All-American defensive lineman and the 1988 Lombardi Award winner for defensive player of the year at Auburn. He came to Georgia after holding the defensive line assistant job with the Tennessee Titans. “He’s a great coach, he’s been there, done it

first hand,” senior defensive lineman Ray Drew said. “He’s done it on all levels so the experience is there, he knows what he’s talking about, it’s just a matter of buying into it, which I think over the past few days, I’ve seen progress from within the segment and everything.” Drew has actually found himself on the wrong end of Rocker. Despite having six sacks last season, Drew was moved to more of an interior defensive lineman position and relegated to the third team for a short time. “You produce, you stay; you don’t produce, next,” Rocker said. “That’s all about trying to get the right combination and to get guys to play with full-speed effort. That’s the most important thing and that’s what I’m working on up front is effort.” While Rocker will manage the Will, the Sam linebacker, who lines up on the other side of the ball, will be managed by Sherrer. He’ll be in charge of the Star position as well, although his previous experience has been mostly with defensive backs and then as the defensive coordinator for South Alabama. For the most part, Sherrer’s job is easy — he gets Leonard Floyd. Where Sherrer may provide the most value is in recruiting. He worked as the Director for Player Development at Alabama for three years and worked very closely with the student athletes in their personal lives, which will definitely help him connect with players on the recruiting trail. Then there’s Ekeler. Ekeler gets the luxury of managing two of the

Southeastern Conference’s top-three leading tacklers from 2013 in inside linebackers Amarlo Herrera and Ramik Wilson. Ekeler has been quite the traveler, coaching linebackers at Nebraska, Indiana and Southern California. Ekeler is quite literally a traveler. While at Nebraska he bought an RV. When he left for Indiana, he lived in it, and plugged it into the end zone of Memorial Stadium. “I hooked up to the stadium,” Ekeler said. “It was a mother’s day gift first of all. I came home one mother’s day and bought my wife a 45-foot, turbocharged, diesel RV. Our kids referred to it as ‘The Dream,’ because every time we’d drive by one I’d say ‘Well, that’s the dream kids.’” Of all of the new coaches, Ekeler has the most personality. When he came to Georgia, he told his unit that if they didn’t laugh at his jokes, they wouldn’t play. “He was serious when he said that,” Wilson said. “Yeah, we all looked at him and he was dead serious. It was pretty cool, like he’s going to force us to have fun and that’s what we need, we need to have fun and play with passion out there.” With all of the diverse personalities that this coaching staff bears, Pruitt’s job is easy. “I would say you look at coach Rock, you look at coach Sherrer, you look at coach Ek, and you watch those guys coach, they’re flying around the field, they’re getting after their guys, they’re very demanding,” Pruitt said. “It’s not me, it’s them.”

A.J. Turman sees carries this spring BY CODY PACE @CodyPace

couple of weeks in the to go out there and play scheme cost him the immediately but there’s ability to compete at a lot of steps before you This spring, A.J. the highest level after actually get to play.” Turman is getting his being the most highly Now it’s redempchance. recruited player out of tion time for Turman. Although he was the bunch. With J.J. Green back poised to sit beHowon defense and hind Todd Gurley ever, he looks Marshall still and Keith Marat it from recovering from shall last season, a positive an ACL injury, the eventual inperspective Turman has juries could have now, saying, been competset him up to be a “It was just ing for the No. big contributor as something I 2 spot in the a true freshman. needed to go spring with Instead, he redthrough to Brendan Dougshirted because of get ready.” las, and has a fall-camp injury. TURMAN “I get gotten some GURLEY “I was just, another year significant I felt like I was of educasnaps. just a step behind tion and another year “He’s definitely everybody knowing the of football, really, just grabbing everybody’s plays,” Turman said. “I to make me better and attention with his effort still got a lot of reps at stronger,” Turman said. and the improvement practice, worked hard. “At first it was hard bethat he’s making so I’m here now.” cause everybody wants he’s definitely makThe timing of the to come in, just play, of ing a good, positive injury couldn’t have course, especially being statement for himself,” been worse for Turman. recruited by everybody Georgia head coach As a freshman, losing a you think you’re going Mark Richt said.

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B8 G-DAY

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Simple defense set for G-Day BY CODY PACE @CodyPace A lot has been made of the potential multiple sets for defensive coordinator Jeremy Pruitt’s defense, but don’t expect to see much of that at G-Day on Saturday. Instead, Georgia will use the opportunity to try and give as many of its players a chance to show how they’ve developed in spring practice. “I don’t think we’re going to try to do a lot of things on defense,” head coach Mark Richt said. “I think we’ll line up and play some good, solid, fundamental defense. Being the fact that it is Jeremy’s first year as the coordinator, people look at our TV, spring game, people try to get clues as to what they can figure out.” What will come out of G-Day, however, is some form of depth chart. Although there are still summer and fall camps in the next five months before Georgia's opener against Clemson, Richt said that his coaching staff would put players “in a depth chart” after the spring game. “I doubt that we’ll say that’s a

The Red & Black

PARK: Athlete’s personal growth key as early enrollee adjusts to life in Athens

solid starting lineup because we’ve got freshmen coming in and we’ve got guys that can make a lot of improvement over the offseason,” Richt said. “I think, there may be a couple guys that are more solid than others, but most everybody’s going to, most every position’ll still be up for grabs I’ll say.” In order to do that, Richt said that the coaches will do their best to get everyone they can into the game. The No. 1 defense will be the black team and will play against the No. 2 offense, according to Richt. However, that could change as coaches shift guys around and there is a possibility for a guy on the No. 2 defense to play some on the No. 1 defense just to see what personnel groupings work best. As for the format of the game, Richt said it would stay the same as last year’s. “We’ll go 12 minute quarters, we will not kickoff, we’ll set the ball on the 25 to start a drive,” Richt said. “Every punt will result in a 35-yard change of field position. If a punt would land inside the 10, then we’ll just bring it out to the 20.”

freshmen. Can they continue to get better each year, each month? “The majority of And as long as he does my fun was my freshthat, he has the talent, man and sophomore he has the arm.” year and my last two Right now for Park, years were more grades it’s all about finding and getting in to colsmall pockets of comlege,” Park said. “This fort in a mostly year and missing unfamiliar cirprom ain’t cumstance — much.” something he’s Park now done more than spends his days once in his life in in large lecture the many steps classes and his that brought him afternoons in from New York, meetings, film to South study and pracCarolina, to tices. Athens. Thrust right PARK In practice, into the middle where the drills of the chaos, are much easier Park is tasked than having to with learning the read a defense entire Georgia and understand offense while the playbook in a working toward way that’s the G-Day scrimrequired to permage, the pinnaform well in a cle of the spring game situation, football season, Park has had on April 12. MASON bright moments. In Georgia’s “If you just first two scrimget in the drill, you mages, the only time drop back and throw stats are kept, Park’s the football, you can growing pains have see his talent base but shown. His second things are spinning so scrimmage was his fast for him mentally best, and he went 1-forit’s hard to really kind 3 for a total of just six of judge him right yards. However, it now,” Georgia head beats his 1-for-7 for coach Mark Richt said. 11-yard performance on When Park looks March 29. out over the defense, “I taught him a lot he sees something in the spring and he familiar among all of gets in the meetings the confusion and newand he’s a little overness. Wearing No. 1 in whelmed because … the defensive backfield everybody’s way above is Tramel Terry. Terry, a him as far as the menyear older than Park, tal aspect of the playbeat Park’s Stratford book.” redshirt senior team all three years the quarterback Hutson two faced off as a memMason said. “He, like ber of crosstown rival every other freshman, Goose Creek High needs to get in the School. weight room, get bigger “He always talked and stronger in his legs trash to me, that’s how and upper body just I knew Tramel, as the like I did when I was a trash talker,” Park said. freshman. It’s all about “I actually got to know the growth process for him more as I was com➤ From Page B1

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“He, like every other freshman, needs to get in the weight room, get bigger and stronger in his legs and upper body just like I did when I was a freshman.” Hutson Mason Quarterback

ing in, in recruiting. He’s a really cool guy. I hang out with him all the time. I eat lunch with him almost every day. It’s fun having somebody from around here and getting to know him more.” There’s something else familiar about Park’s presence on the field, however. The large white “7” printed on the back of his red practice jersey carries an aura all its own — the Matthew Stafford comparisons will be inevitable. But Park isn’t Stafford. He’s got a strong arm, but not Stafford-esque. He plays with his legs much better than Stafford did, making their games much different. If Park ever gets his chance to line up behind the center in Sanford Stadium, he wants to be Jacob, not Matthew. “I don’t want to be compared to him,” Park said. “I don’t want just because I’m wearing his jersey to be, ‘He’s not Stafford.’ Obviously I’m not Stafford. I don’t want that to be something that’s in the media every week if I do play.”

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The Red & Black

G-DAY B9

Thursday, April 10, 2014

DEFENSE

UGA must explore depth at inside linebacker to keep starters fresh in fourth quarter Seniors Ramik Wilson and Amarlo Herrera not only bolstered the reputation of the inside linebacker position for the Georgia football team last season, but also were virtually the only two who played at the “Mike” and “Mo” linebacker positions in 2013. As spring practice preluding the 2014 season is now in full swing and the Bulldogs are preparing for their annual G-Day game this Saturday at Sanford Stadium, don’t expect any drop off in production from Wilson and Herrera. Just expect more rest. Former defensive coordinator Todd Grantham’s NFL mentality included limited substitutions, which was evident last season at inside linebacker. Perhaps the lack of substitutions is part of the reason Wilson led the Southeastern Conference with 133 tackles, while Herrera stacked up as the SEC’s third-leading tackler with 112. That’s not to say Wilson and Herrera don’t deserve their All-SEC accolades from last year­­— they do — and it’s almost guaranteed that the tandem tacklers are going to be dragging down tailbacks, tight ends and receivers for Georgia this fall. But what must change with the 2014 defense under the leadership of new defensive coordinator Jeremy Pruitt are the number of substitutions and the expansion of depth, especially at that inside linebacker spot. Pruitt is a relentless recruiter, so depth expansion will likely take care of itself. The first-year coach coming off of a national championship as Florida State’s defensive man in charge and continues to plant his roots across the state of Georgia as the Bulldogs new coordinator after a successful signing day back in February. But if the Bulldogs plan on keeping Wilson and Herrera healthy and on the field in 2014, it’s imperative that they find at least one, if not two, inside linebackers to come in and give the Bulldogs’ two leading tacklers a chance to breathe early on in the game. Herrera could be seen in multiple instances with his hands on his hips and breathing heavily late in games after playing nearly every snap — an understandable response to being a defense's go-to guy in any given position. At 6-foot-2 and 244 pounds, the senior from College Park is in good physical condition, but even the most

athletic of players need a break from time to time. Take former Georgia inside linebacker and current St. Louis Ram Alec Ogletree, a player who most consider a physical freak. Even Ogletree, a converted safety who was moved into the box and dominated in his time at Georgia, needed a break during games in 2011 and 2012. It was Herrera who was there to take his spot in those times of need. Now Herrera needs his own reliable substitute — someone who can come in and move well laterally, knock heads and drag down players early in the game so that Herrera can come in feeling fresh. While Herrera has said in the past that he’s “not coming out of the game,” if Georgia can find a reliable back-up for him, he and Wilson will benefit greatly, as will the team as a whole, and perhaps Herrera would be more open-minded to sitting a few snaps out with the end goal now in sight. Luckily for Georgia, Pruitt has come in with the mentality that no player’s starting job is secure, and that gives any member of the team who impresses him in practice a chance to see playing time in the fall. That’s why there are several players the Bulldogs could turn to in giving Herrera and Wilson a spell. Senior Kosta Vavlas, a special teams veteran who appeared in all 13 games last season and had 11 tackles, could provide that spark. Sophomores Ryne Rankin, Reggie Carter and Tim Kimbrough could also make waves in practice, but are all relatively limited in their in-game experience. Carter appeared in eight games last season, started against North Texas and notched four tackles including a tackle for loss. Perhaps the 6-foot-1, 229-pound sophomore from Snellville has the best chance to come out of the long list of backups and provide quality depth for the Bulldogs. At this point in preparations, it’s hard to predict what’s on Pruitt’s mind in regards to the inside linebacker spot. Whatever the case, the Bulldogs need quality backups for their studs at middle linebacker, and finding the guys best suited for the job will begin this Saturday in Athens.

Senior inside linebacker Ramik Wilson (51) made 12 starts last season and led the Southeastern Conference with 133 tackles. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

—Raleigh Harbin is a junior journalism major from Jacksonville, Fla.

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B10 Showcase

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

Showcase

Georgia quarterback Brice Ramsey (12) throws a pass during a Georgia spring practice. DAVID C. BRISTOW/Staff

Georgia Bulldogs wide receiver Reggie Davis (81) runs after a catch for a touchdown during a NCAA football game against North Texas played on Sept. 21. DAVID C. BRISTOW/Staff

OFFENSE WIDE RECEIVER Returning starters: Michael Bennett, Malcolm Mitchell, Justin Scott-Wesley, Jonathan Rumph, Chris Conley Key losses: Rantavious Wooten, Rhett McGowan Returning players: Uriah LeMay, Reggie Davis, Kenny Towns, Blake Tibbs Incoming freshmen: Gilbert Johnson, Isaiah McKenzie, Shakenneth Williams, Rico Johnson

OFFENSIVE LINE Returning starters: David Andrews (C), John Theus (LT), Kolton Houston (RT) Key losses: Kenarious Gates (LT), Chris Burnette (LG), Dallas Lee (RG) Returning players: Mark Beard (LT), Watt Dantzler (OG)

Incoming freshmen: Kendall Baker, Isaiah Wynn, Dyshon Sims, Jake Edwards

QUARTERBACK Returning starter: Hutson Mason Key loss: Aaron Murray Returning players: Faton Bauta, Brice Ramsey Key addition: Jacob Park

TIGHT END

TAILBACK Returning starters: Todd Gurley, Keith Marshall Key loss: J.J. Green Returning players: Brendan Douglas Incoming freshmen: Sony Michel, Nick Chubb

Georgia free safety Quincy Mauger (20) tackles Nebraska tight end Cethan Carter (11) during the Taxslayer.com Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Fla., in January. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

Returning starters: Jay Rome Key losses: Arthur Lynch Additions: Quayvon Hicks (position change) Returning players: Jordan Davis, Jack Loonam, Jared Chapple Incoming freshmen: Jeb Blazevich, Hunter Atkinson

Ray Drew (47) rushes Tennessee quarterback Justin Worley (14) in Knoxville, Tenn. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

DEFENSE DEFENSIVE LINE Returning starters: Ray Drew, Sterling Bailey, Chris Mayes Returning players: Toby Johnson, James DeLoach, Jon Taylor, Josh Dawson Key losses: Garrison Smith Incoming freshmen: Keyon Brown, Lamont Gaillard

LINEBACKER Returning starters: Leonard Floyd (OLB), Jordan Jenkins (OLB), Ramik Wilson (ILB), Amarlo Hererra (ILB) Key losses: none Returning players: Reggie Carter, (ILB), Tim Kimbrough (ILB), Ryne Rankin (ILB), Kosta Vavlas (ILB) Key additions: Keyon Brown, OLB (freshman); Lorenzo Carter, OLB (freshman)

DEFENSIVE BACK Returning starters: Damian Swann (CB), Shaq Wiggins (CB), Tray Matthews (FS) Key losses: Josh Harvey-Clemons (SS)

Returning players: Brendan Langley (DB), Corey Moore (SS), Quincy Mauger (FS), Sheldon Dawson (CB), Reggie Wilkerson (CB) Key additions: J.J. Green (CB), Tramel Terry (S)


The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Sports B11

Conor Welton displays on-field leadership after missing 2013 season with injury BY RALEIGH HARBIN @raleighRandB Conor Welton probably wouldn’t beat anyone in a shouting contest, but he makes up for his relative tranquility by playing as hard as he can on the field. Welton, a redshirt junior outfielder for the Georgia baseball team, was described by head coach Scott Stricklin as a quiet, on-field leader — a style Stricklin likes to see instead of having a vocal leader who doesn’t perform on the field. “He’s more on the field,” Stricklin said. “He’s kind of a quiet kid, a lead by example type.” That doesn’t hinder his effort, however. Welton carries his weight in every regard, maxing out effort, according to Stricklin. “Whether you’re in the weight room or on the field, he’s always going at it 100 percent,” Stricklin said. Perhaps his effort dates back to the career setback Welton suffered prior to the 2013 season, and his battle to return to full-speed following the injury. Welton had issues with both of his shoulders that were caused by no singular incident. The issues with his right shoulder date back to his time as high school football player, and the problems with his left shoulder, his throwing arm, had a torn labrum caused by throwing the baseball repeatedly. His right shoulder contained ligament damage and also a torn labrum. Following the MRI results from both shoulders, Welton was informed by the team trainer he would have to miss the 2013 season and have arthroscopic surgery on his left and

Conor Welton missed the 2013 season following surgery on both shoulders. This year he is second on the team with a .319 batting average. FILE/Staff right shoulders. “He wouldn’t let me play anymore with the shoulder that way,” Welton said. “It was coming out when I was sleeping.” Welton, a high school quarterback at the Wesleyan School in Norcross, said his shoulder would dislocate during every football game. “I couldn’t stiff arm or anything,” Welton said. “Every time anybody hit me it would come out.” Welton said he now feels 100 percent at the plate, but conceded that shoulder injuries never truly heal. “Shoulders, once you injure them you can’t ever fix them completely,” Welton said. “I’m going to have shoul-

Are you a

der problems the rest of my life.” Despite the issues that football caused Welton’s shoulders, he said he doesn’t regret playing even though it cost him a year of playing baseball. During that year he had to watch his team struggle to a 21-32 record. “That stuff’s going to happen in life,” Welton said. “Maybe if I was a pitcher, [playing] quarterback probably wouldn’t have been the best thing, but I think it helped me.” Part of the physical contact to Welton’s shoulder involved diving into a base, an injury which he said could have happened in football or baseball. “I wish that maybe I hadn’t gotten any injuries but that stuff hap-

pens,” Welton said. “It happened in both [sports].” Welton said he loves both aspects of football and baseball, but mentioned the playoff atmosphere he played in at Wesleyan in both sports. As a result, it became obvious he’s the kind of person who thrives on competition. That competitive nature has translated into his 2014 season. Welton has explored how far he can push his once injured shoulders, how to adjust to the system of first-year manager Stricklin and life as a team leader. With all of those factors, Welton’s play has steadied. At the plate, the Atlanta native boasts a .319 batting average, one home run, 14 RBI and 28 runs scored in 136 at-bats. Despite the solid splits, Stricklin wants to see more out of his athletic, versatile outfielder. “I want to see him be a little more aggressive,” Stricklin said. “When I say aggressive, [I mean] aggressive in the bunt game, aggressive in the run game and aggressive with runners in scoring position.” Perhaps aggression on the base paths and in bunting comes with time, but with Southeastern Conference games now in full swing, the Bulldogs could use some extra aggression from Welton, and he certainly has the ability to implement it. “A guy like him, he can bunt at any time, he can run at any time and that just puts a lot of pressure on defenses,” Stricklin said. “That’s what we’re trying to do as much as possible.” Once Welton comes through for his coach and shows his aggression, one might hear about it, just not from him.

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puzzles

B12 Puzzles

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Red & Black

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 10

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ACROSS 1 Group of cattle 5 Scrapbook 10 Anka or Hogan 14 Finished; done 15 Stop 16 Meanie 17 Greasy 18 Uprisings 20 Common ailment 21 Area __; phone number’s start 22 Feeling of anxiety 23 Elegance; style 25 Small insect 26 Oscar hopefuls 28 Visitors 31 Uncouth 32 Labors 34 Scarlet or ruby 36 Melody 37 Nickname for New Zealanders 38 Output from Mt. Vesuvius 39 1/60 of a min.

40 __ have the foggiest; was clueless 41 Cave excavator 42 Official emissary 44 “Alice __ Live Here Anymore” 45 Frothy drink 46 Dawn 47 Angry look 50 Writing table 51 __ Vegas, NV 54 One who signs up 57 Bondsman’s offering 58 Singles 59 Not as good 60 Take apart 61 Take a bath 62 Proprietor 63 “__ on it!”; cry to a slowpoke DOWN 1 Horse’s foot 2 Wickedness 3 Unwillingness

4 No longer wet 5 Come __; find 6 City in England 7 “I Got You __”; Sonny & Cher signature song 8 Utilize 9 Singer Tormé 10 __ out; directs attention to 11 Very eager 12 Fancy vases 13 In case 19 Narrow paths 21 Automobiles 24 Suffer defeat 25 Black-and-white seabirds 26 __ up; misbehaves 27 Sadistic 28 Mental courage 29 Dig up, as a tree, and put elsewhere 30 Three and four 32 Broad 33 Possess 35 Move suddenly

37 Windy day toy 38 In __ of; as a substitute for 40 Valleys 41 Monastery man 43 Way too colorful 44 Housecoat 46 Good judgment 47 Get larger 48 Singer Horne 49 Eras 50 Mend socks 52 Assistant 53 Supper in a sty 55 Afternoon hour 56 Use an oar 57 Public vehicle

48 Keyboard instruments 50 Bathroom fixture 51 Instruct 52 Joint most often sprained 53 Local saying 54 Passion 56 Pocket bread 57 Short letter 58 Pal 59 Touches lightly 62 Dyer’s tub

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ACROSS 1 Mustangs and Tauruses 6 Spill the beans 10 Pianist and singer Domino 14 Venerate 15 Racing sled 16 Bad guy 17 Powdered cleanser brand 18 Once again 19 Harness strap 20 Giving medical aid to 22 Sports buildings 24 Repair 25 Easily broken 26 Sculptor’s tool 29 Napped leather 30 Bacardi product 31 Not as risky 33 Arm joint 37 Swiss skier’s range 39 Language heard in Cardiff 41 Molten rock 42 Spaghetti sauce herb 44 Church table

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46 Lion’s lair 47 GI’s footwear 49 Present but inactive 51 Suit makers 54 In addition 55 Concluding 56 Police station’s district 60 Related 61 Gung ho 63 Island greeting 64 Wooden shoe 65 Intl. alliance 66 __ on; be less severe with 67 __ in; surrounds 68 “__ Trek” 69 Flower stalks DOWN 1 As a matter of __; actually 2 Smell 3 Italy’s capital 4 Reveries 5 Love seats

6 Lacking flavor 7 Breathing organ 8 Ice __; cold historical period 9 “Look out!” 10 Predict 11 Insurance seller 12 Courtroom event 13 In a __; sort of 21 Relative by marriage 23 “Ticket to __”; Beatles hit 25 Explode 26 Cancer the __; Zodiac sign 27 Luau dance 28 Little scamps 29 Peddles 32 Daring deeds 34 Commanded 35 Kiln 36 Desire 38 Brothers and sisters 40 Actress Berry 43 Diving bird 45 Scoundrels

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SATURDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 12 ACROSS 1 __ oneself; work steadily 5 Loose, as a rope 10 Teacup’s edge 14 Unlock 15 Expand 16 Law 17 Tenant’s payment 18 Pianist Previn 19 Qualified 20 Far from moderate 22 Most uncanny 24 Samuel’s teacher 25 Actor Rathbone 26 Evening coffee, perhaps 29 Nickname for Harold 30 Forest opening 34 Way out 35 __ person; apiece 36 Very sad 37 Summer month: abbr. 38 Letter __; mailman 40 __-Wan Kenobi 41 Peruvian pack animals 43 Wrath

44 Cold weather garment 45 “77 Sunset __” of old TV 46 Mediterranean or Caribbean 47 TV’s __ Couric 48 Not intoxicated 50 Tease 51 Actor Kevin __ 54 Wild enthusiast 58 Ms. Perlman 59 Baseball great Hank __ 61 City in Nevada 62 Cry from a sty 63 Use up 64 Dines 65 Morse __ 66 Stuffed bear 67 Horse’s gait

DOWN 1 Tiny skin opening 2 Peak 3 Penny 4 Beg 5 Hindu teacher

6 __ up; form a row 7 Find a total 8 Breakfast food 9 Leg joints 10 Writing for the blind 11 Bumpkin 12 Misfortunes 13 Encounter 21 Leprechaun 23 Harshness 25 Australia’s Great __ Reef 26 Great buys 27 Rejoice 28 Stogie 29 That girl 31 Underway 32 Middle East emirate 33 Privileged class 35 Faux __; gaffe 36 Tiny 38 Poultry choice 39 Mr. Gershwin 42 Error 44 Nightclub 46 Mexican shawl

47 Relatives 49 Brutal man 50 Quaid or Travis 51 Gator’s cousin 52 Akron’s state 53 Put in the mail 54 Is __ of; likes 55 Rip 56 4 __ 12 is 3 57 Price 60 Blushing

7 On an __ keel 8 Newborn bird 9 Clever 10 Actor James __ 11 Gung ho 12 Cincinnati team 14 Denver team 21 “The __ Ranger” 25 Afternoon hour 26 “Jack __ could eat no fat...” 27 Uneven 28 Traffic cop’s device 29 Barbecue 30 Gallops 31 Narrow water passage 32 End of a lasso 33 Inexperienced 35 “Guilty” or “Not guilty” 38 Bask 39 Joyful, as a party 41 White lie 42 Hoodlum’s group 44 Pastureland 45 Thumb or pinkie

47 Spear 48 Church service 49 Border on 50 Short note 52 TV’s Perlman 53 Ear adornment 54 Dweeb 55 Very excited 59 Actress Myrna

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MONDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE APRIL 14 ACROSS 1 __ sauce; teriyaki glaze 4 Tree with fluttering leaves 9 Sign of an old wound 13 “Once __ a time...” 15 Range 16 “__ a nice day!” 17 Lima’s nation 18 Removes skin from, as apples 19 Sudden attack 20 Derelict in duty 22 Split __; hair problem 23 Clinton’s VP 24 Feeling blue 26 Peaceful 29 Using a coffee mill 34 Babble 35 Dried plum 36 Neither’s partner 37 Serling and Stewart 38 Injured arm support 39 Sheet of ice on the sea 40 Happy __ clam 41 Gas and coal

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42 Waterbirds 43 Bus station 45 Attach firmly 46 Recede 47 Dryer residue 48 One of the Three Bears 51 Setting up 56 Not up yet 57 Object; article 58 Calf meat 60 Japanese wrestling form 61 Thus 62 Consequently 63 Store away 64 Rarin’ to go 65 24-hour period

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The Red & Black

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Puzzles B13

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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3. How long will gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? ~ 7 points 1. What is the name of the UGA baseball field? ~ 3 points 4. What is one location of the new bicycle repair stations on campus? ~ 5 points 2. When is the Farmers Market held? ~ 3 points 5. Name one student who was named a 2014 Barry M. Goldwater Scholar. ~ 3 points

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$100 check for a student organization or $100 gift card for a student team Go online and register your student team or organization!

2. Submit answers online by Wednesday at 12 noon.

3. PLAY EACH WEEK AND WIN BIG!!

Need a roommate or a job? Got something to sell, rent, or trade? Place your ad ANYTIME at: redandblack.com/classifieds EMPLOYMENT Do you have a Bachelor's degree? Would you like to teach English in Japan? Hello!s Associates in recruiting teachers for the 2015 school year. What: Information session for Hello!s Associates English teaching position When: Sunday, April 27th, 2014 Where: UGA Campus, Aderhold Hall room 114 Contact: Kyle Lovinggood (kylelovinggood@hellosenglish.com) Lifeguards Needed: Gwinnett, Fulton, Walton and Dekalb county pools. For information: visit www. positivelypools.com or call 770972-3111 Earn up to $11/hour at a neighborhood pool! Certification and training provided Blue Whale Pool Management is now hiring 2014 summer season lifeguards and Pool Operators (pool maintenance) in the North Atlanta area (Gwinnett, Alpharetta, Roswell, Norcross, Marietta, and Kennesaw). Certification classes (lifeguarding & CPO) are available. Compensation: $7:25 to $10.00 based on experience To apply, please visit our website at www.bluewhalepools.com or call 770-893-9017. Central Presbyterian Church seeks creative, energetic persons for our youth program for part time positions to help plan, lead and coordinate all youth activities for one year. Send resume/ references to office@athenscentralpres.org. Visit our website at http://athenscentralpres.org to view the complete job description. Dalton Carpet One seeking experienced delivery drivers. Qualifications- Clean MVR, Clear Background Check and drug screen, able to lift 50 lbs, 21 years or older, pays $10 per hour, position offers flexible schedule, some out of town travel required. Fax Brian Birch 706-353-2141 or email bbirch@daltoncarpetone.com

Swimming Pool Technician: full or part time help wanted. Experience preferred but not necessary. Must have work references & valid driver's license. Please send resumes via email to PoolServicesAthens@gmail.com $5 AMAZON GIFT CARD for completion of 5-minute survey on wellbeing in college students. Only one gift card/student. A theological research project sponsored by Teleios, Inc. Take online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/teleioscollegesurvey or on your phone -

HOUSING 4&5 Br Houses still available for Fall '14. UP TO $1000 OFF FIRST MONTH'S RENT for qualified properties! Call Carriage House Realty,Inc at 706.353.1750 for current specials! 3 bedroom 2 bath condo in gated community features include: hardwood flooring, covered patio, pool, lake, crown molding, stainless steel appliances, and granite countertops in kitchen. $129,000 Contact Pat Hallow Coldwell Banker Upchurch Realty 706-424-2182 or 706-543-4000 ext. 287 Room for rent in a 2 bed, 2 bath condo $600.00/mo everything included.Female & graduate/law student preferred. Granite counter tops, walk in closet, 12 ft. ceilings. VERY nice living. Kmathis@ sports.uga.edu 2&3&4 Bedroom Awesome Houses Pre-Leasing for Fall! Walk and Bike to UGA and downtown! Historic, charming, renovated, modern amenities. W/D. $500$1500/month. luckydawg96@ yahoo.com http://athensrentalhouses.co.nr/ House for Rent. 218 Colima Avenue 2 bedroom, 2 bath, kitchen, living room, fenced backyard, large deck. Dogs welcome. Available August 1st. $825/month. 706-461-1302

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! Walk to campus or downtown. Just a couple of blocks from UGA busline. 2BD/2BA flats. $800 with some utilities included. Call Athens Best Rentals at 770-7252018 or 706-540-6540 (cell). $100.00 off 1st month's rent, pre-lease for Fall before May 15th! 1 bedrooms in 5pts. Furnished and Unfurnished. On UGA/City busline. Onsite Laundry, pool. No Pets. $505-$605. Carousel Village Apartments. (706)548-1132, www.carouselvillage.net Over 1200 affordable rental units to choose from, close to UGA with professional 24/7 management. Visit www.RentAthens. com for a complete list with pictures and addresses. Or call 706389-1700 to discuss your housing needs. 2 BR/ 2 1/2 BATH COTTAGES FOR RENT IN THE GATED WOODLANDS COMMUNITY. 12 MONTH LEASE, BUT ONE IS AVAILABLE FOR 15 MONTHS STARTING JUNE. $900./MONTH. CALL ELLEN @ 404-210-9437 OR STEVE @ 404788-6905. 3 bed 3.5 bath dual thermostat climate control for comfortable living in summer and winter Just replaced carpet last July. Pet friendly. Rent is 1000/mo. 221 Center Park Lane Whitehall Village 6787778544

SUBLEASES Subleasing a room in a 3 bedroom 3.5 bathroom townhouse at The Ikon for $504 plus utilities. The home is furnished therefore you don't need to bring your own furniture. briannaj@uga.edu 4 bedroom apartment of girls at The Connection at Athens. The furniture is all upgraded. Your bedroom will have its own SEPARATE BATHROOM and closet. Please email me at erintoms@ uga.edu

Awesome suite for sublease during the summer months. Independent bathroom, independent walk-in closet, independent office, independent corridor and coat closet.4049446619 $340 a month, not including utilities, June/July sublease. 2 bedroom/1 bath in Dearing Garden Apartments off Church Street. It only takes 15min to walk downtown or to the MLC! 6786849071 Sublease in Athens, $375/ month!!! Time: May 5- July 31st Where: Apt. 106, 101 International Drive, Athens, GA, 30605 What: 1 bed & bathroom in a 4/4 apartment 7704029329 Townhouse Wooden livingroom floor 4bed / 4 bath (subleasing 1 bedroom) Now til July Super nice 5 mins from school Bus 14 $375 per month, but negotiable!!! 4047232606 Subleasing a bedroom in a 4/2 (furnished) at the U for summer. Rent 299/month including all util. (Cable/internet, electricity, water) Very close to campus. 229-4445200 Room in 4 bed/4 bath apartment in River Club. Furnished, inunit laundry, cable, internet, pool, volleyball court, basketball court, tennis court. $350/month, not including electricity. 9125083510 Subleasing apartment MayJuly 2014. One room in a 4 bedroom apartment at The U Apartments on Riverbend Pkwy. Rent is $435/month, includes utilities. Email me at jesshok@yahoo.com/ ted2016@uga.edu for more information. Sublease apartment AVAILABLE Now-July2014 & can RELEASE for fall. $285/month. 1BED/ PRIVATEBATH in townhouse. Amenities: pool, dishwasher, washer/dryer, large closet, free parking, UGA&AthensTransit Buses outside door. (404-345-2693) or cherhung@uga.edu

I'm relocating to the Athens area and I'm looking for a room in The Club or The U to sublet starting around June 1st. Dates are flexible. I am female and I prefer to live with other females. 919221-5046. Thanks! Looking to sublease my room in 4 bedroom townhouse in Towne Club (off Milledge) Summer 2014. Rent 445/month plus utilities. Call 404-542-4952 I am in need of a girl ages 18-28. I would be willing to pay for the utility bill so that the rate would be a solid $375/month. 404-7294229 Sublease on 2160 S.Milledge Ave. for girls available. $385 a month without utilities. Private bathroom, spacious kitchen, washer/dryer, previously paid pet fee. Two minutes away from campus. Contact weebee@uga.edu. I have a studio apartment for sublease for summer. On UGA bus line. Near 5 points. It will be available from May-August. E-mail for details. dennis12@uga.edu Subleasing my room at The Connection from May 12th until July 31st! The entire month of May will be COVERED by me! $440 rent. 7707337733 Summer Sublease. $300 per month, plus utilities. 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath townhouse on Eastside. Very spacious. Contact Hannah at hannahm@uga.edu if interested. Sublease 1bed/1bath in 1310 Barnett Shoals rd. (Clearwater Creek). 2nd floor room of the house with friendly roommates. Close to bus stop and food markets. $400/month + utilities. Contact (786)351-4490 SUBLET. $500/mo. 1BR/1BA in 5Pts. Furnished if needed. W/D in unit. Covered parking. Close to campus. Avail May-June. (801) 694-6704.

ROOMMATES 1 bedroom in a 3BR/2B house in Pinecrest on Athens Eastside. Large fenced yard, $333/month, and pets welcome. includes Washer/dryer, fully furnished kitchen/living and garage. 912657-7116 2 bed/bath S Lumpkin Furnished Decorated Satellite/4 DVRs, Outfitted Kitchen, Piano, 46 inch TV with Apple TV and Netflix www.2305slumpkin.com 706 495 2386 August 1

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Employment ........................... $20/wk Seeking Job ............................. $10/wk Roommates ............................. $10/wk Housing .................................... $20/wk Subleases ................................. $10/wk For Sale ...................................... $10/wk Computers & Electronics................................ $12/wk Wanted ...................................... $10/wk Auto ............................................ $10/wk Services ..................................... $10/wk Entertainment/Tickets ......... $10/wk Travel .......................................... $10/wk Yard Sales .............................$10/entry Events ........................................ $10/wk Announcements .................... $10/wk Personals .................................. $10/wk Lost & Found ..................................Free

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LAST Only a few units remain!

CHANCE Don’t miss out... LIVE BIG at

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“G” Pool with Lazy River 25+ Person Hot Tub 30,000 sf Pool Deck w/ Cabanas 20 ft Outdoor TV Off-Leash Dog Park Private Shuttle Service

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

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April 10, 2014 Edition of The Red & Black  

April 10, 2014 Edition of The Red & Black

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