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Thursday, November 14, 2013 Vol. 121, No. 15 | Athens, Georgia redandblack.com

➤ SEE PAGE B1

We are here to stay. No justice, no peace. Up up with education, down down with segregation.

“I think at this point it’s becoming not even a matter of feeling underrepresented but a matter of not even feeling protected at the University of Georgia.” — CAROLINE BAILEY, Black Affairs Council president

SEAN TAYLOR/Staff

“What a lot of folks have to realize too is that a lot of the hurdles and a lot of the changes that are for the betterment of everybody, they are things that you are not going to see. We can list and list and list the things that we’ve done, [but] I think sometimes for folks maybe it wasn’t seen as the right thing or wasn’t enough.” — VICTOR WILSON, Vice President for Student Affairs

BY KENDALL TRAMMELL AND TAYLOR WEST @KendallTrammell @TaylorWest08 Caroline Bailey wasn’t surprised. “I chose the University of Georgia because of the lack of diversity,” said Bailey, the president of the Black Affairs Council. “For a lot of people who go to the University of Georgia, they went to predominantly white high schools, their neighborhoods are predominantly white and it will continue to be that way.” And during a week featuring words of racism and homophobia targeted at UGA student and faculty groups, Bailey’s preconceived notions were confirmed. “I came to [UGA] knowing that the rest of the world once I leave high school will never look like me again.” ••• “Why can’t you dumb dirty n-----s stop stinking up the place?” posted the user onto the BAC’s Facebook page. “Let UGA be RIGHT for good WHITE Christian

students.” “Burn in hell f-----s” was left on the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center’s Facebook page. In response to Facebook posts of hate speech left on the BAC and LGBTRC pages, Bailey filed for a march permit. The posts were left around 9 p.m. Nov. 3 on the BAC and LGBTRC’s Facebook pages. The march was Friday afternoon. A Facebook account created just prior to posting the hate speech on the student groups’ pages operated under the name Matthew Robert Williams. This was the first time either group experienced such blatant acts of hate on social media, but it wouldn’t be the last. Williams denied responsibility for the hate speech posts, stating the account operating under his name was a fake. “Just a heads up that Facebook account isn’t me,” Williams tweeted. He also filed an incident report with the UGA Police Department Nov. 7 around 1

p.m. “Williams advised that he was not responsible for the postings and that an unknown person or persons used his name fraudulently to create the postings,” according to a UGA police report. The Equal Opportunity Office is investigating the matter but declined to comment to The Red & Black. For the students, the Facebook post is not the real problem. The more than 150 marchers who arrived outside of Memorial Hall marched not against the posts, but against racism, homophobia and other forms of discrimination on UGA’s campus. “We’ve been put in situations and environments where we don’t feel welcome, where we don’t feel represented, where we feel like we are the undesirables here at the University of Georgia,” Bailey said. “That we are just here to attract other people because the word ‘diversity’ is being thrown around.” See POSTS, Page A3

Former Bulldog Nick Marshall to face Georgia as Auburn QB

Nick Marshall was dismissed from the Georgia football team in 2012. He is now thestarting quarterback at Auburn.

BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey Across the vast expanse of the college football landscape, the resurgent Auburn Tigers may lay claim to the year’s best turnaround story. Fueling much of that success is junior quarterback Nick Marshall. After sputtering to a 3-9 record and failing to win a single conference game in 2012, the No. 7 Tigers (9-1, 5-1 SEC) have scored 38.6 points per game, good for 18th-best in the nation, all while Marshall has racked up 1,301 yards passing, 734 yards rushing and 15 total touchdowns. “It’s all about our players coming together, putting the past behind them and becoming close,” first-year head coach Gus Malzahn said of the program’s bounce-back year. But when Auburn plays No. 25 Georgia (6-3, 4-2 SEC) on Saturday in Jordan-Hare Stadium, forgetting the past might be easier said than done for Marshall. After all, he once signed with the Bulldogs as a top high-school prospect, only to be kicked off as a freshman along with teammates Chris Sanders and Sanford Seay for allegedly stealing from teammates.

THE AUBURN PLAINSMAN/ Anna Grafton

See MARSHALL, Page B3

NEWS, A2 • VIEWS, A4 • VARIETY, A8 • SPORTS, B1 • SHOWCASE, B7 • PUZZLES, B9 An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia and Athens Communities

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A2 News

Thursday, November 14, 2013

The Red & Black

POLICE BLOTTER Student charged with possession of marijuana and underage drinking A University of Georgia student was arrested and charged with five counts, including misdemeanor possession of marijuana and underage possession or consumption of alcohol, after a UGA police officer stopped him for not wearing a seat belt Saturday around noon, according to a police report. The officer saw a Grey Nissan Titan driving near the Food Sciences building and reportedly saw that the driver, Patrick Joseph Enright, 18, was not wearing a seat belt. The reporting officer pulled him over, and another officer reportedly saw Enright “stuffing” something into the doorjamb. Enright told the officer he was not wearing his seat belt because he had dropped friends off at the game and didn’t think to wear it. The officer asked Enright to open the door of his truck, and when he did, a bag of what appeared to the officer to be marijuana fell out, according to the police report, Enright reportedly said the bag was not his. The reporting officer and a backup officer searched the truck and found a loose, unmarked white pill in the center counsel and a “partial bottle” of vodka under the passenger seat, according to the report. Enright also reportedly told the officer he had a fake ID on him. Enright was arrested and charged with possession of a fake ID, possession of

one ounce or less of marijuana, underage possession or consumption of alcohol, no license on person and not wearing a seat belt. He was booked into the Clarke County Jail at 3:02 p.m. Enright said he did not have a comment for the Red & Black. — Jana French

Man barred from campus after trying to take items from tailgates A man was barred from the University of Georgia campus Saturday afternoon after he tried to take items from tailgates during the Appalachian State University versus UGA game, according to a UGA police report. The man gathered “approximately” 20 folding chairs, two folding tables and coolers with food and drinks. He also took clothes. He told the officer he thought he could take the items since the owners had left them behind. The officer said people might return for the items, so the man put everything back “to the best of his memory.” — Jana French

UGA housing staff reports ‘possible’ drugs, weapons in Rooker Hall A University of Georgia housing staff member reported drug and weapon possession by a student in Rooker Hall Saturday, according to a UGA police report. A student living in the room told the employee she found marijuana and a knife with a group of guests in her room. She

reportedly “did not feel comfortable” going back into her room until the guests were gone. A different student made the same complaint earlier Saturday before police were called. Officers did not find anyone in the room when they went to search the area, giving no indication of any crime. — Brad Mannion

UGA employee reports 105 gallons of gas stolen A total of 105 gallons of gas were stolen from inside University of Georgia vehicles over the weekend, according to a UGA police report. A UGA employee told officers $345 in diesel gasoline was stolen from vehicles at the UGA Automotive Center between Nov. 8 and Nov. 11. The suspect reportedly stole the gas from the tanks of six cars. — Jana French

UGA employee reports attempted rape An attempted rape and sexual assault were reported to University of Georgia police by a UGA Health Center employee Monday, according to a police report. The incident occurred Oct. 30, and the report does not list the victim’s affiliation with UGA. The victim wished to remain anonymous. The only information given to officers was the time frame of the incident. The victim was not able to provide a location of the incident. — Brad Mannion

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Hydroecologist Sydney Bacchus said she found heavy metals in ACC compost, but declined to share the samples with The Red & Black. DaviD C. Bristow/Staff

Athens-Clarke County citizens raise concerns about dump’s odorous compost By Daniel Funke @dpfunke A composting operation at the Athens-Clarke County landfill is raising quite a stink. In 1996 the landfill began composting yard waste and other woody material collected in Athens-Clarke and Oglethorpe counties to sell to individuals and organizations as a facet of new recycling efforts. “One-hundred percent of the woody waste makes up 75 percent of the compost. The other 25 percent is the biosolids,” said ACC landfill assistant manager Blaine Williams. “We’re diverting 100 percent of our woody waste from our landfill, so we’re saving landfill space.” However, members of the Billups Grove Baptist church and Dunlap Road residents who live the near the landfill said the odor coming from the operation is unbearable. “I’ve been here since the landfill went in and it smelled, but not like that compost pile, and some of our neighbors bought that compost and they didn’t know what was in it,” said local resident Wayne Clark in the June 25 meeting addressing the complaints. Residents are concerned about losing the Billups Grove Baptist Church, located on Lexington Avenue in front of the ACC landfill, due to the odor. “Some of our members have changed churches because [the compost] is so bad,” said local resident Charles Nash in the meeting. The Red & Black visited the ACC landfill. The staff said the compost is not only safe to use, but is rated Class A: Exceptional Quality by the Environmental Protection Agency. “[The compost is] Class A and free of pathogens. It’s safe to use in your yard and garden and flowers. It is safe, let me stress that it is safe. I won’t say it doesn’t smell, but it is safe,” Williams said in the meeting. Williams said the landfill regularly tests the compost for potentially harmful metals and pathogens in order to ensure safety and quality. He said the biosolids, which include septic waste cleaned at the wastewater treatment plant via bacteria processes and other organic detritus such as dead insects, have never exceeded the pollutant ceiling concentrations as dictated by the EPA. “We take samples, and once we get the results back then we’ll sell it. But until we get the results back it’s set aside, that way we’re sure we got a good load. We’ve never had a sample fail,” said Jim Corley, the ACC landfill solid waste director. “We’ve done more testing than is even required just to be sure, and we’ve never had any issues with any of our tests. Everything’s always been below the reportable level. We actually exceed [California’s standards], which are typically tighter than the EPA.” *** However, the ethical legitimacy of the composting operation, claimed by ACC administration to exceed safety regulations, has been questioned by other residents. Hydroecologist Sydney Bacchus has lead the allegations against the ACC landfill, claiming that the compost not only smells but also endangers the health of the largely lowerincome community surrounding the site. “They are not required to test that finished product more than once every three months, but they can sell it every single day,” she said. Bacchus said in a letter to AthensClarke County commissioners that when she tested the compost, the results indicated the presence of pathogens and heavy metals that can cause serious health problems, including Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, ar-

senic, fluoride, lead and mercury. She also said that particulate in the air blown from the composting site contained the human pathogens Acinetobacter baumanni and Chromobacterium violaceum. According to the Center for Disease Control, the pathogens Stenotrophomonas and Acinetobacter are among the “nightmare bacteria” that result in 23,000 deaths in the United States every year. When asked for a copy of her test results, Bacchus said she could not release them because of possible legal ramifications. Documents from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division indicate that the ACC compost passed US EPA Class A standards for the pathogens fecal coliform and Salmonella as well as several heavy metals, including arsenic, lead and mercury in early August. Several residents in the Dunlap Road neighborhood adjacent to the landfill said they have had health issues they believe were caused by the landfill. “The thing is that multiple people come up with the same symptoms immediately after they’ve been exposed. High fevers, flu-like symptoms, headaches; you feel like you’ve got this death-defying flu,” Bacchus said. Nash said his family and friends have developed health problems as a result of years of well water having been possibly contaminated by run-off from the landfill. “We have a serious problem out there with that smell. My wife was contaminated by it and so was my daughter,” he said at the commission meeting. “Y’all are saying that we don’t have any problem with [the compost]. But you don’t live in that neighborhood.” Nash’s wife Farah said that she and several others developed itchy skin afflictions and that many people in the community have cancer. She said her daughter was even diagnosed with lupus. In 1992, Athens-Clarke County extended city water to the communities surrounding the landfill, ending the use of well water. Bacchus said that hospital records are largely not available for the community near the landfill. “Most of these people have really low income, and so they’re being treated by the public health service. When they tried to get copies of their records, they went to the health department and they told them their records had been destroyed,” Bacchus said. *** The recent complaints of odor are a facet of a long history of problems between the ACC landfill and local residents. In 1992, landfill administration signed a contract with Dunlap Road residents promising not to expand the landfill. In 2010, they violated that contract with the construction of the composting facility. “Those people do not have a fighting chance and Athens-Clarke Country knows that,” Bacchus said. “That’s exactly why they continue to place this burden on people who cannot defend themselves. And that’s why I say that it’s no different than any other bullying action; people who have power taking advantage of people who don’t have any power.” ACC administration said they remain responsive to the concerns of the community near the landfill. “You’re not being ignored. I’ve been out to your church,” said Mayor Nancy Denson in the Nov. 5 commission meeting. “We told you when there’s an odor there to call [the hotline].” Nash said that he and other residents had not received a hotline number to call prior to the Nov. 5 commission meeting.

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Conner Blackwell and Collette Toney’s names were misspelled in the previous edition of The Red & Black. The Red & Black regrets this error. If you see an error in a story or caption, either in print or online at www. redandblack.com, please contact us at news@randb.com or (706)4333002. We strive for accuracy in everything we do.

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The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

News A3

POSTS: Online hate indicative of insidious discrimination problems on campus ➤ From Page A1 She said one of the biggest problems at UGA is the idea held by so many people that everything is OK — that there is no longer the presence of a white and minority dichotomy. Bailey believes there are more people, aside from the Facebook user, who share the sentiment there are demographic groups that don’t belong on campus. “I’m sure I sit next to them in class, I’m sure I walk past them through Tate, I’m sure that there are more people that feel that way,” she said. “They’ve been surrounded by these thoughts — they are in their heads, they are in their feelings, they are there. It’s in their upbringing.” Katherine Valdez, a senior linguistics major from Athens, came to the march spontaneously after she got off of the bus. “I just knew it was the right thing to do to express my support for everybody — women, anyone of any color, any native language, any sexual orientation, anything like that,” she said. “I don’t always feel I’m the most effective straight ally out there and I wanted to have an opportunity to be more effective.” BAC member Kiondre Dunnam, a sophomore middle school education major from Douglas, said the decision to put on a march in union with the LGBTRC on the bridge near Sanford Stadium was specifically intended to approach this the “right way” and go against stereotypical expectations. “The moment that we strike back, what are we? We’re angry black people,” he said. “That gives people the opportunity to come back and say maybe they deserve to be treated the way they’ve been treated. We refused to give them the opportunity to see us like that.” ••• But the students’ organized protest only added fuel to this fire. A second post was left on the BAC Facebook page Sunday around 9 p.m. “Yall n-----s can protest all you want it just makes you look like the monkeys you are!” This came shortly after a post left on the Black Faculty and Staff Organization Facebook page. “NO N-----S” accompanied a photo of a lynching along with the caption, “WE DONT WANT YOUR KIND AROUND HERE.” Bailey is “at a loss for words” that these things are still happening. “I think at this point it’s becoming not even a matter of feeling underrepresented, but a matter of not even feeling protected at the University of Georgia,” she said. BFSO President Cedric Miller said many were hurt by the posts, but these actions are not representative of the community. “The University of Georgia is a multicultural, globally focused university and the recent Facebook postings don’t speak for our student body nor the Athens community,” he said. “We’re going to stay steadfast in supporting our students.” Miller feels welcome and safe in general at UGA, but said it’s important to continually work on creating an environment on campus where all students can be educated and become leaders. “We’ve come a long way here at the University of Georgia. We’re not the University of Georgia that we were 50 years ago,” he said. “Do we have work to do? Yes we do.”

More than 150 marchers participated in the march on the bridge near Sanford Stadium to bring awareness to the feelings of being underrepresented and unsupported at the University of Georgia. SEAN TAYLOR/Staff

“I want to have students to be safe and not at harm and to have a great experience and there’s something we need to do to improve that, but sometimes administrative duties pull me away.”

••• Bailey expects more from the administration. Its presence, she said, is lacking in a time when it is the most needed. “I think the administration is still stagnant and they haven’t responded as they should,” she said. Vice President for Student Affairs Victor Wilson feels he and other members of the administration made an effort to advocate for marginalized students in ways not always apparent to students. Wilson said he can’t be held accountable for what happened prior to taking his position three months ago, but said he has been making an effort to advocate for all students. “What a lot of folks have to realize too is that a lot of the hurdles and a lot of the changes that are for the betterment of everybody, they are things that you are not going to see,” he said. “We can list and list and list the things that we’ve done, [but] I think sometimes for folks maybe it wasn’t seen as the right thing or wasn’t enough.” Wilson was hurt and confused by comments from BAC members mentioned in a previous Red & Black article regarding how his message via email was not a substitute for spoken words. He said he was proud of the effort he made to be supportive. “I want to have students to be safe and not at harm and to have a great experience and there’s something we need to do to improve that, but sometimes administrative duties pull me away,” he said. “My life’s blood is students.” Wilson and Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs T.W. Cauthen released a message Nov. 6 in response to the hate speech posts. Cauthen feels the posts are “just unacceptable” but the most important issue is their effect on the community. He said students have long expressed to him broad, ranging feelings of being out of place. “I think that [feeling unwelcome or uncomfortable] is a reality for our underrepresented students on this campus,” he said. “The feeling of otherness is a part of this that we continue to try and address at the institutional level.” Both Cauthen and Wilson meant it as a thoughtful way of reaching out, but Wilson doesn’t believe the email can adequately portray the sincerity behind his words. “It’s hard to convey my anger, it’s hard to convey my disgust, it’s hard to convey my personal feelings as an African American,” he said. “It’s hard to convey that in an email.” Wilson wishes there is a word “stronger than offended” to describe how he feels about the Facebook posts and has never seen anything this “bold” at UGA or other institutions he has worked at. UGA President Jere Morehead released a statement Wednesday afternoon via an Archnews email explaining the situation and expressing his sentiments. “While we hope and expect that anyone responsible will be identified and held accountable for their actions, we should not allow them to achieve the goal that seems to be their intent,” he wrote. “To divide our community and divert our attention from the pursuit of an open, unified campus. The statement also mentioned the Georgia Bureau of Investigation has been contacted and will be involved in an investigation. What UGA needs, Wilson said, is an open dialogue. “We all need to sit down and stop and think about the fact that somebody chose to use those words,” he said. “That’s where we got to really have

— VICTOR WILSON, Vice President for Student Affairs some conversations more about that.” Student Government Association President Austin Laufersweiler said Morehead called an impromptu meeting with SGA leadership to address the issue. “I know first hand that administrators at every level are working very hard to address this and are also deeply affected,” Laufersweiler said. But Bailey is tired of talking. “I think the administrators at this time have definitely underserved us in ways that are deplorable. Of all the administrators that I’ve reached out to, only one or two of them were at the march,” she said. “I think that if we can’t even get them to show up at marches students plan and orchestrate, then we really don’t have anything to discuss.”

With a raised hand and an open mind, Bailey views the classroom as a chance to impart her outlook to a population unlike her — a soft sell for those from differing backgrounds. “For me it’s to give people of the majority an opportunity to see a different viewpoint — someone who doesn’t look like them, someone who doesn’t necessarily think like them,” she said. “For the vast majority I want you to be able to take and learn from my experiences, the things I think and the things I have to say.”

Weekly

••• But as patience dwindles among UGA students, UGA police’s investigation is just winding up. The person whose name was used in the second round of Facebook posts chose to remain anonymous but denied involvement and has taken legal action. “This is a crime that’s been done against me, and I don’t want to be tied up in this,” he said. “We are going to find out who did it, and we’re going to prosecute them.” In the instance of the Matthew Robert Williams account, UGA Police Chief Jimmy Williamson said once caught, whoever is behind the posts could be charged with identity fraud, but cyberbullying in the state of Georgia is not criminal. “If you look at laws in most states, there has to be a victim, and a group can’t be a victim. It has to be an individual,” he said. “So even in states that have cyberbullying [laws], there [has to be] an individual that is targeted.” Cauthen said UGA’s Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy comes into play when there is any act targeting of an individual or group for their actual or perceived identities. “People’s right to say awful things is protected by the Constitution and the same right that allows them to say that is the same right that [allowed] our students to march on Friday,” he said. “To me when it becomes problematic is when those words are targeted at a group of people or at individuals and, like I said, for me that is when those posts showed up on those groups’ pages.”

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••• While UGAPD works to figure out the mystery behind the hate speech, UGA’s students are far from done fighting for a supportive and welcoming campus environment. A silent protest in front of the Office of the President is in the works for Thursday. Although Laufersweiler does not want students' voices to go unheard, he said he worries this protest is not the right answer. “I think the march expressed a really powerful message of solidarity," he said. "I do not want the solidarity expressed there to be lost in movements or demonstrations that are less reflective of the unity that administrators and students are trying to achieve.” Bailey said individuals can continue to make a difference and work to change the atmosphere on campus.

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Welfare drug testing a waste of time, resources

OUR TAKE

Local business dwindling in the Classic City

Erin Mauffray

Guest Columnist

A

thens is distinctive for many reasons, but especially for its abundance of locally-owned businesses. Consider downtown — aside from Mellow Mushroom, Starbucks, Five Guys and most recently, Insomnia Cookies, most establishments, such as DePalma’s, Barberitos and Jittery Joe’s, call the Classic City home. Lately, however, there have been a number of local businesses forced to close due to national competition. Always Baked just closed its Jackson Street storefront, shared with Athens Bagel Company, to revert back to Bulldawg Food delivery, an online ordering service, with very limited hours of 7 p.m. to 2 a.m., Fridays and Saturdays. Jill Furman of Margo Sterling Silver, located on Clayton Street, recently told The Red & Black that a similar stress that might force her to close Margo’s doors. “I haven’t had an employee for three years because of the shrinking economy,” Furman said. “I’ve been telling my customers that if [Margo] doesn’t start selling stuff soon, then we’ll be closing in January.” Avid Bookshop, located on Prince Avenue, has also mentioned the possibility of closing in January. But there is more at stake here than just businesses. Opened in October 2011, Avid Bookshop frequently hosts author showcases, trivia nights, book clubs and more. If forced to close in January, we’d lose not only a charming local bookshop, but a venue which hosts cultural events that bring the community together. We can’t forget Weaver D’s, planning to close its doors in a few weeks. “It’s part financial, part being tired, part the economy,” Weaver told The Red & Black. “We’ve been here so long that we’ve gotten tired. And business is not what it used to be.” Last year, when a proposal for a downtown Walmart was presented, there was an uproar of protest, and the complex was never finalized. But watching smaller stores close down around town should be of an equally great concern to residents. Support our local businesses. No one wants to see Athens evolve into another cookie cutter town that is filled with places you can find at any exit off a highway. New businesses are fueled by creativity and a desire to fill a previously unknown niche in the community, so let’s allow those entrepreneurs a chance to succeed here before another national brand runs them out. — Caroline Brown for the editorial board

I

COURTNEY WILLETT

Dietary discrimination: Getting in shape could get you the interview

Y

ou have perfected your résumé, gotten all the experience hours, even lived in the library for the past four years to get that perfect GPA — now the only thing holding you back is your weight. Today, being healthy can make you a better candidate for a job. With an increase in employer-based insurance, companies are paying closer attention to the health and future medical cost of their employees. “I have taught employment workshops and I will say, look in the mirror and ask yourself: ‘Am I someone that I would want to hire?’” said Michael Kofoed, a doctoral student studying economics at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. Kofoed studies the relationship between obesity and labor markets. Kofoed’s research highlights a growing trend of discrimination in the workforce. His research looks at the relation obesity has to employment and wages, by comparing the employer-based health insurance in the U.S. and single-payer health insurance in Canada. “What I have found in the United States is that there is a negative penalty for being obese,” Kofoed said. While experience and education are still the most important determinants of employment, a person must consider how their

Kathleen LaPorte Guest Columnist

health could impact their chance of getting hired. Obese workers are seeing discrimination both in hiring and in reduced wages. The fact is, obesity costs employers both in increased health insurance cost and losses in productivity. “One in three U.S. adults is obese, and researchers say the impact on business can be boiled down to a number: $1,000 to $6,000 in added cost per year for each obese employee, the figure rising along with a worker’s body mass index,” reported National Public Radio in their series “Living Large: Obesity in America.” If you are at risk for expensive health conditions like heart disease, stroke or Type 2 diabetes because of your weight, employers will be more hesitant in considering hiring you because you are more likely to cost them in expensive health care. Obese workers also cost companies in reduced productivity due to missed work days and being less physically fit to perform their job. “Your health is going to determine your productivity in the labor market, which in turn is going to determine your wage outcomes,” Kofoed

said. Weight is a sensitive topic that often is seen as a personal lifestyle decision — but in a changing labor and insurance market, your weight is not just the concern of you and your bathroom scale anymore. Employers want to hire the best and most cost effective workers to be part of their business, and obese workers are just not making that cut. In addition to education and experience, health may be the next determinant in hiring. Kofoed encourages people to watch their health, which will translate into better employment outcomes. He said, “the big thing is your health does matter in the labor market.” Today, companies are investing in workers as more than just tools for carrying out their business; they are investing in the entire well being of the person and their future health. To make yourself the best investment for a company you have to have the education, skills and health to be able to perform the best job possible. — Kathleen LaPorte is a senior from Decatur majoring in journalism and public affairs

am dreadfully tired of seeing people “like” and debate the argument for drug testing welfare recipients on social media. Please, stop. I don’t believe in drug testing welfare recipients, like people so adamantly demand, for the same reasons I don’t believe in drug testing anyone. Drug testing is an industry, and the amount of bureaucracy involved in collecting urine samples and testing them is vast. Accountability and bureaucracy are absolutely necessary for our government, but I think people wanting to drug test welfare recipients are sorely mistaken about what they’re asking. That is not a place where we want to add another layer of red tape. Our system is imperfect, but requiring drug tests for those who receive types of governmental aid is ridiculous. Hardworking people are frustrated with Uncle Sam taking out humongous chunks of their paychecks — with good reason. Any kind of social welfare system is going to be abused in some way, but if you truly believe that most people choose to be dependent upon government assistance, I suggest trying to look at the big picture as a whole instead of rumored cases. All kinds of people get government assistance for various barriers to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness — particularly life. Elderly citizens who can’t work need help; disabled persons need help; children — hungry children — without the luxury of an able caretaker need help. Everyone needs help at some time or another. Why should our government spend millions of dollars to add another layer of bureaucratic red tape to drug test welfare recipients for marijuana? When Florida passed a bill to drug test welfare recipients, the policy only lasted four months. Of the 4,086 tested welfare recipients, 106 tested positive for illegal drugs — only 2.6 percent of applicants, according to an article by The New York Times. And as for drug testing employees, I think if someone who works for you has a drug problem, you would probably be able to tell by the quality of work, or lack thereof. What a waste of resources. Quit demanding that we drug test welfare recipients — maybe we could put some capital into man power to help an already backbroken social welfare system, but that’s another column in itself. Investing in better-trained, better-paid workers and resources for those workers to do their jobs in Social Services well would be way more effective in combatting system abuse than investing in thousands of drug testing kits and processing. — Erin Mauffray is a graduate student from Gulfport, Miss., with a degree in Spanish

OPINION METER: The week that was

ROLE REVERSAL: After having

radically different 2012 seasons, the Bulldogs may lack confidence in their match up against Auburn. Does this make Georgia the underdogs this weekend? Maybe not, but the rankings breed skepticism in the most dedicated fans.

SEX-ED: According to the Trojan

Sexual Health Report Card, UGA ranks 12th in the nation for available sexual health resources on campus. High school health classes are no longer doing the trick, so the University Health Center is stepping in to educate students.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

SGA lacks popular support, needs reform or reduction

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recent article by Emily Kopp provided in-depth coverage of attempts by this year’s Student Government Association to make itself more accountable. And credit is due, because this SGA has done more in that regard than any SGA I have seen in my undergraduate career. However, SGA has misunderstood its own problem. With annual elections, open forum and the contact information of all SGA members listed plainly on its website, SGA has always been institutionally accountable to those who participate in its operation. The real issue is the paucity of students who participate. No matter how “accountable” SGA makes itself, it matters little if the only students who participate are the same who have always participated. The overwhelming majority of students would likely welcome the absence of the annual campaign dash to see who will get the honor of placing “Student Government Association” on their résumés. In short, SGA has a crisis of credibility, not of accountability. I would welcome the existence of an SGA in which the majority of the student body participated, but the truth of the matter is that each year, a large percentage of the student body simply does not vote in SGA’s elections. Examine the recent vote on the question of increasing student green fees. SGA’s website reports that of the 1,771 students who participated in the online vote, 1,332 or 75.21 percent elected to increase the green fee. Set aside the politics of a $1 increase in student green fees, and pause to question which part of the vote demonstrates “significant” support among the student body. Around 1,700 students on a campus of more than 34,400 constitute about 5.15 percent of the student body. Those favoring the increase constitute about 3.87 percent. Is a body that bases its decisions off the opinions of less than 4 percent of the student body really representing students? As it is, SGA is in a perpetual Catch-22. If it sits on its hands and does nothing, then it is a superfluous institution. If it takes action, it is doing so in the absence of support from tens of thousands of students. I know this is an issue that this SGA is sincerely attempting to address, but it is something that cannot easily be remedied by a few institutional changes in the name of accountability. Nevertheless, there are

Brian Underwood Guest Columnist

a few reforms that I believe would make SGA more credibly representative of the student body, separate from my previous call for a 20 percent participation threshold in its next vote of confidence. The first is that it must do away with the self-selection bias in its online voting system for policy polling. If SGA wants to poll the student body on a proposed measure, the poll should reflect the entire student body. By this, I recommend collaborating with administration and the statistics department to randomly sample students (using phone numbers already on record with the University) to discover the real opinion of the student body rather than a self-selected fraction of it. Admittedly, this would be difficult to implement, but I believe the payoff for SGA’s reputation would be immense in the long run. SGA should also reorganize itself in the fashion of any other registered student group on campus. That is, participation would consist of voluntary, dues-paying members. At present, SGA is structured as a sort of union in which all students are enrolled, whether they care to be or not. If restructured, it would act as would any other campus advocacy group by promoting policy changes supported by its members. The key difference is that it would act as the voice of its voluntary membership, rather than the demonstrably inaccurate claim to be the “voice for every student” as it is now. Naturally, this would require SGA to forgo many of its institutional privileges, but it would be a substantially more credible organization, as its will and the breadth of its support would be clear and definable. In any case, the current trend cannot continue. SGA does not need to become more accessible to those already involved. It needs to get more people involved, or else content itself with limiting the scope of its authority and voice. — Brian Underwood is a senior from Evans majoring in history and political science

Views A5

Holiday season invades November

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or someone who loves Halloween so much, it pains me to take down plastic ghosts and somewhat rotten jack-o-lanterns. It feels as though fall is drifting away into a snowy haze in which carols echo eerily in the distance. At least there’s Thanksgiving to keep the harvest season alive. I strolled into the mall in hopes of purchasing some festive fall decorations for the upcoming holiday. Suddenly I was struck by a winter wonderland as sickeningly sweet as billions of cookies on Christmas Eve. I frantically checked my watch, making sure this wasn’t some “Back to the Future” moment. Nope, it’s definitely still November; I should’ve known. This phenomenon occurs annually as soon as haunted houses close their doors and department stores dump costumes in the

Courtney Willett Staff Writer

clearance bin. Consumerism is at its prime. Parents engage in death matches for the last Cabbage Patch Doll or whatever it is kids demand these days. Families cram into matching sweaters and force their children to get along for two minutes just to take a photo. The holiday season has managed to spread itself over two months. Enough with Charlie Brown with the awful Christmas tree playing long before winter has even started. He has his place in December; until then they can just keep playing “The Great Pumpkin.” As coffee flavors shift from Pumpkin

Spice to Peppermint Gingerbread Reindeer Extravaganza and thrift stores undergo a serious sweater shortage, we rush into the white haze of Christmas specials and spiked eggnog. Regrettably, the magic of the holiday season seems to wear thin as we begin it earlier than scheduled. Perhaps we are victims of consumer culture or maybe in dire need of escapism. Regardless, this obsession with celebrating the holidays early is as tempting as peeking at presents on Christmas Eve. — Courtney Willett is a freshman from Marietta majoring in pre-journalism

Media controls perception of natural disasters

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have yet to talk to someone about Typhoon Haiyan, which made landfall along the coast of the Philippines last Friday, who has understood the magnitude of it. The storm has killed an estimate of 10,000 people and has displaced hundreds of thousands from their homes. Bodies lie among the wreckage where children are looking for food and water. The media have a hand in how we view this disaster. The idea of what the Philippines looks like is up to the networks. They would never show footage of the thousands of floating bodies among the wreckage or the children who are badly wounded. That kind of thing frightens Americans, so stations keep these images behind a banner that reads, “WARNING: This gallery contains graphic content.” But just one of the photos from those gallery says more than any article or newscaster. You can see the pain and loss. It is invaluable to see that the people who were affected by this

Megan Smith

Guest Columnist

storm. Americans need to take advantage of the thousands of new sources they have access to. Broaden your horizons. Understand that you probably aren’t seeing the whole picture — but you can if you look. If I ever want to understand any newsworthy situation a tiny bit better, I check different countries’ sources. I triangulate and sift through bias. Typhoon Haiyan has just about sunk the Philippines — the islands are nearly inaccessible, putting all life in danger. But don’t take my word for it. Do your own research. — Megan Smith is a sophomore from Alpharetta majoring in journalism

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A6 News

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Morehead vows to bring all Clarke County kids to campus BY EVELYN ANDREWS @evelynvandrews A new goal has been set by the University of Georgia: to bring every student in the Clarke County school system to tour the campus. Experience UGA began this fall as a partnership between the University of Georgia President Jere Morehead and Clarke County School District. The initiative is sponsored by the Office of Service Learning and the College of Education. “The idea is to eventually have a series of field trips so that students will visit UGA every year from Pre-K until they graduate high school so that every student has the potential to visit UGA 13 times by the time they graduate,” said Shannon Wilder, the director of UGA’s Office of Service Learning. So far, about 700 students have visited the campus. By the end of the year, close to 5,000 students and a group of students from all of the Clarke County schools will visit, Wilder said. “Our goal is to get to all the 13,000 students so it will probably take us about three to four years to get to that point,” Wilder said. The area of UGA the students visit is determined by the grade they are in. Pre-K visits the

State Botanical gardens to learn about forest ecosystems. The Georgia Museum of Art and the Hugh Hodgson School of Music will host a trip for fifth graders. Sixth graders will visit the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership to develop leadership skills. The State Botanical Gardens will also host seventh-grade students, as will UGarden, UGA’s student led garden. Eighth grade will visit the Special Collections Library to study Georgia history. Ninth grade students will visit over 20 biological sciences laboratories and will get to interact with science students. Tenth through 12th grade students studying environmental science and biology will get hands-on experience with deer and aquatic life at the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources. Leonard Piha is an art teacher at Barnett Shoals Elementary. He said he was impressed by his recent trip to the Georgia Museum of Art and the Hugh Hodgson School of Music with his fifth-grade students. “Lots of our kids are never going to the museum even though it is free so it was a great opportunity for them,” he said. “Even though [UGA] is not that far from our school, in a way, it’s like two separate worlds,” he said.

The Red & Black

UGA professor studies superhero sorghum BY JEANETTE KAZMIERCZAK @sciencekaz Largely neglected in favor of its cousins wheat, corn and rye, sorghum may be the plant that saves the day. Andrew Paterson, a Regents professor of genetics, and the University of Georgia’s Plant Genome Mapping Laboratory have been chosen to lead an international group of researchers with a five-year, $4.98 million grant and the goal to increase the production of sorghum worldwide. “Sorghum is tolerant of very low inputs, in particular it’s tolerant of having relatively little water,” Paterson said. “So, it’s able to produce a crop under conditions that many plants can’t and if climate change models are anything like correct, those conditions are going to be a lot more widespread in the future.” Over the past 20 years, Paterson and his team have studied sorghum’s genetics and developed genomic tools to manipulate its DNA. In 2009 they mapped its genome, the first time any African plant had its genome mapped. Paterson said, while sorghum is already one of the cereal crops better suited for drought conditions, one of his aims is to increase sorghum’s overall drought resistance and also to develop perennial strains of the cereal. “The other direction is to try to develop genotypes that would be suitable for producing multiple harvests from a single planting so that we don’t have to plow the field and disturb the soil and potentially cause a lot of soil erosion and incur a lot of expense,” Paterson said. While in the United States sorghum has in the past largely been used as a feed for livestock and also for making ethanol, it has emerged on the market as a substitute for wheat in glutenfree products. The U.S. Agency for International Development awarded the grant to Paterson through its Feed the Future program, which works with partner countries to reduce global hunger and increase food security. “One of the things we recognize is the need to develop vari-

Andrew Paterson, a Regents professor of genetics, has been working to increase sorghum's properties as a super food. Courtesy UGA eties that are really responsive to the kinds of issues that small producers are facing and that’s where Dr. Paterson’s work comes in,” said Jennifer “Vern” Long, a senior international agricultural research adviser for USAID. “So, we recognize that the varieties available to farmers right now are not meeting the need, particularly with a dry and hot environment in which people are producing this product.” Long said Paterson and his team were chosen to lead the Innovation Laboratory for Climate-Resilient Sorghum because of their long history of success with the plant as well as their already-established international connections. “One of the things we really appreciate about the U.S. university community is the broad research networks that U.S. faculty are engaged in,” Long said. “So we recognize that U.S. scientists have a lot to bring to the global research community and Dr. Paterson is not an exception to that. In fact, he is a brilliant example of what kinds of capacity can be brought to advance the goal of collaborative research efforts with other governments and partners.” Other organizations involved in this particular innovation laboratory are The Land Institute, the Agricultural Research Council of South Africa, Ethiopia’s Jimma University and the International Crops

Research Institute for the SemiArid Tropics. Stan Cox, a senior research scientist at The Land Institute in Salina, Kan., is focusing on developing perennial sorghum in areas where it has yet to survive the winter season. “Sorghum is a tropical plant and its relatives originated in the tropics so it happened to do well in Kansas or in Georgia in the summertime but it doesn’t survive the winter here,” he said. “Even a lot of plants in our breeding program that would be perennial in an environment where they don’t have freezing weather, they are not perennial here. It’s a long-term project developing perennial sorghum, but we think probably it can be achieved sooner in our tropical areas.” Even if the innovation lab is successful in developing perennial, highly drought-resistant sorghum, Paterson said, increasing worldwide production would take more than just the research. Asking farmers to forgo plowing under plants after harvest and just replanting every season, will require an effort on their part. “When you introduce a new production system, that’s a cultural change, so to speak,” Paterson said. “And that requires the producers to think differently and act differently in terms of what they do and to take some risk in trying something new.”

Unlikely combination of drugs cure foodborne illness BY JEANETTE KAZMIERCZAK @sciencekaz

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The cholesterol-lowering drug Lipitor and the osteoporosis drug Zometa may provide the onetwo-punch needed to defeat toxoplasmosis, a foodborne illness caused by a parasite in the same group as the parasite that causes malaria. Zhu-Hong Li, a research assistant scientist in the department of biochemistry and molecular biology, worked with Silvia Moreno, a professor of cellular biology, and others to develop this approach. They and their team found that, when they removed what they believed to be an essential enzyme in the parasite, there was no change in its spread. “Our lab has a long history testing different drugs, different compounds against the enzyme in this LI pathway,” Li said. “We think that the toxo or the parasite is an ideal target because these enzymes are essential in all the other [related organisms]. When we studied it, when we studied the project we didn’t find one organism to live without the enzyme.” But when they inhibited the enzyme the parasite didn’t die. Further research showed the parasite’s host organism was providing MORENO the parasite with the nutrients it couldn’t get for itself when the enzyme was removed. In order to slow the spread of the disease, they needed to find a way to stop both pathways. “We try to outsmart them with a double hit,” Li said. “We use a combination of drugs, a little bit of both, that’s our idea. It’s still preliminary, we’re still testing different drug combinations so we’re still working.” Lipitor was used to inhibit the pathway in the host subject, and Zometa was used to inhibit the enzyme in the parasite. The researchers found this combination slowed the parasite’s growth. But why have two different pathways to get what you need? “This parasite is an obligate intercellular para-

site,” Li said. “The majority of the time it stays inside the host cells, but when they eat up the entire host cells they will egress and come out, so between the egress and successfully entering another host cell, there is a short period, and in that short time they are on their own.” Li said the parasites take what they can from the host, but have kept their own method of producing what they need during this in-between time. Toxoplasmosis is one of five neglected parasitic infections in the United States identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These diseases, which include Chagas disease and trichomonaisis, often associated with poorer countries but also present in the U.S., are largely underresearched. Infections can be caused by improper handling and consumption of meat and poultry, but can also be contracted from exposure to cat feces while cleaning litter boxes or to infected cats. The disease is not usually a concern in the majority of the population, but can be very serious for pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems. Women can pass the disease to their unborn child, which can cause complications such as diseases of the nervous system and eyes. In extreme cases it can infect the brain and cause encephalitis or swelling. “There are drugs to treat toxoplasma, but they are all effective during the acute stage of infection, which is not normally when people — sometimes they don’t realize it and confuse it and think they have flu or something else,” Moreno said. “And the chronic form, which is the one that has the parasites in the brain from the cysts, in that stage none of the drugs can really act and are effective for that.” She said she was hopeful that the toxoplasmosis parasite’s near kinsman the malaria parasite might be able to be treated in a similar manner. The next step for the research is to test new compounds, she said. “We’re looking for something that would be a much better combination or more effective cocktail of drugs,” Moreno said. “The other thing that came up out of our work is that this combination of drugs is affecting the mitochondria of the parasite, so we are also trying to do combinations with other drugs.”


The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

News A7

UGA ranks highest in SEC sexual health BY TAYLOR WEST @TaylorWest08

The Foundation for Individual Rights Director of Policy Research Samantha Harris said the group takes issue with UGA’s speech policies. RANDY SCHAFER/Staff

Prior notice required for free speech BY DILLON RICHARDS @thedillonjames

the Director of Student Life Jan Barham. “Generally speaking, there’s no reason on a college campus that sort of traditionally public areas ... shouldn’t be open for speech,” Harris said. “So, it always raises a kind of red flag when we see colleges saying ‘here are the two areas available for free expression.’” She added while she realizes groups can apply for a permit to demonstrate in other areas, it troubled her that the policy gave Barham full discretion over freedom of expression. “I’m not saying that [Barham] is not making those decisions in a reasonable fashion,” Harris said. “But, you know, when you look at the law, the law requires ... clear, objective criteria, and the policy doesn’t supply that.” Barham defended the policy, saying the courts have allowed universities to control the “time, place and manner” of speech. “The 48 hours is there because we don’t know what other factors are happening on campus that will take our energy and our time,” she said. In addition, she pointed out that her

A “marketplace of ideas.” That’s what Jan Barham, associate dean of students and director of the Tate Student Center, calls the University of Georgia. But, some say that marketplace is not as open as it should be. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, or FIRE, rates colleges and universities around the country on their free speech policies. A red light from FIRE indicates a policy that “clearly and substantially” restricts free speech; a yellow light indicates a policy that restricts free speech, but not as severely. Samantha Harris, FIRE’s director of policy research, told The Red & Black that yellow light policies would “most likely” not pass a constitutional test in court. FIRE takes issue with the freedom of expression policy for two main reasons. First, it designates two “free speech zones” as Tate Plaza and Memorial Hall. Second, demonstrations in other parts of campus must be approved 48 hours in advance by

office has denied no “legitimate requests to assemble” since 2010. She said permits are approved as long as they don’t interfere with the business of UGA, and that she works with groups to be sure their demonstrations can comply with those rules. But, for FIRE, the biggest flaw is that the policies inhibit spontaneous demonstrations. “The problem with prohibiting spontaneous demonstrations like that is that sometimes the immediacy of the message is part of how a protester or a demonstrator will communicate with their audience,” Harris said. Nevertheless, Barham said UGA works hard to make sure all groups’ voices can be heard. “We approach [permits] from a place of ‘yes’ and we look how we can make that happen,” she said. There have been positive changes in UGA’s free speech polices. In fact, UGA revised a red-lighted email policy after the 2011-2012 academic year. Harris said this occurred partially because of an article that appeared in The Red & Black during that time.

Film festival to focus on eco-friendly entertainment BY TAYLOR WEST @TaylorWest08 The director of the EcoFocus Film Initiative added her project to the list of faculty and staff work supported by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts this year. Though the initiative has been running for almost six years, Sara Beresford, the director, said this year the project received a $10,000 per year grant from the Willson Center. “The Willson Center becoming involved is super important, and I think for me it represents a buy-in from the humanities and arts side,” she said. “We’re in the science world right here [on campus] and I am doing something that is really this marriage between arts and sciences.” The initiative, which features the annual EcoFocus Film Festival in March, is intended to bring “Highquality environmental films that can simultaneously entertain and educate” to the Athens community, according to the website. She said having the Odom School of Ecology, the Willson Center and the Office of Sustainability behind the project represents the connection between the scientific content of the films and the need to show films that “from an artistic point of view” are good. “I can’t show mediocre stuff,” Beresford said. In addition to showing films, Beresford said she brings in — or in some cases Skypes in — speakers following the films, which worked well and produced a lower carbon footprint. In previous years the initiative has shown films such as FRESH,

Sara Beresford, director of the EcoFocus Film Initiative, hopes to engage students in ecological discussions. HANNA PAP ROCKI/Staff Blackfish and recently Pandora’s Promise. Beresford said the cost of attendance for initiative events through out the year and for the festival varies based on the year’s budget — sometimes there is a standard cost, sometimes certain films are free, and sometimes the festival is free for students. She said the Willson Center grant doesn’t cover all the expenses of the project but is a welcome help, and the rest of the initiative is supported by other grants.

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No glove, no love — the University of Georgia makes an effort to provide information about safe sex as well as readily available contraception to students. Katy Janousek, sexual health coordinator at the University Health Center, said there is a “concerted effort” made on campus to make contraception available. “We really think it’s important not only that condoms are accessible, but that people understand how to properly use them and store them,” she said. Being informed, she said, is also an important part of being safe. “There is so much human error with condoms and there is so much misinformation and myth,” Janousek said. “I think in order for condoms to be used and to be used properly, there has to be comprehensive education, a discussion of attitudes and beliefs and also skill building.” As a result, Janousek said there is a lot of information available on campus as well as free, accessible condoms. And this year the effort to encourage safe, informed sex paid off. UGA came in 12th in the eighth annual Trojan Sexual health Report Card college rankings — jumping 15 spots from last year. Janousek said the use of condoms to practice safe sex is important for more than preventing unplanned pregnancies — condoms, though not 100 percent effective, minimize the risk of spreading sexually transmitted diseases. Condoms, among other sexual health products such as lube and dental dams, are available in several places on campus including the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Resource Center, the health promotion department at the UHC and at the Sexual Health Advocacy Group’s tabling events. Student sexual safety Omar Alcantar, a sophomore computer systems engineering major from Fort Valley, said the availability of condoms on a college campus is “definitely” important. “You hear about these kids all the time who wind up pregnant or with some sort of disease and had they just had the availability or the sense to go get a condom, it would have saved somebody,” he said. Alcantar also said information is important to practicing safe sex. “There are a lot of people who don’t know how to put on a condom properly or use one at all,” he said. “Providing that kind of information does help a lot.” Amelia Williams, a freshman psychology major from Sewanee, said she was not previously aware of where condoms are available, but believes it’s good that there are free options on campus. “I think, I mean I know a lot of people are [sexually active] and I think it’s important to have the option, or to know about it,” she said. “It’s important to have safe sex if you’re going to have it.”

Condom couriers A student group at Georgetown University, H*yas For Choice, a “pro-choice, pro-reproductive justice group,” according to the website, didn’t feel condoms were accessible enough to students and began delivering condoms to events or parties at Georgetown’s campus. “People would come up to us at the table and make comments on how we only table from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,” said Abigail Grace, vice president of H*yas for Choice in a Georgetown Voice article. “That’s not necessarily prime time when you need to find a condom immediately.” Even though Georgetown University’s views as a Catholic and Jesuit university conflicts with those of the student group, which doesn’t receive any benefits or resources from the school, it will not make a move to stop the service, according to the article. Though the group’s service received criticism for trying to promote sex, Grace said in the article that isn’t its objective. “We recognize that [sex is] going to happen. I think that being prepared in all sense and to make this campus as safe of a place as possible is what we’re trying to do,” she said. Grace could not be reached for comment to The Red & Black. Janousek, like the H*yas for Choice students, doesn’t see a problem with providing educa-

tion about sex or contraception to students. “What the evidence has shown and studies have proven is that really as young as middle school age is an appropriate time to start educating students about the consequences of sex,” she said. As to whether or not such a service would ever be available at UGA depends on the students. “I think the key to successful programing is meeting the needs of students and giving the students a voice, so if they do have a need it can be heard,” Janousek said. “So if students wrote in, I think that’s really critical before putting in the time, money and resources to start a program just because somebody else did it and it sounds cool.” Williams said she is not sure if a condom delivery service is necessary at UGA, but said it can’t hurt. “I think if they had it, it would definitely be helpful. I don’t see any disadvantage,” she said. “They could try it out and if it is something that is being used there’s nothing wrong with that.” Alcantar said while he knows where free condoms are available, he feels a delivery service would be helpful. “That does kind of seem like a pretty good idea for parties,” he said. “When you’re in the midst of a party you’re not thinking first thing, ‘I should make a run for a condom.’”

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Thursday, November 14, 2013

The Red & Black

From Broadway to ‘Pitch Perfect,’ Skylar Astin settles on ‘Ground Floor’ BY LESLEY HAULER @lesleyhauler Seven years ago, Skylar Astin was just another struggling actor, auditioning for roles and making a living the best he could. Fast forward to 2013 and Astin has not only secured himself an extensive résumé of film credits, but is also regarded as breakout star of the year. The multi-talented performer got his big break in 2006 as Georg in “Spring Awakening” on Broadway but shot to stardom in 2012 as Jesse in the feature film “Pitch Perfect,” starring alongside Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson, Elizabeth Banks and Brittany Snow. After conquering Broadway and the silver screen, the actor has set his sights on dominating the television screen as well. The “Pitch Perfect” actor is starring in TBS’ new workplace sitcom, “Ground Floor.” The live audience, multi-camera show comes from the minds of two sitcom legends, Bill Lawrence (“Cougar Town,” “Scrubs”) and Greg Malins (“2 Broke Girls,” “How I Met Your Mother”). “Ground Floor” centers on Brody (Astin), a hotshot banker who finds out that his one-night stand, Jennifer, (Briga Heelan) actually works in the maintenance department for the building his bank. What happens next is a whirlwind romance that is further complicated by Brody’s critical boss (John C. McGinley) and their coworkers. The actor wasn’t always up for the role of Brody, though. Astin originally auditioned for another one of Bill Lawrence’s other projects, but the producer thought he would be perfect for the role of Brody and sent the actor the “Ground Floor” script. Immediately after reading the script, Astin was a fan of the show and accepted his offer. “I love the project as a whole. I love the writing, and I love the characters and how they were all fleshed out and the dynamics behind them. And you know, Bill Lawrence has a real style and a real way of writing comedy, so I would have been an idiot to pass up this opportunity,” the actor said. Even though it is easy for sitcoms to get carried away by eccentric characters and plotlines, Astin said that isn’t the case on “Ground Floor” and applauds Lawrence for creating such relatable-yetdynamic characters. “What really attracted me to Brody is that while he is that confident, rich, money manager character,

Skylar Astin, star of TBS’ new show ‘Ground Floor’ (which premieres Nov. 14), credits his ensemble cast for making the move from stage to big screen to small screen a ‘seamless transition.’ Courtesy cups-song.com Bill Lawrence did not write him in the way that so many people do when they make kind of character. This Ben Affleck, slicked back hair, villain of the movie that messes with our hero. [Brody] in fact, is the hero. He’s got flaws. He’s sensitive. He’s very human. And I just loved that,” Astin said. One of the major themes in the show is the class conflict that ensues when a white-collar businessman falls for a blue-collar working girl. However, the show isn’t trying to shove any major themes down anyone’s throats. Instead, it experiments with the differences in the couple’s lifestyles through different light-hearted scenarios. “We get to see things Brody takes for granted and that are completely new to Jenny and vice versa. It’s really fun. In my past relationships, it’s always a learning experience and there’s always things that bring you together in a common thread but it’s also one of the most exciting and sometimes challenging things about being in a relationship when you have differences and you’re brought up differently, and you learn and you grow and sometimes you make mistakes, but that only makes you closer,” Astin said. While there are some similarities between him and Brody, the show does embellish certain scenarios in order to play up the comedy. However, the actor manages to make Brody funny while also

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keeping him down to earth and personable to the audience. “It’s a multi-camera sitcom, so obviously it’s a little bit exaggerated, but we certainly have a common thread and we do have a big heart and a big conscience, and that’s what really attracted me to him. It gave him a full internal clock that I love playing with because he’s often conflicted in what he should do in his relationship and his job,” Astin said. After conquering Broadway and the big screen, moving onto television seemed like the next logical move for the rising star. Although it wasn’t too difficult of a move, one of the biggest differences about shooting for television versus feature films is its production schedule, Astin said. The multi-camera sitcom, which takes place in front of a live audience, is much more fast-paced. “It’s very quick. Also, there’s not as much setup time like there is in the movies. Movies are a little bit more honed in, I think. This is more of a performance that’s captured. My relationship with the camera is always pretty much the same, but it’s really cool when there is an audience on top of it,” Astin said. “Ground Floor” premiered with special back-toback episodes Thursday, Nov. 10 at 10 p.m. on TBS.

Will Packer and Ice Cube bring back classic cop film in new ‘Ride Along’ BY COLBY NEWTON @redandblack There’s a certain type of movie that just doesn’t get made anymore. The kind of movie that has a little gunplay, a little chemistry, a touch of romance. In the last decade, as film budgets have gotten bigger and indie film has gotten stranger, these movies have become few and far between. Will Packer wants to bring those movies back. “I think we’ve gotten away from movies being escapism,” Packer said. “Something to do on a Friday or a Saturday night, go out with your boys and your girls and sit back and laugh ... that’s the kind of thing

Ice Cube and Will Packer visited UGA students at Tate last week to discuss the new film. JOSH GILLEY/Staff we’ve made.” Packer is one of the biggest names in the Atlanta filmmaking scene, a producer and impresario whose most recent film, “Think Like A Man,” became the surprise hit of 2012. His

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new project, co-produced with lead actor and entrepreneur Ice Cube, is a buddy cop spoof “Ride Along.” The film centers on the relationship between Cube’s no-nonsense cop and his sister’s fiancée, played by Kevin Hart. Hart must complete a 24-hour ride along with Cube to prove his suitability to marry Cube’s sister. “This movie, to me, is an area that hasn’t been explored,” said Cube. “I mean, I’ve heard of a ride along, but I don’t know if anyone else has ... we had a cool niche for the movie, and that’s good for me.” The script for “Ride Along” languished in development for years at New Line Cinema (at one point nearly coming into being as a vehicle for Ryan Reynolds and Dwayne Johnson) before being picked up by Universal. Ice Cube’s Cube Vision Productions had been involved in shepherding the script since its beginning, but it took the attention of Packer and Universal to bring it into being. “Every cop movie’s been made ... I think there’s more cop scripts out there than any other type of movie,” Cube said. “I wasn’t even looking to play another cop, but this is just a good movie. And in Hollywood, you can’t let good movies pass you by.” ‘Ride Along’ releases in theaters Jan. 17.


The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Variety A9

Cuban art makes lasting impression on printmaker BY MOLLY GOLDERMAN @mollyg27 Rather than staying in Athens for the summer, Mike Levine, a third year masters of fine arts candidate from Glastonbury, Conn., took his art to Cuba in order to expand his repertoire as a printmaker. “I got into printmaking at my undergrad university. I took a class and really liked the vibes I got from the print shop and my professors ... I more so fell into printmaking because of the professors rather than the printmaking process,” Levine said. The method of print Levine’s main form of print is through collographs, where artists transform basic materials like cardboard into works of art. “For the show [I curated at the Lamar Dodd School of Art] a lot of them are collographs. The collograph is a way to make a print using cheap materials, like cardboard,” Levin said. “You just glue them down to the surface, like if you have pieces of cardboard — smaller pieces you could glue to bigger pieces and you would polyurethane or lacquer it, so you create a print matrix. You’re adding things to the surface. But basically a print is a way to make multiples [editions] ... intaglio on a copper plate, lithography, which you do on a stone, or woodcuts. People specialize in one technique. I’ve done a lot of woodcuts, lithography and some intaglio.” Inspiration and creativity go hand in hand. But Levine, his art is all about honesty with the audience. “Being as honest as you can get with what you’re trying to do, if that makes sense,” he said. “It goes along with the work I do, but drawing from your own experience, whatever that is ... being honest about it, not trying to fluff it up in any way.” Levine spoke about his current work, which incorporates the collo-

graph technique he learned in Cuba. “I’ve been working on screen print monotypes with the collograph. The process allows you to think about a simple shape, so I’ve been making monoprints. I’m not making the same image over and over. I like the result of the process and how it allows me to think about some of the subject matter.” Undergraduate connections pave way Levine traveled and studied in Cuba this summer at center for the arts in Santiago de Cuba. “I went home last winter break. I’m still close with Gus [Mazzocca, professor emeritus, University of Connecticut]. I went to visit him, to figure out what to do for the summer. I remembered he had shown us these prints from this print shop in Cuba. I asked him about that and did my own research on it,” Levine said. “I just decided to go to Cuba, so I contacted the print shop he worked at, Taller Cultural, an artists’ cultural center and workshop. Because they were close with Gus, they said it was good for me to go there.” The Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute awarded Levine a research grant to travel to Cuba. “UGA is such a big school, there are so many opportunities to work with others [departments]. I assumed there was a way to get money, so I saw this place offering money for students to study in Latin American countries,” he said. In Athens, if there’s damage to a building, it’s usually repaired in a timely manner and people don’t really think much of it because that’s the norm in the United States. But in Cuba, it’s a different story. “I was mainly in Santiago de Cuba. They didn’t have technology really. They had one computer with email. People don’t really use the Internet there, so that was different.

Printmaker Miguel Angel Lobaina (left) shows Mike Levine (center) collograph technique at the Taller Cultural workshop in Santiago de Cuba. Courtesy Mike Levine Part was messed up from Hurricane Sandy,” Levine said. “They don’t have the infrastructure to rebuild like we do . . . but it wasn’t just a studio, they had cultural events, music performances, workshops. Students from the art school there came to work, some professional artists — a mix of students and established artists.” Cuba creatively challenged Levine “Cuban artists might not have had all the supplies we had, but they’re really interested in whatever they’re doing and work super hard. If you wanted to do something there, you could, it was just harder — they had more of a drive to commit to something,” Levine said. “It seems like sometimes here, we have so much access to stuff, people dabble in so many things, but people there are so into what they do and do it well.” In Cuba, freedom of speech is a limited art. The culture difference forced Levine to appreciate his opportunities at home. “A lot of Cuban art is political, but they have to be more careful there. It’s similar to here, but if they make art that’s [blatantly] against the government, the government could come after them, and it makes

it harder for them to travel,” he said. ve the country. People are critical, but not overtly so.” Working with other artists is key “I was working with Miguel Lobaina primarily. He’d always tell me to simplify these images. I think I always knew that, but working with him, it felt good to reaffirm why I was interested in printmaking." Levine curated an art exhibit, “¿Que Bola?,” on his return from Cuba, displaying about 50 prints from a handful of Cuban artists, as a stipulation for his study and research there. “After a few weeks of working at the print shop, I asked if I could bring some works back to show people what I did and some of what the artists there were doing. I brought them back in my suitcase so they all had to be a certain size. I decided to call it ¿Que Bola?, it’s like ‘What’s up?’ slang. When I was there, the younger guys would always say it, then I would say it. Each person gave me about three prints. I met all of them. Having a personal connection . . . it’s a little different when I look at them [the works] versus other people, because I knew them.”

Operatic femme fatale teaches lessons of hope  BY HUNTER LACEY @hunterlacey Carmen is a strong, independent woman who doesn’t need a man. Unless she decides that she does, in which case operatic love triangles typically follow. Set in 18th century Spain, Georges Bizet’s “Carmen” follows the tumultuous relationship between Don José, a manly soldier, and Carmen, the titular salacious gypsy. Carmen uses her charm to lure Don José away from his military obligations and his romantic interest Micaëla by convincing him to join her caravan of bandits. Carmen’s capricious ways lead to a violent conclusion as Don José is left heartbroken when the gypsy leaves him for the bullfighter, Escamillo. “I find Carmen to be one of the first independent woman we are introduced to in the history of opera,” said Frederick Burchinal, director of the University of Georgia Opera Ensemble and Wyatt and Margaret Anderson Professor of Voice and Opera. “She does what she wants when she wants, how she wants, and she usually gets what she wants.” Featuring a rather large cast of 10 principle soloists, “Carmen” presents the opportunity for a large number of young performers at UGA to hone their craft. In particular, the opera is viewed as the brass ring for mezzo-soprano singers. “As a mezzo-soprano, it’s the cream of the crop,” Burchinal said. “Every mezzo-soprano would love to [play] Carmen because it’s one of the few times they get to be the center of attention the whole night and not a secondary figure in the storyline.” And Marisan Corsino, a vocal performance graduate student from San Antonio is the fortunate mezzo-soprano chosen to bring the role of Carmen to life at UGA. Corsino enjoys the more dramatic scenes in the opera, such as Carmen’s expressive death scene. “Carmen is so popular because it has every theatrical element in it — there is singing, there is acting, there is drama,” Corsino said. “There are popular tunes that everybody knows, and sometimes they don’t even know they’re from Carmen.” Playing the role of Don José, Joseph Brent, a vocal performance graduate student from New York City who made his debut at Carnegie Hall earlier this month, agrees that “Carmen”’s popularity can be attributed to the frequency of catchy tunes

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within the opera. “[Bizet] could take this compelling story and put extremely catchy tunes that people could leave the opera house humming,” Brent said. “The combination of great story with catchy music that’s not kitsch, but has true musical value, is its staying power.” According to Brent, the opera ensemble has been rehearsing the show “more or less the entire semester.” Staging began last month and rehearsals with the UGA Symphony orchestra and conductor Mark Cedel began two weeks ago. The opera will also feature the Georgia Children’s Chorus, conducted by Carol Reeves, and UGA’s University Chorus, conducted by Daniel Bara, as the show’s chorus. “Carmen” is not strictly a concert performance (which typically lack costumes and movement) despite its location in a concert hall. On the contrary, the production is, according to Burchinal, “a hybrid of a staged version,” featuring exquisite costumes, fiery choreography and a projected English translation of the opera’s French text. Lisa Fusillo, head of the dance department, has assisted the opera ensemble with choreography, endeavoring to add more Spanish flavor to the production. “There are traditional Spanish movements that you will see repeated in the dance sequences — the arms over the head with a slightly arched back is a very common Spanish style,” Fusillo said. “The music just emanates that Spanish style, and when you see the singers embody that, it’s bringing you into the culture.” With all of their performances, the UGA Opera Ensemble aspires to keep the tradition of singing relevant to those who may not be particularly well versed in the operatic arts.

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A10 Variety

Thursday, November 14, 2013

The Red & Black

Graduating art students get their hands dirty curating their own art show BY SAMANTHA LIPKIN @redandblack The Drawing and Painting BFA Exit Show showcases the culmination of four years of artwork from 11 dedicated seniors in their final course in completing the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. These exit shows occur each fall and spring featuring graduating seniors. It showcases each student’s talents in a series of work that usually focuses on a theme decided upon by the individual, and the students work on this body of work for the entire semester preparing for graduation and their future career. They are responsible for the preparation of the show and the details of the reception. “We learn how to work on a series and stick with it as appropriate in the art world,” said Alea Hurst, a senior from McDonough double majoring in painting and management. “So aside from the creating of art, we learn how to prepare for a show overall. We learn about hanging art, title cards, poster design,

organizing a reception, along with creating artist statements and learning to professionally document our work.” The title of this year’s exit show is “Honors Finger Painting,” referring to the troubles faced by art students when they share with others their academic and professional career choices. “Specifically the title comes from students being required to take figure painting, but when people outside of art school ask what classes we are in and we say figure painting they often hear finger painting instead,” Hurst said. Alison Piazza, a senior from Athens majoring in art with a concentration in drawing, is creating one large, mixed media wall installation consisting of ink and pastel on frosted mylar. The theme of her piece is antiquity and nostalgia, in which she is drawing and abstracting antique objects that she has collected over the years to create a sense of age and deterioration. “Their timeless nature and buried stories have always fascinated

BFA EXIT SHOW WHEN: Nov. 12-15, opening reception Friday, Nov. 15 7-9 p.m. WHERE: Lamar Dodd School of Art PRICE: Free

Senior year is stressful enough, but 11 art students worked all semester for their exit show, curated entirely on their own. Courtesy Lamar Dodd School of Art me. Some of my favorite antiques include dolls, lamps, clocks, tea cups, buttons and oil cans,” Piazza said. After graduating, Piazza intends to go to graduate school and become a professional artist. “Preparing for the Exit Show has shown me what it’s like to work in my own studio, which feels more professional than a classroom setting at Lamar Dodd. Also, having a stressful deadline that you have to work towards all semester forces you to create something you feel is worth showing,” Piazza said. Liza Dorsey, a senior from Nashville majoring in painting, is showcasing her mixed media paintings on paper made up of acrylic paint, India ink, acrylic ink, pastels and charcoal. The theme of her pieces is based on her views on social relation-

ships and the groups people form around themselves. Originally, Dorsey was working on something completely different than what will be revealed at the final showing. “I’m a pretty big perfectionist, and I felt like I was putting too much pressure on myself to make the most amazing exit show, one that said everything about me in a few paintings. Ultimately, it was holding me back. So I altered my first idea, and I feel so much better about it. I went back to this initial idea because it allowed me to fuse my painting and drawing into one image and still talk about the connect and disconnect I feel on a daily basis,” Dorsey said. After graduating this semester, Dorsey plans on taking a break from school in order to continue working on her portfolio for grad

school applications and also look for an apprenticeship with an artist to help her get her name out. “I think that the exit show was a very small taste of what working as a studio artist is like. The school provides us with studios to work in, which is really nice, but I know that’s not what happens out in the real world. I think the exit show is a really good way for us to learn how to set up our own art shows in the future and how to work with other artists as well,” said Dorsey. John Gholson, a senior from Bishop majoring in drawing, is presenting a collection made up of digital illustration techniques, traditional painting and drawing as well as photography. The theme of his pieces is reflection and illusions, and his work will be displayed

on a series of mirrors. “I picked that theme because it is essential to my story of ideals, truth, image and beauty reflections,” Gholson said. After graduating, Gholson plans to look for work locally for webdesign, graphic-design or art while further working on his own artwork. He has been developing a comic book universe and characters, some of which are introduced in his exit show artwork titled “Idea of the World.” Nathan Carlson, a senior from Athens majoring in drawing, is showcasing his work made with a mixture of charcoal, gesso and pastels. “I feel that within melancholy or anxiety lies some of the greatest potential for inspiration through which one can find beauty. Bearing this in mind, I seek to capture not the beauty itself but the troubled states of mind from which it is born. As for why I picked it, I’m still trying to figure that out. I’m generally a pretty upbeat person but I’ve always been attracted to darker subject matter,” Carlson said. After graduating, Carlson plans to enroll in a graduate program in two or three years.

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BY CHELSEY ABERCROMBIE @comma_freak The expression goes that everyone has a novel in them somewhere. “I’ve been an aspiring novelist, note the air quotes, since I was very, very young, and I’ve never been a very good writer, but I’ve always loved stories, and there came a point where I was like, ‘I want to write these down,’” said Peyton Palmour, a senior history major from Dahlonega. National Novel Writing Month, or “NaNoWriMo,” is an Internet-based creative writing project in which participants attempt to write 50,000 words in the month of November, and it seeks to help participants young and old do just that. Palmour was first inspired to participate in NaNoWriMo five years ago, when she realized the deadline could help her achieve her goal of writing larger works. “It’s fun and I think the deadline is really useful,” Palmour said. “So is knowing there’s thousands of people all over the world also

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doing it.” Started in 1999, NaNoWriMo now boasts 295,309 writers registered on its website, where participants upload their work in pursuit of the elusive 50,000 words — a goal which equates to writing 1,667 words every day for 30 days. Some NaNoWriMo projects do go on to published success, such as Sara Gruen’s New York Times’ Bestseller “Water for Elephants,” but for most participants, the reward is the finished product itself. In the five years Palmour has been participating in NaNoWriMo, she’s “won” — or fulfilled the 50,000 word requirement — once, with a novel about superheroes. “Your prize is your novel,” Palmour said. “It’s like a really long, extended writing exercise, but a really fun one because you don’t have to do hard stuff, like prose poetry,” Palmour said. The Athens-area NaNoWriMo Facebook group has 167 members of ages ranging from high school to adult, many of whom never saw themselves as novelists and participate purely out of curiosity. “The first time I attempted [NaNoWriMo] was my senior year of high school,” said Kathryn Clark, a sophomore biology major from Fay-

etteville. “My friend and I made a pact to try it because we were both curious to see if we could. I failed miserably that year — I believe I only got around 12,000 words — but it was a good learning experience.” Clark did reach the 50,000 word mark in 2012, an achievement which was its own reward. “Winning showed me that I was able to write longer works of fiction and that I could be disciplined enough to write every day,” Clark said. While Clark’s project for 2013, a work of science fiction, is what most people would think of when they hear the word “novel,” participants are allowed to write anything from poetry to memoirs to short stories. “[NaNoWriMo] is more about the act of writing than producing a publishable novel to me,” Clark said. Athenian Lucy Ralston serves as the 2013 municipal liaison between local NaNoWriMo participants and the event’s sponsor organization, The Office of Letters and Light, a California-based non-profit dedicated to helping children and adults achieve their creative potential. “Back in 2009, I heard about [NaNoWriMo] through a friend

on the Internet, and I decided a long time ago I would never write a novel, but I thought ‘What’s the harm? I’ll give it a try,’ and I won,” Ralston said. “Last year I decided I wanted to be one of the people who helps everybody else, so I became an Municipal Liaison.” Ralston’s duties include operating the Athens-area Facebook group to doling out words of encouragement to organizing Write-Ins, where several NaNoWriMo participants meet and work on their works in places such as Starbucks or the library. “Writing a novel isn’t easy,” Ralston said. “People need someone to talk to, to fire questions off, get answers about something they have a problem with — ‘Do I use a comma here?’ ‘What do I write next?’ ‘Where do I upload my word count?’” While most products of NaNoWriMo will not go on to see the light of day after November 30, even participants who don’t reach the 50,000 word finish line still learn volumes about their own writing selves by the end. “There’s a philosophy that everyone has a novel in them somewhere, and the point is to get it out,” Palmour said. “It doesn’t matter what it looks like.”


The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Variety A11

Band of Horses frontman strays from stable BY ERIN MILLER @erinnicole215

Kevn Kinney of Drivin’ N Cryin’ returns to the stage for a sold-out show with rerecordings he collaborated on with R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck. Courtesy thedayjobs.com

’80s music legends re-record classics BY JONNY WILLIAMS @ItsJonnyW

WHEN: Thursday, Nov. 14, 8 p.m.

WHERE: 40 Watt Club PRICE: $5 SOLD OUT

both the merchandise and the event itself. For Kinney, this was to make sure that everyone who wanted to see them had no reason not to. “We’re selling the re-recordings on an EP at the show. Its five songs for $5 and the show is only $5 because

we wanted to keep it cheap enough for everyone to come out and have fun,” said Kinney. Kinney’s hope seems to have already come true with tickets to one of Athens’ most important musical events of the year being sold out for quite some time.

Ben Bridwell fell for music while working at the rock club Crocodile Café in Seattle. Courtesy Flicker/Jason Persse what separates the good live performances from the great ones. “I think an element of risk. I like when bands don’t play the same set every night. When bands allow themselves a bit of a failing moment. When someone forgets words or someone forgets a change. Those are humanizing moments and make you feel like you are part of something different,” he said. Bridwell, 35, didn’t start playing guitar until his mid-20s while in Seattle. Even though he is taking a step back from Band of Horses for now, Bridwell doesn’t want to give the idea he is trying to distance himself from the band. “I am very grateful for all the Band of

BIRDSMELL: BEN BRIDWELL OF BAND OF HORSES, BRYAN CATES WHEN: Friday, Nov. 15, 8 p.m. WHERE: 40 Watt Club PRICE: $11-21

Horses songs and all the success they have brought me,” he said. “I’m not running away from Band of Horses by any means. I am interested in embracing it in another way.” Although without his normal herd,

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When it comes to live music, there is a difference between concerts being considered a “show” and an “event.” Shows are usually enjoyable and looked forward to, but happen all the time, especially in Athens. Events in music, on the other hand, are rare, highly anticipated and sought after by a larger audience. The latter of the two descriptions is easily the more appropriate in regard to Kevn Kinney, lead singer of Drivin’ N Cryin’, and R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck’s concert Nov. 14 at the 40 Watt. The event, which features two highly influential ’80s musical figures, will be an overall conglomerate of music from then and now. “Last year, Peter released a vinyl only album, ‘Peter Buck’ — his first solo record ever. He’s going to be doing songs from that in the first set,” Kinney said. Kinney’s headlining folk set will feature the entirety of the opener’s backing band, including Buck himself. The two musical powerhouses’ history includes vast collaboration both individually and with their respective bands. “Me and Peter Buck made a record [“MacDougal Blues”] in 1988. Then in 1989, Drivin’ N Cryin’ toured with R.E.M. for their Green Tour,” Kinney said. “MacDougal Blues,” Kinney’s solo debut that features Buck as both a musician and a producer, is the musical focus of the headlining act. Though not all songs that will be performed are from that specific album, most of them were conceived in the same era. This idea of performing songs that are aged also plays into the EP that will be available to buy at the concert. “We have this record which is a folk record. It was released a while ago, and so what I’ve done is me and Peter went back to the same studio and recorded the guitar and vocals for five songs. Two of the songs are from that record, but I’ve added verses to bring them up to speed,” Kinney said. “One of them is brand new, one of them is a song Peter liked that I wrote in his house that didn’t make it on the record and another one is one we played on tour from a while ago. So they’re all from that tour, but only two are from the actual record. It’s a rerecording, so it’s just a little somethingsomething.” Performing in the Classic City is nothing new to Kinney. The singer holds a particularly special memory at the 40 Watt as well. “Well, I lived in Athens from 1993 to 2002,” Kinney said. “My first show in Athens in 1985 was actually at the 40 Watt.” A stressed element of the concert is the convenient pricing of

KEVN KINNEY AND THE ROAMIN COUNTRYMEN, PETER BUCK

Ben Bridwell doesn’t do well in idle. After an eventful year touring with Band of Horses, one might expect the band’s lead singer to take some time off. But instead, the South Carolina native decided to try out a solo career with Birdsmell. “I recorded a song a couple years ago and I never really did much with it, and at the time it didn’t really seem like it needed to be released. And it was just hanging around and Band of Horses was slowing down a little bit and getting ready to take a break,” Bridwell said. “I just figured it would be a good time to get out and try some new material.” During his eightcity tour, Bridwell will travel around the Southeast playing in small venues with good atmospheres. He handpicked each concert location. “I like the wily nature of Southern crowds,” he said. “When they go out to see a show there is usually some partying involved. Just a looser vibe all around.” Bridwell, who is coming to The 40 Watt Friday, thinks that a more relaxed vibe is

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The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Sports

Sports B1

SCORES. STATS. GAME TIMES. ➤ SEE PAGE B6

FAMILIAR FACE, FAMILIAR FOE

Rodney Garner returns to Auburn after 15 years in Athens

Rodney Garner now coaches for the Tigers, but UGA coaches and players hold no ill will toward the Auburn alumnus. FILE/Staff

BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey Nick Marshall won’t be the only familiar face on the Auburn sidelines this weekend. When the Bulldogs travel to take on the No. 7 Tigers (9-1, 5-1 SEC), they will also have to contend with assistant head coach Rodney Garner, who spent the previous 15 years as UGA’s defensive line coach and recruiting coordinator.  Garner’s Auburn ties are well-known. As a player, he earned All-SEC honors as an offensive lineman during his senior year while also serving as captain. Later he coached for the Tigers in a number of capacities from 1990-95. But now, nearly 20 years later, he has finally returned to coach at his alma mater.  “That was one of those where it wasn’t about money, but it was just about whether he wanted to go home to his college team,” head coach Mark Richt said. “He may not have said it right away, but I had a pretty strong suspicion that he was very attracted to them this time around. He’s had some other opportunities to go back home or back to Auburn, but this time I think just had a different overall tone to it.” The players of No. 25 Georgia (6-3, 4-2 SEC) hold no hard feelings toward their former coach, either. They understand the motives behind the inter-conference move and have wished Garner the best moving forward. “Him being a guy playing at Auburn, who’s won SEC Championships at Auburn, that’s something that a guy really wants to be a part of, somewhere he played at,” cornerback Damian Swann said. “I think that was a great move for him.” Of course, while there’s no doubt Garner’s coaching and recruiting prowess have not been assets this season, the Bulldogs will perhaps miss his family’s Thanksgiving cooking the most. “It’s always been a big deal, and coach Garner and his family have always had a bunch of guys over to the house for Thanksgiving,” Richt said. “I’m not exactly

sure what Plan B is.”  All home-cooking aside, Georgia has managed to hire a just-as-qualified replacement away from Mississippi State in Chris Wilson. During his first year at Georgia, Wilson has overseen a defensive line responsible for 14 of the team’s 26 sacks, with the latter mark ranking second-best in the conference. In addition, eight different defensive lineman have combined for 20 tackles for loss under his tutelage.  “Chris is a hard-nosed ball coach, which we’re kind of used to around here, and at that position you have to be,” Richt said. “He’s a great communicator, and I think he really shows our guys that he cares about them as a person. He just relates well to them. I think you’ve got to gain their respect by letting them know that you mean business and whatever you say and ask them to do, you hold them accountable to do it. Chris is really good at that.” But Wilson wants more, particularly out of a run defense that still ranks fourth in the Southeastern Conference, allowing 126 yards rushing per game. And it’s a unit sure to be put to the test by Auburn’s touted running game. “That’s a trick question. A coach is never pleased,” Wilson said with a smile. “We’re solid. We need to get to the point where we can be dominant. When I talk about dominant, when you look at those guys getting 70, 80 yards a game, that’s dominant rush defense.” Much of Wilson’s praise has stemmed from his ability to get the most out of defensive end Ray Drew — a former five-star recruit that now leads the team in sacks with six in the midst of his breakout junior season. “They’re two different people, but they both have their things that everyone likes and dislikes about them,” Drew said of Garner and Wilson. “As far as coaching style, they were both technicians. They wanted things done perfect. If it wasn’t done just right, you had to go back and do it again.” See GARNER, Page B4

NEW LOCATION:

BRAVES’ NEW

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WORLD

Atlanta Braves plan new stadium at intersection of I-75 and I-285 5

The Atlanta Braves are moving up the road and it could affect thousands of University of Georgia students and alumni. The details are still largely unknown, but the Major League Baseball franchise announced it would be moving from its home at Fulton County’s Turner Field in 2017 for a proposed new stadium in Cobb County. The new location is expected to be near the intersection of I-75 and I-285 near the Galleria/Cumberland Mall. Numbers have still not been released as to how much the new stadium in Cobb County will cost, but the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported the stadium would cost “$450 million in financing by the county and another $200 million put up front by the baseball team.” Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed released a statement that said he was unwilling to burden the taxpayers of Fulton County by paying for the stadium with county or city funds. “It is my understanding that our neighbor, Cobb County, made a strong offer of $450M in public support to the Braves

and we are simply unwilling to match that with taxpayer dollars,” Reed said. “Given the needs facing our city and the impact of Turner Field stadium on surrounding neighborhoods, that was something I, and many others, were unwilling to do.” According to the UGA Fact Book 2012, the University has 2,885 students from Cobb County, which makes it the third-largest provider of UGA students. Cobb County is also home to 14,462 UGA alumni, making it the county with the third largest number of alumni. The money Cobb County is providing for the new stadium is likely to come from current funds or a raise in an existing tax, considering a new tax would necessitate voter referendum. Cobb County was forced to cut its education budget in May, resulting in five furlough days for all school system employees during the 2013-2014 school year, as well as the loss of 182 teachers. The county losing the Braves, Fulton, is the largest base of Georgia alumni and students in the state. In 2012, 3,896 students came from Fulton County, the second most behind Gwinnett. Fulton County is also

I-7

BY CY BROWN @CEPBrown

Courtesy HomeOfTheBraves.com

the largest alumni base in the state with 25,583 alumni within the county limits, according to the UGA Fact Book 2012. Turner Field opened its doors in 1997 on the sight of what had been Centennial Olympic Stadium in 1996 and Fulton County Stadium before that. The Braves will play at Turner Field three more seasons. Reed has already begun planning a new project for the space left vacant by Turner Field. “I guarantee you we’re not going to leave you with a vacant Ted,” Reed said in a press conference Wednesday. “When [the Braves] leave, we’re going to have a master developer demolish the Ted and we’re going to have one of the largest developments for middle-class people the city has ever had.”

The proposed site of the Atlanta Braves' new stadium is expected to be on the northwest side of the I-75/I-285 intersection in Cobb County. The county will pay a reported $450 million for the new stadium.


B2 Sports

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Rule changes in college basketball should lead to increase in scoring

The Red & Black

Former Purdue transfer becomes a defensive leader of UGA volleyball BY MARIYA LEWTER @MariyaChanel

BY CODY PACE @CodyPace When the men’s basketball NCAA rules committee came down with some changes to how defense would be played in the 20132014 season, Georgia head coach Mark Fox had to sit his players down for a talk. “It’s completely different than they’ve ever played in their whole life, so there’s going to be some adjustment, certainly for players but also for us as coaches,” Fox said. The rule changes were designed to speed up the flow of the game and increase scoring. Among the more drastic changes, handchecking and arm bars have been outlawed. Hand-checking, the use of the hands to impede progress of an offensive player, makes it more difficult to play the ball-handler. Before the rule change, a defender could extend his arm and make slight contact with the offensive player to gauge distance. Even that slight contact would now be considered a foul. “It is a little difficult,” senior forward Donte’ Williams said. “You can’t really touch the man, you can’t really get physical with them but at the same time you’ve still got to move your feet and slide and rebound and defend.” Combining that with the elimination of arm bars — the use of the forearm in defending — leaves defenders with one option: stay out of the ball handlers’ way and go for the traditional shot block. “In the past, you get a lot of contact and this year I can’t arm bar them,” junior center Tim Dixon said. “I’ve got to keep my hands up. I’ve got to show my palms, my wrists or whatever and try to stay in front of them and wall them up. It’s very different than last year.” Another rule change all but eliminates the charge. Referees are now told to

Georgia basketball head coach Mark Fox believes the new rule changes will positively affect the game. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff focus on identifying offensive attack before the positioning of the defender. This focus along with the loose definition of “offensive attack” makes it difficult for defenders to establish position to draw a charge. “You can almost take a charge now easier defending a ball handler than you could before but it’s harder to take a charge the old fashion way so that’s very different,” Fox said. Although these rules make the game drastically different than it was last season, they are not new to basketball. The college basketball initiative to boost scoring and speed up game flow mimics the one by the NBA prior to the 2004-2005 season. Once the rules committee handed down its decision, Fox spoke with a former NBA official about the expected learning curve to the new rules. “I talked to a veteran NBA official, he said it took the entire preseason and three weeks of the regular season before people adjusted and then the game’s been better ever since,” Fox said. “How long will it take college guys? That remains to be seen.” However, during the transition period, Fox said

that he thinks people will “get a little bit frustrated.” In order to alleviate his team’s level of frustration, he brought in a referee for an open dialogue with the players. “We’ve had officials come meet with our players and our players had a very open dialogue with, ‘Can we do this? Can we not do that?’ and try to educate them that way,” Fox said. “We’ve spent a lot of time on it but still, it’s a significant change.” The numbers would show that Fox’s efforts have paid off. Through two games last season, Georgia committed 42 fouls, compared to 38 this season. Moreover, Georgia fouled just six times in the first half with its starters playing most of the minutes and five of 13 secondhalf fouls were attributed to freshmen that played more minutes due to a 39-20 halftime lead. Although the change may be difficult and confusing at times, Fox said that he is a proponent of the change and that he believes the sport will be better in the long run. “I’m going to be brutally honest,” Fox said. “I think that the emphasis on rule change in our game is needed.”

The Georgia volleyball team is having one of its best seasons since 2004, with a solid 18-8 record. The leadership of the team’s seniors has helped this team grow and succeed all season long. One senior in particular has positively affected the Bulldogs, and her name is Elena Perri. Perri was born in Richland, Mich. where she attended Gull Lake High School. The middle blocker stands at 6-foot-2 and claims that her height is what initially got her into the sport of volleyball. “I was basically just really tall when I was little,” she said. “There was a competitive volleyball team by my house, and I had a friend that was on the team. She asked me if I wanted to try out and join, and, ever since middle school, I’ve played and loved it.” Perri was a three-time All-State selection in high school and served as her team’s captain for three seasons. She earned Michigan Interscholastic Volleyball Coaches Association AllRegion 11 honors as a senior and initially played for Purdue University. As a Boilermaker, Perri played in five matches and earned the Sue Jurkonis Award for strongest freshman. After her freshman year, she decided to transfer from Purdue to Georgia. “I committed to Purdue when I was really young,” Perri said. “Then I got hurt a couple times. I got there, and it just didn’t seem like it was going to pan out for me playing-wise. I wanted to go to a school where I could still make a pretty big impact and be at a really great school. The volleyball piece and the school piece fit for me here [at Georgia].” Last season, Perri started all 30 matches and tallied 132 kills, averaging 1.18 per set. She also led the team with 117 blocks, including 13 solo blocks. So far this season,

Elena Perri transferred to Georgia in pursuit of playing time. DAVID C BRISTOW/Staff Perri leads the team in blocks with 84 and has recorded 102 kills. Head coach Lizzy Stemke expressed how Perri has evolved as a player since joining the Bulldogs in 2011. “Elena has always been a really consistent player,” Stemke said. “Her volleyball IQ is really high. She has really become a much more offensive player, especially here in the last couple of months. It’s been fun to see her take off on the offensive side. She’s always been a solid blocker, and she knows the game so well, but I think physically she’s made some really great strides in her offensive game to become a really nice allaround middle for us.” When asked about Perri’s affect on the other girls of the team, Stemke raved about her ability to build relationships with her teammates. “Elena’s got a really fun personality,” she said. “She’s the kind of kid that can hang out with anybody and everybody on the team. She knows when it’s time to buckle down on the court, but she has a real relationship with every player on the team.”

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The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Sports B3

Smack talk helps cornerback Shaq Wiggins rattle opponents BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey Shaq Wiggins has never been the biggest guy on a football field. At 5-foot-10 and 165 pounds, the freshman cornerback is not the type of player to consistently overpower his opponents. He’ll make his share of tackles and hits, though even he wouldn’t call that his strong suit. But what he lacks in size, Wiggins makes up for with his words. He talks trash, and it works. “I’ve been doing it ever since high school. It’s a little strict in high school; in college I’m kind of free,” Wiggins said. “Me talking to the other players, I think it kind of gets to them a little bit. They really feel it when they miss passes or anything like that. I try to make them feel it.” Wiggins keeps his motor mouth running outside of football, too — a trait with which his teammates are well-acquainted. “Everybody knows Shaq is probably the craziest guy on the team, talks all the time. It’s just great being around his personality,” safety Tray Matthews said. Even Wiggins was quick to label himself as the UGA defense’s resident funny man. “I’m kind of the guy that does stuff out of the blue, makes everybody laugh,” he said. “People that’s on the staff that’re not usually around me probably look at me crazy. If somebody’s down, I put a smile on their face, make somebody laugh. I kind of smooth things out a little bit.” Of course with defensive lineman Garrison Smith already in the fold, there has been some contention as to who deserves the title of “funniest guy on defense.” Wiggins naturally rejected Smith’s claim to the comedic crown. “That’s a total lie,” Wiggins said. “You just look at his body. His body’s terrible. Nah, Garrison’s funny, but he’s not more funnier than me. Everybody knows.”

In any case, that penchant for getting under an opposing receiver’s skin could come in handy on Saturday when the No. 25 Bulldogs (6-3, 4-2 SEC) take to the plains and face rival No. 7 Auburn (9-1, 5-1 SEC). “It’s going to be a lot of people talking smack on the field and off the field,” Wiggins said. “I kind of know pretty much everybody on the Auburn team. There’s some players that’s injured that are going to be talking stuff. It’s going to be friendly smack-talking.” The smack talk may continue, but perhaps somewhere down the road Wiggins will shed the label of “small cornerback.” “Hopefully, once this football season’s over, I should get up to like 175. I know the coaching staff was real hard on me. I’m going to have to eat right and lift pretty hard next season,” he said. Or maybe that won’t even matter. “I’ve definitely gotten more confidence playing against the receivers I’ve played against,” he said. “The game is slowing down for me a bit, so I’m starting to see certain things.”

Shaq Wiggins may be small, but he talks a big game. The freshman cornerback considers himself a master trash talker and the team’s resident class clown. DAVID C BRISTOW/Staff

MARSHALL: Bulldogs happy for former player’s success ➤ From Page A1 As has been welldocumented, Marshall joined the UGA football team as a cornerback and became a member of the program’s heralded “Dream Team” recruiting class of 2011. Coaches had originally hoped to put the multifaceted athlete at quarterback, but the Wilcox County product had other intentions. “Our initial conversations with him in recruiting were quarterback. That’s what we recruited him as the whole time. He had a change of heart and wanted to play defense,” offensive coordinator Mike Bobo said. “We just felt he was such a good athlete that we had to play whatever he wanted to play. I thought he was an NFL corner when he was here.” Bobo admitted he had big ideas for what Marshall might have done as a signal-caller. “He’s an unreal athlete. Felt he could do anything really. Had a lot of plans for him offensively out of the norm of what we might do, but his heart wasn’t in it so we let him play defense,” he said. Still, Marshall resolved to pursue his defensive aspirations.  With Sanders Commings and Brandon Boykin firmly entrenched as starters, he saw limited action and recorded just five tackles in 13 appearances as a freshman. But the future at cornerback appeared bright for the one-time Atlanta JournalConstitution “Super 11” selection. “He’d be an allconference type guy. He would have a very bright future at that position,” head coach Mark Richt said. “He’s a dynamic guy. He’s got multi-skills and he’s using a lot of them as a quarterback right now.” Progressing through his freshman

year, Marshall managed to build his share of close friendships with fellow “Dream Team” members as well. In fact, many still keep in touch with Auburn’s starting quarterback, including former roommate and junior cornerback Damian Swann. “Me and Nick, we kind of got close living in Reed Hall when we first got here our first summer. That went with a lot of the guys who were here that came in with my class,” Swann said. “It was just us over there. We were really all we had until we moved to ECV with the rest of the team. I don’t think that bond will really be broken.” But then the news broke: Marshall was off the team, dismissed in February 2012 with Sanders and Seay for an incident that, according to multiple sources, allegedly involved theft of money from teammates. Those on the team closest with Marshall were naturally shocked to watch a friend, let alone a promising football player, depart Athens in such a quick, unexpected fashion. “I looked at it as [a] mistake,” Swann said. “Guys not thinking about what’s going on. I’m pretty sure those guys would’ve taken it back. I think they handled the situation very well moving onto different place, having success.” *** In the fallout, Marshall would transfer to Garden City Community College, where he became the starting quarterback and wound up a 3,000yard passer and 1,000yard rusher by season’s end.  It was at that time when Malzahn, then the head coach at Arkansas State, began to recruit Marshall. Upon assuming the reins of Auburn’s foot-

ball program, he managed to lure assistant coach Rodney Garner — a former AllSEC player with the Tigers — away from UGA, where he had served as defensive line coach and an ace recruiter since 1998. Garner of course knew Marshall well from his days with the Bulldogs, and soon all the pieces were in place for Auburn to draw a signature from the talented quarterback. “I got to know Nick recruiting him at Arkansas State as a person. We did our homework on him there,” Malzahn said. “The fact that we got here with coach Garner, who knew him well and knew the family well, all of the above had to do with that. We’re proud of Nick on and off the field.” The rest, as they say, is history: Marshall emerged victorious from a four-way preseason quarterback competition and has gone on to spearhead a remarkable offensive revival in Auburn. Already the Tigers have put up 4,933 yards of total offense this season, and Marshall has accounted for more than 2,000 of those yards. That alone would make Auburn’s quarterback a legitimate dual-threat factor that Georgia’s defense will have to contain on Saturday. And though he has not thrown all that much in Malzahn’s run-first offensive scheme — the Tigers have surpassed 300 yards passing just once this season — his playmaking abilities have already drawn comparisons to former Heisman winner Cam Newton. “Cam was a much bigger man, obviously, but Nick’s just as dangerous as a runner because of his speed and agility and those types of things,” Richt said. “He can be just as effective as a runner. I

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think they’d be throwing more if they had to throw more.” What’s more, Marshall will be at least somewhat acquainted with Georgia’s defense when the two clash on the Plains this weekend.  “He is familiar with them, there is no doubt,” Malzahn said. “If he holds true to past experience this year, he doesn’t get too high or too low. There isn’t too much that rattles him. He stays pretty calm no matter what the moment.” *** The emotions may vary on both ends of the matchup. But leading up to yet another high-profile game for the Bulldogs, coaches and players have both expressed nothing but excitement for what Marshall has been able to accomplish since his unceremonious departure from Georgia football. “I’ve said on plenty of occasions that if a guy has a situation where he doesn’t finish here at Georgia, a guy that signed with us, my goal for him is to find a new home and to have success at it,” Richt said. “So I’m happy for Nick.” All things considered, perhaps the revival of Auburn football is not the season’s best comeback story. Rather, that title may belong to its quarterback, who like Newton before him has gone from JUCO standout to SEC household name in less than a year. The contingent from Georgia has certainly expressed pleasure at witnessing the turnaround. Come Saturday, however, the Bulldogs may not be so pleased with Nick Marshall’s success.

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B4 Sports

Thursday, November 14, 2013

The Red & Black

Bulldogs to face one of the nation’s best rushing attacks BY CONNOR SMOLENSKY @ConnorSmo Auburn’s offensive game plan won’t be much of a surprise on Saturday. The No. 7 Tigers (9-1, 5-1 SEC) love to run the ball and do it rather effectively. This season Auburn has run the ball on 71 percent of its plays while averaging 320 rushing yards per game, ranking them first in the Southeastern Conference and third nationally. The Tigers utilize the rushing tandem of junior running back Tre Mason and junior quarterback Nick Marshall, who used to play for the Bulldogs (6-3, 4-2) before being dismissed from the team in 2011 for allegedly stealing from a teammate. “I know they are a heavy run team, especially the last couple weeks, so you have to stop the run if you’re going to stop them,” senior safety Connor Norman said. “They have a bunch of different guys that can carry the ball, so it’s obviously a big deal this week.” Mason, a Palm Beach, Fla. native, has been the Tigers’ No. 1 back this season and has carried the ball 181 times for 1,038 yards and 16 touchdowns on the year, averaging 103.8 yards per game. But it’s Marshall that poses the bigger threat. Marshall is a dual-threat quarterback who has rushed for 734 yards and seven touchdowns this season, and is coming off a big game against Tennessee where he collected 214 yards and two touchdowns on 14 carries. With the success Marshall has displayed in his inaugural Auburn season, he is drawing comparisons to a former Auburn great. “Cam [Newton] was a much bigger man, obviously, but Nick’s just as dangerous as a runner because of his speed and agility and those types of things,” Georgia head coach Mark Richt said. “He can be just as effective as a runner. I think they’d be throwing more if they had to throw more. From the film I see, they don’t have to throw much, so they’re

Defensive tackle Garrison Smith believes Georgia's experience against dual-threat quarterbacks will help it against Auburn. RANDY SHAFER/Staff just running it. They are throwing some, but there are not many games where he threw over 10 passes in a game because he hasn’t had to. We know he’s a very capable passer, and the times he does throw, he’s very impressive.” Richt also explained the difficulty of defending

a rushing quarterback, especially one with the athleticism of Marshall. “It’s not really triple option football, but fundamentally, if a team’s quarterback can run the football, that is one less free defender who can try to make a tackle,” he said. “So let’s say that if you have 10 blockers and a quarterback that runs, there’s a blocker for 10 guys obviously, and a runner, so there’s only one unblocked guy that can make a play.” But this isn’t the first time the Bulldogs will be facing a rushing quarterback this season. Georgia has defended three dual-threat quarterbacks this season, and has been sub-par in its efforts. Against Clemson, the Bulldogs allowed Tajh Boyd (22.78 rushing ypg) to rush for 43 yards and two touchdowns, let South Carolina’s Connor Shaw (41.67 rushing ypg) to go for 82 yards on the ground and gave up 43 rushing yards and a touchdown to Missouri’s James Franklin (48.33 rushing ypg). Having played so many running quarterbacks already, Georgia feels confident heading into Saturday’s matchup. “We have been doing better, we’ve been improving and that’s what it’s all about,” senior defensive lineman Garrison Smith said. “We’ve been getting better every week and that’s the biggest thing.” It will be especially important for the Bulldogs to play discipline and maintain their gap assignments against the Tigers to prevent any big plays. Allowing the Tigers to gain large chucks of yardage in the ground could spell disaster for the Bulldogs. Saturday’s contest is set to be a battle between two opposing strengths as the Bulldogs have played well against the run, ranking fourth in the SEC while giving up 126 rushing ypg. “Just play like we have been playing all year,” junior inside linebacker Amarlo Herrera said. “We have been stopping the run so we have to be physical like we’ve been playing.”

Ejection halts progress for UGA safety GARNER: UGA faces ex-coach BY BENJAMIN WOLK @benjaminwolk

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just got to get a little bit lower as I try and hit the offensive player. With one hit, everyI’m just trying to make thing Corey Moore plays.” accomplished in the But it wasn’t the month prior took a ejection for the penalty backseat. itself that frusFor the third trates Moore. time this season, What bothers a Georgia defenGeorgia’s safety sive player was is that he was questionably removed from flagged for tarthe game when geting a defensehis game was less offensive really starting to opponent. And, shine. for the second After two time, the ejection MOORE years of (mostly) for the penalty sitting behind upheld. This time, the standout safeties culprit (or the victim) Bacarri Rambo and was junior safety Corey Shawn Williams, Moore Moore who was penalwas poised to take over ized for targeting an the reins in the Appalachian State Bulldogs’ defensive wide receiver along the backfield. sideline. “Once those two Like many of the guys left, they both targeting penalties that talked to me,” Moore have been called this said. “The only thing season, Moore’s hapthey told me was, it’s pened so fast he wasn’t opportunity. ‘We left; even able to react to you’re the only vet guy tell himself to back off. that’s left on the back “I don’t think I end — you and Connor could have [done any[Norman]. You’re going thing differently],” to have some young Moore said. “You got a guys that you’ll have to guy coming down like compete with.’” me trying to make a But a lateral collatplay on the offensive eral ligament tear durplayer. He’s in the air; ing a punt block in the all your momentum is preseason put a hiccup going toward him. His in Moore’s schedule, body happens to drop. which was beginning to That was the situation look extremely promisand I’m just trying to ing. It wasn’t until the make a play, and I got Missouri game that called for the targetMoore was finally ing.” beginning to feel like As the play took himself again. place, the potential “I went to go block penalty was an aftera punt and Connor thought for the 6-foot[Norman] actually 2, 214-pound defender. came in and wrapped “It was not on my around my knee and mind. What was on my hit it and made my mind was trying to LCL tear,” Moore said. make the play on the “I didn’t know it was offensive player,” Moore torn. I tried to walk it said. “It is what it is. I off and I did walk it off, so it just swells up on me.” Moore’s improved health showed. The following week against Vanderbilt, after weeks of Georgia’s

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defense failing to create turnovers, Moore managed to change course. Off a deflection, Moore hauled in his first career intercep tion, a play that — at the time — looked like it might clinch the win for the Bulldogs’ in the SEC East contest. While the game’s result didn’t turn out as desired, the interception was just what Moore needed. “You always want to get your confidence up when you’re out there playing, so that was a big factor with that interception [against Vanderbilt],” Moore said. “I just wanted it to carry over to [the] Florida game.” And that’s exactly what he did. With just under eight minutes to play in the World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party, Georgia’s defense looked at a 3rd-and-12 with Florida quarterback Tyler Murphy poised to make one final push to cap off the Gators’ attempted comeback. Moore had other plans. Georgia’s coaching staff called a safety blitz, and Moore rose to the challenge, sacking Murphy for a huge loss. But, this past Saturday, when Moore was ejected, Georgia’s fans were stripped from watching the junior safety make plays against Appalachian State. Because of the new — and highly criticized — targeting rule, Moore had to watch much of the game in the locker room. Moore, though, will use the ejection as fuel. “God puts you through stuff like that in life to test you,” Moore said. “My grandma always told me, ‘God gives his toughest battles to his best warriors.’”

➤ From Page B1 Becoming a new coach at any institution always comes with its set of challenges, namely dealing with and assimilating among a new crop of players, but Wilson was lucky to find the cupboard stocked. Wilson feels that transition has gone as smoothly as he could have hoped, though he credited Garner’s recruiting while doing so. “Scheme is scheme. Football is football. You just get used to all the different new personalities and they’re getting used to your personality,” he said. “Rodney did a great job, put great players in the room and good men. I’m really fortunate in that regard.” But it may not be so easy for the team to compliment Garner should he end up affecting the outcome this year’s edition of the Deep South’s Oldest Rivalry. Maybe he will simply serve as extra motivation for Georgia’s defense to escape Jordan-Hare Stadium with an upset win intact over both a former player on Marshall and an old coach in Garner. “It’ll be weird if I see him, cause he’s been close to my parents and I was close to him during the recruiting process,” freshman safety Tray Matthews said. “It’d be a little funny to me, but it’ll be even better if we get the ‘W’ and I’ll try and mess around with him.”


The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Sports B5

BEHIND ENEMY BYLINES This season, The Red & Black will be reaching out to the sports editor of each opponent’s school newspaper to discuss the weekend’s game. This week we talked to Justin Ferguson, assistant sports editor of Auburn University’s student newspaper, The Auburn Plainsman.

CY BROWN: Auburn’s bread and butter is on the ground, but do you expect it to go to the air more against a weak UGA secondary? JUSTIN FERGUSON: I would expect Auburn to air it out more, but no one has been able to predict Gus Malzahn’s play calling this season. The Tigers threw four straight passes to start the game against Tennessee, then only threw three more for the rest of the game ... and still won by 32 on the road. There is an air of “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” about this offense, and Malzahn has said repeatedly that this is a run-first team. I would expect double-digit passes against Georgia, but 20 or more would be a complete shock. The nation’s No. 4 rushing offense will keep pounding the ball on the ground until some one slows them down.

CB: How expected was this success in Malzahn’s first season? JF: Auburn fans expected a turnaround this season, but no one has expected nine wins heading into “Amen Corner.” The most optimistic fans had Auburn winning eight games at the most, and now there is talk of a BCS berth and a shot at the SEC Championship game. Fans were cautiously optimistic at the start of the season, but 2012 was so devastating to the program that immediately returning to the top tier of college football was a dream. However, Malzahn has reinstalled the system so many of these players were recruited to play, hired top-notch defensive assistants, and brought a new attitude back to Auburn. I think the Tigers have benefited from an easier schedule than ones in years past, but the turnaround in Auburn has been nothing short of unbelievable.

CB: Looking back, do Auburn fans now credit the 2010 National Championship to Malzahn and Cam Newton, and write off Gene Chizik? What is the general opinion of Chizik around Auburn? JF: Absolutely. Remember, Gene Chizik was a head coach with an awful record at Iowa State before he came to Auburn. He made the right call in hiring Malzahn and other great assistants who excelled in recruiting, but the culture surrounding the program was not healthy in the final months of his reign at Auburn. Several Tigers were in the news for all the wrong reasons off the field, and many people blame that on Chizik’s disciplinary skills. On the field, the team’s attitude needed to change after the hard crash from the top of the world. Many fans will thank Gene Chizik for hiring Gus Malzahn and recruiting Cam Newton and Nick Fairley, but he is still the face of Auburn’s fall from grace in 2011 and 2012.

CB: Who are some players Georgia fans are unfamiliar with, but won’t be after Saturday? JF: Offensively, keep your eyes on Corey Grant. While Tre Mason has become the workhorse back for this powerful Auburn rushing attack, Grant provides a burst of speed that defenses have to respect. A player from nearby Opelika who transferred back home after a short stint at Alabama, Mason will most likely be the fastest player on the field this Saturday. He is a weapon on speed sweeps and kick returns, helping Auburn turn things around this season in both offense and special teams. Defensively, watch for Auburn’s three true freshmen defensive linemen: Montravius Adams, Elijah Daniel and Carl Lawson. With the rotation defensive coordinator Ellis Johnson has installed on the defensive line, Tigers young and old get more than a fair share of snaps at the front of the attack. All three of these players were rated four-star or higher and have made significant impact on defense this season for Auburn. While Daniel has gotten most of the attention and a Freshman of the Week award, Daniel is coming off his best game of the season at Tennessee and Adams is a consistent presence up the middle at tackle.

CB: When Nick Marshall was dismissed for Georgia as a cornerback, few Bulldog fans expected him to re-emerge as Auburn's quarterback. How important has Marshall been to Auburn’s success this season? JF: Nick Marshall has been a huge boost for Malzahn in his return to The Plains. While you don’t have to have a dual-threat quarterback to run Malzahn’s system, his ability to run the read option adds another weapon on the ground with the Tigers’ three quality running backs. When teams try to slow down Mason up the middle, Marshall has the speed to get to the next level. Marshall’s passing ability is decent. He has a powerful arm that sometimes can be too powerful, and overthrows were a major problem at the start of the season. He still has accuracy issues, but when he gets into a rhythm, it’s hard to slow him down. He has a great deep-ball threat in Sammie Coates, the nation’s leader in yards per catch, and true freshman Marcus Davis, who is as surehanded as they come for Auburn this year. While true freshman Jeremy Johnson has done well in his playing time this season, Marshall brought college experience at quarterback and athleticism that makes Malzahn’s offense even more dangerous.

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B6 Sports

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Sports shorts

First Downs Rushes yards (net) Passing yards (net) Passes Att-Comp-Int Offense Plays Yards Fumble Returns-Yards Punt Returns-Yards Kickoff Returns-Yards

UGA vs. Appalachian State Box Score

APP 17 32-32 221 39-22-1 71-253 0-0 0-0 7-159

UGA 27 30-127 441 42-30-2 72-568 1-4 2-3 3-19

INT Returns-Yards Punts (Number-Avg) Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Possession Time 3rd-Down Conversions 4th-Down Conversions Red-Zone Score-Chance Sacks: Number-Yards

2-15 5-42.6 2-1 11-65 33:12 7 of 18 1 of 2 1-2 0-0

1-16 1-44.0 3-1 7-52 26:48 5 of 9 0 of 2 4-4 3-32

SEC Statistical Leaders Passing AVG/GAME

Tackles Player 1. Ramik Wilson (UGA) 2. A.J. Johnson (UT) 3. Avery Williamson (UK)

Tackles 92 84 82

Avg/G 10.2 8.4 9.1

Player Yards 1. Johnny Manziel (TAMU) 3313 2. Aaron Murray (UGA) 2477 3. Zach Mettenberger (LSU) 2733

Yds/G 331.3 275.2 273.3

SEC Standings Conference East Missouri 5-1 South Carolina 5-2 Georgia 4-2 Florida 3-4 Vanderbilt 2-4 Tennessee 1-5 Kentucky 0-5

Overall 9-1 7-2 6-3 4-5 5-4 4-6 2-7

West Alabama Auburn Texas A&M LSU Ole Miss Miss. State Arkansas

6-0 5-1 4-2 3-3 3-3 1-4 0-6

9-0 9-1 8-2 7-3 6-3 4-5 3-7

The Red & Black

FOOTBALL BCS Standings Team Record 1. Alabama 9-0 2. Florida State 9-0 3. Ohio State 9-0 4. Stanford 8-1 5. Baylor 8-0 6. Oregon 8-1 7. Auburn 9-1 8. Clemson 8-1 9. Missouri 9-1 10. South Carolina 7-2 11. Texas A&M 8-2 12. Oklahoma State 8-1 13. UCLA 7-2 14. Fresno State 9-0 15. Northern Illinois 9-0 16. Michigan State 8-1 17. UCF 7-1 18. Oklahoma 7-2 19. Arizona State 7-2 20. Louisville 8-1 21. LSU 7-3 22. Wisconsin 7-2 23. Miami (FL) 7-2 24. Texas 7-2 25. Georgia 6-3 Saturday's games Troy at Ole Miss, noon, ESPNU Kentucky at Vanderbilt, 12:21 p.m., SEC TV No. 25 Georgia at No. 7 Auburn, 3:30 p.m., CBS

AP Top 25 Team 1. Alabama (56) 2. Florida State (3) 3. Ohio State 4. Baylor 5. Stanford 6. Oregon 7. Auburn 8. Clemson 9. Missouri 10. Texas A&M 11. South Carolina 12. Oklahoma State 13. UCLA 14. Michigan State 15. UCF 16. Fresno State 17. Wisconsin 18. LSU 19. Louisville 20. Northern Illinois 21. Arizona State 22. Oklahoma 23. Texas 24. Miami (FL) 25. Georgia

Record 9-0 9-0 9-0 8-0 8-1 8-1 9-1 8-1 9-1 8-2 7-2 8-1 7-2 8-1 7-1 9-0 7-2 7-3 8-1 9-0 7-2 7-2 7-2 7-2 6-3

Points 1472 1418 1310 1303 1272 1139 1109 1049 1012 909 857 780 669 633 596 588 503 470 467 396 362 285 185 121 78

Florida at No. 11 South Carolina, 7 p.m., ESPN2 No. 1 Alabama at Mississippi State, 7:45 p.m., ESPN Byes: Missouri, Tennessee, Arkansas, LSU, Texas A&M

Schedule Thursday Nov. 14 Georgia Tech at No. 8 Clemson, 7:30 p.m., ESPN Marshall at Tulsa, 7:30 p.m., FOX Sports 1 Friday Nov. 15 Washington at No. 13 UCLA, 9 p.m., ESPN2 Saturday Nov. 16 No. 3 Ohio State at Illinois, noon, ESPN No. 17 UCF at Temple, noon Iowa State at No. 18 Oklahoma. noon, FOX Sports 1 Indiana at No. 22 Wisconsin, noon, ESPN2 Troy at Ole Miss, noon, ESPNU Cincinnati at Rutgers, noon Purdue at Penn State, noon West Virginia at Kansas, noon Central Michigan at Western Michigan, noon Kentucky at Vanderbilt, 12:21 p.m. NC State at Boston College, 12:30 p.m. North Carolina at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m. Maryland at Virginia Tech, 12:30 p.m. Florida Atlantic at Southern Miss., 12:30 p.m. Akron at Massachusetts, 1 p.m. Campbell at Old Dominion, 1 p.m. Washington State at Arizona, 2 p.m. UAB at East Carolina, 2 p.m. LA-Lafayette at Georgia State, 2 p.m. Idaho State at BYU, 3 p.m. UCONN at Southern Methodist, 3 p.m. Syracuse at No. 2 Florida State, 3:30 p.m., ABC No. 25 Georgia at No. 7 Auburn, 3:30 p.m., CBS No. 12 Oklahoma State at No. 24 Texas, 3:30 p.m., FOX No. 16 Michigan State at Nebraska, 3:30 p.m., ABC No. 23 Miami (FL) at Duke, 3:30 p.m., ESPNU Michigan at Northwestern, 3:30 p.m., BTN TCU at Kansas State, 3:30 p.m. South Alabama at Navy, 3:30 p.m. Utah at No. 6 Oregon, 4 p.m. California at Colorado, 5:30 p.m. Texas Tech at No. 5 Baylor, 7 p.m., FOX Florida at No. 10 South Carolina, 7 p.m., ESPN2 Houston at No. 20 Louisville, 7 p.m., ESPNU Memphis at South Florida, 7 p.m. Colorado State at New Mexico, 7 p.m. Louisiana Tech at Rice, 7 p.m. Texas State at Arkansas State, 7:30 p.m. No. 1 Alabama at Miss. State, 7:45 p.m., ESPN No. 4 Stanford at USC, 8 p.m., ABC Oregon State at No. 19 Arizona State, 9:30 p.m.

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL Team Record 1. Connecticut (35) 1-0 2. Duke (1) 1-0 3. Stanford 1-0 4. Tennessee 1-0 5. Louisville 1-0 6. Notre Dame 1-0 7. Kentucky 2-0 8. Maryland 2-0 9. Baylor 1-0 10. California 1-1 11. Oklahoma 2-0 12. North Carolina 1-0 13. Penn State 2-0 14. LSU 2-0 15. Nebraska 1-0 16. Texas A&M 0-0 17. Colorado 0-0 18. Purdue 1-0 19. Michigan State 0-0 20. Oklahoma State 2-0 21. South Carolina 2-0 22. Iowa State 1-0 23. Dayton 1-1 24. Georgia 1-0 25. Gonzaga 2-0


The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Showcase B7

Showcase

Ramsey Student Center boxing instructor Chris Jordan (red), also known as The Indian Outlaw, boxes against Eddie Morris (stripes) at the Sugar Bert Boxing match on Nov. 9. The event was held by the Georgia Athletic and Entertainment Commission. Jordan, a cruiserweight, lost by split decision moving him to 5-6 in his career. Each of his five career wins is by knockout.

PHOTOS BY TAYOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff


B8 Variety

Thursday, November 14, 2013

The Red & Black

Events THURSDAY NOVEMBER 14 Carmen When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Concert Hall Price: $5 (w/UGA ID), $18 Contact: arts.uga.edu Pride & Prejudice When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Building Price: $12-16 Contact: drama.uga.edu WorldFest 2013 When: 11:30 a.m. Where: Tate Center Price: Free Contact: isl.uga.edu Peter Buck, Kevin Kinney & The Romain Countrymen When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: 40watt.com Tea Leaf Green, Thomas Wynn & The Believers When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $15 Contact: georgiathe-

atre.com

When: 10 p.m. Where: Green Room Price: $5 Contact: greenroomathens.com

The Queers, Kingons, Burns Like Fire, Shehehe When: 9 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (under 21) Contact: caledonialounge.com

Golden Dragons Acrobats When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Price: $15-30 Contact: pac.uga.edu

The Floorboards When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com Miracle at Midnight Dance Party When: 10 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $10 Contact: newearthmusichall.com FRIDAY NOVEMBER 15 Hal Holbrook in “Mark Twain Tonight!” When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Concert Hall Price: $49-69

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 19

Elder Athens indie group Elf Power joins its translucent pop stylings with Atlanta fuzz-rockers Deerhunter at the 40 Watt Friday. Photo courtesy Elf Power/Jason Thrasher Contact: pac.uga.edu EPICer Ariel Dance Performance When: 8 p.m. Where: Canopy Sudio Price: $6-15 Contact: canopystudio. org The Ecotones present “autumnTuned” When: 6 to 9:45 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 Contact: ugaecotunes@ gmail.com Athens Showgirl Cabaret When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $5 Contact: facebook.com/ lkshuffleclub Birdsmell, Bryan Cates When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $11 (w/UGA ID), $21 Contact: 40watt.com Keller Williams When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $20 Contact: georgiatheatre.com Jonah Smith When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: Free Contact: theworldfamousathens.com Wedge, MotherF***er, Visc. When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: caledoniounge.com

Pride & Prejudice When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Building Price: $12-16 Contact: drama.uga.edu SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 EPICer Ariel Dance Performance When: 4 and 8 p.m. Where: Canopy Sudio Price: $6-15 Contact: canopystudio. org Pride & Prejudice When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Building Price: $12-16 Contact: drama.uga.edu Deerhunter, Elf Power When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $16 Contact: 40watt.com Laura Marling, Willy Mason When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $15 Contact: georgiatheatre.com Juston Stens, Pete Donnelly When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $7 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com Taterzanda, Jane Jane, Tonda When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: caledonialounge.com

Minor Wiley, Scooterbabe, Simuvac, DJ Mahagony When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ Go-Bar

Erin Lovett, Grape Soda, Moths, Small Beige Girl When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com

Kate Morrissey, Chris Isaacs When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: $5 Contact: hendershotscoffee.com

Children of Pop, Manny & The Deepthroats, Echo Constant, DJ Blowpop When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/

Go-Bar Minnesota, Robbie Dude When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $12 Contact: newearthmusichall.com Burlesque Beta When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: $3 Contact: facebook.com/ Go-Bar SUNDAY NOVEMBER 17 AutismUGA 5k When: 8 to 10 a.m. Where: Stegman Coliseum Price: $20 Contact: autismuga@ gmail.com Tre Powell, The Hobohemians, incatepec When: 3 p.m. Where: Mama Bird’s Price: Free Contact: mamabirdsgranola.com Ruby The Rabbitfoot, Jeremy Wheatley When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $5 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com EPICer Ariel Dance Performance When: 2 and 6 p.m. Where: Canopy Sudio Price: $6-15 Contact: canopystudio. org Stomp Out Domestic Violence When: 4 p.m. Where: The Classic Center Price: $10 Contact: project-safe. org MONDAY NOVEMBER 18 Sarah Jarosz, Brian Wright When: 7 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $15 Contact: meltingpointathens.com Moon Hooch

Peabody Decades Screening: “Gideon’s Trumpet” When: 7 to 9 p.m. Where: Special Collections Library Price: Free Contact: libs.uga.edu/ scl Cloak & Dagger Dating Service, Come What May, Bear Girl, We By The Sea When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: caledonialounge.com Matuto When: 7 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 Contact: meltingpointathens.com Bad Movie Night: “Fists of Steel” When: 8 p.m. Where: Cine Barcafe Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ badmovienight WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 20 Comedy Bouncy Castle When: 9 p.m. Where: Max Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ The-Max-Canada SALSAthens When: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $8 Contact: facebook.com/ lkshuffleclub MBUS Battle of the Bands When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: 40watt.com Consider The Source, Sumilan, Universal Sigh When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $5 Contact: georgiatheatre.com Johnny Winter When: 8p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $27 Contact: meltingpointathens.com Black Moon, Sea of Dogs, Hele Scott, Pipes You See, Pipes You Don’t, Rene LeConte, Jacob Morris When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 Contact: caledonialounge.com

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The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Puzzles B9

Your weekly guide to Athens’ daily deals.

Drink and Dining GUIDE THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Where: 256 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 549-0166 Website: www.allgoodlounge.com

********* HAPPY HOUR DRINK AND FOOD SPECIALS - Monday to Friday 3:00 – 7:00 - $12.99 Coors Light Towers all day/every day ********* 1/2 off Wine or Sangria $2 Bottle Miller Lite Where: $3.50 Wells 196 Alps Rd., Suite 49 $4 Pitchers Miller High Life Phone: 3 – Close 25¢ (706) 354-6655 Boneless Wings On Facebook:

$2 Bottle Miller Lite $3.50 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life

$2 Bottle Miller Lite $3.50 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life

facebook.com/ BuffalosCafeAthens

Where: 175 N. Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 353-2439 Website:

Live Trivia 7pm $10 Pitchers Blue Moon, Yuengling & Bud Light $2 Bottle Miller Lite $3.50 Wells 10% student discount on food

$2 Specialty Martini's $2 Off Terrapin pints $2 Bottle Miller Lite $2 Bottle Miller Lite $3.50 Wells $3.50 Wells $4 Pitcher Miller High Life $4 Pitchers Miller High Life 3 – Close All You Can Eat: 3 – Close 50¢ Traditional Wings $13.99 Traditional Wings Boneless Wings $12.99

$2.99 Buffalo Canyon-ritas $2 Bottle Miller Lite $3.50 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life 3 – Close All You Can Eat: Traditional Wings $13.99 Boneless Wings $12.99

$1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily

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Where: 320 E. Clayton Suite 201 Phone: (706) 613-0892 Website:

$6 Frozen drinks, $13 House wine bottles

$3 Well drinks & shots

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

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HAPPY HOUR $1 Pints of High Life all day

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life

8pm - Trivia $7 Domestic pitchers, $1 High Life pints

mellowmushroom.com

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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Downtown Location

10 YEARS & COUNTING!

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Difficulty: 18

Difficulty: 18

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B10 Puzzles

Thursday, November 14, 2013

The Red & Black

1

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE NOVEMBER 14

ACROSS 1 Make indistinct 5 Actor McQueen 10 As __ as a boil 14 Come in last 15 Ladies 16 Very eager 17 Eras 18 Beginning 19 Boring event 20 Socks & nylons 22 Kindle users 24 Papa 25 Song stanza 26 Happen 29 “Where __ I go wrong?” 30 Peru’s Indians 34 Additional amount 35 Distress signal 36 Reno attraction 37 Stein contents 38 Craftsman 40 African antelope 41 Stockpiles

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43 Evil 44 Conceited 45 Carrying a gun 46 Aviate 47 Turned off; feeling blasé 48 Misrepresent 50 “Now I __ me down to sleep...” 51 Make wider 54 Fortress; stronghold 58 Public uprising 59 Moses’ brother 61 Spanish artist 62 Shaping tool 63 Accidental stroke of luck 64 Get __; take revenge 65 Casual shirts, for short 66 Middle East nation 67 Actor __ Foxx

DOWN 1 Uninteresting 2 Company symbol 3 __ up; spends 4 Leftover silt 5 Knight’s weapon 6 Actor Danza 7 13th letters 8 Swerved 9 Go into 10 Depresses 11 Monster 12 Lion’s cry 13 Omelet maker’s needs 21 Cochlea’s spot 23 Of the Far East 25 Able to be seen 26 Largest city in Nebraska 27 Purple or pink 28 Dairy product 29 Speck 31 Groucho’s prop 32 “Little Orphan __”

33 Noise 35 Soon-to-be grads: abbr. 36 Scoundrel 38 __ up; totaled 39 Utter 42 Partial refunds to the buyer 44 Traveler 46 Grand __; big conclusion 47 Flying mammal 49 Full of foliage 50 Fine fabric for a tablecloth 51 Unruly child 52 Carousel, e.g. 53 Seep out 54 Soft drink 55 Bird of peace 56 Observed 57 Terra firma 60 Bacardi product

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FRIDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE NOVEMBER 15 ACROSS 1 Street surfacer 6 __ in; wearing 10 One of the Three Bears 14 Banishment 15 Actor’s part 16 Elderly 17 Santa’s helpers 18 Fumbler’s word 19 Use a Kindle 20 Response to a stimulus 22 Son in a royal family 24 Fish __; aquarium 25 Little pad under a drink 26 Afternoon nap 29 Door fastener 30 Depressed; sad 31 Join, as a club 33 Actor Stacy 37 Thing; object 39 Rarin’ to go 41 Grain storage tower

42 Fortuneteller’s deck of cards 44 Eskimo canoe 46 __ to; because of 47 __ Peace Prize 49 Kids; jokes with 51 Gondola operator 54 Unyielding 55 Pockmark on the moon 56 Covered wagon passengers 60 Sheltered bay 61 Make indistinct 63 Arm joint 64 __-friendly; easy to operate 65 Uncommon 66 Tripoli’s nation 67 Cincinnati team 68 Filled with wonder 69 Disrespectful

DOWN 1 Look searchingly 2 Wheel rod 3 Paper towel brand 4 Votes into office 5 Say again 6 Thief 7 Crazy as a __ 8 Mont Blanc or the Matterhorn 9 Powerful ruler 10 Louisiana’s counties 11 Insurance seller 12 Harmony 13 Deadly snake 21 Foolish 23 Off-the__; ready-made 25 Mariah or Drew 26 Narrow cut 27 Tiny bit 28 Beverage holder 29 Allowed by law 32 __ aback; surprised 34 Assists 35 Board game

36 Garden tools 38 Ogres 40 Numerical comparison 43 Heavy book 45 Pieces of corn 48 Ms. Streisand 50 Aviator Earhart 51 Happen 52 Got up 53 Talked wildly 54 Gave a pink slip to 56 Untainted 57 Recedes 58 Rogers & Clark 59 Influence 62 Statute

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SATURDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE NOVEMBER 16

ACROSS 1 “Do You Know the Way to San __?” 5 Play a guitar 10 Hold __; keep 14 Hideous 15 On the __; free to the customer 16 Sign of sleepiness 17 Sequoia or oak 18 Starry-eyed 20 Title for Harkin or Hatch: abbr. 21 Noggin 22 Pebble 23 7-times-a-week newspaper 25 Actress West 26 Gushed forth 28 Longs 31 Rowed 32 France’s dollar before the euro 34 Leprechaun 36 Fibs

37 Plank 38 Celebrity 39 Golfer Ernie __ 40 Dog 41 Davis or Midler 42 Walk leisurely 44 Took an opinion survey 45 Most common conjunction 46 Blue __; largest mammal 47 VP __ Agnew 50 Entryway 51 Total 54 Job for a tailor 57 Walk around with a long face 58 Gas or coal 59 Embankment 60 Actor John of “Good Times” 61 TV show award 62 City in England 63 Strong urges

DOWN 1 Sticks out 2 Meanie 3 Thinnest 4 Needle’s hole 5 Armor carried on the arm 6 Currently 7 Regretted 8 Neighbor of Canada: abbr. 9 Singer Tillis 10 Bivalve mollusk 11 Intl. military alliance 12 Bed size 13 A single time 19 Sir __ Newton 21 Rushed 24 Fills with amazement 25 Repair 26 Shoe bottom 27 Buckets 28 Three feet 29 Irritating 30 Schedule

32 Very unpleasant 33 Raced 35 Dancer Astaire 37 Courageous 38 Peddle 40 Esteem 41 Wild hog 43 Seldom 44 T-Mobile store purchases 46 Courted 47 Out of harm’s way 48 Small oval fruit 49 Dating couple gossiped about 50 Headfirst plunge 52 “Once __ a time...” 53 State of clutter 55 Everybody 56 Peg for Tiger 57 Spring month

33 35 38 39 41 42 44 45 47 48 49 50 52 53 54 55 59

MONDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE NOVEMBER 18

Terry believes business is part of the community.

ACROSS 1 __-jet; type of printer 4 Passion 9 Dermatologist’s concern 13 City near Lake Tahoe 15 Depart 16 Bump __; meet unexpectedly 17 Perched upon 18 Word in the names of many bowling alleys 19 Require 20 Invigorating drug; upper 22 Jewels 23 Accepted standard 24 Lincoln, to pals 26 Baseball official 29 Cloud over the eye lens 34 Low-ranking British peer 35 __ off; diminish gradually

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36 Misfortune 37 Not closed 38 Summoned with a beeper 39 Renown 40 Tavern order 41 Stacks 42 __ by surprise; startled 43 Predisposition; bent 45 Changes one’s alarm clock 46 Word of disgust 47 Cod or carp 48 Snow vehicle 51 Statement of protest 56 Fuel, for some 57 Unwilling 58 Margarine 60 Villain 61 Bert’s buddy 62 Close by 63 Broadway award 64 Parakeet food 65 Sault __. Marie

DOWN 1 Tax-deferred retirement acct. 2 Brooklyn team 3 Shoelace problem 4 Charm; entice 5 Kingdom 6 Carvey or Delany 7 Baker’s need 8 Said again 9 Sewing machine brand 10 Leg joint 11 Thingamajig 12 __ off; falls asleep 14 Viewpoint 21 Dawn, for short 25 Saloon 26 German sub 27 Syrup flavor 28 Primp 29 Deceitful; crafty 30 Mimics 31 Not sleeping 32 One of Santa’s

reindeer Adolescents Powder Tiny punctures In __; stylish Cribbage piece Exam Actor __ Moore Wealth Foul-smelling Dundee native Company’s symbol Deserve Drill a hole TV’s Pauley Bullring cries Tidy Raw metal


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The Red & Black

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Puzzles B11

1

TUESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE NOVEMBER 19

ACROSS 1 Juicy fruit 5 Flock members 10 Popular flower 14 Wheel shaft 15 Actress Berry 16 Eras 17 One of the three tenses 18 First phase 19 Ensnare 20 Loving 22 Large tank that holds rainwater 24 Colony insect 25 Furry swimmer 26 Tranquillity 29 City transport 30 Cheese-topped tortilla chip 34 Conceal 35 Took a chair 36 Xerox machine 37 Insert 38 Bullfighter

40 Gift of __; glibness 41 Appeared 43 __ and tonic; bar order 44 African nation 45 Was mistaken 46 Observe 47 Most terrible 48 Carnival attractions 50 Winter month: abbr. 51 Cop’s title 54 Today 58 Bide one’s time 59 Cracker spreads 61 Old Roman robe 62 Old magazine title 63 Some golf tournaments 64 Hardly __; infrequently 65 Iditarod vehicle 66 Child’s bear 67 Actor __ Foxx

DOWN 1 Daddy 2 Physical, e.g. 3 To boot 4 Go over, as one’s steps 5 Yell 6 __ Christian Andersen 7 Rail systems 8 Votes into office 9 __ four; dainty iced pastry 10 Dilapidated building 11 Bad guy 12 Burn 13 Sports network 21 Afternoon hour 23 Spanish man 25 Power failures 26 __ out; get rid of gradually 27 Sea duck with soft down 28 Deadly viper

29 Blind as a __ 31 Stogie 32 Makes well 33 Planet’s elliptical path 35 Melancholy 36 Swindle 38 Battlefield doc 39 Perish 42 Earned 44 Mafia member 46 Mexican shawl 47 Tiny 49 Train station 50 Persnickety 51 Hooting birds 52 Get an “F” 53 Small flute 54 Take care of 55 Bird of peace 56 Grew old 57 Linear measure 60 Brother of JFK

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WEDNESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE NOVEMBER 20 ACROSS 1 Church singers 6 Con game 10 Fissure; split 14 Door hanger’s metal piece 15 Jab 16 Actor Sharif 17 Sports building 18 “Abbey __”; Beatles album 19 Labyrinth 20 Leftover; remaining 22 Proverbs 24 Slight coloring 25 Wiliness; guile 26 Wild binges 29 Adjust a clock 30 “The Raven” poet 31 Refuse to obey 33 Cavett & Clark 37 As soon as possible: abbr. 39 Come from behind to win

41 Scuttle contents 42 Katmandu’s nation 44 Nitrogen and hydrogen 46 Bread variety 47 Glove material 49 Connected 51 Collection of weapons 54 Escape 55 Cat owner’s purchase 56 Personal code to enter a site 60 Burial place 61 Snatch 63 Giggler’s sound 64 In this place 65 British noble 66 From the East 67 Inquires 68 Toddler 69 Each floor of a building

DOWN 1 Scorch 2 Bring on board 3 Dollar bills 4 Set on fire 5 More prepared 6 “Jack __ could eat no fat...” 7 “Groovy!” in today’s jargon 8 Letters before an alias 9 Military awards, often 10 Amorous 11 Spitting __; exact likeness 12 Disturbs 13 Lock of hair 21 Car racer Al __ 23 Recolored 25 __ down the river; betrays 26 Reach across 27 Sit for a photo 28 Gather crops

29 Take it easy 32 Quick breakfast for some 34 Bottle stopper 35 Actress Ballard 36 Vehicle pulled by huskies 38 Artists’ trays of colors 40 Hollers 43 Path 45 Afternoon naps 48 Dart thrower’s board 50 Most modern 51 Fraternity letter 52 Irritates 53 Long-legged bird 54 Tale by Aesop 56 Leave the car 57 Cincinnati, __ 58 Raise, as kids 59 Declare untrue 62 Sunbeam

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Looking to sublease my room in 4 bedroom townhouse in Towne Club (off Milledge) Summer 2014. Rent 445/month plus utilities. Call 404-542-4952 Retreat South townhouse on Riverbend 5 mins from school. Frequent bus 4bed/4bath (subleasing 1) $375 per month + utilities Dec to July stareun0705@hotmail.com SUBLEASE AVAILABLE! 1BDR in 4BDR/2BTH 5POINTS house. Available mid-December. Full kitchen, two living rooms, porch & plenty of parking. Walking distance to campus & bus stops. $455/month+utilities. Email bmtrav@uga.edu Subleasing my room in 3br/2ba Normaltown house for Spring Semester 2014. Ideal for UGA students, walking distance from HSC bus stop, about 2 miles from DT/campus. $350/month + 1/3 utilities

Subleasing 1BR/BA in a townhouse off Barnett Shoals Rd. Dog friendly. Can be furnished if needed! Pool and gym access. Lease ends July 25, 2014. 355/ month + utilities, negotiable. 1 Bed 1 Bath. 1 block from campus at River Mill. Rent includes parking, water and basic cable. Unfirnished unit. $569 per month. For Spring semester. For info email agmyers91@gmail. com Looking for 2 females to take over our lease during the Spring semester. It's a 3BR apartment located at 909 Broad Looking for a female to sublease. Great location near 5 Points off of Milledge. Beautiful home. 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths. Live with three great girls. $550/ month. Contact Kelsey Backus 678-416-2771 Private 1 BR/1 Bath available in a 2 BR apartment on S Milledge Ave. Rent is $400. Includes water. Contact me at eagulich@uga.edu for more info.

Looking for a male or female to take over a $373/month lease at Lakeside apartments, Spring 2014 or sooner. Private bedroom, two-person bathroom. Pets welcome! Please email mmarks93@ uga.edu 1 bedroom of 4 bedroom house! Rent 331$! Is on South Milledge Avenue and on Athens Transit busline. 3 female students currently live there. Room is LARGE with private bathroom! 1bed, 1bath townhouse off Barnett shoals Rd. All appliances included, private patio area, minutes away from campus. $500/ month. See what is free after signing agreement. Contact info 706-705-2549 Lauren. Abbey West Apartments. Private Bedroom/bathroom. $390 a month/utilities included. Four girls. Pet Friendly. Completely Furnished. Call 678-689-4025 for more information. Ready ASAP Looking to sublease my bed/ bath in 4br/4bath house. Clearwater Creek (Barnett Shoals) from now until end of July2014. Frequent Buses. Rent 400/month plus utilities. Call 786-351-4490

Bedroom available in a three bedroom apartment at the Connection. Fully furnished, hardwood floors, W/D included, walk in closet. Pet friendly. $425 Cable, water and internet included. 678-982-3014 $383/month: Looking for a girl or guy to take over a lease at Lakeside apartments, Spring 2014 or sooner. Private bedroom, two-person bathroom. Pets welcome! Please email mmarks93@ uga.edu1MATE

ROOMMATES

Normaltown House (near the Grit), looking for 1 more (female/ student) roommate for Spring 2014 semester. $350/month + 1/3 utilities. Contact srl9@uga. edu if interested! $350/month 2Bed/2.5Bath Townhouse minutes from campus- 3rd year ad major looking for female roommate to move in January. Email me greenek@uga. edu if interested! Look forward to hearing from you! :) Room for rent at Lakeside Apts. Available now. Furnished bedroom. Full kitchen with washer-dryer. No deposit. Call John at 608-332-8776.

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B12 Sports

Thursday, November 14, 2013

The Red & Black

UGA has strength in numbers with deep, star-less team BY NICK SUSS @nicksuss

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Georgia doesn’t have the kind of basketball program that can be ranked in the top 10 solely because of its freshman class. Georgia doesn’t have Andrew Wiggins of Kansas or Jabari Parker of Duke. Georgia isn’t Kentucky. Georgia isn’t any of these things. But Georgia is deep. In the team’s season opener against Wofford, 14 players logged at least two minutes of action, 11 of them scoring a point and 13 of them grabbing a rebound. While no single player stands out as a superstar, three players scored in double digits and another fell just short with nine points. “I think we’re going to have a different leading scorer every game,” senior forward Donte’ Williams said. “We have I think four guys who scored double digits. I think that we can use that to our advantage; teams can’t focus on just one person.” After last season, sharing responsibilities may be a welcomed change. While it was logical for the 20122013 incarnation of the Bulldogs to rely on the since-departed Kentavious Caldwell-Pope to the tune of 430 shots, 591 points and 226 rebounds — 207, 339 and 87 more than the next best on the team, respectively — a game where Caldwell-Pope wasn’t at his best meant a loss. This team doesn’t suffer from those woes. “It’s the truth,” Williams said of the team’s need to replace CaldwellPope. “We’ve just gotta, as a team, pick up more responsibilities. He led us in scoring. He led us in rebounding. We just gotta pick up.” Why find one dominant player to supply big points when 11 players could do just the same? This becomes even more possible when considering that junior college transfer Cameron Forte and freshmen Juwan Parker and J.J. Frazier contributed 17 points Friday and are expected to only get better with experience. “Our young guys have to play,” head coach Mark Fox said. “It’s critical that they got significant minutes.” But with most of Georgia’s depth comprised of younger players, one would naturally expect concern about the team’s experience and

Senior forward Donte’ Williams (15) believes Georgia can replace what it lost in Kentavious Caldwell-Pope with improved depth. TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff leadership. That’s one thing Fox isn’t worried about in the slightest. “The older guys are taking care of the younger guys,” Fox said. “Even though we only have one senior, Marcus [Thornton] is a senior academically and [junior forward Nemanja Djurisic] played a ton of minutes, so those guys have been very good leaders to the younger guys.” However, there are still too many uncertainties with this team to make any judgments about how significant its depth is. The team doesn’t have another Caldwell-Pope waiting in the wings. No freshman is drawing comparisons to LeBron James as Kansas’ Wiggins is or Carmelo Anthony as Duke’s Parker is. No one expects this team to still be playing in March, let alone April. No one, not even the members of the team, knows exactly what the season will hold or who the superstars will be. Frazier put it best. “We’ve got no one and we’ve got everybody at the same time.”


November 14, 2013 edition of the Red & Black