Page 1

If a victim of rape never speaks, no one hears a sound. STORY By Hilary Butschek @hilarylbutschek

Anonymous reporting of sexual violence, although allowed under federal law and University of Georgia guidelines, does nothing to aid security offices in preventing rapes. Two employees of the Equal Opportunity Office, which investigates violations of UGA rules, reported two sexual violence crimes on campus to the University of Georgia Police Oct. 3, but the EOO is unaware of the identity of at least one of the victims.

“It was reported by the residence halls to the EOO with the message that the student did not want to pursue. In one of the cases they’re not even aware of who the victim is. It’s an anonymous report,” said Tom Jackson, senior vice president of public affairs. Both of the victims’ identities were kept anonymous on the reports. One was a sexual assault Sept. 9 in Reed Hall and the other was a strong arm rape that occurred Sept. 28 in

Creswell Hall. They were reported by EOO Director Janyce Dawkins and Associate Director Kristopher Stevens, according to UGA police reports filed Oct. 3. Dawkins did not respond to requests for an interview from The Red & Black. The anonymous reports of sexual violence continued this week. On Wednesday, Executive Associate Athletic Director and Senior Woman

Thursday, October 10, 2013 Vol. 121, No. 10 | Athens, Georgia redandblack.com

DAVID C BRISTOW/Staff

Adviser Carla Williams reported a case of felony sexual battery which occurred Oct. 6 at East Campus Village. According to the police report, Williams stated an unknown female student reported someone known to her committed the offense of sexual battery against her. The student did not want to file a report about the incident at this time. See REPORTS, Page 2

Y T E K RIC TICKETS

TICKET PRICE

DOWN, AND OUT

If a scalper asks for face value for a big game, the ticket is probably fake.

HOLOGRAM Legitimate UGA football tickets have custom foil featuring the Georgia ‘G.’

SEATING Getting a lot of cash for cheap seats may be a sign of counterfeit money.

Six reported fake ticket sales so far this season By Brad Mannion @madbrannion

DAVID C BRISTOW/Staff

TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

Georgia football players Malcolm Mitchell, Keith Marshall (top) and Justin Scott-Wesley(right) suffered season-ending ACL injuries this year. Michael Bennett (left) also tore his meniscus against Tennessee.

Common injury disarming Georgia’s offensive arsenal BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey Covering a punt. Catching a pass. Celebrating a touchdown. The unfortunate theme in all of these otherwise routine plays involves a Bulldog starter tearing the anterior cruciate ligament — better known as the ACL — in one of his knees, an injury both infamous and all-too-common in the world of football. This season has been harsher than most for No. 7 Georgia (4-1, 3-0 SEC), with the afflicted including starting receivers Malcolm Mitchell, Justin ScottWesley and tailback Keith Marshall. All three were poised for productive seasons, and yet in each of their cases it took only a moment for football’s silent killer to erase several months’ worth of conditioning and preparation. Two of these plays came in one game, and wideout Michael Bennett also hurt his knee in the Tennessee contest, later diag-

nosed as a meniscus tear that required surgery and should sideline him for a at least a few weeks. The heartbreak becomes tough to watch for fans and players alike, and the aftershock of those losses can have its effects on any normal team’s psyche. The Bulldogs, like most players, are also well aware of the inherent dangers playing football carries. They know the game’s risks. But they also realize what has been lost. “For me, there’s three guys I’ll never play football with again at Georgia,” senior tight end Arthur Lynch said. “It’s definitely tough, but that’s part of the game. Football’s a physical game and a physical sport. It comes with the territory. If you don’t expect for some injuries to take place, then you’re just kind of living in a fantasy world. I think we’ve been able to adapt to injuries thus far and we’ll continue to do so.” “Next man up,” the team

might say. But what of the men down? *** Keith Marshall was a mess. During the first half of Georgia’s overtime win over the Volunteers, he ran just a few yards out from the line of scrimmage, searching for the the pass quarterback Aaron Murray had just thrown his way. Tennessee cornerback Cameron Sutton came to hit Marshall as the ball arrived and the ball sailed just out of the sophomore tailback’s grasp. Down on the field for a few minutes, he was soon helped by Georgia’s training staff. Cameras later caught the second-year tailback, who had been filling in for an injured Todd Gurley, crying on the bench, perhaps already knowing the diagnosis that was to come.

Timothy Huban did not worry about the legitimacy of the scalper when he spent $400 to be denied entry into Sanford Stadium. “It was just right out front of [the stadium],” he said. “It looked like the person was buying and selling tickets, so it didn’t really cross my mind that they would be counterfeit.” Six incident of football fans buying fake tickets from scalpers — including Huban’s ­— have been reported to University of Georgia police during the 2013 home football games. Collectively, victims have lost roughly $2,170 purchasing fraudulent tickets, according to these reports. The 2013 UGA game versus Louisiana State University alone saw 87 percent of this money lost to fake ticket sales. “This goes on every year,” said UGA Police Chief Jimmy Williamson. “If the event’s huge, there’s people out there selling tickets, and if you don’t go to someone you know, or a legitimate vendor, you will more than likely get taken advantage of.” The number of incidents reported for home games in 2012 was lower, but UGA police responded to one incident involving a victim paying for $440 in fake tickets. Williamson said many incidents of this nature go unreported. According to an article by the University of Missouri student newspaper The Maneater, roughly 400 tickets were read as “missed scans” on the day of the UGA-Mizzou football game in 2012. The cause of many of these fraudulent ticket sales is the accuracy and detail of the fake tickets when compared to real tickets. “There are some distinct differences between valid, authentic tickets and what’s being sold,” said Tim Cearley, director of ticket operations for the UGA Athletic Association. “But they’re doing a pretty good job out there of coming close to what we and other schools are selling.” See TICKETS, Page 3

See INJURIES, Page 14

NEWS, 2 • VIEWS, 4 • SPORTS, 9 • FEATURE, 11 • SHOWCASE, 16 • VARIETY, 17 • PUZZLES, 21 An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia and Athens Communities

Established 1893, Independent 1980


2 News

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

POLICE BLOTTER UGA student charged with shoplifting from Macy’s Athens-Clarke County Police arrested and charged a University of Georgia student with shoplifting at 5:23 p.m. Sunday after she allegedly stole two dresses and one shirt from the Macy’s inside Georgia Square Mall. A Macy’s employee reportedly saw the student, Katherine Hoyle, 21, go into a dressing room with items and a flat purse. When she came out, “she had less items than when she entered and her purse was fuller,” according to the police report. The employee checked Hoyle's fitting room and found two empty hangers, two price tags and one security tag in the pocket of a jacket that was left there, according to the report. Hoyle was taken to the loss prevention office, where the employee “warned the offender of criminal trespass for two years from the incident loca-

tion,” and the mall security “warned the offender of criminal trespass from the entire mall for a period of one year.” The Red & Black was unable to reach Hoyle for comment.

ly appears at locations where the she can also be found.

— Jana French

A University of Georgia employee reported the theft of roughly $250 in items from Brooks Hall to UGA police Monday. The items reportedly stolen were a framed picture and glass award located outside the employee’s office. The items weren't missing at 5 p.m. Friday when the employee last saw them but were gone he returned at 9 a.m. Monday. Police determined there was no damage to any doors of Brooks Hall, but the building was not secured during the alleged time of the incident.

UGA student reports stalking by known individual The victim of a series of stalking incidents told University of Georgia police Monday the most recent incident involved the suspect following and watching her inside the Tate Student Center on Oct. 2. Several similar incidents have occurred between the 20-year-old UGA student and the suspect, beginning when they met in the fall of 2012. But it was not until recently the student noticed the person reportedly “placing her under ... surveillance.” She told police she fears for her safety, as the suspect alleged-

1p, 4p, 7p, & 9:55p 1:30p, 4:25p, 7:20p, & 10:15p 1p, 4p, 7p, 9:55p

GET YOUR HOLIDAY SHOPPING FINISHED EARLY

— Brad Mannion Framed picture, glass award stolen from Brooks Hall

— Brad Mannion Alleged UGA employee suspected of pointing firearm at woman A verbal argument between a man and woman led to a firearm pointed in the direction of the woman, according to an Athens-Clarke County Police report. The man drove with the woman to deliver tools to another man to repair his car with at 8:20 a.m. Monday. According to the report, the man who delivered the tools is a University of Georgia employee but this could not be confirmed by The Red & Black. When the man and woman arrived with the tools, the man allegedly accused the woman of seeing other people. The police arrived after the man and woman left the scene. Later, police came into contact with the woman, and she said the man pulled out a gun and pointed it at her during the argument. — Brad Mannion

Purchase a PANDORA Pavé Gift Set for $200, available starting October 3. 283 E Clayton Street Athens 30601 706.543.3473 • www.tenas.com

While supplies last. See store for details.

REDDY URGENT CARE Open 7 days WALK-IN

MON-SAt: 8AM-8PM SUN: 10AM-6PM

706-621-7575

For all non-life threatening sicknesses or injuries

www.ReddyUrgentCareCenters.com

1061 DOWDY RD, SUITE 100, ATHENS GA 30606 (Off Epps Bridge WAL-Mart, Behind Ryan’s) AtheNs

RoystoN

DANIeLsvILLe

hARtWeLL

UGA students report car break-in Two University of Georgia students told UGA police $311 worth of equipment was stolen from one of their cars at 9:09 p.m. Friday. The owner of the car reportedly parked his car on the third floor of the West Parking Deck from Thursday at noon and Friday at 9:09 p.m. When they returned to the car, the first student’s 8 GB iPod Nano and ear buds were missing. The other student’s iPod car charger, Converse low top shoes, a black auxiliary cord, a silver chain with a wing charm and fake diamonds and spare change were also missing. The items have not been recovered. — Jana French

Rachel Moorehead, a system administrator for EITS, said the UGAMail upgrade in November will be the last for the next six months. randy schafer/Staff

UGAMail to update once more By Mariana Viera @mariana_viera1 UGAMail is getting ready for another makeover. Lewis Noles, a system administrator for Enterprise Information Technology Services, said Microsoft will implement another design update to the system any time between Nov. 1 and Nov. 30. “Basically, [Microsoft] will give us notice about two weeks before [the upgrade will happen],” Noles said. UGAMail underwent an update Aug. 2 through Aug. 4, that changed the logo on the top left corner of the screen from “UGAMail” to “Office 365.” Otherwise the update did not change the appearance of the website. Rachel Moorehead, another system administrator for EITS, said this upgrade change the “look and feel” of UGAMail a bit more. According to the EITS website, which has screenshots of the new layout, the new design will feature a blue bar at the top of the screen with the new Office 365 logo. The calendar and

contacts function will move from the left sidebar to the top blue bar. Emails will be written directly on the reading pane on the right-hand side of the page instead of in a pop-up window. The log-in page will remain the same. “This is an upgrade that Microsoft is pushing out,” Moorehead said. “It’s to get us to the latest upgrade version of their email software.” EITS expects the update to run as smoothly as the last. “We don’t really expect there to be any disruptions,” Moorehead said. “The most you might be asked is to log out and log back in.” Moorehead said this should be the last of the big updates from Microsoft for the next six months. She said Microsoft is going to start implementing smaller updates more frequently as opposed to large, infrequent updates. Kerri Testement, the public relations coordinator for EITS, said this upgrade is driven completely by Microsoft The company is implementing the change.

REPORTS: ‘Unusual’ for police to be unaware of cases brought to Equal Opportunity Office ➤ From Page 1 After an anonymous report of rape is filed with the EOO, the office must balance two often opposing requirements put in place by federal law Title IX. “If an anonymous incident of sexual violence is reported to the Title IX coordinator or Equal Opportunity Office ... to the extent possible they are required to do two things — to investigate and to respect the victim’s wishes,” said Daniel Carter, the director of 32 National Campus Safety Initiative. If a victim goes to the police to report a rape, but tells them she does not want anything done, the police will respect her wishes and not conduct an investigation. But, the EOO is held by the Title IX federal requirement to conduct some kind of investigation. According to the “Dear Colleague” letter sent April 4, 2011 from the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, the rule is “A school that knows, or reasonably should know, about possible harassment must promptly investigate to determine what occurred and then take appropriate steps to resolve the situation.” Carter said, a school’s investigation would have two goals in mind. “The first one would be could you prove with the preponderance of the evidence standards … that the institution’s rules were violated. Or it might also look at what were the circumstances and what corrective action could be taken to remedy a hostile environment,” he said. The term investigation, though, is defined broadly by the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights in the “Dear Colleague” letter, especially when the victim does not want to be known. “They will have to work with the information at hand,” Carter said. “So, for example if the accused has been

identified, they would need to keep that on file and be prepared to make note if the accused shows up in another report, or, for example if someone from an organization that they are involved with shows up in another report. So that if they could identify a pattern or a potential hostile environment that affects more than one individual, further action may need to be taken.” When a victim doesn’t speak out all the EOO and the police have to do is report the number publicly, as required by the Jeanne Clery Act. It does not mandate reporting the victim’s name. “They don’t have to tell me who,” said UGA Police Chief Jimmy Williamson. “All I need to know is what happened, where it happened, when it happened, and the big thing I like to know too, is was the person known to them or not known to them, and that sometimes based on the time frame will determine if we do a timely warning or not.” The reason the EOO did report the rapes to the police was to make the crimes public, Jackson said. “It’s very unusual for [a report] to come to EOO that the police aren’t already aware of. Usually it’s the other way around. In fact Ms. Dawkins told me that these two in September were the first time that had happened since she became director,” Jackson said. UGA police file a report in response to every rape they hear about, Williamson said, even the essential element of a crime is missing — a victim. “I’m going to count it as a rape whether I

have the victim or not. Most communities will not report that as a rape because the element of a crime is that you have to have a victim,” he said. But Williamson prefers to see a victim as soon as possible after the crime happens because it’s the optimal time to collect evidence, such as physical violence to the victim and bodily fluids left on sheets and clothes. Jackson said in the future, the EOO will look out for reports not known by both offices. “It was an unusual situation,” he said. “In the future they’ll be checking closely to make sure [the police] know about any that have come to them.” Between the police and the EOO, Williamson said, some kind of investigation would always be done into sexual crimes reported on campus. “The EOO office, under Title IX, even if the victim of a sexual assault or a rape does not want it investigated, EOO will investigate,” Williamson said. “Title IX and the ‘Dear Colleague’ letter require the University to investigate even if there’s no police action going to be done. So, to me, they went to somebody who was going to investigate no matter what. If they’d come to me and said I don’t want you to investigate, we weren’t really going to do anything.” For any office, the authority to thoroughly investigate crimes on campus depends on the voice of the victim. “The Office of Civil Rights has never said that there is an obligation, in fact they said quite the reverse, to force a victim to take any action,” Carter said.

Corrections In the Oct. 3 edition of The Red & Black: Seven of 10 campus parking decks are being paid for, not eight (page 3).

Nick Watson Editor-in-Chief editor@randb.com Erica Techo Managing Editor me@randb.com


The Red & Black

Thursday, october 10, 2013

News 3

UGA researchers told to ‘continue working’ despite government shutdown By Jeanette Kazmierczak @sciencekaz When the national government shut down Oct. 1, science research-related agencies across the country ground to a halt as 800,000 federal employees were furloughed. The University of Georgia’s Office of the Vice President for Research issued an announcement Sept. 30, instructing UGA researchers working on federally funded projects to continue research as usual. “What we said in that memo hasn’t changed,” said Regina Smith, associate vice president for research. “We’ve instructed our faculty to proceed with their projects as usual. Continue working, continue working. That seems to be, from our conversations with other research universities in the state of Georgia and with other SEC schools, we’re all doing pretty much the same thing. Business as usual.” Smith said UGA has formed a small committee to consider what to do if the government continues to not issue money for research. She said when an investigator receives a federal grant, UGA pays them for their work and is reimbursed by the grant provider at the end of the month. “Right now what’s happening is, they’re not reimbursing us,” Smith said. “So the only money we have to spend is University money and we’re continuing to do that. But stop and think, University money can only go so far.” UGA researchers brought in a total of $104,501,189 in federally sponsored awards for the 2013 fiscal year. But big-name agencies including the United States Department of Agriculture and the National Institute of Health are running on skeleton crews because they have stopped receiving money from Congress. “We are starting to see that payouts to agencies are being limited or are not happening,” said Andrew Dill, UGA’s director of federal relations. “And I think review of grants are being limited or are not happening because of the continued furloughing of employees. Congress has tried to do some piecemeal funding of certain agencies like NIH, which have not been successful.” OVPR has advised researchers to continue submitting grants according to pre-shutdown deadlines, even if there’s no one on the receiving end,

The University of Georgia has continued research, but has also formed a committee to figure out what to do if the government shutdown and lack of funding continues until the end of the month. david c. bristow/Staff Smith said. The proposals must still have the correct electronic time stamp to be valid. Smith said UGA would stop work promptly on any federally funded project if instructed to by an agency, but has only received three stop-work orders so far. Smith said she wasn’t aware of the details but stop-work orders are typically associated with contract workers, not grant-sponsored researchers. UGA adjunct professors and students who are employed at local stations of national agencies like the USDA and the Environmental Protection Agency

Breast cancer screenings, awareness essential for all college-aged women BY Lauren McDonald @laurenmcdonald2 Breast cancer threatened to end former Gym Dawg Talya Vexler’s life just as it was beginning. The then 23-year-old University of Georgia senior and stand-out gymnast was diagnosed with breast cancer at Athens Regional Medical Center in 2003. “I don’t mean to scare anybody into being worried about this,” Vexler said. “But I am only alive because I got checked. I thought something might be wrong, and I did something about it. I didn’t feel sick, and all I had was a lump.” Since her diagnosis, Vexler, who now works as an assistant coach to the gymnastics team at the University of Iowa, has worked to spread awareness. October is the month for Vexler’s message. Throughout this breast cancer awareness month, UGA Relay for Life will partner with Zeta Tau Alpha’s Think Pink Week to continue Vexler’s message on campus — and local health care facilities will continue to provide the services necessary to help collegeaged women detect and deal with breast cancer. “I think it’s something that college students don’t think about enough,” said Kate Plumblee, a senior health promotions major from Atlanta and the executive director of UGA Relay for Life. “But our behaviors right now — exercising, eating healthy — that’s going to affect whether or not we get breast cancer, or any other type of cancer for that matter, in the future. I definitely think it’s important for us to think about, even now.” Elizabeth Conway, a breast nurse specialist at the Breast Health Center at Athens Regional Medical Center, said she hopes Vexler’s message stays on campus beyond October. “Young women can and do get breast cancer,” Conway said. She said she sees many college students come to Athens Regional for breast health check-ups. “[Breast cancer] is something that a female college student should have on her radar,” Conway said. “Women of the age of 18 or 19 should start doing a breast exam at home once a month. We would also suggest that when they’re going to their physician just for their routine yearly checkup that they do a clinical breast exam in the doctor’s office.” The University Health Center offers clinical breast exams with each scheduled gynecological exam, said Liz Rachun, the health communications coordinator at the UHC. Students with cause for concern will be referred to a specialist. But Conway said women who have a family history of breast cancer shouldn’t wait for a reason to be concerned. They should begin screenings 10 years before their family member’s first diagnosis. “If someone’s mom was diagnosed at age 40, they would need to start screening at age 30,” Conway said. “Even if they’re not finding anything wrong with their breasts, we would want them to start their screening earlier than the general population.” While the screenings are important, Rachun said she believes the counseling services offered through UHC to be the “most important

Awareness Events OCT. 11: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Athens Goes Pink at Terrapin Brewery will feature food, live music and a luminary ceremony.

OCT. 19: 8:30 a.m., Tanger Outlets will be hosting a Fit For a Cure 5K Run. OCT. 23: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Cancer Prevention Cooking Class at the Athens-Clarke County Health Department. Participants will learn how to prepare meals and snacks that can reduce the risk of cancer.

OCT 24: 5 to 8 p.m., Tanger Outlets will host Pink Night of Giving, an auction featuring UGA football tickets, a free night at Chateau Elan Inn, a free round of golf for four at Double Oaks Golf Course and a $250 Tanger gift card. MORE: All through October — Thomas Eye Center Optometry is offering Pink Your Pumpkin, in which guests can paint pumpkins pink for a $1 donation. resource” to young women with families affected by breast cancer. Conway said counseling is also an important tool for personal breast cancer battles. “Young women face a little different issues than maybe a woman diagnosed in her 60s,” she said. “We’re talking also about their future fertility. Will they be able to have children? Will the surgery affect their sexuality and their body image?” ARMC offers a support group specifically for young women fighting breast cancer. Vexler said this sort of support was priceless after her diagnosis. “My advice would be that, if you’re ever in the position where you’re facing a diagnosis, to find just one person to talk to that’s around your age because that’s really what helped me the most,” she said. But whether diagnosed or on alert, Conway said awareness spread through groups such as UGA Relay for Life or through stories such as Vexler’s is the first defense against breast cancer. “It’s something to not be afraid about, but something to be informed about,” she said. Vexler said her decision to get checked out by a doctor ultimately saved her life. “You just have to be aware of your body, and you have to get something checked if it’s not right,” she said.

were cut off from research projects when the doors closed. Many of those researchers were unavailable for comment because, as federal employees, they needed permission from their agencies to speak to The Red & Black, but their press officers had been furloughed as well. With Oct. 8 marking the beginning of the second week of the shut down, UGA has hunkered down for the long haul. “We will continue to do that research until we can’t do it anymore,” Smith said.

tickets: Discrepancies do not ‘foil’ fake sales ➤ From Page 1 Certain characteristics of the real tickets could not be disclosed to The Red & Black for fear of replication, but there is a design on the ticket used to benefit game attendants. “The biggest thing that is on our tickets is a custom foil, and within that foil, it says Georgia Bulldogs and it’s got the trademark ‘G’ in it,” he said. “That’s primarily the identifier that we have in place that cannot be duplicated. What we’re seeing on the counterfeit tickets is, on where that custom foil is, the counterfeiters are using more generic foil type, and most of these are obviously being sold or purchased on the street.” This does not stop fans, particularly nonregular attendees, from falling victim to these purchases. “The one-time fan who is just coming to that game isn’t familiar to what our ticket looks like, so to the untrained eye, it looks and feels like a genuine ticket,” Cearley said. Huban, whose attendance marked his third trip to a UGA football game ever, said he and his friend, who had attended several games, were both fooled by the tickets’ appearance. The threat of fake tickets is combined with the increased risk of counterfeit money. Williamson said the number of incident counterfeit money is “about 50-50” with the number of fraudulent tickets sold. “If the deal sounds too good, it probably is,” Williamson said. “If someone is offering you $50 a piece for a game that nobody wants to see, you’re getting fake money. The same thing goes for something like the LSU game — if there are tickets on the 50-yard line for face value, they’re fake tickets.” During the 2012 football season, five separate reports of victims receiving fake money for real tickets came to UGA police’s attention, a series that totaled in the exchange of hundreds of counterfeit dollars. Due to the busy schedule for police on Gameday, Williamson said there is not enough service, and the situation is not severe enough, to stop every scalper and counterfeit money dealer in Athens on any given Saturday.

Legitimate football tickets are made with custom foil featuring the Georgia ‘G’. taylor craig sutton/Staff

Weekly

Corner

Bring this in for a free leather cord, in red or black, with purchase of Georgia bead.

Laser Hair removaL BoGo! Buy one area, Get one area Free!*

yuva meDiCaL sPa - 706-621-7585 start Laser Hair removal noW!

rIVIa TeaM T:30PM Mon. 8

SPor WedS.TS TrIVIa 8:30PM

Play Sports Trivia Weds. nights and get a Free fried pickle basket w/ $10 purchase Tax and gratuity not incl. Cannot be combined w/ any other offer or discount. For Sports trivia only. Expires 10/24/13.

1860 BarneTT ShoalS rd. STe 101 • 706-850-1916

Free Cheese Bread, Garlic Bread, or Hummus with purchase of full-priced entree. • limit one per customer • must present coupon 320 E. Clayton St. • Downtown


4 Views

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

Views

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Red & Black wants to know what you think — so let’s start a conversation. Email: opinions@randb.com or letters@randb.com Facebook: Like The Red & Black Twitter: @redandblack

Unlimited meal plan encourages college obesity

OUR TAKE Sexual assault help on campus lacks recognition

Megan Smith

T

he numbers lie, and it could take $70,000 to fix. The Red & Black reported last week that the number of sexual assaults reported by University of Georgia Police is deceptively low. From 2009 to October 2013, 22 rapes were reported to UGA Police. In that same time period, 80 rapes were reported to The Cottage, a sexual assault center in Athens. And though University officials told The Red & Black that they believed the number of assaults was underreported, there has been no increase in visibility of victim resources. The Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention program, an on-campus resource located in the health center, is a program which is funded through student health fees, but many students don’t know it exists. One student, who was a victim of sexual assault, said she was unaware of an on-campus resource for sexual assault victims. In a letter to the editor, Dr. Jean Chin, executive director of UHC, said RSVP helps coordinate the same services as The Cottage — legal advocacy, counseling, medical services, etc. The health center, however, refers victims to The Cottage if they wish to press charges or have a forensic exam. While RSVP and the health center provide important services to victims, the program still lacks exposure. There seemed to be a consensus among those interviewed for the article — UGA is aware of underreporting of sexual assaults and it needs to make available campus resources for victims common knowledge. So why is there no push for greater visibility? The existence of this office proves its necessity, but the lack of student cognizance of RSVP undercuts the program’s intended benefits. If a student is a victim of sexual assault, they cannot go somewhere they don’t know exists. Students can see advertisements for the vision clinic and flu vaccinations in every building on campus, but they won’t see an ad for RSVP. Regardless of the reason the group is underfunded, RSVP needs to establish itself as an authority and help center on campus. The Cottage’s budget is $70,000 a year. This provides resources to victims and creates a greater visibility for the program. The first step to addressing a problem is having an accurate idea of the problem. A lack of visibility means victims report their assaults to off-campus organizations, making the problem appear smaller than it is. — Erica Techo for the editorial board

Guest Columnist

F

they are being smart in simply pulling off the anchovies to reveal a delightful peanut butter sandwich. Think again. You’re now left with a suspicious fishy residue atop once delicious peanut butter. Alas you are now plunged into a pit of hopeless despair in which you doubt you will ever enjoy food again. Fortunately there is a secret third option: throw the godforsaken sandwich away and make yourself something you can actually stomach. We face disaster in different ways. Some days you find that you’re able to laugh off the sandwich and carelessly throw it away. Others want to hurl themselves off the roof along with this nightmarish sandwich that now dominates their lives. Perhaps you sit in front of your laptop and write up a reasonably comedic column about it. (Guess which one I do?) The bottom line is this: at the end of the day, no matter who you are, we all have this same dreadful peanut butter and anchovy sandwich. What distinguishes us is our ability to forget this over-used metaphor and move on with our lives in hopes of relieving others of truly terrible lunches.

orty percent of children in the state of Georgia are overweight. Our childhood obesity rate is second in the country. The “Freshmen 15” is not a myth for most students. According to the American College Health Association, college obesity jumped from 27 percent in 2009 to 29 percent in 2011. I know I gained a few inches — particularly around the middle — eating bowls of tater tots and those amazing pizzas at ECV. The cookies, cakes, frozen yogurt and array of breakfast cereals didn’t help either. I weighed myself right before summer started; my BMI was in the overweight category, and it was frighteningly easy to get there. As a freshman, I spent $3,956 for my 7-day meal plan. That’s roughly $18 a day or $6 a meal (assuming you’re going three times a day); and while they may sound extremely reasonable, you need to think about what you would be eating instead. I’m a Kroger shopper. I buy a pack of six frozen chicken breasts for $9 every week. I also buy lettuce ($5) and a pack of bleu cheese crumbles every other week ($5). I buy a bottle of olive oil ($8) and a bottle of balsamic vinegar ($4) whenever necessary, usually every other month. As you might have guessed, I love my chicken salads. I will eat them for lunch and dinner every night of the week. As my roommates suggest, this is a pretty lavish meal for any college student, but really, I am spending roughly $1.50 per salad. And don’t let me be misunderstood, these are some hearty salads. I fill up a salad bowl no problem and will put away a good four ounces of chicken. I would never just have eaten a salad like this in the dining hall, though. I would have needed some mac and cheese, maybe some fries and one of those amazing yeast rolls. But I wouldn’t have stopped there; if there were chocolate chip cookies, I was in. God forbid they had those insane double fudge cookies, or I was done for. The dessert tray was my best friend and my waistband's worst enemy. Since meal plan is notoriously unlimited, there isn’t a “pay as you go” option, making anything and everything is fair game. My friends and I would fill up our trays without considering that we weren’t all that hungry, and we would sometimes get up for second and even third helpings. At home I eat that salad, and I’m good to go. I may steal an Oreo or two from my roommate, but I’m not searching for three desserts like I was last year. If I had had to pay as I ate last year, I would have made my yummy salads and had a cookie. I would have had to abide by my limits. The university is so proud to “let the big dawg eat,” but the only thing we have to show for it is our growing waistlines.

— Courtney Willett is a freshman from Marietta majoring in pre-journalism

— Megan Smith is a sophomore from Alpharetta majoring in journalism

Courtney Willett

College as an introvert: Freshman faces streak of bad luck, bad lunch

B

eing a freshman in college is a lot like going to a sandwich shop you’ve never been to. You’re the only one in line and trying to take in the entire menu as quickly as possible while the cashier eyes you impatiently. His irritation only makes you more anxious and you hastily order. As you walk out you wonder how you ended up with the peanut butter and anchovy sandwich that is now your life. This whole experience is deeply upsetting. We get to the point where even something as small as lunch can ruin our lives, let alone tests and extracurricular activities. It only takes one minor stumble before everything seems to fall out of place. You find yourself shaking your fist and blaming some higher power for being out to get you. For instance, I often find that despite my good intentions, bad luck rears its ugly head in my life. While walking to class I discovered an insect sitting atop my bagel — the first omen. I had to get rid of this now tainted bagel quickly. An idea sprung to mind: rather than contributing to some landfill where the bagel would only rot away, I could return it back to nature. I would be providing some lonely squirrel dinner for the night. Contriving such a good deed made me cocky and I believed I would pull off the next step in this elaborate plan to — let’s face it — be lazy. Of course if someone just saw me throw a bagel at a tree I would receive numerous dirty looks and

Courtney Willett Guest Columnist

judgmental sneers. Thus I had to be discreet and throw the bagel at a time when no one was looking. This proved to be more challenging than I had originally thought as there is quite literally always someone watching. At last I gained my window of opportunity and hurled the bagel over the fence into the den of some starving squirrel. Unfortunately my aim is rather horrible and the bagel simply ricocheted off the fence and hit me right in the face — a very confusing sight to any observer. I could do nothing else but tuck my tail (and bagel) between my legs and head back to my dorm sullen and defeated. Several other unlucky things ensued. I managed to hit my head on the soap dish, experience academic failure and trip going up the stairs (yes, that is physically possible). After moments like these I have to ponder whether or not this is truly reality or perhaps some alternate universe where I am a magnet for every unfortunate event: a martyr of sorts in a world where everyone else’s sandwiches are flawless and mine still reek of anchovies. There are several approaches to this awful sandwich/life metaphor. Some choose to tough it out and gnaw at the corners all the while getting increasingly more nauseous. Others think

Opinion Meter: The week that was

Reading revamped: With Dyslexia Awareness Month in full swing, UGA’s Disability Resource Center is considering adding access to Dyslexie, a font designed for those with reading disabilities, to their extensive list of tools available to help students.

Driving drunks: The heroes of late-night Athens, Designated Dawgs, have been removed from their home base in the Fred Building, meaning their services may be impeded. In order for the free rides home to continue, the group must raise money soon.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

Editor In Chief: Nick Watson Managing Editor: Erica Techo News Editor: Cailin O’Brien Associate News Editor: Kendall Trammell Sports Editor: Cy Brown Associate Sports Editor: Connor Smolensky Variety Editor: Caroline Brown Associate Variety Editor: Colby Newton Opinions Editor: Laura Thompson Photo Editor: David Bristow Chief Photographer: Taylor Sutton Multimedia Editor: Gabe Ram Design Editor: Caitlin LeMoine Social Media Editor: Jamie Gottlieb Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Assistant Editorial Adviser: Erin France

’90s nostalgia: “Aaron’s Party” making its way back to Athens is just one more instance of ’90s resurgence. Masses of 20-somethings love nothing more than reliving their childhoods through Aaron Carter, Jimmy Eat World and Neutral Milk Hotel concerts.

Our Staff

Staff Writers: Shannon Adams, Kelly Cunningham, Taylor Denman, Arvind Deol, Ben Dell’Orto, Jana French, Marena Galluccio, Elizabeth Gerber, Jake Goodman, Raleigh Harbin, Justin Hubbard, Laura James, Helena Joseph, Jeanette Kazmierczak, Emily Kopp, Hunter Lacey, Mariya Lewter, Brad Mannion, William (Chet) Martin, Stephen Mays, Lauren McDonald, Robbie Ottley, Cody Pace, Randy Schafer, Tanya Sichynsky, Nick Suss, Caroline Wingate, Mariana Viera, Tyler Serritt, Matthew Simmons, Taylor West, Courtney Willett Senior Reporters: Chelsey Abercrombie, Hilary Butschek, Alec Shirkey Staff Photographers: Shanda Crowe, Heather Pitts, Hannah Pap Rocki, Taylor Renner, Erin Smith, Damien Salas Staff Videographers: Emily Erdelyan, David Glenn, Jaime Lee Chief Copy Editor: Molly Golderman Cartoonist: Meredith Taylor Page Designers: A.J. Archer, Julia Carpenter, Sarah Dempster, Monty Lucco

ADVERTISING: 706-433-3001

Student Ad Manager: Josie Brucker Student PR Manager: Stephanie Pham Ad Assistant: Laurel Holland Account Manager: Zach Jones, Will White Marketing Coordinators: Leah Curl, Debbie Feldman, Danny Jacob, Meghan McLynn, Alexander Peterson, Ali Rezvan, Dennis Scullin, Elizabeth Stowell, Kelly Taylor, Liliana Torres, Kristina Wade Marketing Team Members: Russel Abad, Patrice Boswell, Jamie Herndon, Caitlin Huff, Alston Merritt, Brandon Murphy, Colleen Reilly, Sarah-Rose Schiffin, Chris Schultz, Taylor Todd

PRODUCTION: 706-433-3021

Creative Director: Dan Roth Student Production Manager: Bennett Travers Student Digital Designer: Victoria Nikolich

Ticket traps: As the number of student football tickets has decreased, the number of roadside scalpers has seemingly multiplied. But buyers beware, the high price you pay for these tickets does not guarantee their authenticity.

Production Assistant: Christine Byun

BUSINESS: 706-433-3000

General Manager: Natalie McClure Office Manager: Ashley Oldham Student Assistant: Chandler McGee Classified Manager: Siah Burton Distribution Manager/Maintenance: Will Sanchez Distribution Team: Trey Burger, AJ Meyer, Lyddy O’Brien, Hunter Whitfield Circulation Assistant: John Berrigan The Red & Black is published each Thursday throughout the year, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a non-profit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


The Red & Black

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Views 5

Dystopian days: ‘1984’ and now ‘Rape-bait’ email epitomizes misogyny

T

he summer after eighth grade, I secretly created a Facebook account at my best friend’s house. It didn’t take me long to admit this to my mother, who rather than order me to delete it, told me to read “1984” by George Orwell. I nodded, I said I might and I didn’t. But she continued to warn me about the dangers of putting personal information and thoughts online, and often repeated her instruction to read the book, saying that if I did, I would rethink social media. Flash forward to the tail end of my junior year of high school. Mr. Patrick, my American Literature teacher, prescribed me with some reading direction. When he lent me his personal copy of “1984,” I didn’t really have a choice. So the first week of summer, when it was nap time at my babysitting gig, I finally read the book. Even those who haven’t read Orwell’s classic dystopian novel are probably familiar with many of its central themes. Many of Orwell’s “1984” based expressions have seeped into regular conversation — the concept of “Big Brother” was born out of “1984”, as was “doublethink,” “newspeak” and “the thought police.” Now having read the book, I can see my mom’s point. The argument that social media is progressing us toward Orwell’s dystopia is logical in some ways. Certainly we are more careless with our privacy. We know that posting our contact info,

Olivia Aldridge Guest Columnist

opinions, life events and photos can leave a lasting online fingerprint, and yet social media has become so deeply ingrained in our lives that we throw caution to the wind. Social media is becoming more and more personal. When we post on Facebook from our phones, our location appears at the bottom of a post. Any location we are “tagged” in is collected into a detailed map of our lives. The advertisements on the page change based on what we “like” and which ads we click on. Social media seem to be increasingly able to delve into our personalities and tastes. So if social media is watching us, is Big Brother watching us, too? The Snowden scandal made it clear that government-based internet surveillance is real, after all. But I’ll drop pretenses of conspiracy theorizing. True, social media makes us easier to watch. But the very nature of social media is the voluntary sharing of information. The modern individual has two personas: their physical, real life persona and their online persona. Social media users project themselves as they want to be seen. They sculpt their profiles to represent a character, and this is what keeps them safe from an Orwellian dystopia. The

intelligent user controls what aspects of their life and personality are available. In “1984,” Orwell describes many futuristic technologies that proved to be self-fulfilling prophecies — telescreens for example, resemble the Skype of today. What Orwell didn’t imagine was that his technologies would be popularized as openforum and consumerist creations. Social media changed the whole game, giving people voices rather than stifling them like Big Brother did. Numerous social and political movements have been enabled by social media. From Arab Spring uprisings to marriage equality, social media users have generated awareness through what they post, share, “like” and retweet. Government surveillance can’t change the fact that social media is by the people, for the people. My mom’s generation is intimidated by the rapid societal changes social media brings, and perhaps social media does have dangerous side effects. But despite many semblances to Orwell’s imagined future, a BigBrother censored dystopia isn’t one of them. — Oliva Aldridge is a freshman from Monticello majoring in pre-journalism

Grammar needed for real world success

W

hile walking through North Campus, I was approached by a student asking if I would be interested in joining her business fraternity. I informed her that I was an English major, not business. “Good luck with that,” she replied. Looking back, I can’t help but scoff at how quickly the girl dismissed the validity of my degree. I feel as though my degree is important but, more importantly still, I feel as though the knowledge of English grammar my coursework has taught me is invaluable. With the vast majority of modern communication being written, be it in the form of a text message or an email, people need to know how to write correctly. While spoken language readily evolves and adapts to colloquialisms, old, written rules are slower to change. A native speaker living in Georgia would absentmindedly say or send “y’all” in a message, but doing such in a professional interview outside of the area would be in error. Don McCreary, a professor at UGA who has taught a course completely on the topic of grammar, said, “Poor grammar can easily influence someone’s first impression of another.” This judgment can be especially stringent, McCreary said, in the workplace, where most communication is done via email. “Think about a business proposal,” McCreary said. “If someone thinks you’re uneducated because of poor grammar, that deal is likely to fall through.” In that instance, you’re not only representing yourself, but an entire company. In that instance, the grammatical skills that your business degree failed to teach you could have severely impacted your workplace per-

I

t seems that the men of Georgia Tech’s Phi Kappa Tau fraternity don’t know how to dance. Apparently this year’s pledge class is socially awkward to the point that they need to receive email reminders of how to properly take advantage of intoxicated girls. Entitled “Luring Your Rape-Bait,” the email sent by an established member of the Alpha Rho chapter divulges brotherly advice best summarized in the soon-to-be-infamous “7 E’s of HOOKING UP!”: “1. Encounter (spot a girl or group of girls) 2. Engage (go up and talk to them) 3. Escalate (ask them to dance, or ask them to go up to your room or find a couch, depending on what kind of party) 4. Erection (GET HARD) 5. Excavate (should be self-explanatory) 6. E-------e (should also be self explanatory) 7. Expunge (send them out of your room and on their way out when you are finished. IF ANYTHING EVER FAILS, GO GET MORE ALCOHOL.” The writer’s concern for the future of his fraternity is admirable — really. He reassures the young men that he is sharing his expertise in order to see them succeed at future social gatherings. And the student’s version of success, which is dangerously similar to sexual assault, apparently lies contingent upon a man’s ability to fill a pretty girl with cheap alcohol then dry hump her in public under the pretense of “dancing.” Campus police and Tech’s Interfraternity Council are looking into the conduct of the student’s as

Laura Thompson Views Editor

well as the rest of the chapter, but the damage has already been done. Not only has another batch of young men been instructed that women are objects for nothing more than sexual pleasure, there are countless women who have been “baited” by men like the student before. But there is good that can come from such a blatant display of cheap comedy and sinister intentions. While the student’s tactics are nothing new, the national attention that has been drawn to the incident further emphasizes the need for a cultural shift away from this type of hate speech, which often goes overlooked. If you don’t find the email frightening, you should. This unofficial handbook for objectifying and abusing women is a manifestation of decades of misogyny — further perpetuated by mere slaps on the wrists of the brutish men who are openly supportive of such practices. Even “comic” sidenotes on a fraternity listserv should no longer be tolerated. This is definitely not the first instance of testosterone-fueled women-hating, but there is no reason it can’t be the last. — Laura Thompson is the views editor for The Red & Black

CORN MAZE

PUMPKIN PATCH Free hayrides, vortex tunnel, jumping pillow, and campfires with purchase of admission.

706.769.0627 Family Friendly Alcohol Free

Stephen Mays Staff Writer

formance. Kyle Wiens wrote in the Harvard Business Review, “Everyone who applies for a position at either of my companies, iFixit or Dozuki, takes a mandatory grammar test.” Wiens also states in the article that he has no patience for grammatical mistakes and simply passes over that person who applies for the job, despite any other qualification that makes them right for the position. With most of the world converting to digital, mobile and online mediums, written words are becoming even more important. “Good grammar is credibility, especially on the Internet,” Wiens said. “In blog posts, on Facebook statuses, in e-mails and on company websites, your words are all you have.” With the advancement of our communication systems, we often forget to think about what we’re saying. Instead, we simply jot down the answer, hurry to type out the response and send an email on its merry way. What we forget, however, is that our knee-jerk responses often contain errors or our tones are misread. I can’t help but wonder how many business deals have fallen through due to a simple misuse of the word “it’s” for “its” or not realizing that “they’re” over “there” with “their” belongings.

Get Student Notes™ for Midterms

You can pick up notes 5 days before your test For information call or text (706) 352-9076, or go to www.studentnotes.com

— Stephen Mays is a senior from Hawkinsville majoring in English and publication management

• 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms Available • Fully Furnished • No Signing Fees • Limited Spaces Available For Fall

Call/Text 706 352 9076

* Pet Friendly

www.poloclubuga.com

Only at Baxter Street Bookstore


6 News

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

Sugar grant to give sweet relief

SHE BLINDED ME WITH SCIENCE Jeanette Kazmierczak @sciencekaz

By David Higgins @DMHiggins3

have there been so many Q: Why grasshoppers this year?

A:

On top of the cicadas this year, there have been a lot of noisy insects flying around in Georgia. “I’ve noticed there are a lot more [grasshopers] than usual this year also,” said William Hudson, a professor and extension specialist of entomology. “I think it all goes back to the amount of rain we had and if you think about all the lush, green vegetation growing along the side of the roads and especially compared to the last few seasons that we’ve had, it was just a really good year for grasshoppers.” Hudson said grasshoppers eat young, green plants. In previous seasons, there have been more hot, dry spells to toughen up the vegetation. But Hudson said peak grasshopper season is almost over. “Around here it’s in the summertime,” he said. “They aren’t active in the winter ... In south Georgia that’ll run — you’ll have a grasshopper season that’s 10 to 11 months.” Grasshoppers, crickets and katydids belong to the taxonomical order Orthoptera. The big differences between grasshoppers and crickets are: • Grasshoppers sing by rubbing their hind legs against their wings. Crickets just rub their wings together. • Grasshoppers have short antennae. Crickets have long ones. • Grasshoppers are out all day. Crickets prefer to come out at dusk.

Even mushrooms found in backyards that are technically safe to eat can soak up pesticides and fertilizers that can render them poisonous. Courtesy Kirk Edwards/UGA

The fungus among us unsafe to eat By Jeanette Kazmierczak @sciencekaz Premium toppings for your pizza shouldn’t come from your yard. It’s been a good year for mushrooms in Georgia, but there are some things homeowners should keep in mind during peak mushroom season. ***

“Live the difference” NEW 24 HR Fitness Center New Firepit & Outdoor Kitchen NEW Pet Park

New Clubhouse! legacyofathens.com 610 Gaines School Rd 706-548-1353 11461

There’s a lot of fascination surrounding mushrooms. The most important thing to know, for the average homeowner finding mushrooms in their yard, is to never eat anything they find. “First they want to know what it is, and then the next thing they want to know is it edible,” said Jean Williams-Woodward, an associate professor of plant pathology. “And I don’t think they really want to know whether they’re going to go out and eat it, they just want to know sort of like is it poisonous. But they ask if it’s edible.” Williams-Woodward stressed first and foremost that people should never eat anything they collect. Especially if they found it in their yard, even if it’s technically edible. Mushrooms can concentrate fertilizers and pesticides. *** The University of Georgia has a plant disease clinic that can help people curious about fungi they find in their yard. “If you’re a homeowner and you have a mushroom you want to identify, if it’s purely hobby — something you’re trying to do out of interest — it would probably be best if you joined like a local mushroom club or something like that,” said Ansuya Jogi, a diagnostician in the plant disease clinic. “We typically deal with the disease side of it. So, we get samples where, let’s say a dog’s gotten sick and they know he’s eaten a certain mushroom and they want that identified. Or we’ve had a sample where a horse became sick and other samples we get are where trees are being affected.” The best way to find help identifying a mushroom is to go through the county extension officer first. But if items need to be shipped into the dis-

ease clinic, it’s best to wrap them in newspaper in a box and send them overnight, W i l l i a m s -Wo o d w a r d said. Avoid sending samples in plastic bags because they degrade, she added, and never send them in envelopes. *** Williams-Woodward said amateurs could also start identifying fungi themselves by buying field guides and making spore prints. “There are quite a few different field guides,” she said. “And that would be the best thing, get some of the field guides.” Many times the first step in finding the species of a mushroom is making a spore print. W i l l i a m s -Wo o d w a r d said she suggested taking two pieces of construction paper — one white, one black — and placing the mushroom so half is on each color. This makes it easier to see lighter colored spores, especially if the spores are white because then they could be highly poisonous. *** Cornelia Cho and Sam Landes, a married couple and president and treasurer of the Mushroom Club of Georgia, said they get questions from curious Georgians as well. The Mushroom Club of Georgia has 290 memberships, Landes said, and the majority is from the Atlanta area, although some members come all the way from Florida and North Carolina. Landes said he got started mushroom hunting with his mother in Illinois, looking for morels. “Cornelia found the Mushroom Club of Georgia like five years ago,” he said. “We started getting involved and going to meetings because they were likeminded people, scientific-minded people, outdoor-minded people.” Cho said part of the draw for her was the oddity of mushrooms, but also the important environmental aspects and the different uses people are finding for mushrooms — like packing material and water purification. “There’s a big aspect of mushroom hunting that’s like treasure hunting,” Cho said. She had the same warning as WilliamsWoodward about peo-

Terry believes business is part of the community. Major in

FINANCE

It’s more than stock trading... terry.uga.edu/finance

ple eating the mushrooms they collect, though. “I do think that your primary fear as a president, and fortunately this has never happened to anyone in a mushroom club in the United States — there have been no deaths from any club members anywhere — but of course your worst fear is of course that someone would just go gallivanting off and eat something toxic,” Cho said. “We do stress do not, do not, do not eat mushrooms if you do not really, really know what they are.” *** It was the fifth wettest summer on record for Georgia, which made it a great year for fungi, said Marin Talbot Brewer, an assistant professor of plant pathology at UGA. “This summer there were more mushrooms than I’ve ever seen,” she said. Landes said it was a good year for the club’s expeditions as well. “This year, this summer, was a very big chanterelle season,” he said. “Cornelia and I probably picked 30 or 40 pounds this year. Our club went on a walk out on somebody’s private property. They invited us and the club found 50 pounds in one afternoon.” Last fall, Brewer identified Macrocybe titans, the largest mushroom cap in the western hemisphere, for the first time in Georgia. “Everything I came across pointed to this Macrocybe, but every single report said it’s not found outside of Florida within the U.S.,” she said. “I mean it’s found in Central America, some part of the Caribbean, parts of South America, but never outside of Florida within the U.S. So I thought this could be really interesting if it’s the first sighting outside of Florida.” None of the other sightings of the mushroom panned out last year, Brewer said. But she’s hoping to see it again this year because of the good mushroom conditions. She said it’s a large white mushroom found in clusters in grassy, disturbed areas like lawns and the side of the road. “It’s just so much fun to be able to go out and all this stuff is there,” Cho said.

The National Institutes of Health awarded a five-year, $7.4 million grant to a group of five labs at the University of Georgia to study chains of carbohydrates that could affect future disease prevention. The research groups involved with the grant are housed at the UGA Complex Carbohydrate Research Center at their facility on Riverbend Road. “[Winning this grant] is an excellent example of how CCRC faculty are able to collaborate by bringing their diverse expertise toward a common goal,” said Richard Steet, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at UGA and one of five leaders of the project. Geert-Jan Boons, a UGA Foundation distinguished professor in biomedical science will serve as another of these leaders. He said the small chains of sugar molecules or carbohydrates the teams will study are called glycans. They attach to lipids and proteins, including those that coat the outer layer of the cells in our bodies. “Glycans are involved in almost every biological processes you can imagine,” he said. On the surface of the cell, g lycans serve as beacons that communicate information about the cell to those around it. Boons said these beacons can be attacked by pathogens such as the flu virus, which attaches to a specific type of glycan in order to begin its infection. He said the group’s work could have implications for human health if the researchers learn how these glycans are assembled in our cells, what types of glycans are associated with which diseases and how diseases affect the trafficking of these sugars in the cell. Boons said his group will focus on creating a way to reproduce the same sugar chains in a test tube at a high quantity. “Our goal is to develop a technology to make it possible to synthesize every glycan found on a human cell,” Boons said. With a library available, the team can search which glycans are targeted by illnesscausing microbes. “We need to know first how glycans work in health and disease before new therapeutics can be developed,” Boons said. Steet and Boons will work on the project with Lance Wells, an associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology and Kelley Moremen and James Prestegard, two professors of biochemistry and molecular biology. Boons said accepting this substantial grant from the NIH showed the scientific prowess of both the CCRC and UGA.


The Red & Black

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Red & Black alumnus’ career brought ‘full circle’ by hall of fame induction BY Jana French @janalynnfrench Bill Shipp “stepped on everybody’s toes in sight” during his time as managing editor of The Red & Black in the mid1950s. That is, before he was expelled and the staff adviser took more editorial control of the paper. “If you want to know how I affected the University of Georgia, I let the faculty really stick its nose into SHIPP our business, because they didn’t want any criticism of the kind I did to the governor, the legislature or the regents,” Shipp said. Shipp never stopped stepping on toes, but he’s no longer punished for it. The Red & Black alumnus and former writer for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution was inducted into the Atlanta Press Club Hall of Fame Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the InterContinental Buckhead, along with Ed Baker, Margaret Mitchell, Monica Pearson and Dale Russell. Shipp’s journey to this award began when he “found writing was the one thing [he] did pretty well with in school.” “I also felt that the people I knew in journalism, like Bill Kenney in the local paper and some of the people around town — they were really in a position to make a difference on how the whole region conducted itself,” he said. He began his career as the editor of the Pitchfork for Marietta High School and went on to become the managing editor for The Red & Black after he transferred to the University of Georgia. Shipp said he

would have graduated as the class of 1955, but was asked to leave UGA after writing several columns in which he “spoke ill of the governor,” who at the time was Herman Talmadge. He also wrote columns about how he felt Horace Ward, an A f r i c a n - A m e rican student, should have been admitted into the UGA School of Law. Shipp interned with the Atlanta Constitution in the summer of 1953, and started working with them after returning from the Korean War. George Berry, who held several positions with the state and city of Atlanta government while Shipp was reporting, said he “was the premiere political reporter in the state of Georgia for a long period of time.” Jim Galloway, political columnist for the AJC, has known Shipp since he was an intern for the AJC in 1976. He said he thinks Shipp is being inducted because he “was an excellent reporter and editor. “More importantly, he was the first journalist to go really heavy into internet,” he said. In 1987, Shipp resigned from being the political editor of the AJC to start his own newsletter, “Bill Shipp’s Georgia.” The newsletter went on to be “the country’s first serious political journal on the Internet,” according to the New Georgia Encyclopedia. Shipp said he sees his induction into the APC Hall of Fame as the capstone to his career. “I was a charter member of the Atlanta Press Club way back in the ’60s, so I guess it means I have traveled full circle,” he said.

News 7

ALPHABET SOUP

Delta Zetas have fun with philanthropies, tradition, turtles By Taylor West @TaylorWest08 The University of Georgia chapter of Delta Zeta focuses on fun, philanthropy and turtles. Rachel Jones, a junior psychology major from Lawrenceville, said a part of what makes Delta Zeta unique is the national and local level philanthropies it supports. “Our national philanthropy is the Painted Turtle Camp and it’s a camp in California for children with chronic illnesses,” the philanthropy chair said. “Each week the camp specialized with a certain illness or disease so the camp is completely catered to fit every need they would have. They get to go for one week and pretty much be a normal kid.” She said each year the chapter sponsors a few girls to go to California in the summer and work as counselors. The sorority also supports a local-level philanthropy — the Turtle Grant for the hearing and speech impaired — that stems from national support for hearing and speech impaired organizations such as the Starkey Hearing Foundation. “We keep in contact with any hearing and speech impaired associations, schools and networks,” Jones said. “It’s really cool because we get to follow up with that. Everybody from the chapter gets to see what we’ve helped raise money for.” Jones said the money raised by Wing Bash, an annual event hosted at the DZ house on Milledge Avenue, goes to support the Turtle Grant. She said this year more than 1,100 people attended the 12th annual Wing Bash and ate more than 13,000 wings. “From the rough estimates I’ve gathered, we’ve raised a little over $7,000,” Jones said. “It’s pretty cool because that’s obviously not something an individual person could achieve very easily on [his or her] own. It’s just exciting to know that’s going back to something local.” Katelyn Lewis, a junior public relations major from Thomaston and the PR chair of the Zeta Pi chapter, said the philanthropy speaks to her because of a childhood friend. “Growing up I had a lady I was really close to — my mom’s best friend — and she is deaf and she reads lips and everything for her way of communication,” she said. “She is just awesome and just the way she has dealt with it, I always admire her for it.” Jones said the local and national philanthropies become important even for girls who don’t initially have an attachment to them. “It’s kind of grown to be something that you really care about,” she said. “Even if you didn’t have a personal connection when you came in, you definitely leave with it.” Jones said in addition to a focus on philanthropy, the sorority has a number of other traditions — both serious nationally established rituals and fun chapter traditions — that make it special. She said in chapter every week the girls give out awards — the spirit stick, pat on the back and the support bra. “The spirit stick is DZ-related for good deeds you’ve done or for the good of the chapter, and the pat on the back is just anything, if you won any award on campus or got a good grade,” she said. “And we also do the support bra, which is for girls who might be struggling, or going through a rough time. But it’s kind of goofy because the award is a very large sized [bra].” Lauren Governale, a nursing graduate student from Dacula and the Panhellenic delegate for the

Katelyn Lewis (left), Lauren Governale (middle) and Rachel Jones (right) enjoy DZ life. Hannah Pap rocki/Staff Zeta Pi chapter, said the sorority holds their mascot in high esteem. “We are the turtles. We take our turtles very seriously,” she said. “Our president actually has pet turtles.” The Zeta Pi president, McKenzie Teschner, was unavailable for comment. Governale said the sorority also draws a lot of traditions from its founders. “There were six founders so we do everything in sixes, I guess is one of our traditions,” Governale said. “We have Facebook pages for our founders and stuff.” Governale said she enjoys the sorority and living in the house because there isn’t any drama. “I like to think that we’re the down to earth sorority on campus,” she said. “We just all get along. There is no drama.”

dos Santos 3 Sat. october 19th 8pm! $7 coveR

Every Game viewable from every seat!

1860 BaRnett ShoalS Rd. Ste 101 • 706-850-1916

IMPORT

Paying it forward: Willson Center to fund beneficiary project By Taylor West @TaylorWest08 One Willson Center cluster is using its winnings to benefit others. Ideas for Creative Exploration — ICE — is using its Willson Center for Humanities and Arts grant money to start up other interdisciplinary projects. David Saltz, head of the department of theatre and film studies and the executive director of ICE, said it is a project to incubate projects. “The project is really to forge collaborations. We are not working on a specific research project,” he said. “This is about creating a fertile ground for people throughout campus to make contact with each other and to get the support to create [interdisciplinary] types of projects.” ICE is “a catalyst for innovative, interdisciplinary creative projects, advanced research and critical discourse in the arts, and for creative applications of technologies, concepts and practices found across disciplines,” according to the Willson Center website. “We are all so busy with our individual projects so just sitting in a room with someone from dance or music can be really, really valuable,” he said. “But a lot of the most productive collaborations that ICE has facilitated have been between artists and engineers and physics and marine science and all different areas.” He said ICE’s goals line up

well with the goals of the Willson Center making it a perfect candidate for the grant. But he said ICE predates the formation of the research clusters and has a good track record of supporting interdisciplinary projects. Prior to the Willson Center grant, Saltz said ICE received support directly from the Office of the Vice President for Research as well as from Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School. He said the idea was inspired by his own interdisciplinary work. “When I first came to the University back in [1997], one of my key goals was to find ways to reach across the disciplines and create work that doesn’t fit comfortably within any of the established departments,” he said. Mark Callahan, senior academic professional in the Lamar Dodd School of Art, said ICE is not really a project so much as a mission “to elevate the level of collaboration.” “You can also think of what we’re doing in the true sense of the research cluster is building a network of people and trying to combine resources to make the quality of the work better,” the artistic director said. Saltz said like the other Willson Center research clusters, the project has a three-year plan and received grant money — $15,000 — for the first year. But the money will not be used primarily to fund its own research.

He said support of the Willson Center is key to acknowledgement of the projects. Callahan said ICE involves a lot of people beyond himself and Saltz and across many disciplines. The types of projects ICE is supporting goes beyond just the arts. He cited a theatre project in the spring that is in collaboration with the physics department. Callahan said one of the things the project does is provide ICE Project Grants, or seed grants, for other people’s interdisciplinary projects. “It’s often times something they couldn’t do by themselves in their own department,” he said. “We can offer them, maybe it’s funding, maybe it’s some equipment or time to start it up.” He said the project has not yet started supporting any new projects with the Willson Center money, but is still working with projects from before the clusters were formed. Saltz said he anticipates some failures but hopes to have some local, national and even international notoriety. “If at the end of the three years there are even three projects that have really gained national attention for the University of Georgia, I would be very happy with that,” he said. “And some failures — if we are not having some projects that are noble failures, we probably have been much too conservative in what we are supporting.”

$1.99 Bud Light Pints ALL DAY SUNDAY!

166 cain velazquez vs.

CA

15% off all REPaIRS (with UGa ID)

R D O C TO

RS

1900 W. Broad Street • (706)-353-6006 8am - 5:30pm Monday-Friday • 8am - 12pm Sunday

2020 Barnett Shoals Rd • 706-546-8777 • HibachiAthens.com

All You Can Eat Buffet, 300 daily Hand-Rolled Empanadas Hand-Cut Fire-Grilled Steaks Topped w/ Mama Elena’s Chimmichurri Sauce Vegetarian & Vegan Dishes Unique, Delicious House-Made Cupcakes - Different Flavors Each Week!

items

Includes: Sushi, Hibachi, Seafood, Ribs, Steak, and much much more...

Biggest and Best Buffet in Town!

www.vivaargentinecuisine.com Delivery available through www.bulldawgfood.com

Tues, Wed, Sun 11am-9pm Thurs, Fri, Sat 11am-10pm Lunch specials daily until 3pm. Closed Mondays.

3567 Atlanta Hwy • 706-316-3382 • AthensChinaStar.com


AthensStudentHousing.com A P P LY @ AT H E N S ST U D E N T H O U S I N G . CO M

R AT E S A S L O W A S

$276 @ LAKESIDE DON’T DELAY - SIGN TODAY

NEW LOW RATES

@ RIVER MILL & THE CLUB RIVER MILL

LAKESIDE

THE CLUB great locations to campus • individual leases • private bedrooms • resort-style amenities upgraded computer center @ Lakeside • new leather-style furniture available @ River Mill

LAKESIDE • RIVER MILL • THE CLUB Rates and amenities subject to change. See office for details.


The Red & Black

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Sports 9

Sports “It’s given me more desire. Once I have that mindset, I’m usually going to achieve it. I wasn’t going to let anything stop me.”

Freshman Gym Dog Rachel Schick focused on the mental side of the game while physically unable to compete. taylor craig sutton/Staff

Mental gymnastics help Gym Dog heal from injuries BY ELIZABETH GRIMSLEY @AllFlippedOut Freshman gymnast Rachel Schick has been out of competition for more than two years, but her future in collegiate gymnastics was never in doubt. “It’s given me more desire,” Schick said. “Once I have that mind-set, I’m usually going to achieve it. I wasn’t going to let anything stop me.” At the final competition in her sophomore season, the junior Olympic national championships, Schick injured her ankles.

The injury left her needing two surgeries: one on her left ankle to shave down an overgrown tibia, clean out extra growth and remove an extra bone; and another on her right ankle to shave down the bone and take out a fracture. Coming back from a single surgery of that severity is a difficult task and could finish off an athlete’s career. Coming back from two surgeries of that nature is almost impossible. However, Schick did it. Instead of worrying about recovering in time to still compete for the Gym Dogs, Schick turned

her focus to the mental aspect of the sport. “Every night I would do mental routines,” Schick said. “That was a really big thing installed in me when I was young. If you can’t do the numbers, then you do mental routines.” Mental gymnastics is one of the reasons Schick said she was able to come back so strong. And now that she’s at Georgia and fully recovered, her teammates are noticing that drive she has to get out there and lead the team to be the best it can be. “Rachel shows leadership with

Offensive linemen break their silence

Bulldogs build unity with help from the few, the proud BY JUSTIN HUBBARD @JHubb93

BY ALEC SHIRKEY @AShirkey Georgia’s offensive line has broken its silence. Since beating South Carolina four weeks ago, not a single offensive lineman on the No. 7 Bulldogs (4-1, 3-0 SEC) had chosen to speak to the media. That changed on Monday, when senior right guard Chris Burnette surfaced in Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall as the lone delegate representing his position group. “It was just kind of like a group thing,” Burnette said of the line’s selfimposed censorship. “We’re going to focus on ourselves, not worry about the media, friends who were talking about the games, family who were talking about the games. We just wanted to keep it together.” In hindsight, maybe it wasn’t so bad. Since allowing four sacks in a rough outing against Clemson, Burnette and his blocking compatriots have settled down to great effect, giving up just three sacks in the remaining four contests. The group also bounced back from a lackluster performance on the ground against North Texas by paving the way for a rushing attack that went on to average 5.44 yards per carry against LSU and 6.43 yards per rush last weekend in deafening Neyland Stadium. “A lot of it’s just been communication,” Burnette said. “We’ve been trying to make it a point in practice, to make sure we’re on the same page.” Burnette himself earned a nice distinction after a solid showing against the Volunteers, garnering SEC Offensive Lineman of the Week honors. However, the LaGrange native was not so sure it was the best performance of his career. “I think I’ve graded out higher than that in the past. I feel like they draw a name out of a hat,” he said. Given the almost unprecedented string of injuries to hit Georgia’s offensive skill positions in the past month, the offensive line now looks like one of the more defined units on

her actions,” senior Kaylan Earls said. “She works really hard and you can see that she’s really determined and very motivated to do well in the gym and help her team.” And for someone who’s also been through a major injury, Earls had some words of advice for Schick. “Everything happened for a reason,” Earls said. “It’s just a minor setback. All you have to do is push hard. She’s a strong gymnast and I have no doubt that she’ll come back fully recovered and in full force.” See SCHICK, Page 10

Georgia's offensive linemen made a concerted effort after the South Carolina game not to speak with the media and focus on themselves. david c bristow/Staff the team — a far cry from how the group looked during fall camp, with players competing at almost every position on the line. The Bulldogs still employ a rotation among their offensive linemen. Even so, Burnette believes that now it will fall upon him and the other men up front to provide a sense of stability for an offense suddenly seeing some real mid-season changes. “I feel like we’ve been trying to put pressure on ourselves the past few weeks to really try to be great, because without us things just don’t get rolling. If there was a good time

for anything like this, it would be now because we’ve been challenging ourselves prior to this,” he said. “We got to be the bell cows on offense.” But Aaron Murray’s most-prized protectors won’t find much relief in No. 25 Missouri (5-0, 1-0 SEC), which boasts one of the conference’s best pass-rushers in defensive end Michael Sam (six sacks on the year). “I think that they have some really talented guys up front,” Burnette said. “I think they’re just really quick, they do a lot of stunts, so it’s going to take a lot of film study.”

Head coaches typically preach unity and leadership to their players, but Georgia’s women’s basketball and volleyball teams took that to a whole new level during training with the Marine Corps. Volleyball head coach Lizzy Stemke said the reason the reason team decided to participate in the training was to build leaders among its players. “Any way that we can get our team talking about how we’re gonna come together, how we’re gonna step up to the plate, how we’re gonna lead — we jump at opportunities like that," Stemke said. The volleyball team’s training, which occurred in August, consisted of STEMKE large and small group discussions about the core leadership values of the Marines, including integrity and character. The team’s captains — Maggie Baumert, Allison Summers and Brittany Northcutt — said the training was effective, and could help the team throughout the season. “We learned their leadership skills that they use, and we learned how to connect it to being on the court,” Baumert said. Northcutt further described the day’s training. “We had a list of words related to leadership, and then they split us up into groups and we got two or three words,” Northcutt said. "We defined them, related them to our team, then came back all together and discussed, as one team, how things relate between the Marines and our team.” When asked if the training could benefit the team throughout the season, Summers said that it could. See MARINES, Page 10


10 Sports

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

MARINES: Intense training helps team togetherness ➤ From Page 9 “I think [the season is] gonna take a lot of leadership skills, especially from the captains,” Summers said. “As a whole, in general, it’ll be important to use the traits that the team as a whole can use to push through the entire season.” The women’s basketball team was involved in a much more demanding training, also hosted by the Marine Corps. The training was Sept. 14, and consisted of a circuit course, the Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test and a leadership reaction course. Cpt. Patrick Darcey, an Officer Selection Officer for the Marine Corps, described just how grueling the Lady Dogs’ day was. “They did a circuit course where they would do an exercise, and then one of the Marines would talk to them about different leadership traits of the Marine Corps,” Darcey said. “For example, they’d do push-ups, and we’d talk to them about integrity and why integrity is important.” Next, the Lady Dogs went through the Combat Fitness Test. “[The Combat Fitness Test] consists of an ammunition can lift,” Darcey said. “Ammunition cans weigh between 35-40 pounds, and they had to lift that over their heads as many times as they could. Then, they ran through an obstacle course where they had to low crawl, they threw

a mock grenade, they had to carry one of their teammates, they had to carry ammunition cans, that sort of thing.” After the first two events were completed, Darcey said that the team finished up with the training’s third portion. “The last part was the leadership reaction course,” Darcey said. “They’d do an exercise, and then have to complete a problem, like thinking problems. Those problems would consist of moving some gear across a field without touching the field, so they’d only have pieces of wood to use to cross the field. They’d have to line the wood up and walk across it. They are pretty simple mental problems, but they were so tired by this point that it makes it really difficult to do.” Junior Erika Ford, a guard for the Lady Dogs, said the training was unlike anything else the team has ever done. “It was different,” Ford said. “It was definitely something we’re not used to when it comes to a ‘team retreat.’” Freshman Halle Washington said although the team was expecting a team retreat, the training exercises were still beneficial. “First of all, we all thought we were going on a team retreat, something special in the mountains, swimming,” Washington said. “All of a sudden, four Marines walk in, and they’re all like ‘Get up! Let’s go!’ [The

SCHICK: Gym Dog focused on mental game in recovery ➤ From Page 9 Schick is a perfectionist, but wanting everything to be just right immediately after an injury isn’t realistic. Sometimes that drive and desire for perfection can be Schick’s downfall, so it’s something Georgia head coach Danna Durante has been working on with her. “Having been out for two years, we’ve told her to be patient because it’s going to take some time,” Durante said. “She’s one of those ones where you have to say enough, no more because she’ll just keep going and going. She’s just so passionate and excited that any rust that might be there, we’ll work through in the gym.” However, that perfectionist mindset can also be helpful since collegiate gymnastics is all about minimizing the deductions. Where it really becomes noticeable for Schick is on bars. Unable to use her lower body for such a long time, Schick spent a lot of time on the event and improving her upper body strength along the way. “I would just do as much upper body strength as I could and try to make myself sweat out of that instead of with cardio,” Schick said. “My lines have cleaned up a lot more. It’s not only that I got more skills, but I got the basics in.” Durante even said she sees potential in Schick to be the kind of bar worker similar to some of the Gym Dogs’ greats. “Her bars are huge,” Durante said. “She swings well. She has a beautiful line. Everything she does, she does with great precision. If you can put that great form with those big skills, that’s Chelsea Davis, that’s Kat Ding and that’s where you get those national champions.” After so much hardship leading up to her college career, Schick kept one thing in the back of her mind that kept her going through all of the hard times. “My [club] coach used to always say, ‘Expect the worst and hope for the best,’” Schick said. “When you think of it that way, it really helps you.”

Georgia volleyball and women’s basketball teams did Marine Corps training to improve leadership skills and team unity. david c bristow/Staff training] kind of brought us all together as a team, because we had to work together and encourage each other to get through the whole day.” Landers said that the training goes hand-in-hand with his usual approach to getting his team prepared for the season. “We try to do something every year that spurs team building, communication and leadership,” Landers said. “That was the purpose [of the training]. I thought that [the Marines] were outstanding in their message and what they shared with our players. I thought that the activities were very good. They were designed to develop a level of communication between our players, and they did that.” The Marine

Corps reached out to multiple teams on campus, and the volleyball and women’s basketball teams were the first to respond. “It’s just part of our initiative to help out with the community and develop leaders in the community,” Darcey said. “It’s just a part of what we do. We brought these ideas to [the coaches], and these teams jumped at it ... It lets them develop themselves in a different way than a normal team would.” Although this is the first Marines training for a Georgia athletic team, Darcey said that the Marine Corps has held similar trainings at Berry College and Kennesaw State University, and has at least two more trainings coming up at Georgia with the

Luxury Student Living

track teams and baseball team. Marjorie Butler, a sophomore guard for the Lady Dogs, said that the team hopes that the lessons learned from the Marines will carry over into the new season. “It was interesting,” Butler said. “I think it was a really different experience. I think a lot of us were expecting a different kind of team retreat, so it caught a lot of us off guard. We were all expecting to load up on a bus and go on a retreat, but we just had to go across the street to the practice football field. This team benefited from it. It was a really good experience. Part of it was getting us synchronized and just bringing us together, and that part is what we’re hoping will roll over onto the court.”

Closet

Powder

Laundry

Bedroom

Game Covered Patio

STOR. 1

STOR. 2

STOR. 3

Living Room Closet

STOR. 4

Kitchen DW Closet Pantry

Two Garage

Bedroom

DINING

Closet

Closet Bedroom

Study

BASE RENT

CABLE, INTERNET, ALL UTILITIES (LESS ELECTRIC)

FURNITURE (OPTIONAL)

$420 $50 $29

706-LIVE BIG (706) 548-3244

Garage Level

First Level

Second Level

Bedroom


APPLY ONLINE TODAY FOR FALL 2014

ATHENSSTUDENTHOUSING.COM RIVER MILL • THE CLUB • LAKESIDE APARTMENTS


12 FOOTBALL

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

Hot Mizzou offense comes to Athens BY BENJAMIN WOLK @benjaminwolk Don’t expect Missouri to play much old man football on Saturday in Sanford Stadium. The Tigers sport an explosive, balanced offensive attacked led by third-year starter James Franklin. “Missouri is a very, very hot team,” Georgia head coach Mark Richt. “It was kind of scary actually to watch the tape of it. They were so proficient on offense.” The 6-foot-2, senior quarterback has completed 68 percent of his passes this season, adding 13 touchdown passes to only three interceptions. “He’s standing in the pocket with a lot of confidence, and he’s very accurate,” Richt said. “He’s on target, and he looks like he’s in his element.” Much of that confidence derives from his weapon-filled receiving corps. Dorial GreenBeckham, L’Damian Washington and Marcus Lucas all stand 6-foot4 or taller, creating constant mismatch nightmares for opposing secondaries. “They got big, physical, great-looking receivers,” Richt said. “A lot of yards, a lot of points per game They’re really doing some great things.” With Georgia’s young, and relatively small cornerbacks, members of the Georgia defense fully accept the challenge that the passing game creates. “It’s going to be a challenge facing them. They have some real, real, real big receivers,” defensive lineman Garrison Smith said. “It’s going to be a challenge for our corners to play them, but if everybody does their job then we’ll have success. We just

have to keep getting better.” But it isn’t just Franklin’s arm and receiving weapons that can hurt opposing defenses. Franklin has compiled 278 yards on the ground this season for two scores. His familiarity with offensive coordinator David Yost’s system creates chaos for opponents. “They are very wellcoached, and they are looking to win the East just like we are,” Richt said. “James is healthy and he’s more confident [than last year]. He’s running well. They run the option, they run the read option, and if nothing is there he’ll take off running with confidence.” Franklin isn’t the only person gaining yards on the ground from the Missouri backfield, however. Four Missouri players — Russell Hansbrough, Henry Josey, Marcus Murphy and Franklin — have more than 275 yards rushing this season. Among the three running backs from that group, all three lead each of the major rushing categories this season. Hansbrough leads the Tigers with 379 total rushing yards, Josey leads in rushing scores with six and Murphy owns the most yards per carry among Tiger backs, averaging 8.4 per attempt. “They’re running the ball well,” Richt said. “It’s not just the passing game, that’s for sure.” So, just when the Bulldogs thought the elite offenses such as Clemson and LSU were out of the way, Missouri comes to Athens Saturday to present perhaps the biggest defensive challenge for the Georgia so far this season. Missouri ranks eighth in the nation

in points per game, scoring no less than 38 points in all five games this season. While the competition hasn’t been overly impressive, the Tigers hung 51 points on the Vanderbilt Commodores last week in Nashville, solidifying the veteran team’s ability to travel and still score. So, once again, the question going into a Georgia football contest is how the young secondary will produce. For the first five weeks of the season, the inexperienced defensive backfield has agitated the Georgia fan base with missed tackles in open field, blatant miscommunication in coverage and trouble stopping the pass on third down. The latter causes extreme concern against a Missouri offense that has consistently converted on 54 percent of its third down tries. “It’s everybody. It’s a team defense. Some players aren’t getting a rush, we aren’t covering long enough, and we aren’t getting off of our blocks,” linebacker Amarlo Herrera said. “It’s a team defense; it’s everybody. If the rush got there quicker then we wouldn’t have to cover longer. If we cover longer then he’s going to get sacked. It’s a machine.” Nonetheless, Georgia’s youngest defensive players, particularly the freshmen, must rise to the occasion Saturday if Georgia wants to contain the dangerous Missouri offense. “Everybody’s got to do their job, don’t play like you’re in high school,” Smith said. “What I mean by that is be disciplined. If all 11 players do their job at the same time, there will be success.”

Marshall Morgan kicks a game-winning field goal at Tennessee.

david c bristow/Staff

Marshall Morgan leaves troubles behind BY BENJAMIN WOLK @benjaminwolk Marshall Morgan’s 42-yard, gamewinning field goal to beat Tennessee marked a personal redemption for Georgia’s sophomore kicker. It was redemption for his selfdeclared underperformance in his freshman season, going 8-for-14 on field goal attempt, often missing significantly. It was redemption for his field goal he’d missed off the post earlier in the contest. But mostly, it was redemption for missing two national-implicating games to start the season for violating team rules. “I feel a lot more comfortable out there and it’s also I feel a lot more focused,” Morgan said. “Knowing that I had to miss two game, I had to realize that my job is special and I can’t take it for granted.” When Morgan booted the gamewinner through the uprights last Saturday, the entire field goal kick team leaped on the kicker in celebration. The moment was — literally — breathtaking for Morgan. “I was anxious to kick it. I just went out there and just felt real confident, and it was successful,” Morgan said. “After the game, there was 3,000 pounds on me. I was trying to get them off of me. That’s a lot of weight. I’ve got asthma.” The game-winning kick confirmed a positive trend for Morgan. In the first quarter of the Tennessee contest, he converted on a 56-yard field goal, his second-consecutive

ALL NEW!

week with a 55-plus-yarder (he made a 55-yard kick against LSU). Morgan prides himself on the personal achievement of consistent success on long-distance field goals, but nothing compares to a kick that clinches a win. “The 57-yarder, I mean the moment was big for me,” Morgan said, “but there’s nothing more satisfying than finishing off a win for your team.” Morgan’s early-season success, disregarding the two-game suspension, derives from intensive offseason work to correct several freshman errors. But Morgan was gifted a former Georgia kicking legend to ease him through pivotal freshman to sophomore transition process. Kevin Butler has been working with Morgan since last season’s end just to make some basic corrections and give moral support. “He’s given me some tips in the offseason, during the season,” Morgan said. “He was at the Tennessee game. He was just a morale booster. He’s just a great guy to be around. Just a former stud here at Georgia as a kicker.” Butler holds the Georgia record for longest field goal in Bulldog history, a 60-yarder to beat Clemson in 1984. That matches his high school career long. Perhaps he challenge his mentor in the near future. “I don’t want to do that to Kevin. He’s a great guy,” Morgan said. “But if the opportunity presents itself, that’d be great.”

Save Money and Hassle with ALL

Now Leasing

INCLUSIVE RENT!

Everything you need is included; rent, water, electric, cable, internet and even the furniture, HDTV, washer and dryer! With state-of-the-art amenities, individual leases and spacious floorplans, it’s all here and just a short walk or bike ride from campus. The Flats at Carrs Hill…more than a place to live, it’s a lifestyle. • Individual leases with all-inclusive rent • Fully furnished 1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor plans • Private bedrooms and baths • Full kitchens, laundry, TV and WIFI • Community center with fitness, pool, tanning, sports court & more

Downtown Athens

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

et tre

Sanford Stadium

eS

Located on the Oconee River. Walk to campus or downtown!

• Covered parking

e on

592 Oconee Street Call (706) 357-1111

Leasing Office

t Stree oad W. Br

Oc

Visit us today!

78

Dudley Park

• Gated community with 24/7 video surveillance, elevators and interior hallways

S. Mil


The Red & Black

FOOTBALL 13

Thursday, October 10, 2013

BEHIND ENEMY BYLINES Every week this season, The Red & Black will be reaching out to the sports editor of each opponent's school newspaper to trade questions about the weekend's game. This week we traded questions with Jacob Bogage, sports editor of the University of Missouri's student newspaper The Maneater

Cy Brown: Missouri coach Gary Pinkel was a name many people had on the hot seat at the beginning of the season. Is the fanbase firmly behind him after this season’s start? JACOB BOGAGE: One thing about this fan-base is that it’s made up of eternal optimists. Last year, people thought Mizzou really could contend in the SEC and that was absolutely false. At 5-0, Gary Pinkel looks like a genius and rightfully so. He’s a got a solid, healthy team that’s truly SEC-caliber.

CB: One of Georgia’s biggest weaknesses are its secondary. How effective do you think the duo of wide receivers Dorial Green-Beckham and L’Damian Washington will be in the game? JB: Don’t forget about Marcus Lucas, Bud Sasser, Jimmie Hunt and even Jaleel Clark. Six different receivers have TD catches this year. Franklin has a real bevy of arrows in his quill and [if] Mizzou wants to stay in this game, it will have to air it out and make it high scoring.

CB: Much of the talk about Missouri this season has been centered on its explosive offense. How does the team stack up on the defensive side of the ball? JB: That was [a] real question mark coming into the season. The secondary led by E.J. Gaines, who already has three picks in five games. Meanwhile, Mizzou — led by two-time SEC D-lineman of the week Michael Sam — has seven sacks in each of its last two games. If Aaron Murray baits Gaines, or plain steers clear of him, the big play through the air could be UGA’s lifeline.

CB: Who are some Missouri players Georgia fans are not aware of, but will be after Saturday? JB: James Franklin goes as his rushing attack goes. Mizzou has rushed for at least 170 yards in each of its five games (including 245 at Vandy). Circle tailbacks Henry Josey (No. 20), Marcus Murphy (No. 6) and Russell Hansbrough (No. 32) in your programs. If the Tigers can have success on the ground, they — like Tennessee — can push Georgia to the brink.

NOW LEASING! Furnished and unfurnished apartments for fall 2014. Everything you need, everything you want & a few extra surprises—ALL RIGHT HERE! • Water, Cable & Internet • Sparkling Salt Water Pool • Modern Fitness Center • Compuer Lab • Game Room

• 24-Hour Emergency Maintenance • Basketball, Volleyball & Tennis Courts • On Athens Transit Bus Route • Study & Meeting Rooms • Tanning Dome

Beaut ! Mizzo

www.ReserveAtAthens.com 175 International Dr | Athens, GA 30605 | 706.548.4400

Missouri quarterback James Franklin (1) has the 20th best passer rating (160.2) in the NCAA. He is the sixth most efficient SEC quarterback. file/Staff

CB: How has quarterback James Franklin matured over his three seasons as a starter? JB: James is such an unflappable personality. He’s calm and collected. His presence in the pocket and confidence in his arm are superb. But more than that, Mizzou quietly has one of the best receiving corps in the conference.

PREDICTION JB: Georgia 41-Missouri 35 Making me pick against my own school? Cruelty! Aaron Murray goes to town on Missouri’s secondary, but the ‘Dawgs can’t run the ball without Gurley. Mizzou’s offense slows, but still puts up points. Fair warning: flip these figures if UGA coughs up the football. The Tigers cash in like kings on takeaways.

“Now Accepting Reservations for 2014” Residence Features: • Studio 1,2,3, & 4 bedroom flats and townhomes • 3.5 blocks to UGA and Downtown Athens • Refreshing swimming pool / cardio center • 32 unique floorplans featuring 9-20 ft. ceilings • Responsible Pet Owners Welcome

“Athens #1 five years in a row”


14 FOOTBALL

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

Next man up: Receiving corps searches after multiple injuries BY CONNOR SMOLENSKY @ConnorSmo Georgia wide receivers coach Tony Ball preaches the same thing before every practice, and until now, it may have just seemed like a cliché speech. “‘Prepare like a starter. Prepare like you are the starter because you never know and you’re one play away from a starter,” said senior wide receiver Rantavious Wooten as he mimicked his coach. Heading into the season the thought was that if there were one position the No. 7 Bulldogs (4-1, 3-0 SEC) could afford an injury it was at wide receiver. That’s no longer the case. Georgia lost Malcolm Mitchell, who was the Bulldogs’ leading returning pass catcher, for the year with an ACL tear suffered in the team’s first game against Clemson while celebrating a touchdown. On Saturday, the Bulldogs experienced two more costly injuries as Justin Scott-Wesley tore his ACL, ruling him out for the year, and Michael Bennett tore his meniscus, which will keep him out for at least Saturday’s game against Missouri and probably longer. Scott-Wesley and Bennett rank two and three in receptions and receiving yards this season. So now the question arises: who will step up? Junior wide out Chris Conley started three games for the Bulldogs last season, and has been Aaron Murray’s favorite target this year, catch-

ing 20 passes for 318 yards and three touchdowns on the year. But other than Conley, Georgia only has two players that have ever started a game with seniors Wooten and Rhett McGowan. Wooten stepped up in the team’s 34-31 overtime victory over Tennessee last Saturday catching six passes for 38 yards and two touchdowns, which matched his touchdown total from last season. McGowan only start came in last year’s Capital One Bowl win against Nebraska, and for his career the former walk-on has collected 292 yards receiving and two touchdowns. “I expect to get more snaps,” McGowan said. “If you lose two guys like that at the same position I expect to get a good bit more snaps.” Other than these two veterans the Bulldogs will need to rely on a heap of inexperienced freshmen for production “I think the experience is important and useful,” McGowan said. “We’ve [Wooten and I] played in big games before and just leading by example for those younger guys and giving them confidence and helping them at practice. Tell them what they’re doing wrong and if they do something right let them know. You want their confidence high right now and they’re playing with great confidence, Reggie [Davis] and some of the other guys are playing with great confidence right now and they’re excited.” Davis is the only freshman who has seen time up until this point, and for the season he has four receptions for 147 yards and a touchdown — one

Wide receiver Chris Conley (31) is a player who will have to increase his production to account for the absence of injured receivers. david c brstow/Staff of them being a Georgia record 98yard reception. Besides Davis, Georgia will look to a pair of redshirt freshmen to fill in for its missing veterans. “[Kenneth] Towns and [Blake] Tibbs are probably going to get more work,” Georgia head coach Mark Richt said. Towns is also a former walk-on and was a member of the scout team last season, while Tibbs was a threestar recruit out of high school where he caught 63 passes for 1,065 yards and 15 touchdowns during his senior

year. Neither player has seen time thus far, but their teammates are confident that they can come in and be productive right away. "Those guys [Tibbs and Towns] have been with us and know a lot of the things we’ve been doing,” Wooten said. “There’s going to be some moving around or what not, but we definitely I think have the personnel and people, the group, that can step up at any position and make plays. That’s why they were brought for, to make plays."

INJURIES: Sideline tears and injury fears all part of the game of football torn ligaments. Often the workouts involve basic jumping exercises and the use of balance boards, which some coaches have begun to incorporate into daily practices, per the AOSSM. Though they may not discuss it often, there is a mentality that players try desperately to avoid: the thought that any play, even ones that involve no contact, could lead to season-ending injury on any given Saturday. “Losing Keith and Justin, it was sad because both of them were having really great seasons. It’s just time for someone else to step up and take off where they left,” defensive end Sterling Bailey said. “After seeing one of your teammates get hurt, it creeps in there, but you got to block it out and you got to go 110 percent every down so you won’t have to worry about getting injured.”

➤ From Page 1 He was coming off the first 20-carry outing of his career and appeared set for even more touches in a thin Bulldog backfield. “I feel like [the coaches] have confidence in me, I have confidence in myself,” Marshall said before the game. “[The 20-carry game] wasn’t really a big deal to me.” Multiple replays showed Sutton had hit Marshall low and came into contact with his knee. Defensive players are now taught to do this, freshman safety Quincy Mauger said, because of the targeting rule, which threatens to eject defenders that hit the heads of defenseless receivers in efforts to prevent concussions. “That’s just how football is. Hard hits, unexpected plays,” Mauger said. “Just got to go out there, lay it all out on the line.” Junior wideout Chris Conley, a member of the NCAA’s student-athlete advisory committee, has seen as much firsthand on the field, and believes that more defenders are tackling low because of the rule change. “That’s just naturally what has to happen or you risk being thrown out of the game and risk your team winning that game that week,” he said. “For defensive players to be aggressive, they have to hit low.” Yet contact is only part of the problem. *** Malcolm Mitchell was on his feet. He tore his ACL one week earlier against Clemson, and yet the junior from Valdosta was walking around outside of Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall — not a confident gait, but one foot in front of the other nonetheless. There seemed a steady resolve, even defiance, in those steps, knowing full well his playing days were still months away. Mitchell had come off a sophomore campaign that saw him make 40 catches for 572 yards receiving, all while starting four games at defensive back. With all of his focus turning solely to receiver entering 2013, the season looked even more promising for the young wideout. “It helped a lot, just knowing I could focus on one thing and get better at that,” Mitchell said back in August. Fate would intervene on a hot night in Death Valley when Mitchell ran to congratulate tailback Todd Gurley on his 75-yard touchdown run with a chest bump — a tried and true celebration in the world of sports. But when he landed, something was wrong. Mitchell knew it. The team knew it, as well. “[Mitchell] actually hurt it in the exuberance of the first touchdown of the game for us when he

ZOMBIE Makeup!

***

Collin Barber suffered a concussion on a blocked punt against Tennessee. david c bristow/Staff went to congratulate his teammate,” Richt said. “I think he jumped up and chest bumped or whatever, and he landed in a bad way and that’s when he knew something had happened.” Freshman wide receiver Tramel Terry could sympathize. Already set to enroll early and participate in spring football, he tore his ACL on the opening kickoff of the Shrine Bowl in December — a meaningless exhibition game for a player whose future was already decided. “I wish I could go back in time and not play in the Shrine Bowl,” Terry said. His knee had been bothering him during that week’s practice, and sure enough one of the first cuts he made on the field’s wet grass spelled trouble. Contact, he said, had nothing to do with it. “I made the cut, felt something wasn’t right and then was hit. The hit might have made it worse,” Terry said to The Post and Courier in December. Mitchell had experienced knee swelling in the weeks leading up to the Clemson game, as well. In fact, of the estimated 150,000 torn ACLs Americans suffer each year, approximately 70 percent of these are non-contact injuries, according to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). There are prevention measures and exercises, such as plyometrics and balance training, that have been shown to reduce the likelihood of

60's/70's/80's costumes!

100's

of AWESOME rentals for $20 and Under! SO many accessories... Build your costume for

LESS!

Stepping up was exactly what Justin Scott-Wesley expected to do. With Mitchell’s season ending after just one quarter, the redshirt sophomore who had set a thencareer high in catches and yards in last season’s Capital One Bowl seemed the most likely candidate to have his role increased. “I feel like I prepared myself for this moment back during January. And in the summer, I prepared myself for this moment, so I feel like when I had my opportunity and I had my number called, I made the best of it,” Scott-Wesley said after the Clemson game. Now, in the midst of a promising season, ScottWesley joins an ever-growing list of injured Bulldogs. Moving forward, Murray and offensive coordinator Mike Bobo will have to work with an almost entirely different group of receivers than they had during fall camp, and one less involved in the offense up until this point. The 2013 Bulldogs, to be sure, have already experienced a year’s worth of drama and faced their fair share of obstacles just five weeks into the season. How they respond will be critical, but if the past weekend’s win in Knoxville was any indication, this year’s Georgia team has an especially steely mental resolve. “I think we’re fine. We’re ready to go to battle again. Football is a physical game with injuries, and other teams have injuries. Some guys are very excited about the opportunity to make more contributions,” Richt said. The team will move on, if only because it must. But for these Mitchell, Marshall and Scott-Wesley, it looks to be a tedious eight-plus month journey back to full recovery — a long climb back to their former strength. Just another part of the game.


The Red & Black

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Sports 15

Sports shorts Football AP Top 25 Poll

USA Today Coaches Top 25

Team Record 1. Alabama (55) 5-0 2. Oregon (5) 5-0 3. Clemson 5-0 4. Ohio State 6-0 5. Stanford 5-0 6. Florida State 5-0 7. Georgia 4-1 8. Louisville 5-0 9. Texas A&M 4-1 10. LSU 5-1 11. UCLA 4-0 12. Oklahoma 5-0 13. Miami (FL) 5-0 14. South Carolina 4-1 15. Baylor 4-0 16. Washington 4-1 17. Florida 4-1 18. Michigan 5-0 19. Northwestern 4-1 20. Texas Tech 5-0 21. Fresno State 5-0 22. Oklahoma State 4-1 23. Northern Illinois 5-0 24. Virginia Tech 5-1 25. Missouri 5-0

Points 1495 1424 1359 1305 1278 1158 1138 1051 1003 993 844 819 780 764 681 556 536 514 418 358 258 204 138 115 105

SEC Statistical Leaders

Yards 614 594 450 651 616

Yds/G 122.8 118.8 112.5 108.5 102.7

Passing AVG/GAME Player Yards 1. Aaron Murray (UGA) 1534 2. Johnny Manziel (TAMU) 1489 3. Zach Mettenberger (LSU) 1738 4. James Franklin (MIZZ) 1407 5. A. Carta-Samuels (VA) 1561

Points 1544 1486 1379 1356 1327 1188 1130 1105 1067 964 953 833 807 747 698 591 574 393 366 350 336 325 169 125 97

UGA vs. Tennessee Box Score

Rushing Player 1. Mike Davis (SCAR) 2. Jeremy Hill (LSU) 3. Todd Gurley (UGA) 4. Alex Collins (ARK) 5. Rajion Neal (UT)

Record 5-0 5-0 6-0 5-0 5-0 5-0 4-1 5-0 4-1 5-0 5-1 4-1 4-0 5-0 4-0 5-0 4-1 4-1 4-1 4-1 5-0 5-0 5-0 4-1 5-1

Team 1. Alabama (57) 2. Oregon (4) 3. Ohio State 4. Clemson (1) 5. Stanford 6. Florida State 7. Georgia 8. Louisville 9. Texas A&M 10. Oklahoma 11. LSU 12. South Carolina 13. UCLA 14. Miami (FL) 15. Baylor 16. Michigan 17. Florida 18. Northwestern 19. Washington 20. Oklahoma State 21. Texas Tech 22. Fresno State 23. Northern Illinois 24. Nebraska 25. Virginia Tech

Yds/G 306.8 297.8 289.7 281.4 260.2

First Downs Rushes yards (net) Passing yards (net) Passes Att-Comp-Int Offense Plays Yards Fumble Returns-Yards Punt Returns-Yards Kickoff Returns-Yards INT Returns-Yards Punts (Number-Avg) Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Possession Time 3rd-Down Conversions 4th-Down Conversions Red-Zone Score-Chance Sacks: Number-Yards

UT 18 41-189 196 31-17-0 72-404 0-0 1-15 1-11 0-0 6-51.2 1-1 9-67 30:44 7 of 17 3 of 3 4-5 1-7

UGA 22 37-238 196 35-19-0 72-434 0-0 4-2 1-18 0-0 5-34.0 0-0 6-41 29:16 4 of 13 1 of 1 4-5 3-16

SEC Standings Conference East Florida 3-0 Georgia 3-0 Missouri 1-0 South Carolina 2-1 Tennessee 0-2 Kentucky 0-2 Vanderbilt 0-3 West Alabama 2-0 LSU 2-1 Auburn 2-1

Overall 4-1 4-1 5-0 4-1 3-3 1-4 3-3 5-0 5-1 4-1

Texas A&M Ole Miss Arkansas Miss. State

1-1 1-2 0-2 0-2

Saturday's games No. 25 Missouri at No. 7 Georgia, noon, ESPN No. 14 South Carolina at Arkansas. 12:21 p.m Western Carolina at Auburn, 2 p.m. No. 17 Florida at No. 10 LSU, 3:30 p.m., CBS No. 1 Alabama at Kentucky, 7 p.m., ESPN 2 Bowling Green at Mississippi State, 7:30 p.m. No. 9 Texas A&M at Ole Miss, 8:30 p.m., ESPN

volleyball

Week 7 matchups Thursday Oct. 10 Rutgers at No. 8 Louisville, 7:30 p.m., ESPN San Diego State at Air Force, 9 p.m. Arizona at USC, 10:30 p.m. Friday Oct. 11 Temple at Cincinnati, 8:30 p.m., ESPN Saturday Oct. 12 No. 25 Missouri at No. 7 Georgia, noon, ESPN No. 12 Oklahoma at Texas, noon, ABC Iowa State at No. 20 Texas Tech, noon Pittsburgh at No. 24 Virginia Tech, noon, ESPNU South Florida at Connecticut, noon Indiana at Michigan State, noon, ESPN2 Memphis at Houston, noon Eastern Michigan at Army, noon Nebraska at Purdue, noon Kansas at TCU, noon No. 14 South Carolina at

soccer Lipscomb TCU Furman Southern Miss Nebraska Ga. Southern North Florida La-Lafayette UNC Green Kansas N. Dakota St. Notre Dame at LSU at Texas A&M vs.Tennessee vs. Ole Miss at S. Carolina at Florida at Missouri at Arkansas vs. Kentucky vs. Alabama vs. Miss St. at Tennessee vs. LSU vs. S. Carolina at Ole Miss at Miss State vs. Texas A&M vs. Auburn vs. Kennesaw State

W, 3-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-0 L, 3-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-1 W, 3-0 W, 3-0 L, 3-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-1 W, 3-2 L, 3-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-2 7 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 8 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 1:30 5 p.m. 5 p.m.

SEC Standings SEC Overall Florida 4-0 15-1 Kentucky 4-0 12-3 Missouri 3-0 19-0 Arkansas 4-1 11-5 Georgia 3-1 13-3 South Carolina 2-2 10-6 Alabama 1-2 13-4 Texas A&M 1-2 9-5 LSU 0-1 10-3 Miss. State 0-2 9-7 Tennessee 0-3 8-9 Auburn 0-4 9-7 Ole Miss 0-4 10-7 Friday, Oct. 11 Kentucky at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Georgia at South Carolina 7

Arkansas, 12:21 p.m. Navy at Duke, 12:30 Western Carolina at Auburn, 2 p.m. Central Michigan at Ohio, 2 p.m. Buffalo at Western Michigan, 2 p.m. Miami (OH) at Massachusetts Kent State at Ball State, 3 p.m. Boston College at No. 3 Clemson, 3:30 p.m., ABC No. 17 Florida at No. 10 LSU, 3:30 p.m., CBS No. 15 Baylor at Kansas State, 3:30 p.m. FOX No. 19 Northwestern at Wisconsin, 3:30 p.m., ABC San Jose State at Colorado State, 3:30 p.m. Virginia at Maryland, 3:30 p.m. Syracuse at North Carolina State, 3:30 p.m. Troy at Georgia State, 3:30 p.m. East Carolina at Tulane. 3:30 p.m. New Mexico at Wyoming, 3:30 p.m. No. 2 Oregon at No. 16 Washington, 4 p.m.

Rice at UTSA, 4 p.m. No. 18 Michigan at Penn State, 5 p.m., ESPN Akron at No. 23 Northern Illinois, 5 p.m. Marshall at Florida Atlantic, 5 p.m. No. 5 Stanford at Utah, 6 p.m. No. 1 Alabama at Kentucky, 7 p.m., ESPN2 Middle Tennessee at North Texas, 7 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe at Texas State, 7 p.m. Idaho at Arkansas State, 7 p.m. Bowling Green at Miss. State, 7:30 p.m. UAB at Florida International, 7:30 p.m. Boise State at Utah state, 8 p.m. Georgia Tech at BYU, 7 p.m. No. 9 Texas A&M at Ole Miss, 8:30 p.m., ESPN Colorado at Arizona State, 10 p.m. California at No. 11 UCLA, 10:30 p.m., ESPN2 Oregon State at Washington State. 10:30 p.m., ESPNU

UGA Soccer Schedule

UGA Volleyball Schedule Aug. 30 Aug. 31 Aug. 31 Sept. 6 Sept. 7 Sept. 10 Sept. 13 Sept. 14 Sept. 14 Sept. 20 Sept. 21 Sept. 21 Sept. 27 Sept. 29 Oct. 4 Oct. 6 Oct. 11 Oct. 13 Oct. 18 Oct. 20 Oct. 23 Oct. 25 Oct. 27 Nov. 3 Nov. 8 Nov. 10 Nov. 15 Nov. 17 Nov. 24 Nov. 27 Nov. 29

4-1 3-2 3-3 2-3

Freshman cornerback Shaq Wiggins awaits the snap during Georgia's 34-31 overtime victory against Tennessee. DAVID C. BRISTOW /Staff

p.m. Miss. State at Texas A&M, 7:30 p.m. Alabama at Arkansas, 8 p.m. Ole Miss at LSU, 8 p.m. Missouri at Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13 Arkansas at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Kentucky at South Carolina, 1:30 p.m. Georgia at Florida, 2 p.m. Miss. State at LSU, 2 p.m. Alabama at Missouri, 2:30 p.m. Auburn at Ole Miss, 2:30 p.m.

Date

Opponent

Location

Aug. 23 Aug. 25 Aug. 30 Sept. 1 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 13 Sept. 15 Sept. 20 Sept. 27 Sept. 29 Oct. 4 Oct. 6 Oct. 11 Oct. 18 Oct. 20 Oct. 25 Oct 27 Oct. 31

Texas Houston Mercer Furman Jacksonville UNC Greensboro Long Beach State Charleston S. Carolina Missouri Kentucky Alabama Ole Miss Auburn Mississippi State Texas A&M LSU Arkansas Florida

Austin Houston Athens Athens Athens Greensboro Athens Athens Athens Columbia Lexington, Ky Athens Athens Auburn, Ala Athens Athens Baton Rouge Fayetteville Athens

Time/ Result L, 2-0 W, 2-0 W,3-0 W,2-0 W,1-0 (OT) W, 1-0 W, 1-0 W, 5-1 W, 2-0 W,1-0 L, 1-0 L, 3-2 (OT) L, 3-1 8 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 8 p.m. 2 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

SEC Standings LSU Kentucky South Carolina Texas A&M Alabama Florida Ole Miss Missouri Tennessee Arkansas Georgia Vanderbilt Auburn Mississippi St.

SEC 4-0-1 4-1-0 4-1-0 4-1-0 3-2-0 3-2-0 3-2-0 2-2-1 2-2-1 2-3-0 2-3-0 0-4-1 0-5-0 0-5-0

Friday, Oct. 11 Arkansas at Texas A&M, Time TBD Alabama at South Carolina, 7 p.m. Tennessee at Kentucky, 7:30 p.m. Missouri at LSU, 8 p.m. Florida at Mississippi State, 8 p.m.

Overall 8-3-2 10-2-1 11-1-1 9-3-1 5-7-0 9-3-1 10-3-1 6-6-1 7-4-2 9-4-0 9-4-0 3-7-3 4-8-1 3-9-0

Streak W3 W3 W4 W4 L1 W1 W1 L1 L1 W1 L3 L1 L4 L5

Georgia at Auburn, 8 p.m. Vanderbilt at Ole Miss, 8 p.m.

Georgia Baptist College of Nursing of Mercer University, the oldest accredited

nursing program in the state, offers the

Bachelor of Science in Nursing. The College of Nursing also offers: • RN-BSN Completion Track (for licensed nurses) • MSN program with Nursing Education, Clinical Nurse Specialist or The Family Nurse Practitioner Focus • PhD in Nursing • Doctor of Nursing Practice

(678) 547-6700 nursing.mercer.edu

12076


16 Showcase

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red and Black

Showcase

}

Country rock star Luke Bryan stopped by Wild Wind Farm, about 40 minutes outside Athens, on his sixth annual Farm Tour. The baseball-cap-clad singer set up shop and performed for a sold-out crowd at Wild Winds Farm, serenading fans with hits from his most recent album, “Crash My Party.”

{

Bryan gave several shoutouts to UGA in his two-hour performance, at one point donning a Georgia jersey and calling the Dawgs in the middle of a song.

PHOTOS BY JONAH ALLEN/Staff


The Red & Black

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Variety 17

First to ‘Call the Dawgs’: Claude McBride remembered for passion BY ALEX EVERHART @alexbeverhart Reverend Claude McBride (1932-2013) is remembered for his ministry, optimism and his love for the Bulldogs. However, this man has not been given the true credit he deserves. As an esteemed alumnus and supporter of the University of Georgia, Claude’s services should not go unnoticed.   He served as the senior pastor for Milledge Baptist Church for 19 years before becoming the football team’s chaplain. Friends and family of Claude recognize these many achievements, but few know what stemmed from his creative mind.  The pastor himself created UGA’s most well known cheer, “Calling the Dawgs.” Claude realized Georgia’s fans needed a cheer to boost the energy in Sanford Stadium. He took inspiration from the University of Arkansas’ “Calling the Hogs” cheer and made it into his own.  “He decided we needed a call like Sooie pig,” said Walt McBride, Claude’s son, also an alumnus of UGA. Walt remembers his father as a man of creativity and humor.     “He was remarkably creative,” Walt said. “He just found ways to connect with people.”   Claude graduated from UGA in 1954 with a degree from the journalism school. During his time on campus, Claude was a member of the Red Coat Band as well as a varsity cheerleader and member of the men’s Glee Club.  “He was a cheerleader [while] at UGA, but never grew out of it,” Walt said. 

Yawn played for the with football players. Georgia Bulldogs from “The players would 1965 to 1968 as an offencome over and watch sive guard. Yawn claims TV on weeknights,” no one loved the Wynter said. Georgia Bulldogs as Opening up their much as Claude did. home to athletes, they Claude served as provided more than a the team’s chaplain for place to hang out. at least 32 years, “He would fold up a according to his wife card with a saying in it Gayle.  for every football player “He was such a big every away game,” fan. He supported Wynter said. “He the team in ways would go into the we didn’t even stadium and clip know about,” said pieces of the Wynter McBride, hedges to put in Claude’s daughter the cards.”  and a UGA alumClaude went na. so far as to take  Wynter said two potted hedgher father made es to Jacksonville sure every player for the Georgiahad a piece of the McBRIDE Florida game so hedges to take the players could with them to away still run between the games. hedges.  During his time as “I think one of the chaplain, Claude was best [memories]0 was able to mentor UGA’s him after the National finest players and Championship in 1980,” teams. He was known Wynter said. “They let to be at every practice the families in the lockand always traveled er room. We walked in with the team to the and saw Daddy holding away games. He stood the trophy with a huge alongside UGA’s finest grin.”  coach, Vince Dooley, Walt remembers and players such as how Claude dressed up Tim Callaway, Bruce every Homecoming Yawn, Herschel Walker game and cheered with and Frank Ross. the alumni on the field.  “Close relationships “Watching him with with so many generathe alumni cheerleaders tions, that is what was having a ball … [It was] neat about it,” Walt just fun watching him said. have a good time and Wynter remembers not taking everything her home always filled seriously,” Walt said.

In 1983, Claude continued his work for the University when appointed associate director for Alumni Relations. He retired from his pastoral duties, but continued to contribute to the University’s alumni.  “He was leaving the pulpit, but not the ministry,” Walt said.  Claude’s family considers him UGA’s biggest fan. He traveled to nearly every away game and never missed an opportunity to counsel a player.  “He was always optimistic in happy or sad situations, wins or loses,” said Claudia Skinner, Claude’s granddaughter and a sophomore from Athens majoring in dietetics.  Her grandfather was revered as a man of humility and positivity.  “The most optimistic person I’ve ever been around,” Vince Dooley said in a recent article from the Athens Banner Herald. Claude passed away on Aug. 23. His family accepted “The Old Faithful Dog” award on his behalf at the North Texas Game. He is remembered for his many achievements, but shall never be forgotten for “Calling the Dawgs.”

Rev. Claude McBride from a 1969 edition of The Red & Black announcing his chaplainship. file/Staff

Finding his way back to Athens Claude was born in Columbus, where he returned after graduation. As a young man, Claude took a job for The Columbus Ledger, where he worked for two years. During his time in Columbus, Claude also worked for a small Baptist church in Stewart County. There, he met his wife, Gayle, who attended a neighboring church. Gayle also works for UGA in the athletics department.    Claude realized the ministry’s calling and left Columbus for seminary. He left Columbus in 1957 and attended Southern Baptist Seminary in Louisville, Ky. Upon graduation, Claude moved to Jacksonville Beach, Fla. in 1959 and moved to Calhoun in 1961 to work in multiple churches.   “The happiest day in his life was when he accepted the call at Milledge Baptist Church,” Walt said.  Claude and Gayle returned to Athens to stay in 1964.  During his time as Milledge Baptist Church’s senior pastor, he started a student outreach program and Baptist Student Union. Claude’s programs drew university students and even athletes to the church.   “He loved the University and reaching out to people,” Walt said.

N For ow L Fal easin l 20 g 14 Live. Study. Play. Downtown.

‘The Old Faithful Dog’ According to his family, Claude formed many close relationship with students from campus. In the late ’60s, Vince Dooley caught wind of Claude’s services and invited him to become the chaplain for the football team. “He really became the chaplain because so many football players went to his church,” said Bruce Yawn, former Georgia football.

0''*$*@-C456%&/5C)064*/(C1@35/&3C0'C5)&C >C? ® ® w 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 Bedroom

Luxury Student Apartments w Infinity Edge Roooop Pool w Gated Community

w 10,700+ sq o Resident Center w Fully Furnished w Extensive Fitness Center w Walk to Class

170 College Ave | 706.355.9997 | TheStandardAthens.com | info@thestandardathens.com


18 Variety

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

Aaron Carter heads to Athens for ultimate Throwback Thursday BY LESLEY HAULER @lesleyhauler Before One Direction and The Wanted took the stage, and before Bieber Fever infected the nation, Aaron Carter was America’s Boy Next Door. The former teen idol burst into the music scene and shot to stardom crooning about a girl named Candy. In just the span of a few years, the teen star spit out multiple platinum records, stole the hearts of tweenage girls and managed to beat Shaquille O’Neal in a game of basketball. But it hasn’t been easy for the hip-hop and pop star. Riddled with stints of family drama, arrests and rehab, the star quietly dropped from the spotlight. But the 25-year-old is back and wants Candy now more than ever as he comes to Athens on his “After Party Tour” hoping to prove that it has been and always will be Aaron’s Party. After an eight-year hiatus, Carter is heading back on the road in an effort to revamp his music career and reconnect with his fans. The tour comes to Athens Oct. 10 at the Melting Point. The tour, which kicked off in February, proved to be so popular that they have extended the tour — twice. Carter got the idea to go back on tour while he was performing in the off-Broadway musical “The Fantastiks” in 2011. Performing on stage in the musical was a completely different experience than performing in concerts. “It was a whole other environment,” Carter said. “Sometimes there were people there who didn’t know who I was, and I felt like I was really trying to work for their attention and their appreciation as much as I was trying to work for their applause, cause that’s what it’s all about.” The entire experience made him “hungry to perform.” “It seemed like a good way to open back up my doors and get back on tour and get people to believe in me again,” Carter said. Even though performing on stage

Aaron Carter Show WHEN: Oct. 10, 6 p.m. WHERE: The Melting Point PRICE: $15 for students, $20 for general admission

helped jumpstart his career, Carter said he owes his comeback all to his fans, and he means it. “The fans really made me want to get back out there, and it was only a matter of time, really figured it out and wanted to get back on the road,” Carter said. His fans are ready for the party. “I didn’t believe it when I first heard he was coming. I didn’t realize he was still trying his music career. But when I realized it was true, I thought it was so great,” said Lacey Davis, a junior journalism major from Lawrenceville. Coming to Athens answered many wishes. “It was like every 11:11 wish I made in my elementary school was finally coming true,” said Blis Savidge, a sophomore pre-journalism major from Johns Creek. Although many of the fans are at the concerts out of pure nostalgia, Carter is determined not to let his fans down. His set list is full of his classics such as “Aaron’s Party” and “How I Beat Shaq,” but Carter wants to make sure his fans realize he isn’t the same little boy who won over the hearts of tweens as he crooned “I Want Candy” when he was 13 years old. “I’ve been really working on my craft as a performer, and people are going to see who I am now and who I am going to be for the next 20 years,” Carter said. The “Aaron’s Party” singer said the most important thing for him right now is to reconnect with his

No longer a teen heartthrob, Aaron Carter is ready to make a comeback after an eight-year hiatus. And yes, he still wants Candy. Courtesy TheArtistGroup/Wikipedia fans, by any means possible. Besides the surprisingly popular “After Party Tour”, Carter has also been working on a new album, as well as a behind-the-scenes documentary about the tour, and the singer makes sure to keep his fans in check through social media. “I would say in the world of social media, it is very easy for everyone to get content nowadays, and I kind of want people to get insight onto what I’ve been doing and how amazing it is making my comeback, that they’re coming and showing up and really being supportive, regardless of what anyone says,” he said. Many fans are waiting with open arms, ready for their first celebrity crush to make a comeback. “He can absolutely do it. He has a ton of loyal fans that would love to hear his new stuff,” said Erin Ensley, a junior from Collins Hill majoring in advertising. Meanwhile, others aren’t so sure the 25-year-old has it in him. “The fans who remember him

have matured too much over the years for him to be able to change enough to keep a familiar image while still appearing to his new taste in music,” Davis said. Some don’t see the nostalgia craze lasting. “I don’t know if he can make a comeback, but I definitely think he will have another 10 seconds of fame,” Savidge said. “He’s fueled by nothing but nostalgia of young women right now.” Despite the naysayers, Carter is just appreciative the world has given him a second chance. “To be able to see all of my fans who have been able to stick with me, and helping me out and coming to my shows, it’s been incredible. I have a lot of work to do and lot more shows to do and a lot more people to see. That’s my goal — to see as many people as I can and share my music with them,” Carter said. Even though Aaron Carter still wants candy, the question is do the fans? Only time will tell.

Abbey Road LIVE! celebrates Lennon’s birthday BY SAMANTHA LIPKIN @redandblack

join our Wait! Don’t sign underground that movement. lease yet!

Beatlemania has struck Athens at the Georgia Theatre. Athens-based Abbey Road LIVE! is performing an All-Star Jamboree celebrating the birthday of the Beatles’ front-man John Lennon at the Georgia Theatre Thursday night. Heavily focusing on Lennon’s material and adding some songs from his solo career, the cover band is commemorating what would have been the musician’s 73rd birthday. Initially a part of an original band called Fuzzy Sprouts in the ’90s, members Andrew Hanmer, Dave Domizi and Michael Wegner re-formed as Abbey Road LIVE! after the dissolution of the group. “We decided to do something a little different for one of our shows, so we learned the entire ‘Abbey Road’ album,” said Michael Wegner, guitarist, keyboardist, clarinetist and vocals, of his time in Fuzzy Sprouts. It was well received by the crowd, as well as a lot of fun, so the success formed the basis of the cover band Abbey Road LIVE!. Initially a tribute to “Abbey Road,” the group broadened its scope of material to songs and albums from all eras of the Beatles. Wegner explained that the Beatles strongly influenced all of the band members since they were kids. “For me, it became my working model for learning to play music. They had the perfect songs, harmonies and lyrics,” Wegner said. The band’s first shows were at the Georgia Theatre, and the John Lennon birthday celebration has become an almost annual tradition at the venue the group considers home. The first of these celebrations was in 1997 while the members were still a part of Fuzzy Sprouts. In 2001 or 2002, it was brought back as an annual show.

Abbey Road LIVE!, an Athens-based Beatles cover band, is celebrating John Lennon’s 73rd birthday at Georgia Theatre. Courtesy Abbey Road LIVE!

ABBEY ROAD LIVE! WHEN: Oct. 10, 8 p.m. WHERE: Georgia Theatre PRICE: $12

“Back then, we were only playing a few shows a year, so we tended to schedule them on special occasions,” Wegner said. This year has been a busy one for Abbey Road LIVE!, which kicked off with double album shows featuring “Rubber Soul” and “Revolver” around the Southeast. This year’s birthday celebration is going to be even bigger than those in the past. The band has been collaborating with musicians from other Athens bands to create the AllStar Jamboree show on Thursday. Some of the special guests include Mike Mantione from Five Eight, Jason NeSmith from Casper and the Cookies, Chris

$5,000 in scholarships are still available for study abroad in France for Spring 2014!

go

Full Service Car Wash With Oil Change $24.95 (up to 5 qts.) for oil change (regular value $38.95, you save $14.00)

Plan now. Contact Carolina Robinson at carolir@uga.edu.

4350 Lexington Rd., Athens, GA (across from Wal-Mart)

McKay from The Critical Darlings and singer/song writer Caroline Aiken. There are a few more surprise performances in store. “It’s going to be a crazy show, at one point we will have six or seven guitarists on stage, plus some horn players,” Wegner said. Everyone wants to know a band member’s favorite song, but every fan knows there’s no simple way to answer that question with merely one song — sometimes even two or three. “That’s never a fair question, there are so many great ones,” Wegner said. “I’m partial to the George Harrison material — ‘Here Comes The Sun’ and ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps.’ The songs that are the most fun to play are the ones that everyone sings along with like ‘All You Need Is Love,’ ‘Hey Jude’ and ‘Twist and Shout’ ... Really this list could go on and on.” Abbey Road LIVE!’s John Lennon birthday celebration AllStar Jamboree has something for all Beatles’ and Lennon fans alike, keeping the memory of musical legends alive.


The Red & Black

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Variety 19

Comic trades vulgarity for popularity BY COLBY NEWTON @redandblack It’s not easy being clean. Brian Regan has been a working comic for more than 16 years, and for most of them, he’s never made a joke your grandma would blush to hear. Over two albums, three DVDs and a heavy touring schedule, Regan has built a reputation on his ability to express his thoughts without dirtying the ears of any listeners. But while most clean comics are relegated to playing church basements and county fairs, Regan managed the difficult move of cleaning up his act without losing the respect of his peers. Big-name comedians from Jerry Seinfeld to Louis C.K. have named Regan as one of their personal favorite comics, and the comedian regularly sells out clubs and auditoriums as he tours the country. So how does Regan manage to stay ahead in a game where crudity is king? “Well, the flippant answer is that it’s funny, but I try to guard against giving a selfserving answer,” Regan said. “But really, I enjoy what I do, and I like to think I put a little effort into it … The fact that I’m fortunate enough to have a fan following and have other comedians like what I do means a lot to me.” While Regan entered the comedy game largely unformed his early acts included a bag of props that he would pull out to emphasize punch lines the comic quickly gained a reputation for his singular observations and skewed take on ordinary life.

While Regan’s earliest acts included the occasional swear word or dirty joke, he soon decided that he could make people laugh without making them look down their noses. “[The act] was always mostly clean … at most, maybe 5 percent of my stuff would have a four letter word in it,” Regan said. “And I don’t want to be 95 percent, I want to be 100 percent. I never got a 100 on a test in school, so I decided to give myself one.” But while Regan keeps his act clean, he’s no prude in his private life — he names legendarily filthy standup George Carlin as one of his comedic inspirations, and is understanding toward any comic who might feel the need to drop the F-Bomb to wake their audience up. “It all depends on where you’re at in your career and where you are, literally, on stage,” Regan said. “Early on, you have to perform in situations that can be a little rougher, you’ve gotta play bars that have a comedy night and stuff like that … To survive in those rooms, sometimes having a four-letter word in your act can get people’s attention.” Regan cites much of his comedic success to the fact that he makes relatable, understandable observations comments on the little quirks and oddities of life, rather than riffs on popular culture or American politics. This quality allows him to connect with audiences from all walks of life, from upscale New Yorkers to Midwestern farmers, through the easily-understood binds of shared marvels and frustrations.

Brian Regan WHEN: Friday, Oct. 11, 8 p.m. WHERE: Classic Center PRICE: $42.50 “I come off as this everyman sort of comic, where everyone can relate, because my upbringing was rather generic,” Regan said. “I grew up in a normal kind of family with brothers and sisters, I played Little League baseball … It was this very All-American sort of perspective. But I found peculiar humor within that world.” Regan may make simple observations, but that doesn’t mean he doesn’t put thought into his comedy. The comic spends much of his time examining the act of making people laugh, figuring out why he can see these strange takes that others miss. “I don’t know how the brain looks at something in a funny way … that’s what’s interesting about comedy, two people can look at the same exact thing and the other can look at it and say, ‘Hey, that’s funny,’” Regan said. “Why the one person sees humor in it and the other doesn’t, that’s interesting to me. It’s hard to get your arms around it and figure out why, you know?” The length of Regan’s career and the depth of his catalogue mean that the comedian is often confronted with fans of his most famous routines, but the comic doesn’t allow himself to rest on his

Praised by legendary comedians Jerry Seinfeld and Louis C.K., Brian Regan makes witty observations on everyday occurrences. Courtesy Joseph Craven/theburninsider.com laurels. “I don’t feel the pressure some people do to keep doing old routines in my act … I like to keep turning the material over, I like it to be fresh, I like making footprints on virgin snow,” Regan said. “Somebody might come up to me and say, ‘Hey, do this’ and I’m just like, ‘Great, I’m glad you like this, but I might not necessarily be doing that tonight’… But I don’t mind people liking the old stuff. It feels good.” While many of Regan’s peers including fellow clean comic success story Jim Gaffigan have plied their acts into supporting roles in television and film, Regan is content to stay on the road. (To date, his only IMBD credits are for a 1995 episode of “Dr. Katz” and a character voice on 2011’s “The Looney Tunes Show.”)

“I’ve never been interested in being a star or being a celebrity, I just like the comedy. I like getting on stage and making people laugh,” Regan said. “I wouldn’t be opposed to doing a little acting role here or there, but … y’know, everyone in this business has a different quest. Some people use comedy as a way to get famous, for others that’s an end result. For me, it’s an end result.”

Ultimately, all Regan wants to do is make his fans laugh. “When somebody laughs, it’s one of the most honest emotions someone can feel in life, and to get up on stage and make a whole roomful of people laugh, it’s very gratifying,” Regan said. “And when you get off stage and they give you enough money to buy a sandwich, that’s good too.”

‘Servant of Two Masters’ draws on physicality of acting BY COLBY NEWTON @redandblack It’s gone by many names: slapstick, harlequinade, Larry, Curly and Moe. But the art of archetypal physical comedy reached its zenith with commedia dell’arte. While the form has mutated and evolved over the centuries, the original forms are still occasionally dramatized and the University Theatre has decided to do just that. This week, the University Theatre presents the classic commedia piece “Servant of Two Masters.” “What you have to understand is that it’s a very physical show, which is different from a lot of things we do here,” said Director T. Anthony Marotta. “It’s a very different approach to training the actors, getting them comfortable enough to go through a two-and-a-half hour physical performance and play off each other and the audience.” Created in 16th century Italy, commedia is best remembered for popularizing the idea of improvised comedy, the idea that actors needn’t be beholden to a rigid script in order to create entertaining work. Actors played as masked, easily understood characters whose surface desires drove much of the action, relying on physical expressionism and artistry to win over audiences. Originally written in 1753, “Servant” concerns itself with the

plight of one Truffaldino, a perpetually-starving servant who secretly takes on a second master in order to line his pockets and fill his belly. The play is largely a farce, hurtling from plot point to plot point as an excuse for creating physical comedy and never asking more than laughter from the audience, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy for the actors. Marotta, directing his first play for the University, came to UGA last year as the movement and fight coach for the theatre program. He brought his knowledge of these skills to training his cast, many of whom had never trained in commedia or physical comedy before starting rehearsals. The cast members were forced to learn on the job as they memorized their lines and improvised physical and verbal comedy at every rehearsal. “A lot of what I had to learn was the big S’s your speed, your size and your specificity,” said Brad Burnham, “Servant’s” Truffaldino and a freshman from Milton studying theatre. “The idea of acting with your body as opposed to acting with your words … it’s a blend of physicality and vocal acting, which I think is a really good test for any actor.” “Servant” plays with many classic theatrical tropes disguises, star-crossed lovers, citywide intrigue but the first and foremost goal is to make the audience laugh. The play is largely carried on the strength of the

actor’s improvisations, to the point that the show is different every night; everyone who attends the show is promised a singular experience. “We have a script, but we definitely have places where we deviate from it some more than others,” said Stephanie Murphy, a cast member and second-year graduate student from Chicago. “I had some improv experience from acting in Chicago, but this is the first time I’ve really had to delve into the form. It’s been a really exciting journey.” But while Marotta and his cast are committed to observing the forms of commedia, that doesn’t mean they’re stuck in the past. Marotta has done everything he can to keep the audience fully engaged in the play, from designing the stage around a contemporary steampunk theme all the way to sending his actors out to engage the crowd directly. Marotta understands that the classical form and stylings of commedia may turn audiences off, but believes the timelessness of the characters and their desires will resonate with the audience. “The beautiful thing about commedia is the characters are all based on basic human wants,” Marotta said. “To love, to eat, to have sex, to have power… I’m hoping that the audience walks out recognizing these needs and laughing at how earnestly these characters try to obtain them.”

perrysstores.com

YOUR TAILGATE HEADQUARTERS Large Selection of Domestics & Craft Beer

706.353.0057 706.583.4066 706.543.0005

Fine Wine & Liquor

4388 Lexington Rd. 706.583.4066 265 North Ave. 706.543.0005

1195 Cedar Shoals Drive Like us on

ARBOR CREEK LynnROCK WhitE COLumns hALL


20 Variety

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

Events THURSDAY OCTOBER 10 Aaron Carter, Brie Goldsobel, Connor Pledger When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $15 Contact: meltingpointathens.com Abbey Road Live! When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $12 Contact: georgiatheatre.com White Violet, Velveteen Pink, Blue Blood, Little Gold When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: 40watt.com Pilgrim, Moths, Don Chambers When: Caledonia Lounge Where: 9:30 p.m. Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: caledonialounge.com

Druid City Hospital Visitation Hour, Deral Fenderson, Silas Lang When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flcikertheatreandbar.com Passafire, Ballyhoo! When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $12 Contact: newearthmusichall.com Wynton Marsalis When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Concert Hall Price: $50-60 Contact: pac.uga.edu Servant of Two Masters When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Price: $7-12 Contact: drama.uga.edu “Evil Dead:” The Musical When: 8 p.m. Where: Athens Community Theatre Price: $15-18 Contact: townandgownplayers.org

Make It An Evening: A Gospel Celebration When: 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: $5 Contact: georgiamuseum.org King Comedy Night When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $5 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com FRIDAY OCTOBER 11 Brian Regan When: 8 p.m. Where: The Classic Center Price: $42.50 Contact: classiccenter. com/theatre “Pushin’ Up Daisies” Screening When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Cine Barcafe Price: $5 Contact: athenscine. com Servant of Two Masters When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Price: $7-12 Contact: drama.uga.edu “Evil Dead:” The Musical When: 8 p.m. Where: Athens Community Theatre Price: $15-18 Contact: townandgownplayers.org Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Restavant When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $20 Contact: 40watt.com Yonder Mountain String Band, Cicada Rhythm When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $25 Contact: georgiatheatre.com Squisch When: 11 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: Free Contact: georgiatheatre.com Casper & The Cookies, Elekibass, Lake When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $8 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com Rubblebucket, Dana Swimmer,

now serving Brunch!

Trivia wednesdays 8pm

daily lunch specials $ 1 Pints $ 5 Mini calzones changes weekly

Monday 5PM - close

320 easT clayTon sT.

1sT, 2nd & 3rd place prizes

40 Beers on draft and a FUll Bar 706.613.0892

OCT 10 ..................... Abbey Road Live! All Star Jamboree & John Lennon Birthday Celebration OCT 11 ................................. Yonder Mountain String Band w/ Cicada Rhythm OCT 11 .............................Squisch - Rooftop FREE 11pm 21+ OCT 12 ....................... UGA vs Missouri - On the Big Screen! OCT 12 ...............................................106.1 WNGC Welcomes Montgomery Gentry w/ JJ Lawhorn OCT 17 ..................... They Might Be Giants w/ Moon Hooch OCT 18 ............ The Revivalists w/ Mamas Love & Boomfox

Local alt-rock stalwarts, Lowdive, show off soulful lyrics and grungy guitar rhythms at a free show this Saturday at Nowhere Bar. David C. Bristow/Staff Programs When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $12 Contact: newearthmusichall.com Cult Of Riggonia, Megafauna, Rampy Boys When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: Free (21+), $2 (18-20) Contact: caledonialounge.com Miss Princess Avenue Pageant When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: $5 Contact: facebook.com/ Go-Bar

Contact: townandgownplayers.org Jeff Coffin & The Mu’tet When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $15 Contact: meltingpointathens.com Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: The Capital Room Price: Free Contact: thecapitalroom.com Trivia When: 9 p.m. Where: Amici Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ amiciathens

Makhato When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ nowherebarathens

Trivia When: 7 p.m. Where: Buffalo’s Cafe Price: Free Contact: buffaloscafe/ athens

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12

MONDAY OCTOBER 14

“Evil Dead:” The Musical When: 8 p.m. Where: Athens Community Theatre Price: $15-18 Contact: townandgownplayers.org

Max Comedy Presents: Big Ol’ Open Mic When: 8 p.m. Where: Max Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ The-Max-Canada

“Present” Screening When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: $5 Contact: ithappenedonhalloween.com Diamondback, Super V When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $8 Contact: 40watt.com Montgomery Gentry, JJ Lawhorn When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $30 Contact: georgiatheatre.com Baths, Groundislava, Time Wharp, Murk Daddy Flex When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $12 Contact: newearthmusichall.com

Tom Visions, The Ebon Hawk When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: flickertheatreandbar.com Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Highwire Lounge Price: Free Contact: highwirelounge.com Team Trivia When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Price: Free Contact: beefobradys. com/mybeef/athens. aspx Open Mic When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Price: Free Contact: hendershotscoffee.com

Lowdive, Dangfly When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ nowherebarathens

GOpen Mic Night When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ Go-Bar

Dodd Ferrelle & The Wintervillians When: 8:30 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $7 Contact: meltingpointathens.com

TUESDAY OCTOBER 15

Juna, Virgin Lung, Kater Mass, Lower Cases & Capitals When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (1820) Contact: caledonialounge.com SUNDAY OCTOBER 13 Servant of Two Masters When: 2:30 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Price: $7-12 Contact: drama.uga.edu “Evil Dead:” The Musical When: 2 p.m. Where: Athens Community Theatre Price: $15-18

When: 9 p.m. Where: Green Room Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ greenroomathens Grassland String Band, Katie Pruitt & Sam Dickson, Manmade Mountains When: 7 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 Contact: meltingpointathens.com Trivia When: 9 to 11 p.m. Where: Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Price: Free Contact: fuzzystacoshop.com Locos Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Locos Grill Price: Free Contact: locosgrill.com Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Johnny’s Pizza Price: Free Contact: athensjohnnys.com Movie Quotes Trivia When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Max Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ The-Max-Canada Trivia When: 7:30 p.m. Where: The Office Lounge Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ officeathens Karaoke When: 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Where: The Volstead Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ volsteadathens Open Mic Night When: 8 p.m. Where: Sundown Saloon Price: Free Contact: facebook.com/ Sundown-Saloon WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 16 The Modern Pinups Revue When: 7:30 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5-7 Contact: 40watt.com “Danzon” Screening When: 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Tate Theatre Price: Free Contact: correa@uga. edu

Vienna Boys Choir When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Concert Hall Price: $35-45 Contact: pac.uga.edu

“It Was A Big Year” Series When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Special Collections Library Price: Free Contact: libs.uga.edu/ scl

Kenny Bullock When: 7:30 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $10 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com

SALSAthens When: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $8 Contact: facebook.com/ salsaathens

Swing Dance Night When: 7 to 10 p.m. Where: DanceFx Price: $3-5 Contact: athensswingnight.com

The Shadowboxers, Chic Gamine When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $10 Contact: meltingpointathens.com

Five Knives, Kyle Andres, The Electric Sons, Chancellor Warhol When: 6 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: Free Contact: 40watt.com Sans Abri, Pierce Edens & The Dirty Word

Pat McGee, Jason Adamo When: 9 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $18 Contact: theworldfamousathens.com


The Red & Black

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Puzzles 21

Your weekly guide to Athens’ daily deals.

Drink and Dining GUIDE Thursday

FRIDAY

SATURday

SUNday

MONday

TUESday

wednesday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, $1 off of everything, Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Where: 256 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 549-0166 Website: www.allgoodlounge.com

Over 300 items including crab legs Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Where: 3567 Atlanta Hwy Phone: (706) 316-3382 Website:

Over 300 items including crab legs Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items including crab legs Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

Over 300 items Chinese Japanese and American/Sushi, Ribeye, and Seafood

www.athenschinastar.com

$1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, $1 off drinks from 4-7pm, new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily new specials daily

Where: 175 N. Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 353-2439 Website: www.greenroomathens.com

$6 Frozen drinks, $13 House wine bottles

Where: 320 E. Clayton Suite 201 Phone: (706) 613-0892 Website:

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

$3 Well drinks & shots

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

HAPPY HOUR $1 Pints of High Life all day

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life

8pm - Trivia $7 Domestic pitchers, $1 High Life pints

mellowmushroom.com

WING SPECIALS 3pm to close! All You Can Eat Wings (Monday & Wednesday) 50¢ Traditional Wings (Tuesdays) 25¢ Boneless Wings (Thursdays)

4

8

1

5

7

2

6

9

3

6

3

7

4

8

9

1

2

5

9

7

2

1

8

3

5

2

5

6

9

5

8

4

3

9

4

7

2

1

6

6

8

9

2

7

1

3

1

5

3

6

2

9

4

3

1

4

7

5

6

8

8

4

7

9

3

5

2

4

3

6

5

1

8

7

7

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

2

1

3

4

7

8

3

4

7

5

8

9

6

1

2

8

1

6

7

6

5

3

7

1

3

4

5

8

9

1

7

4

9

1

7

2

8

4

5

3

6

6

4

4

8

6

9

3

7

5

3

5

4

2

6

9

1

7

1

3

4

5

6

8

1

9

7

5

4

3

2

5

2

8

6

7

1

9

8

6

9

7

2

4

3

9

4

2

8

1

5

6

2

3

5

1

9

8

7

Difficulty: 10

2

6

3

2

9

6

9

6

8

4

9

2

9

3

6

1

4

8

1

8

5

8

2

7

Difficulty: 10

2

5

2

1

7

8

2

9

3

4

4

9

5

3

7

1

6

7

1

4

6

8

2

5

9

8

1

5

2

7

3

3

6

2

4

5

9

8

5

3

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

7

9

2

4

8

3

5

1

6

1

5

8

6

9

2

3

7

4

6

8

7

2

6

3

1

5

9

9

4

4

3

1

4

6

7

2

8

4

3

7

5

6

1

9

7

5

8

1

9

3

2

1

2

6

3

5

7

4

5

4

9

7

8

6

1

9

6

1

2

4

8

7

Difficulty: 18

Difficulty: 18

redandblack.com Bookmark www.redandblack. com on your mobile browser E to get the latest in UGA and ScanisHitER v to local news. r site! ou

Puzzled by your current housing situation? Landmark has the soLution! CaLL 706.395.1400 for more info!

8

9

3

4

2

5

6

2

7

5

8

1

9

3


puzzles

22 Puzzles

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Red & Black

1

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE OCTOBER 10

ACROSS 1 Siesta 5 Whole wheat or pumpernickel 10 Boring 14 “__ upon a time...” 15 1/16 of a pound 16 Terry cloth wraparound 17 Enthusiastic 18 Obviously true 20 Coloring solution 21 Lodges for travelers 22 Rough woolen coat fabric 23 Mrs. Reagan 25 Forbid 26 Clever; sharp 28 Abnormal nasal growths 31 Huge horned beast, for short 32 Dancer Gene 34 Mimic 36 Pres. William Howard __ 37 Aviator 38 Forehead 39 Zoom down snowy slopes

40 41 42 44 45 46 47 50 51 54 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

Difficult to eradicate Male duck Resounds Baby’s underwear Pose a query Actress __ Hannah TV’s Mandel Sand mound Gobble up Exaggerating the value of Meanie Be flexible Daughter of one’s brother Liver secretion Climb __; mount Talk out of Piece of Greek Orthodox art

DOWN Down the __; eventually Covetousness Able to be proven in a lab TV’s Koppel Dribble, as a basketball __ nose; cold symptom Finishes Highest card Lion’s lair Muscular Part of the ear Well-qualified Pay attention to Pisa’s nation Bump __; meet Female relative Leave suddenly __ and crafts Tremble Tactic One unable to use his legs 30 Said something 32 Smooch

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 21 24 25 26 27 28 29

33 35 37 38 40 41 43 44 46 47 48 49 50 52 53 55 56 57

BPOE member Jug Quick look Hee-haw Baffling riddle Urgent Coif Peril Idiot Vagabond Microwave, e.g. __ away; left Cut calories Woody’s son Adolescent Conjunction Suit accessory Japanese sash

P U Z Z L E

Drunk is when you feel sophisticated but can’t say it.

S P O N S O R

256 E. Clayton St • 706-549-0166 • Mon-Sat Noon-2AM

FRIDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE OCTOBER 11

1 6 10 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 22 24 25 26 29 30 31 33 37 39 41 42

ACROSS Mulgrew and Winslet Talk back Permanent skin mark Venice’s nation Heat in the microwave “As luck would __ it...” Beauty spots Related Golf club with a thin metal head Ghosts Illuminated by nature __ off; read the riot act to Sentence enders Watery part of the blood Hot __ sundae Regulation Delay Child’s writing assignment Pitcher Post or Procter Large brass instrument Mountains of South America

44 46 47 49 51 54 55 56 60 61 63 64 65

66 67 68 69

Beginning; start Big game Pain caused by a bee Gets up Charting out a route Songbird Mistakes Truthfully Dizzy or James Object; thing Lake near Reno Landers and Sothern __ Lee; frozen dessert brand Shallot’s kin Geneva or Erie Rotate Nuisances

Import Car DoCtors

1 2 3 4 5

6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 23 25 26 27 28 29 32 34

DOWN Basinger and Kardashian Perched upon Saga Votes into office “All __ go!”; signal to begin Curl the upper lip and growl Diving birds __-Doo; snowmobile Perceived; felt Glossiest Monte __; Monaco resort Steer clear of Landlord’s collections Thrill Egg on Tugs Entreaty Area of grass Blown away Throw In the midst of Hauls into court

35 36 38 40 43 45 48 50 51 52 53 54 56 57 58 59 62

Up to the task Hairy oxen Answer Long wistfully Begin moving Place for a nest __ on; demand Bizarre Olympics prize Sports building Practical joke Lady Frau’s husband __ and that Money, slangily Cravings Greek “T”

Check out the

Automotive RepAiR

brought to you by

University of Georgia

VISITORS GUIDE

10% OFF LabOr

w/Student or Military ID 1900 W. Broad Street

Summer/Fall 2013

(706) 353-6006

Brought to you By

SATURDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE OCTOBER 12

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 34 35 36 37 38 40 41

ACROSS __ in; wearing Sentry Hit movie about a shark Reign Higher berth Leave out Grows gray Game often run by the state Israeli dance Tijuana native Big name in auto racing Discarded cloth Drops a lover VP Spiro __ Swim __; diver’s flipper Bread browned Drop of sweat Panama or fez Swordsman Conjunction Mate Fraternity letter Spiraled

43 44 45 46 47 48 50 51 54 58

59 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Recede Holler 24 __ gold Curved band Full of lather Too loose, as pants Have a bug Diligent student Priest’s cap “...a partridge in a __ tree.” Joy __ of TV’s “The View” Closed circle Shaping tool Sierra __; African nation Villain Require Trimmed a lawn’s border Departs

DOWN  tudy late for tomorrow’s 1 S test 2 Racing sled 3 TV’s Trebek 4 Wanted 5 Soviet labor camp 6 Come __; find 7 Relevant 8 Hold on to 9 Like a wry sense of humor 10 Lyndon B. __ 11 Biblical book 12 Metal thread 13 Night twinkler 21 Crow’s remark 23 Say 25 Nervous 26 Taken __; surprised 27 Italian seaport home of Christopher Columbus 28 Lowest point 29 Distant 31 Played a role 32 Makes airtight

33 35 36 38 39 42 44 46 47 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 60

Indeed __ at; attacked Winter month: abbr. Flower part CBS rival Toiled Wood for a Christmas fire Concurred Gentleman Actor Clark __ Went public with Reach across Relinquish Mistiness Source of woe Like a take-out order Ripped Gorillas, e.g. Boar

32 33 35 38 39 41 42 44 45 47 48

Happening Does an usher’s job Advantage More tired Easily broken Desert fruit “Old Glory” Topeka’s state Not as fresh Blackboard First, second, third or home Put-__; taken advantage of Late actor Foxx Doing nothing Book page __ as a pin Deep long cut Prepare Easter eggs

MONDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE OCTOBER 14

ACROSS 1 __ dog; frankfurter 4 Poultry store buyer’s choice 9 Ferris wheel or merry-goround 13 Astonished 15 Cannot __; finds intolerable 16 Wines & dines 17 Equipment 18 Shapes 19 Perched upon 20 Messiest 22 __ a soul; no one 23 Newman or Reiser 24 Pot cover 26 Beauty parlors 29 Lowest-ranking soldiers 34 Rainbow __; freshwater fish 35 747 or Cessna 36 Pennsylvania or Fifth: abbr. 37 Public uprising

38 39 40 41 42 43 45 46 47 48 51 56 57 58 60 61 62 63

Street talk Hopping insect Inquire Fail, as a school class Facade Most annoying Inclines Years lived Male deer __ up; incinerate Looting Makes fun of Perfect In the __; winning, so far Ice cream parlor treat Fill with joy Not difficult Make __ meet; eke out a living 64 __ to; cite 65 Definite article

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 21 25

26 27 28 29 30

31

DOWN Slimy, eel-like fish Runs up a tab Colorful duck School grounds Bubbling away on the stove Stack Chances Baby bird African nation Tiny bit Entryway Catch sight of School quitter Breathe heavily “__ Got You Under My Skin” Part of most purses Ascend __ at; beholds Nursery purchase Place in order of importance Claw

49

50 52 53 54 55 59


puzzles

The Red & Black

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Puzzles 23

1

TUESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE OCTOBER 15

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 25

26 28

31 32 34 36 37 38 39

ACROSS Up in __; irate “Get lost!” Piece of office furniture Tidy Give a speech Wheel rod __ a one; none Surprising disclosure Jacuzzi Cottonwood or cedar Catchers’ gloves Cone topper “Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my __ John...” Shun Mix with others, as at a party Plant pest “__ Low, Sweet Chariot” Peeve Speaker’s platform Gong’s sound Lowly laborer Break a commandment

40 41 42 44 45 46 47 50 51 54 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

Sliver of glass On the __; free Oslo’s nation Baby’s sock Give help to Syrup flavor Undress Manufactured Major network Trailblazing Icy precipitation Doing nothing Italy’s most famous poet 5 __ 15 is 3 Have to have Make a smudge worse __ on; trample

44 46 47 49 51

Chavez or Romero Needless turmoil Fisherman’s hopes Actress Mia __ __ game; event for the finest athletes Honor with a banquet Yachtsman From California to New York Finished Snatch Stiff Drug addict British title Game site Not as much Actress Daly Troublesome

DOWN 1 Bancroft and Jillian 2 “As ye sow, so shall ye __” 3 Mai tai garnish 4 Home for swine 5 Grief 6 Crawl slowly 7 __ about; sing the praises of 8 Consumed 9 Tillis or Tormé 10 Going out with 11 Way out 12 __ machine; casino staple 13 Mattel’s boy dolls 19 Surrounded by 21 Three-__ sloth 24 Greek letters 25 Croon 26 Actor George 27 Madrid’s nation 28 Follow orders 29 Police officer’s title,

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 23

25 26 27 28 29 32 34 35

30 32 33 35 37 38 40 41 43 44 46 47 48 49 50 52 53 55 56 57

36 38 40 43 45 48 50

51 52 53 54 56 57 58 59 62

perhaps Jagged Kill Armed conflict Leg joint Actor Everett Place to swim Steal Remain optimistic __ cats and dogs; poured Harass persistently __ ray; devilfish Whirl around Popular detergent Actor’s part Dig for ore Use the teeth Clippety-__ Ames & Asner Ewe’s mate __ and hers

WEDNESDAY CROSSWORD - ANSWER ONLINE OCTOBER 16

1 6 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 31 33

37 39 41 42

ACROSS Flip-__; rubber sandals __ tale; far-fetched story Sports network Opponent Woodwind African nation __ so often; occasionally Raiders or Rams Boast Crazy Morphine or codeine Deceased One __; each other Mental tension Valuable thing Certain vote __ on; forwards Restaurants’ lists of dishes __ milk; nonfat beverage S, M, L and XL “Room for __”; sign at a boardinghouse Mexican mister

54 55 56

60 61 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

DOWN Dancer Astaire Not taped Above Sunday paper insert Duplicity Carried Still in the sack Hawaii’s Mauna __ Citrus fruits Make resentful Alaska’s Palin Piece of china African nation Neon & helium “Annabel Lee” or “The Raven” Pompous fools Impudent talk Toddler Harness strap Shaping tools Friendlier Within reach Take apart

Store away Thugs Bank vaults Ceremony Dilapidated building Circle with a bull’s-eye Install a new electric system TV’s Paula __ Baggy Freeway divisions Fairy tale Deserve; merit Grows old Skater’s oval June 6, 1944 Sunbeam

HAVE HEADLINES SENT TO YOUR INBOX EVERY WEEK

www.redandblack.com/site/notifications.html

register a team

5 questions every week

*Questions

Tri v a

?

AthensLivingUGA presents

12236

www.redandblack.com/contests_events/trivia submit answers online

Tickets+Parking+Food @ The Braves Game!

3. Name the former Red and Black 1. What is the name of the new writer that is being inducted into species of mushroom that recently the Atlanta Press Club’s Hall of showed up in Georgia? - 3PTS Fame. - 5PTS 4. Which building on campus is the first to win a LEED Gold Certification? - 7PTS 5. What artist is playing at the Melting Point on October 10th? - 3PTS How to Enter: 1. Register a team

‌Employment Get paid to type! SBSA is a financial transcription company offering part-time positions. Create your own schedule. Competitive production-based pay. New location close to campus! Must be able to touch-type 65 wpm & have excellent English grammar/comprehension skills. Visit our website to apply: www. sbsgrp.com.

For sale

FARM NEAR UGA FOR RENT OR SALE/OWNER FINANCING. 10 ACRES, 5STALL BARN. 2br/2ba HOUSE +840sq.ft. finished basement. $1500-1700/mo. depending upon option. Brenda 706/543-7400 Computers Still On Liquidation! All Macs. Reasonably priced. OBO. 17" & 20" iMacs, PowerMac Towers, LCD Monitors, and accessories. Call 706-4333021. Contact Vicki.

Retreat South townhouse on Riverbend 5 mins from school. Frequent bus 4bed/4bath (subleasing 1) $375 per month + utilities Dec to July stareun0705@hotmail.com

Duplex for Rent, 2 BDRM, 2 BA, Patio, W/D hookups, Private Parking, free water, Call after 4pm, 7063536014 Contact Paul.

I am transferring schools and need someone to take over my lease ASAP. My apartment is fully furnished. All utilities are included for $550. Call/text 678 267 9368 for info.

‌Housing

Artist Cottage On Boulder Creek. 2BD 2BA. Frig,stove,was her,dryer,water,trash furnished. Fireplace in living room. Private and safe. $800.00 + dep. 770685-5753/lconway0813@gmail. com

‌sublease

Looking to sublease my room in 4 bedroom townhouse in Towne Club (off Milledge) Summer 2014. Rent 445/month plus utilities. Call 404-542-4952 Sublease at Carousel Village 1 bedroom/1 bathroom Furnished $590 a month Contact: laugraj@ gmail.com

Top Student Team: Ramsey Gods Top Student Organization Team: Pandora Yearbook

2. Submit answers online by Wednesday at 12 noon.

Need a desktop? PC not cutting it? Why not a gently used R&B Mac? Wiped clean, various ages, sizes, and accessories. Call 706-433-3021. Contact Vicki.

SUBLEASE AVAILABLE! 1BDR in 4BDR/2BTH 5POINTS house. Available mid-December. Full kitchen, two living rooms, porch & plenty of parking. Walking distance to campus & bus stops. $455/month+utilities. Email bmtrav@uga.edu Subleasing 1BR/BA in a townhouse off Barnett Shoals Rd. Dog friendly. Can be furnished if needed! Pool and gym access. Lease ends July 25, 2014. 355/ month + utilities, negotiable. Looking for someone to sublease from me for the Spring 2014 semester, 2 bedroom apartment in the Woodlands (on the east side). Text 803-553-3245.

Sublease 1bd, 800 sqft for 549/month starting early Nov. Gated community with fitness center and pool. 20 minute walk to campus and downtown. Pet friendly and quiet neighborhood! Contact: 617-968-2764 Sublease at Carousel Village 1 bedroom/1 bathroom Furnished $590 a month Contact: laugraj@ gmail.com

‌ROOMMATE

Normaltown House (near the Grit), looking for 1 more (female/ student) roommate for Spring 2014 semester. $350/month + 1/3 utilities. Contact srl9@uga. edu if interested! 1 bedroom in 3-bdr brick house. Shared bath. Hardwood floors. Spacious yard. Clothesline. Garden with compost. Mature roommates. Prefer male graduate student or professional. Flexible lease. 706-380-5233

win cool prizes!

Grand Prize

(Hint check out Red & Black publications)

2. What developmental disorder is spotlighted for the month of October? - 3PTS

3. PLAY EACH WEEK AND WIN BIG!!

What's The best way to advertise

in Athens? The Red And BlacK ClassifiedS!

Classifieds Information Rates

(0-24 words)

Private Party..................................$10.00 Housing..........................................$23.00 Help wanted..................................$23.00 Business..........................................$21.00

FREE ADS

For University Community Only

(Private Party Merchandise, Under $101) (0-15 words) 3 Consecutive Days..................................................FREE

(Merchandise must be priced. One item per hsld per week. Ads must be received from UGA e-mail address only. No walk-ins or standard mail accepted.)

CLASSIFICATIONS 10. Roommates 30. For Sale 45. Seeking Job 75. Tickets 90. Yard Sales 110. Personal

20. Housing 35. Computers 50. Auto 80. Employment 95. Events 120. Lost & Found

25. Subleases 40. Wanted 60. Services 85. Travel 100. Notices

706-433-3011 classifieds@randb.co www.redandblack.com/classifieds/

Classifieds Disclaimer The Red & Black does not verify, investigate, or endorse any classified ad. Readers are urged to use caution when responding to an ad.


24 Variety

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Charitable chauffeurs need new home

The Red & Black

LISTEN UP!

BY ELIZABETH GERBER @lizgerberrr Students face the issue of figuring out how they will get home after a night downtown every weekend. Luckily, the University of Georgia has in place a free safe ride system that allows students to do just that. Designated Dawgs, UGA’s student volunteer safe ride program, provides safe, non-judgmental rides home from the downtown area. As of Oct. 7, Designated Dawgs has provided 74,431 safe rides home. “We offer rides to anyone in the Athens community. We will not, however, provide a ride to anyone who is unable to walk themselves to the car or who has thrown up before getting into the car because of health concerns,” said Sarah Hughes, executive director of Designated Dawgs. Any individual needing a ride home from Downtown for whatever reason can call Designated Dawgs, or find its table outside the Fred building Downtown, and they would receive a free ride home from Designated Dawgs. Designated Dawgs called the Fred building home for the past 10 years, until now. The building was a donation, therefore the organization hasn’t had to pay rent for about 10 years. Recently, the group was issued a three weeks notice to vacate the building and is now looking for a new space to move operations to. “Designated Dawgs is vital to the community. UGA no longer has an escort van for students, therefore whether a student needs a ride home from the library or a ride home from a party, Designated Dawgs’ services are more important than ever,” said Patrick

After 10 years of providing free rides, Designated Dawgs can no longer set up outside the Fred building and must find a new location. Courtesy Designated Dawgs Klibanoff, a senior from Norcross majoring in finance, international business and public relations. “If Designated Dawgs can no longer provide its services, the community will be more at risk.” Designated Dawgs was an idea conceived by Terry College of Business graduate Tim McNary. As a graduate from the University, McNary was familiar with the challenges students faced in getting home safely from Downtown whether they were studying or socializing. McNary based his idea off of a similar program in place at Texas A&M University. The Designated Dawgs was implemented after a visit to observe how the program would work, and it provided its first ride in 2001. “Once a semester Designated Dawgs hosts ‘Rider Appreciation’ weekends. Along with a free ride, Designated Dawgs will give out a goodie bag filled with candy, Ramen, a water bottle and Advil for the next day. It shows that they actually care about the people who use their services,” said Hadley Dreibelbis, a senior from

DESIGNATED DAWGS PERCENTAGE NIGHT WHEN: Oct. 10, 6 p.m. to midnight WHERE: Dirty Birds

Valdosta majoring in public relations, international affairs and political science. Designated Dawgs is hosting a percentage night Thursday at Dirty Birds to raise money so that it can continue to provide services to the Athens community. The organization will receive 10 percent of the funds raised that night. The money will first go toward a law school event, with any unused funds going toward finding a new venue to base the program out of. “We believe that we provide a valuable service to the Athens community. Our percentage night is a part of a larger effort to secure more funding so we can continue doing what we do,” Hughes said.

Sign a 1-year lease and get

$500 off

your first month’s rent! * Some restrictions may apply

Must present this coupon at time of initial signing, not good with any other offer.

Expires 10/31/13

Carriage House Realty Inc. 706-353-1750

of Montreal’s old rock sound resonate in its 12th album, “Lousy with Sylvianbriar”, released on Tuesday. Courtesy Jonas Riise Hamre/Creative Commons Images

of Montreal frontman carries new album BY HILARY BUTSCHEK @hilarylbutschek “Lousy with Sylvianbriar,” of Montreal’s new release, is a never ending stream of surprises. Every song has a new punch line and different feel to it, as if they were written decades apart from each other. However, the mix of obvious influences on the album, released on Tuesday, don’t clash enough to make the collection an incoherent. What holds it all together is the obvious common denominator in every song — Kevin Barnes’ vocals. His voice comes through the recordings like an angst-driven ’90s teen demanding to speak out. Most of the time he isn’t saying very uplifting things, for instance take the opening lines of “Colossus”: “Your mother hung herself in the National Theater when she was four months pregnant with your sister, would have been 13 years old today. Does that make you feel any less alone in the world?” And dad’s story, which follows, isn’t any less cheery — but there’s something about the way Barnes sings it. It’s light, lazy, highpitched with only acoustic guitars

and minimal drums backing it. All of the accompanying melodies on the track are upbeat and happy on the surface, typical of the band. Barnes isolated himself in San Francisco for the making of this record, retracing the steps of old Beat Era poets such as Allen Ginsberg to create the authentic feeling of the past in his music. All of the accompanying melodies on the track are upbeat and happy on the surface, typical of the band. This time of Montreal’s sound harkens back to the twangy early rock ’n’ roll days. It’s that kind of classic rock you almost can’t place because it’s what all the start-up good ole rock ‘n’ roll bands sounded like. The song “Belle Glade Missionaries” especially has that infectious rock sound about it. But on this track, Barnes’ voice sounds very similar to Britt Daniel of Spoon. In another reminisce into the past, “Sirens of Your Toxic Spirit” slows the album down with melodic harmonies, almost close to those of Simon & Garfunkel. These tracks should be played on a cassette. That old medium is where of Montreal’s music, vocals and that signature slight crackle covering almost every second of its recordings, feels most at home.

October 10, 2013 edition of The Red & Black  

October 10, 2013 edition of The Red & Black