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OCTOBER 4, 2012 • VOLUME 120, Number 9

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Georgia Athletic Association changes drug policy BY NICHOLAS FOURIEZOS The Red & Black The Georgia Athletic Association changed its student-athlete substance abuse policy in June, opening the door for two of its top defensive players to return two games before they would have under the previous policy. Junior linebacker Alec Ogletree and All-American safety Bacarri Rambo returned Saturday after serving four-game suspensions. Ogletree

and Rambo reportedly tested positive on random drug tests in March, after eating marijuana-laced brownies, according to several published reports. The failed tests were both players’ second student-conduct offenses. Rambo was suspended for the first game of the 2011 season after he was pulled over for speeding and a marijuana joint was found in the purse of a passenger who was riding in his car. He was not charged in the incident,

No confirmation of link between robberies

but school officials were informed. Ogletree was charged with theft by taking as a freshman, accused of stealing a scooter helmet from a fellow athlete in 2010. After two offenses, according to the 2011-12 student-athlete handbook, “the student-athlete will be suspended from competition during the athletic season for no less than 50% of the total sport season if either of the See ATHLETICS, Page 16

COURSON

FELTON

Closing time?

Cailin O’Brien The Red & Black Athens-Clarke County Police are investigating the connection between three robberies downtown out of approximately six robberies that were reported in the greater Athens area between Sept. 26 and Monday. But police cannot confirm a link between the incidences yet, Capt. Clarence Holeman of the Centralized Criminal Investigation Division said. “I can’t say with any certainty right now. We’re still investigating,” he said. “Right now, the only real consistency we have is that they all happened, and that’s why there’s an investigation. We can’t say definitively yet yes or no.” Holeman said the location and timing of the incidences are the only connections police can draw so far. “They happened around the same place in the same area,” he said. “That’s what makes us look and try to see if they’re connected.” The violent robberies downtown began when two unknown black men beat and robbed two “intoxicated” men, taking their money and a cell phone Saturday at 8:15 p.m., according to an Athens-Clarke County Police report. The suspects reportedly “at some point, grabbed [the victims] in headlocks and led them into an alleyway.” One victim reportedly told police a suspect choked him until he passed out. See ROBBERY, Page 2

WHAT NOT TO MISS UGA Campus kitchens kickoff When: Thursday, 1 p.m. Where: 135 Hoyt St. Cost: Free Contact: campuskitchen@uga.edu

Dexter Weaver announed Weaver D's, an Athens restaurant staple, is undergoing financial trouble because fewer businesspeople who work downtown visit the eatery. Weaver said utilities are close to being shut off. sean taylor/Staff

Weaver D’s on brink of closing in two to three weeks Shiv Patel The Red & Black A staple of the Athens restaurant community is on the verge of shutting its doors, owner Dexter Weaver said Monday. Weaver D’s Delicious Fine Foods has been serving up traditional homestyle favorites for 26 years — but Weaver said this streak might

soon be ending. “We have been experiencing very slow business, and if things do not improve, we would have to close down,” Weaver said. “We are an icon of this area, and we need people to patronize.” Weaver D’s, which has the slogan “automatic for the people,” was recognized by the James Beard Foundation, a culinary organization, as one of America’s Classics in 2007. This, along with other distinctions, has made it a landmark in Athenian culture. R.E.M. used Weaver D’s slogan for its 1992 album “Automatic for the People.” With the faltering of the economy, students are tightening spend-

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WHAT YOU MISSED football photo galleries from georgia v. tennessee search: football ››

‘milquetoast’ romney fading fast in battleground states search: Romney ››

See FOOD, Page 3

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ing, and as a result, the local restaurant is fighting to stay alive, Weaver said. The threat of having the utilities shut off is becoming a regular problem for the owner. He used the notoriety of his restaurant to prevent the immediate closing of his business. “[The gas company] came last week to shut the gas off, and I had to plead with them,” Weaver said. Weaver said he believes that if business stays stagnant, he would have to close down within two to three weeks. He said total income is down at least 50 percent compared to this time in 2011.

The fourth floor of Memorial Hall is undergoing construction to house the African American Cultural Center's six programs. sean taylor/Staff

The African American Cultural Center, which was created to establish a welcoming environment for AfricanAmerican students at the University, was absorbed by another office this summer. The six programs it housed, including the Abeneefoo Kuo Honor Society and Black Theatrical Ensemble, were transferred to the Multicultural Services and Programs Office, a move which Dean of Students Bill McDonald said was consid-

ered after three key positions were left vacant over the summer. “The catalyst for moving the African American Cultural Center back into Multicultural Services and Programs was that all three of our full-time positions were vacated,” McDonald said. “We chose it was more efficient to streamline, and it would build more unity among all our students.” The former senior coordinator left to accept a position with another university in June. See AFRICAN, Page 3

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Let's Storify

Food with Soul

We've built Storifies from tweets, Facebook posts, photos and videos. We're exploring the social media response to Michael Bennett's torn ACL and the drama at Weaver D's.

Weaver D's may be in danger — and our videographer is on the scene. Check redandblack.com to see more on the fate of an Athens-area landmark.

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NEWS, 2 • OPINIONS, 4 • VARIETY, 8 • SPORTS, 11 The Red & Black is an independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community

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NEWS

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Crowdsourcing, ‘citizen science’ make UGA research interactive

AT A GLANCE Aggravated sodomy reported in Creswell Hall An act of aggravated sodomy was reported to University Police Wednesday at 7:28 p.m., according to a University Police report. According to the report, the officer met with the reporting party. The reporting party was the area coordinator for Creswell Hall. The reporting party said she was informed of a Creswell Hall resident who reported “having oral sex performed on them.” The act was

reportedly done “by a known individual, against their will.” This act reportedly occurred Saturday “sometime during the night” and Sunday morning. The officer met with the victim. The victim reportedly “did not want police involvement or assistance.” The case is “inactive,” according to the report. —Erica Techo

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Sanford gate personnel paid for game access

By Jeanette Kazmierczak The Red & Black Threadless T-shirts, restaurant rankings and Wikipedia have something in common: crowdsourcing. The term was coined in 2006 by Jeff Howe, a contributing editor of Wired magazine. Howe defines crowdsourcing as “the act of taking a job traditionally performed by a designated agent (usually an employee) and outsourcing it to an undefined, generally large groups of people, in the form of an open call,” he wrote in his blog Crowdsourcing. com. “Crowdsourcing means human participants help in solving computationally difficult problems,” Ismailcem Budak Arpinar, an associate professor of computer science, wrote in an email. “Computer [science] and [artificial intelligence] had really good progress in developing various algorithmic techniques. But still computers and software have difficulty in certain tasks.” Arpinar used the example of restaurant rankings. It would be difficult for computers to rank a restaurant because the task is subjective. Crowdsoucing is becoming more commonly used in research projects because it allows for the collection of large numbers of data — although the quality of the data comes into question when just anyone can contribute. Karen Payne, a public service associate in the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, drew a distinction between bounded or vetted and unbounded crowdsourcing. Bounded crowdsourcing pulls from an experienced community of volunteers. Unbounded is a

Sanford Stadium gate personnel took money from people who did not have tickets in exchange for letting them into the game, according to a University Police report. Further investigation reportedly led officers to identify four separate gate workers with money taken from University students. Police reportedly found $241 in total on all four personnel. The report lists no action against the four workers but lists the incident as theft by conversion. —Calin O'Brien

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Police respond to possible drug sales in Brumby Hall University Police responded to a complaint of drugs possibly being sold from a dorm room in Brumby Hall Monday at 11:20 a.m., according to a report. The reporting party reportedly told police he “had received information about drug activity as well as alcohol being in the room.” Brumby Housing will handle a separate, non-criminal housing violation, according to the report.

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more traditional volunteer model. Payne is providing technical oversight for a project which is creating virtual maps of North Korea out of a print atlas for humanitarian and relief efforts. Her crowdsourcing involves vetted users who are familiar with geographic information systems. “We’re really grateful for the people. We really couldn’t do it without them,” Payne said. Jenna Jambeck, an assistant professor in the college of engineering, is using unbounded crowdsourcing to track marine debris in coastal waters. “The tools that I’m using are really new, but the whole concept of using volunteers to both log and pick-up debris or litter is not new at all,” Jambeck said. “It has, with electronics, gotten really easy with the internet, and you can collect

The next incident occurred when two black men jumped over a fence to beat and rob a man of $40 on Thomas Street, according to an Athens-Clarke County Police report. The victim, who was walking from downtown, told police he had “said something back” to the two men who were “talking trash” through the fence when they jumped the fence and beat him. The responding officer noticed the victim “was bleeding from the face and had blood all over the front and back of his shirt,” according to the report. He also had a swollen left eye and a cut on the back of his head. An hour later at 3 a.m., three black men reportedly attacked and robbed an “extremely intoxicated” man, taking his cell phone and $200 near the intersection of Dougherty and Foundry streets, according to an Athens-Clarke County Police report. The victim reportedly could not describe the suspects or their vehicle to police. Kathryn Lookofsky, director of the Athens Downtown Development Authority, said

crime like this downtown “comes and goes,” but she said she feels that “for the sheer number of people downtown, the crime rate is extraordinarily low.” “Don’t believe the hype. Just be smart, and that’s not just because it’s downtown Athens. That’s in any environment,” she said. “I don’t consider downtown Athens to be a dangerous place any time, night or day. I’m down here quite a bit and always feel safe. Just be smart about it.” Lookofsky said she hopes these recent crimes do not affect the number of people visiting downtown. “The more publicity these things get, the worse and more detrimental effect these things have,” she said. “That’s one thing I fight with the local media regularly about — to make sure that when they report crimes as downtown, they are actually downtown.” Three of the six violent robberies reported from Sept. 26 to Monday happened on what Loofofsky called the “periphery” of downtown. Three suspects reportedly held a man at gunpoint Friday at 4:20 p.m. and stole $130 from him after kicking him out of the car

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that they had been riding in together at the Auto Zone on Ruth Street. An unknown suspect described as a “slender man” robbed the Golden Pantry on Epps Bridge Road at gunpoint Sunday at 9:37 p.m. One local man reportedly warded off an attempted robbery. He reported being “jumped” by a black man he knew “just from playing ball at the gym” Monday at 2:40 p.m. as he was leaving the gym, according to a report. The suspect reportedly “tried to take his head phones and his iPod but was unable to get it.” An Athens-Banner Herald article lists arrests made and warrants issued for two of these incidences, but The Red & Black has no information about these arrests. Holeman said there was no president evidence to believe any of these crimes are connected. “Anytime we have a lot of the same kind of crime, we always look to see if there’s a link,” he said. “But I didn’t say they were connected.”

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data from all over in a really efficient way.” Volunteers used to use paper data cards, not always standardized, to track with pen what they were finding on beaches. Jambeck and her team have created the Marine Debris Tracker app for the Android and iPhone. Once the app is downloaded, users can log litter and GPS coordinates online instantly, although a cell signal is not necessary to document information. “[In] citizen science, which this is often termed, [it] is hard to have quality assurance and quality control,” Jambeck said. “The issue with this is that I have people collecting where they want to collect. We can’t say there are more cigarette butts littered in Omaha than Athens.”

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NEWS

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➤ From Page 1 If it were to shut down, Weaver’s five employees would find themselves without work. “I’m proud of the work we do here,” said Dorothy Parks, an employee of four years. “This is my only source of income, and if it closes, I’m gonna miss greeting people and seeing people. It would break my heart to see this place close.” Weaver said the students and the residents of the nearby apartment complexes are still loyal customers, but he has noticed a lack of businesspeople coming to eat. “We are asking businesses and offices to just come,” Weaver said. “We always just kept looking forward with the hope that business would get better, but it never did. And now we are in the position we have.” For the students that live nearby, Weaver D’s is a local place with comfort food. “I enjoy treating myself to this place. This is the only place with good mac and cheese and fried chicken,” said regular patron Marcus Fernandez.

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If Weaver D's were to close, the restaurant's five employees would find themselves without work. Dorothy Parks, an employee of four years, said her job at Weaver D's is her only source of income and she would miss greeting and seeing customers. Sean taylor/Staff

The closing of the restaurant would mean the removal of a prominent tourist attraction and local favorite. “It would be sad [if Weaver D’s closed down] because there really aren’t places like this around here,” said Rebecca Beman, a student at Gainesville State College. “These guys are locally owned and have soul food.” Greg Stevens, a sophomore from Duluth, said the increasingly political tone of the restau-

rant has kept people away in recent months. The restaurant is adorned in political images supporting President Barack Obama. The influx of other soul food restaurants may also be playing a role in the decreasing business. “I know that there are other restaurants springing up, but we were here first. I hope people look at the history that’s here,” Weaver said.

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ELECTION CONNECTION

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Youth unemployment double U.S. average Nicholas Watson The Red & Black Editor’s note: Election Connection is an ongoing series running on Tuesdays that reports on topics and issues pertaining to the Nov. 6 elections.

Bill McDonald, dean of students, said the unexpected release of two positions led to the changes in the African American Cultural Center. Sean taylor/Staff

AFRICAN: Full-time employees left center ➤ From Page 1 However, former Director LaRetha SpainSchuler and former Assistant Director Amy Anderson vacated their positions in May. Spain-Schuler was “alleged to have engaged in egregious conduct that is not compatible with [her] continued employment with the University of Georgia,” according to a May 1 email from McDonald to Spain-Schuler obtained by The Red & Black. Spain-Schuler’s firing was effective May 8, according to the email. McDonald said the unexpected release of the two positions led to the changes in the cultural center. He did not say what led to the terminations. “We had some changes in the [cultural center] staff, so that all our positions were open,” McDonald said. “We could have chosen to rehire, but we wanted to experiment and see how this works.”

But some familiar with the cultural center and its organizations are concerned about the changes and the way they were brought about. Sequoia Bates, a 2012 graduate who held leadership roles in both the Multicultural Services and Programs office and AACC, said the merger left questions unanswered. “Why was it done in such a time when there weren’t students on campus? In terms of support services for minorities, there is that advocacy aspect, and this cultural center is needed. Even if it wasn’t needed, the University has a responsibility to address the community at large and discuss it,” Bates said. McDonald told students of the changes in July and announced the decision to merge officially at an Aug. 11 leadership retreat.

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Jobs, jobs, jobs. A talking point. A mantra. A president’s litmus test, and a challenger’s core. But for many college students, they are but pools of water in a desert horizon. At 14.6 percent, one out of every seven Americans aged 20 to 24 years old is without employment, according to the Department of Labor 2011 calculations. This is seen due to a lack of career experience, University Selig Center for Economic Growth Director Jeff Humphreys said. “Everybody’s having a harder time finding a job, so unemployment across the whole spectrum is higher,” Humphreys said. “Students get put against a more experienced worker in an interview and more experienced employees that have done a number of interviews and established networks in the industry. [Students] are just not competitive.” With an unemployment rate of 8.1 percent, young adults have nearly twice the difficulty in finding a job. Paul Conway, former chief of staff of the U.S. Department of Labor and president of Generation Opportunity, said this is the time to move past the partisan red and blue lines. Generation Opportunity is a nonprofit organization advocating youth political involvement. “To [Generation Opportunity], in our opinion, this is no longer a Republican or Democrat issue,” Conway said. “It is a fundamentally American issue because you’re looking at a generation that has been set back in terms of job skills, experience in their careers and the ability to earn money to pay back their debts and get on with their lives.” The president’s first-term employment numbers offer mixed results in his reelection bid. As the private sector saw a 300,000 net gain over these last four years, government jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, have seen nearly 1 million jobs lost, with a total deficit of 400,000 nonfarm jobs since January 2009. While his 0.84 percent annual job growth beats his predecessor’s (0.51 percent growth and 0.84 percent decline for the two terms), there are still less people working than in January 2009. Unemployment rates by age demographic make a sharp decline past the age of 25. Members of these groups had no higher than 10.3 percent unemployment, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. “There is a very strong, inverse relationship between age and the unemployment rate,” Humphreys said. “The younger you are, the more likely you are to be unemployed.” Conway said students should vote for the candidate most likely to expand the private sector.

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OPINIONS

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WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Red & Black wants to know what you think — so let’s start a conversation. Email: opinions@randb.com or letters@randb.com Facebook: Like The Red & Black page Twitter: @redandblack

Hannah Snyder Guest Columnist

Criticism can help students hone craft

OUR TAKE Nick Fouriezos Sports Editor

T

ick. Tick. Tick. The clock is moving painfully

Prez debate Staying informed about politics isn't just a chore: it's in your self-interest It’s not about fighting for your right. That has been done. But now you’ve got to fight apathy, sometimes uninspiring candidates and the bustle of college life to get yourself to the TV and watch a debate between two men over the age of 50. Get out the popcorn, because you’re in for a ride. It’s not about whether or not you agree with the policies or with politics at all, for that matter. You have a right to vote and to be involved in the election process. But you also have a right to abstain from it. What does matter is that the issues and things you do care about are affected by who is sitting at the top of the political ladder, and if you aren’t aware of it, you’re going to be faced with some negative surprises. Sure, right now the life and multiple estates of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney might seem far removed. But if he’s elected to president and he’s cutting social welfare, it’s going to affect you in some manner. And if you’ve been complaining about all those tax hikes, well, President Barack Obama might not be your guy. Staying knowledgeable about politics isn’t about some greater duty to mankind, although it can be (and as proud proponents of freedom of the press and democracy, we encourage that). However, for those less civic-minded folks, it’s also about protecting what’s in your best interests. The debate tonight between Romney and Obama on Wednesday is the first step in the process of staying involved. Get some friends together and do a potluck. Join the College Republicans or the Young Democrats in watching it and enjoy the discussion. Follow it on Twitter, or even better, follow our coverage online at www.redandblack. com. It’s your right and it’s important to take advantage of it. Don’t do it for us. Do it for yourselves. — Nicholas Fouriezos is the sports editor of The Red & Black.

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Julie bailey /Staff

Bring out yer dead: freshman battle constant bouts of illness

D

espite the abundance of hand sanitizer dispensers scattered throughout campus, getting sick is unavoidable for masses of germ-infested freshmen. It’s just like going off to summer camp. Hoards of children kept in close quarters for extended periods of time always leads to bad cases of the sniffles. Once you get to college, this case of the sniffles may become reccurring or alarmingly comparable to the plague. In any given lecture class there is a constant chorus of coughing and sneezing providing background noise for the professor to talk over. For some, Mucinex or DayQuil will become a staple of everyday functioning. For others, a quick stop at the University Health Center will nip the problem in the bud by way of a Z-Pak or shot of penicillin. One of the most frustrating parts of being sick on campus for the first time is that Mom isn’t there to provide chicken noodle soup or whatever personal remedies have been working their magic on your sinuses for years. Her maternal reassurance over the phone isn’t quite as effective as it was when you were still living at home. As an all-grown-up college freshman, it is your job to be both the patient and the caretaker. Good luck getting into your lofted bed with a cough powerful enough to expel the lining from your trachea. Each dorm seems to have its own “disease of choice.” Strep has been running rampant around Brumby (or so I’m told) and Myers boasts a noteworthy number of sinus infections. Because of the close living quarters and constant exposure, it’s hard to pinpoint who the original carrier of disease is. Although

Laura Thompson Guest Columnist

Patient Zero may never be identified, it is best to quarantine any hallmates, friends or classmates who so much as sniff too many times. As nice as they may be, it’s not worth the risk. The routine of getting sick, ignoring it, getting worse and finally seeking treatment goes in cycles for the average college freshman, who may spend two weeks of each month suffering from some sort of sickness. It becomes more of an anomaly to see a healthy student than to see one pathetic and sleep-deprived, withering away to a pile of mucus in the corner of a classroom. As sad as it sounds, you lose sympathy when it is an everyday occurrence. The only upside to this mucus-filled truth of college life is that this phase of constant illness should be nearing its end. Now that I’ve battled two separate bouts of sickness I can feel my immune system coming back strong. These college germs may have knocked me down for a while, but now my antibodies are coming back swinging. Those who survive the first semester of college gain not only credit hours but also immune systems of steel. — Laura Thompson is a freshman from Houston, Texas, majoring in pre-journalism

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MAILBOX

Religious freedom is good, religion is bad One of the least welcome sights on a dreary, rainy Monday morning is a Bible-pusher distributing on campus. Or at least, that’s what I would have insisted a few years ago. Now, although I’m every bit as secular, atheist and anti-religion as I was then, I welcome this dissemination of religious information. A true victory for us secularists would be public indifference to the distribu-

tion of religious texts, not necessarily the ban of them. Freedom of speech on both sides of the religious spectrum should be valued. Muslims who want a world free of characterizations or criticisms of Mohammed should strive to create a society where the motivation for those actions is gone, not one where the repercussions include fatwas and attacks on embassies. Secularists should push for

a society where we brush off religious fanaticism, not one where we ban it from public places. After all, there is no better warning against Christianity than the Bible upon which it’s founded, and there is no better way to foster disbelief than to increase biblical literacy. — Todd Pierson is a senior majoring in ecology from Indianapolis, Ind.

slow. I’m sitting in my Creative Writing class, preparing to have my first piece “workshopped” by fellow writers. My story could be incredibly well-received by the whole class while my professor commends my unmatched writing skills. Or, more likely, my piece could be ripped to shreds by my unforgiving classmates. My turn rolls around. For the love of God, I can’t remember the last time I felt this anxious. It is unnatural for us to follow through with something knowing, without a doubt, that it is going to be harshly judged by others. Often, we downplay what we bring to the table to be safe; free from judgment, free from that terrifying feeling that someone may not agree with or be overly happy with what we have created. But after a time that safety grows boring and we want someone to give us an opinion. We become less afraid of how the criticism may feel and more consumed with what we can glean from it: how we can improve, change and grow through having our work, and ourselves judged. To clarify, I am not advocating being quick to make generalizations about people or their characters, which is the middle school definition of being judgmental. I am advocating speaking your mind when you think your opinion can make a difference — when someone asks you to be honest about something or you are presented with the opportunity to express yourself candidly, and being open to the opinions of others. The time has come — my classmates begin to discuss my story. I hear my classmates highlight the highs and lows of my submission. They point out things I had missed while writing my story, and ultimately all of their criticism is constructive. My story is critiqued, and we move on. I have been judged and evaluated outright for something that was completely my own. And I am better for it. — Hannah Snyder is a senior from Dalton majoring in psychology and Spanish

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Opinion Meter: The week that was

LOSE-lose: Unemployment for recent graduates stands at 14.8 percent, the highest of any adult population. University students who anticipate graduating soon face a set of unattractive options: ride out the economy in grad school (potentially racking up student loan debt) or enter a cutthroat labor market.

benefits vote: On Thursday, University Council passed a resolution calling for full benefits for the domestic partners of University employees. This move would bring UGA closer to its peer institutions — many have already instituted domestic partner benefits. Now the proposal moves on to Mikey and the Board of Regents.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

Editor In Chief: Polina Marinova Managing Editor: Julia Carpenter News Editor: Adina Solomon Associate News Editor: Megan Ernst Sports Editor: Nick Fouriezos Variety Editor: Tiffany Stevens Opinions Editor: Blake Seitz Recruitment Editor: Alex Laughlin Multimedia Editor: Lindsey Cook Photo Editor: C.B. Schmelter Design Editor: Amanda Jones, Jan-Michael Cart Senior Reporters: Adam Carlson, Mariana Heredia Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Assistant Editorial Adviser: Erin France

bacon baloney: Last week, a breathless report by a British trade association claimed a global bacon shortage was “unavoidable.” The news sizzled across the Internet. But call off the supermarket raid and pack up the vacuum sealer, hoarders. It wasn’t true, although meat prices will probably rise next year.

Our Staff

Editorial Assistant: Laura Hallett Staff Writers: Ashton Adams, Haley Allen, Karen Ashley, Ryan Black, Carolyn Brown, Cy Brown, Jesse Bruno, Hilary Butschek, Ashlee Davis, Megan Deese, Jacob Demmitt, Luke Dixon, Kat Drerup, Tyler Evans, Hayden Field, Nat Fort, Jamie Gottlieb, Elizabeth Grimsley, Elizabeth Howard, Megan Ingalls, Zach Jarrett, Morgan Johnson, Jeanette Kazmierczak, Darcy Lenz, Wes Mayer, Ashton Moss, Cailin O’Brien, Robbie Ottley, Cody Pace, Wil Petty, Gabriel Ram, Heather Reese, Aepril Smith, Connor Smolensky, Erica Techo, Maria Torres, Nicholas Watson, Taylor West, Kelly Whitmire Chief Photographer: Evan Stichler Staff Photographers: Megan Arnold, Lindsay Boyle, Wes Blankenship, Shanda Crowe, Michelle Norris, Taylor Sutton, Sean F. Taylor Videographer: Michelle Samuel, Jenna Reed

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soul SAVING: Athens soul food stalwart Weaver D's is in dire financial straits, its income down 50 percent from this last year. Owner Dexter Weaver says he may have to close shop in a few weeks if business does not improve. It’s time to roll up sleeves and loosen waistbands to save this Athens icon.

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BUSINESS: 706-433-3000 Publisher: Harry Montevideo Business Manager: Erin Beasley Operations Assistant: Ashley Oldham Recruitment Editor: Carolyn Crist Sr.

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Thursday, October 4, 2012

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OPINIONS

‘Milquetoast’ Romney fading fast in battleground states

F

ollowing the 2010 midterm elections and the Republican Party’s 63 seat gain in the House of Representatives, Republicans were optimistic about the 2012 presidential election. As long as Republicans selected a strong candidate to challenge President Barack Obama, many were confident that the GOP would retake the White House. Unfortunately, the Republican Party appears to have gone out of its way to pick the most lukewarm candidate in the field of prospective nominees: former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. According to stateby-state poll averages by Real Clear Politics, President Obama’s re-election is looking fairly secure as of Sept. 27 [“2012 elections electoral college map,” Real Clear Politics]. Of the 538 electors up for grabs, at least 265 of them are leaning in President Obama’s favor, just 5 short of the 270 he needs to win. By contrast, the Romney / Ryan ticket has 191 electors leaning in their favor — 79 short. So what happened? Is it possible that, over the course of two years the Democratic Party has regained the popularity they lacked in 2010? Not likely. As the unemployment rate tanks with workers dropping out of the labor force, as the debt continues to outstrip GDP, as the cost of health care continues to rise and as the Federal Reserve announces another round of manipulative monetary pumppriming, the prospect of the public being particularly fond of the party in power is probably overstated. This becomes blatantly clear when you take a closer look at one of the key battleground states where Romney lags in the polls: Wisconsin. According to Real Clear Politics, Obama currently leads Romney in Wisconsin by 7.8 points [“Wisconsin: Romney vs. Obama,” Real Clear Politics]. Just short of four months after Wisconsin’s Republican Gov. Scott Walker became the first U.S. governor to survive a recall election, Mitt Romney is now dead in the water in the exact same state. Unless the national tides have changed drastically over the same time period (and they have not), then something else must explain the sudden change in the wind for the GOP in Wisconsin. This “something” is not public perception of the two parties or even public perception of President Obama. Rather, the distinct differences between the candidates themselves — that is, between Walker and Romney — are the most likely culprits. Walker’s no-nonsense, principled stance against public sector unions and their effect on government deficits and school systems struck a chord with Wisconsin voters. In contrast, Romney’s repeated inability to remain consistent does little to rally his base, let alone attract independents. As I have stated before, this is due to Romney’s personal lack of principles; it is difficult to convince voters to support you based on what you stand for when you yourself stand for nothing. And, if one thinks about it, the 2012 presidential election is turning into a carbon copy of the 2004 election but with the party labels reversed: a weak, unpopular

incumbent going up against a milquetoast challenger from Massachusetts who cannot seem to connect with voters. The ultimate irony here is that many

Republicans supported Romney in the primaries on the ground that he was the “best candidate” to challenge President Obama in the general election. As it turns out, he

was one of the weakest. — Brian Underwood is a junior from Evans majoring in political science and history

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Brian Underwood Guest Columnist

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NEWS

The Red & Black

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Student food pantry expands its weekday hours The UGA Student Food Pantry is expanding for a reason. The UGA Student Food Pantry, which confidentially provides free and healthy food to students who can’t afford it, has expanded its hours to be open every weekday to serve students in need. “Students asked us why we weren’t open all week,” said Ansley Spinks, the student pantry committee assistant. “Since it is expanding and getting bigger, we decided we could try it, and it went well last week, so we’re going to keep it open.” With the expansion, there is also a need for more manpower in order for the pantry to stay open all week.

AT A GLANCE Texting and walking a problem

Student pantry WHAT: Student Pantry WHEN: Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. WHERE: Memorial Hall, room 208 COST: Free to anyone with a student ID DONATIONS: The food pantry has a list of suggested foods to donate including canned vegetables, rice, pasta, peanut butter, cereal, soup and canned fruit.

University of Georgia researchers have said exercising and staying active are important ways to keep off unwanted pounds. file/Staff

Study provides weighty insight on ‘Freshman 15’

—Megan Deese

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By Elizabeth Howard The Red & Black Freshmen are warned about several things in college: the scary professors, the lack of sleep and, of course, the extra pounds. The “Freshman 15” is a slogan that looms over first-years’ heads as they begin college, but a new University research study could bring insight for freshmen. This study, conducted by kinesiology professor Ellen Evans and postdoctoral kinesiology research associate Bhibha Das, will help freshmen understand where their individual bodies need improvement. “We are looking at a variety of factors. We are looking at their blood, which includes their cholesterol levels, their insulin level and inflammation markers,” Das said. “We are looking at their height and weight when they come into college.” Students will also fill out questionnaires, wear a pedometer to track steps taken per day and keep a food diary, Das said. The study, which is meant to analyze but not diagnose, will show how numerous factors play a role in weight gain during the first year of college. “Freshmen are trying to figure out and maneuver new social and physical environments,” Das said. “What we’re seeing is that the stress, the anxiety and the depression is playing a role in people’s activity habits and their nutrition habits.” With stress and anxiety coinciding with freshman year, Evans said she hopes to gain insight into how to educate and help students today and in the future. “We are hoping to gain more information about the present day students,” Evans said. “Possibly, thinking about how we can enhance curriculum and how we can partner with student health services, like the [recre-

ation] center. But hopefully, we would like to get enough data to go after a federal grant to test empirically our interventions to see if we can make a difference. That is the big picture.” Eating well and staying active are hard commitments to make, but they are still necessary feats during such a crucial time, Evans said. “Eating well, managing quantity of energy and then the quality of diet is going to take intention. You have to train yourself that way. It has to be a priority,” Evans said. In high school, it is easier for students to stay active because of involvement in sports, but it is harder to have a structured exercise environment in college. Das sad freshmen need to find ways to fit exercise into everyday life. “I think walking, using active transport, is a great way to fight the ‘Freshman 15,’” Das said. Choosing healthy eating options is also imperative. With the awardwinning University dining halls, choosing to eat the vegetables can be difficult, Evans said. “You have to be able to walk by the cookies and fries and get to the asparagus and grilled fish. It becomes a behavioral management issue,” Evans said. Evans and Das agreed that University Food Services does a fantastic job with giving students options as well as educating them on healthy food options. Food Services offers a pamphlet with the food options in the dining halls and the nutritional information. Das and Evans said these changes in exercise and food choices need to be made early on in adulthood. “If you start these habits early on and it becomes a part of who you are,” Das said, “it is a lot easier to build that into your life as you get older.”

Walking and texting can be just as dangerous as texting while driving. Distracted walking has increasingly become a problem across the country and at the University. “We have had a number of pedestrian accidents with vehicles just this semester alone,” said University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson. “A large majority of those, the pedestrian was at fault.” Distracted walking not only affects the pedestrian, but it also creates safety concerns for drivers and bikers. Hospitalization from distracted walking has quadrupled in just seven years, according to the Associated Press. —Elizabeth Howard

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Univ. Food Services ranked No. 16 The University is not only top ranked for its football team — it was also ranked No. 16 on The Daily Meal’s “52 Best Colleges for Food in America” list. Nina Fomufod, the writer of the top food list, said there were many factors which went into deciding which schools would make the list. University Food Services was noted for its many events, optional meal plan and 24-hour service in Snelling Dining Commons.

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­—Erica Techo

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UGA professors study connection between sleep apnea, obesity By Taylor West The Red & Black

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A chance topic of conversation at a campus meeting on campus led to two University professors’ collaboration in a sleep apnea study. Brad Phillips, Milian-Reeve professor and head of the department of clinical and administrative pharmacy, is working with Richard Meagher, a distinguished research professor of genetics at the University, to understand the mechanisms behind the interplay between obesity and sleep apnea. Phillips said the idea for the experiment came from his and Meagher’s meeting at a conference on campus. “We found we had a similar interest, and it focused around sleep apnea,” he said. Meagher said they are going

to do experiments to study various changes in the body, but they are just getting started. “We are gong to set up experiments looking at obese and lean people with sleep apnea and try and tease out changes that lead to cancer and cardiovascular disease,” he said. Phillips said sleep apnea is a disorder in which people stop breathing during the night and has been linked to increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer. Obesity is a factor commonly present in patients with sleep apnea. “We knew that obesity, if it is present, actually makes sleep apnea worse,” Phillips said. Meagher said when a person is obese, his tissues become hypoxic, meaning they don’t have enough oxygen, and with sleep apnea, breathing temporarily stops. Over time, DNA chromatin is remolded.

MEAGHER

PHILLIPS

“That is called an epigenetic change and has to do with reprogramming the development of your tissues and cells,” he said. “[In this case,] it is like your body reprograms your tissues and cells in a bad way.” Meagher and Phillips are looking for causes and effects. “We are trying to use epigenetics to dissect cause and effect,” Meagher said. “If you get the cause, maybe you can prevent [disease].”

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Thursday, October 4, 2012

NEWS

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Finding solutions for farmers, one cow at a time By Jeanette Kazmierczak The Red & Black Pam Knox helps farmers save cows from heatstroke. It’s all in a day’s work at her job as the U n i v e r s i t y ’ s Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. In her new position, under two different grants, she is responsible for communicating with other extension climatologists and farmers about the potential repercussions of climate change on crop and livestock industries in Georgia. She was promoted to her job in July, but she has worked at the University since 2001 as the assistant state climatologist and as a staff researcher funded by grants. She is now a faculty member in the department of crop and soil sciences. “It’s a very delicate balance,” Knox said. “I always try to take a historical perspective and talk about what we’ve already seen. A lot of these farmers have been here for 40 or 50 years, and they know what’s happened over time. They’ve seen it in their own lifetime.” In her years of climatology experience, Knox has learned a lesson or two. Corn stops growing when the thermostat climbs to 86 degrees. Car dealerships lose about 30 percent of their business on rainy days. And farmers need to stay resilient in the face of climate change. Most years, farmers can get by without irrigation because on average Georgia receives 50 inches of rain a year,

Knox said. But if droughts become more common and temperatures are higher, farmers have to face the idea that installing expensive water storage facilities may be a necessity. Knox’s job is to help farmers make economic decisions like installing irrigation. “Pam brings an immense amount of climate knowledge to our team. Our team was selected by [the] USDA for this project because we know livestock production and we have access to the farmers. Having Pam’s climate background really completes the team,” Mark Risse, the leader on the agricultural climate team, wrote in an email. Knox got her Master’s degree at the University of WisconsinMadison, where she met her husband John Knox, who is an associate professor in the geography department. Pam Knox served as the Wisconsin state climatologist from 1989 to 1998. In 1996, she was elected the first female president of the American Association of State Climatologists. “You have to figure out what it is [farmers] really want and figure out how to get the data to them,” Knox said. She also serves as a consultant forensic meteorologist, using satellite and radar to determine weather conditions at the time of accidents and crimes. “It’s like CSI. You get clues. Only this time, they’re clues about the weather rather than blood spatter. And you try to figure out what the weather circumstances were for some particular incident,” Pam Knox said.

Her husband’s favorite case is the “Beaver Case.” A beaver had built a dam near a road, creating a pond. After a night of rain the water got deeper and the next morning a car came along the road, hit some water and slid off of the road into the pond. The driver KNOX drowned in the accident — and that's where Knox’s work. “I had to look at

how much rain fell and when it fell,” Pam Knox said. “It turned out in that case that the culvert under the road hadn’t been cleared.” Knox clears all consulting work with the University before signing on. “Pam likes to know lots of things about lots of different subjects and that’s perfect for forensic work. Sometimes it will be sun angle. Sometimes it will be

precipitation,” John Knox said. Pam Knox is also the regional coordinator for the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network. Volunteers maintain rain gauges and take daily measurements which they enter on the web, making the information immediately available for scientists and the public. John Knox said his wife’s new position brings recognition to her achievements. “For a long time, she was staff and I think

people didn’t appreciate the level of experience she has as the first female AASC president, as somebody who worked for [the] founder of satellite meteorology,” he said. Knox said she looks forward to working with Georgia farmers. “It’s important for me to get out and talk to some of these groups,” she said. “I’m looking forward to getting to see other parts of the state.”

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The Red & Black

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Troy Davis’ fight revealed in letters to UGA student By HANNAH REISS For The Red & Black Last September, Troy Davis’ execution sounded throughout the world. Davis was convicted of shooting and killing Savannah police officer Mark MacPhail in 1989, but his supporters said there was too much doubt surrounding the case. The publicity surrounding Davis produced the second most active Twitter event of 2011, with support from organizations like the NAACP and Amnesty International. On Sept. 21, 2011, sophomore Gautam Narula watched in the lobby of Myers Residence Hall as major television networks covered Davis’ execution. Hours earlier, he had stood outside

the jail in Jackson, where Davis would be executed. Narula had decided to return to Athens after hearing a rumor that the execution would be delayed another day. However, the rumor was wrong. The execution was carried out that night. The next day he checked his mailbox, expecting some textbooks. Instead, he received Davis’ final letter, written three days before his execution. “I didn’t want it to be forgotten. Troy Davis was [an] icon, but I wanted people to know who he was as an actual person," Narula said. Narula had heard about Davis' case three years earlier through his mother, a reporter. He began writing letters to Davis and was

soon visiting him on death row. This past spring, Narula decided he wanted to share the Troy Davis he knew with the world. His selfpublished memoir, “Remain Free: A Journey Through Life and Death with Troy Davis,” will be released this winter. Narula wrote his first letter to a Troy Davis who had just come within 90 minutes of his second scheduled execution. “I thought it was inspiring that he was still fighting and maintaining his innocence 90 minutes before he was about to be executed. I wasn’t expecting a response," Narula said. Six days later, Narula and his mother visited Davis in his maximum security prison in Jackson. They were among other visi-

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Gautam Narula, a political and computer science major from Alpharetta, wrote letters to Troy Davis years prior to the prisoner's execution. Courtesy Gautam Narula tors, but Davis paid attention to Narula. “He could tell I was nervous, and he tried to put me at ease right away,” he said. “He saved a seat for me, so I could sit next to him.” Before long, the phone calls began. The prisoners were allowed two 15-minute collect phone calls a day. Both parties were careful about what was said, afraid their conversations were being recorded by the prison. Eventually, Davis acquired an illicit cell phone. Still, Narula’s family didn’t publicize their conversations. “They were very clear that they didn’t want him talking to the media,” Narula said. “If they had found out that we were having conversations, they would have revoked his phone privileges. We didn’t publish any of those recordings while he was still alive because we were afraid of what might happen.” Many of Davis’ stories were about run-ins with jail authorities.

“The guards would beat the prisoners, but they’d wrap them in towels to make sure the bruises wouldn’t show up,” Narula said. “A lot of times guards would get involved in disputes between prisoners. If one prisoner wanted to jump another one, he could bribe the guard to ‘accidentally’ leave the cell door open. Those are things that the prison would definitely not want to get out, but they will, because I’m writing about them in the book.” From jail, Davis shared his faith. He spent much of his time in jail reading Scripture, and in his letters to Narula, he referenced Biblical passages. “He was able to go through 20 years of death row sustained on his belief that he was not afraid to die,” Narula said. “He said he knew that he was innocent and that God knew that he was innocent ... He would always refuse his final meal because he said it

wouldn’t be his last. And, every time, until his last, he was right.” Through his book, Narula wants to share his insider knowledge. “I wanted people to know a lot of stuff that went on behind the scenes, [like Davis’] account of what happened that night of the murder, or the conditions of death row, or what it was like being a celebrity on death row. You wouldn’t get that from just Googling it.” As for the book’s content, it’s as much about Narula as it is about Davis. “It’s a memoir,” he said. “Some other people were asking if I should interview family members and get his family involved in it, but it’s really my own personal story. I’m from the wealthy suburbs, and he was from a rough part of Savannah. We were a whole generation apart. It was an unlikely friendship.”

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‘Second Life’ virtually mirrors real-world systems Nick Fouriezos Sports Editor

The line between reality and cyber reality is easily crossed. Everyday events that used to be solely confined to the tangible world have become commonplace in the universe of online gaming, especially in Massively Multiplayer Online Roleplaying Games — weddings, birthdays, holidays and parties have become commonplace in such video games. Add money to the occasion, and those lines blur even more. That’s what Linden Lab’s “Second Life” did in 2003. It has shaped virtual gaming ever since. The concept is simple — make a user-produced virtual economy, and allow the players to purchase the Internet currency with real currency. Real currency can be used to buy Linden dollars ($L), which are then used to purchase items. It's not about paying to win the game, simply because there is nothing to win. Like games such as “The Sims,” there is no clear agenda in “Second Life.” The video game industry is already dependent on people exchanging money for virtual realities. With the advent of $15-per-month MMORPGs it’s not all that different to pay directly for the virtual items you want rather than paying just for the ability play. “Second Life” is much more than a cash-drain though. In fact, it’s possible to turn a profit by playing the game, even while paying for it. There are free memberships but to really make money, you have to purchase a premium account, which costs either $9.95/month, $22.50 quarterly or $72/year. Even with those costs, about 64,000 users made a profit in “Second Life” in February 2009, according to figures published by Linden Lab. Linden Lab also showed 38,524 users made less than $10, while 233 made more than $5,000.

Press Start to Play Look out for the following game reviews and lists online. Oct. 5 — Start-up gaming systems for new gamers. Oct. 7 — "Anna," a psychological horror about the depths of the human psyche. Oct. 9 — "To the Moon," two doctors fulfilling a dying man's wish.

That’s out of 21.3 million accounts as of November 2010, but considering that many of those accounts are probably inactive, it’s still feasible to make money rather than lose it. More importantly, “Second Life” is an experience that could reflect the future of gaming — one that aims to mirror our own world. Sure, “Second Life” is just an avatar on a computer screen, but it has the potential to be so much more, with the same concepts of virtual economies and communities it has already established. I'll never forget when my brother told me that he could sell his character on "Runescape," a free MMORPG, online for $20. The player came fully stocked with items and highly-developed skills, which made it a valuable asset. People are willing to pay for alternate realities that give them a real and viable escape. And, as gaming technology improves and becomes more and more immersive — hello three-dimensional, controller-free consoles — virtual communities such as "Second Life" will become even more life-like. — Nicholas Fouriezos

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The Red & Black

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EAT UP!

Pumpkin spices it up for fall It’s finally here. A brisk breeze is in the air, leaves are slowly changing color and, most importantly, pumpkin season has arrived. Autumn is the most pleasant season of the year, and incorporating pumpkin into food and beverages is

delicious and fitting of the time. One 15-ounce can of Libby’s Pumpkin only costs $1.78, and these two recipes can be made with one can. — Caroline Brown

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Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies These special cookies are my favorite during the fall season. I have made them for years, and they never disappoint. The recipe is like any basic cookie recipe, but the addition of pumpkin makes them so soft, almost cake-like, while the ground ginger, cloves and nutmeg give them depth and a subtle spiciness. Friends claiming they hate everything pumpkin have tasted these and loved them. Victoria's Secret's PINK launched a competition between schools for who could get the most Twitter votes. The 10 winners received a free party. Courtesy @VSPINK

Victoria’s Secret to tailgate at UGA By KAT DRERUP The Red & Black A PINK-centered football frenzy will hit The Classic Center this afternoon, courtesy of Victoria's Secret.

The Classic Center will be the Athens’ stop for Victoria’s Secret PINK National Tailgate Tour, a 10-stop trail through contest-winning colleges that will receive free gear and

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food from the lingerie chain. On Aug. 27, Victoria's Secret launched a national social media campaign for two weeks. Students voted via Twitter to win a tailgate for their university by sending tweets to @VSPink with the hashtag #TailgateWithPink and the school name. The top 20 colleges were matched against one of their rivals for the last round, during which the remaining schools continued to vie for top votes. During the final round, the University won against the University of Florida. During its stop, Victoria's Secret’s PINK Truck will be loaded with free sunglasses, koozies, water bottles, T-shirts and tons of prizes. There will also be games and raffles for a chance to win yoga pants and exclusive items. “For the first week we were behind and Florida started catching up,” said Cylla Senii, a campus rep for Victoria's Secret’s and advertising major. “Then the night before, Florida got ahead and UGA was in Twitter jail because we were tweeting so much. At first it was slow and then girls started going crazy.” Two hours before the competition ended, the University took the lead with 50,000 tweets, surpassing Florida by 2,000. “I’m so excited about the PINK tailgate,” said Caroline Wagerman, a senior human development and family sciences major from Atlanta. “I can’t wait to be the most stylish girl in yoga with the [Victoria's Secret] yoga pants.” To kick off the tailgate, Victoria's Secret PINK mini stuffed dogs was hidden on campus on Wednesday. Girls who find and redeem the dogs at the tailgate on Thursday will receive a VS PINK Georgia shirt. Senii said the tailgate is something not to miss for students, even without a stuffed dog to redeem. “Over 1,200 confirmed that they are coming and will probably go up from there,” Senii said.

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½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, soft ½ cup white sugar ½ cup light brown sugar 1 egg ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ½ cup canned pumpkin 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground ginger 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Maxie B's Pumpkin Shake Maxie B’s is a local bakery and dessert café in Greensboro, N.C. Every fall its delicious pumpkin shake returns for the season, and when I’m in town, I am one of the first in line to get one. The smoothness of the yogurt and pumpkin together is accented with pieces of chocolate chip cookies. Blended all together, this milkshake is autumn in a cup, perfect for an afternoon treat or dessert. In a blender (or milkshake maker), combine first four ingredients. Blend until smooth, adding milk until at preferred consistency. Stir in crushed cookies. Pour into a glass, then garnish with whipped cream, dash of pumpkin spice, and a gingersnap. Recipe from Maxie B’s Bakery, Greensboro, N.C.

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15 oz. french vanilla yogurt 1/3 cup canned pumpkin 1 shake pumpkin spice ¼ cup milk, more as needed 1/3 cup crushed chocolate chip cookies Garnish: whipped cream, dash of pumpkin spice and a gingersnap

Five fall-worthy October hangouts Winter is coming. But in the meantime, there's fall. Autumn is a liminal time, crammed straight between the free land of summer and frozen tundra, between midterms and bonfire weekends. Even without the nice weather, there are still reasons to get out and enjoy the cooler air. There's carnivals and haunted houses and pumpkins galore. Here are five festivals and farms to get you over the end of summer and on fall— all available this Saturday. 5. 28th Annual North Georgia Folk Festival — The North Georgia Folk Festival is back, this Saturday at Sandy Creek Park.

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Preheat oven to 350°. Line cookie sheets with aluminum foil or parchment paper. In a large bowl, beat the butter and white and brown sugars with a mixer until the mixture is light and fluffy. Beat in the egg, then mix in the vanilla and pumpkin. In a second bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and cloves. Slowly beat the flour mixture into the batter in thirds. Stir in the chocolate chips. Scoop the cookie dough by heaping tablespoons onto the prepared cookie sheets and bake for about 13 minutes, or until the cookies are browned around the edges. Remove the cookie sheets from the oven and let rest for 2 minutes. Take the cookies off with a spatula and cool them on wire racks. Yield: 30 cookies, but this recipe can easily be doubled.

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4. Pumpkinfest 2012 — Feed your need for pumpkin beer at Aromas this Saturday. 3. 2nd Annual Apple Fest — Taste some local apple treats at this festival, in Arrow. 2. Washington Farms — Go through a corn maze and pet a pig in Watkinsville. 1. Zombie Farms — Zombies come to life at 4965 Lexington Road on Saturday. — Tiffany Stevens

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Thursday, October 4, 2012

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11

SPORTS

Freshman linebacker surprisingly sack savvy BY BENJAMIN WOLK The Red & Black Jordan Jenkins didn’t expect his collegiate career to start this quickly. Then again, Jenkins’ modesty would suggest that he hasn’t even been playing that well. “Eh, I’m alright,” Jenkins said. “I gotta do a little better of reading the run-pass, but I always feel like I can do one or two things better.” Yet five games into his true freshman season, the outside linebacker has recorded 12 tackles — four for a loss — three sacks, a forced fumble and a recovered fumble. That’s not too shabby for a guy that was playing against high school, Class-AAAA talent a year ago. The high level of production and early playing time, though undermined by Jenkins himself, still surprises the young linebacker. “I definitely did not think I’d be playing anytime soon,” Jenkins said. “The only time I thought I’d play is maybe toward the end of the season, maybe like Georgia Southern, but I really didn’t even think about it this year.” The 6-foot-3, 257 pound freshman made the first big statement of his career in the Bulldogs’ week two matchup against Missouri. With 6:49 left on the clock and Georgia leading by two touchdowns, All-American linebacker Jarvis Jones came around the edge and jarred the ball loose from Missouri quarterback James Franklin. The fumble was loose for what seemed like forever, but Jenkins finally recovered it on the five-yard line. “I knew Jarvis was about to strip it out, and then I saw John Jenkins get it and I thought, ‘No, my hopes are gone,’” Jenkins said. “Then I saw it bounce out. I had in my mind that it was my fumble and that I was going to get it, so I just fell on it.” The fumble recovery may have been the dagger to Missouri’s hopes

of winning their first Southeastern Conference game, but it was the spark plug for Jenkins’ future in a Georgia uniform. Jenkins — along with fellow freshman linebacker Josh Dawson — was thrown into the starting lineup the following week against Florida Atlantic, due to injuries to Jarvis Jones and Cornelius Washington. Dawson expressed how monumental it was for the two freshmen to be presented with an opportunity to start so early in their careers. “Getting your feet wet, it was just a great experience getting to start as a freshman,” he said. “Ninety-six thousand [people] looking onto you, seeing your face from the Jumbotron — it’s just a good experience.” The week after his first start against FAU, Jenkins logged the first two sacks of his college career, against Vanderbilt. It was also his first SEC home game. But Jenkins’ production didn’t stop there. Last week, with Tennessee down seven and driving, the Bulldog defense was forced to make a big stop. Jenkins, having taken note of Jones’ play against Missouri, forced Tennessee’s quarterback Tyler Bray to fumble, all but finishing off the Volunteers. But recovering the fumble in the Missouri game has still been the highlight of the young linebacker’s season. “Scooping up the fumble in Missouri was still my favorite because I didn’t think I’d get it. I was so close to the end zone, I thought I was scoring,” Jenkins said. “That’s just the greatest feeling, picking up a fumble and just running with it.” He still holds out hope for a defensive touchdown this season. “I’m determined this year to score,” he said. “It’s either going to be a pick-six or I’m scooping up another fumble, but it’s going to happen.”

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SIDELINES Defensive back earns weekly award Georgia cornerback Sanders Commings was named the SEC Co-Defensive Player of the Week Monday after grabbing two interceptions in the final quarter of Georgia’s 51–44 victory over Tennessee. The senior cornerback accumulated five tackles, four of which were solo. The two interceptions came in the final six minutes of the game, with the first coming near midfield and the second during a frantic comeback attempt by Tennessee with seven seconds left in the game.

Marshall earns Gurley too, Tri-Freshman with 130-yard performance honors Georgia true freshman tailback Keith Marshall earned the SEC Tri-Freshman of the Week honors Monday. Marshall led Georgia in rushing against Tennessee, carrying 10 times for a career-high 164 yards. He also scored two touchdowns in the game, while compiling runs of 72 yards and 75 yards. The total yards were the most since Washaun Ealey's 183 in 2009 against Georgia Tech. — Staff Reports

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Georgia true freshman Todd Gurley earned the SEC Freshman of the Week award for the third time Monday, being named to the team alongside Bulldog running back Keith Marshall and Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel. The tailback earned 130 yards and three touchdowns on 24 carries in Georgia’s 51-44 victory over Tennessee. — Staff Reports

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Georgia freshman linebacker Jordan Jenkins forced a crucial fumble from Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray, in Georgia's 51-44 victory. C.B. SCHMELTER/Staff

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ESPN College GameDay is taking its famous pregame show to the site of No. 5 Georgia’s matchup against No. 6 South Carolina, in Columbia, S.C. on Saturday. The game is being lauded as a possible winner-takes-all for the Southeastern Conference Eastern Division, with the winner having an advantage to represent the SEC East in the SEC Championship game at the end of the season, against the winner of the SEC West.

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College GameDay arriving in Columbia

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12

SPORTS

The Red & Black

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DAWGS OFF THE LEASH

A.J. Green continues to light it up for Cincy

Ex-Bulldog kicker Blair Walsh had his first miss of his NFL career.

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After a season high in receiving yards last week, former Georgia wide receiver A.J. Green led the Cincinnati offense with 117 yards on nine receptions. Green also found the end zone for the third straight game. Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton found his top target on an early fourth quarter fade route, as Green beat two Jacksonville defensive backs for the score. The touchdown extend-

ed the Cincinnati lead to 24-10, after the Jaguars had pulled within a touchdown. Boykin, Dent have career-highs in victories Brandon Boykin had a career day against the New York Giants. The Eagles kickoff returner and nickel back had a career-high four tackles in the game. Bokyin’s four tackles were also tied for the highest

number of solo tackles on the Eagles defense in the game. Boykin now has a total of 10 combined tackles in his rookie year, nine of which have been solo. Philadelphia won 19-17 after New York missed a field goal with the time expiring. Akeem Dent had a season-high four combined tackles in the Atlanta Falcons last-minute 30-28 win against the Carolina Panthers. The secondyear linebacker also started for the second consecutive game at middle linebacker for the Falcons. Dent appears to be taking advantage of the starts as he had back-to-back season-high weeks for Atlanta. Walsh no longer perfect in professional career

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That’s probably OK with the Vikings rookie place kicker, as his team was perfect in their previous three games. Walsh’s kicking perfection came to an end early in the fourth quarter, as he missed a 46-yard field goal with 13:15 left. The kick would have extended the Minnesota lead to 14 points. Walsh’s streak ended at 18 completed conversions in a row, including nine straight field goals. Matthew Stafford had his second 300 yard game of the season, going 30 out of 51, for 319 yards against the Vikings. Stafford cut Minnesota’s lead to a single score with his first rushing score of the season, but the Lions were unable to finish the comeback in the final minutes. — Luke Dixon

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Thursday, October 4, 2012

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FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Stopping Lattimore key to border-state rivalry

Mary Beth Box walked-on with the Georgia gymnastics squad, as did her sister Mariel. Damien salas/Staff

Gym Dog walk-on traces sister's footsteps to Athens BY ELIZABETH GRIMSLEY The Red & Black Mary Beth Box may be a walk-on freshman, but she’s not stepping into uncharted territory. Mary Beth’s sister Mariel was a senior on the Georgia gymnastics team last season and now serves as the manager. But Mary Beth said even though they’re four years apart, it wasn’t weird to have her sister around so much — especially since she was injured during her freshman season as well. “I love it actually,” Mary Beth said. “She went through the exact same thing her freshman year, which is totally weird. But it’s nice to actually be in the same environment as her. I love having her here. I’m excited. I hope she is.” Mary Beth suffered a left knee injury in preseason practices before her freshman season, the same exact injury her sister suffered in her freshman year. Mariel agrees that their shared injury was strange. “That’s just so weird to me,” Mariel said. “But for both of us to have left knee surgeries our freshman year is crazy.” Having someone on the team who was very close to Mary Beth definitely influenced her decision to join the team. However, Mariel tried not to influence her sister’s choice too much. “When the time came for her to choose a college though, I tried to stay out of the decision process,” Mariel said. “I really wanted her to be in Athens, but it was a choice she had to make on her own so I tried not to sway her one way or the other.” At one point, Mary Beth’s goal to follow her sister’s path as a walkon at Georgia was in jeopardy. The status of walkons are decided on by the head coach, and former head coach Jay Clark resigned last May, leaving Mary Beth in limbo. But she talked to newly-hired head coach Danna Durante over the summer, and Durante

confirmed that there was still a spot on the team for the younger Box sister. Mary Beth not only shares her injury and walk-on status with her older sister, but also an attention to detail built from their similar training background. “You can see that in their technique that both of them came from the same gym and came from Russian coaches who are very strict about form and doing everything the correct way,” junior Shayla Worley said. “So you can see that in their gymnastics.” Worley was Mariel’s roommate last year, and she has gotten to know Mary Beth this year. She said that though the sisters’ situations are similar, they are actually very different. “Their personality types are almost the extreme opposite, where Mary Beth is very outgoing and not afraid to speak out or do things that might get her extra attention,” Worley said. “Mariel is the different side of that and kind of shied away from public humiliation.” Sophomore Sarah Persinger agreed that the two have very different personalities but said they had one thing in common — their contagious sense of humor. “I think one thing that’s super similar is their laugh,” Persinger said. “Once they start feeling kind of awkward, they both just burst out laughing, and it’s hilarious. Mary Beth’s laugh is absolutely contagious. If you hear her laugh, there’s no way that you can keep a straight face.” And although the sisters may be different, Persinger said she can still see a lot of the same qualities in Mary Beth, who she described as having a similarly compassionate attitude and friendly demeanor. “They both just have the absolute biggest heart,” Persinger said. “Mariel was my big sis on the team last year, and I just love her to death.”

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After winning a 51-44 scare against Tennessee last Saturday, No. 5 Georgia must gear up for this weekend’s game against another Southeastern Conference Eastern Division foe — No. 6 South Carolina. Saturday’s game marks the first time the two teams didn’t play each other in the first two games, since South Carolina joined the SEC in 1991. Georgia head coach Mark Richt said the schedule change aided his preparation. “I think the biggest difference is we’ll be watching this year’s film,” Richt said. “This is a big, big game. When you start playing this deep into the season, and you’ve got two undefeateds, it’s huge.” The Gamecocks have beaten the Bulldogs the last two seasons, with a 45-42 victory in 2011 and a 17-6 win in 2010. Last year’s match-up was a high-scoring one, but the play of South Carolina’s defensive line proved too much for Georgia in the closing minutes. Jadeveon Clowney created many of the fourth-quarter problems for Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray. Richt realizes that Clowney and fellow defensive lineman Devin Taylor have the ability to cause a lot of problems

for the Georgia offense. “They are outstanding, there’s no doubt about it,” Richt said. “They are super tall, athletic, they really have outstanding technique. They’re much more physical against the run than they were a year ago. They really are complete players now — and there’s two of them.” However, much of the focus will be on Georgia’s defense. Last week, Georgia gave up 44 points and 197 rushing yards to a Tennessee offense that was considered to be pass-happy. This week, the Georgia defense faces its toughest test yet, against Heisman-hopeful running back Marcus Lattimore. Lattimore has gained 448 yards and is averaging 4.8 yards per carry, while also having the second-most rushing touchdowns in the SEC with eight. The do-everything back for the Gamecocks is recovering from an ACL injury last season. “[Lattimore] does seem to play even better as the game wears on,” Richt said. “I think most defenses, when they’re fresh, when it’s early in the game, they run faster, they hit harder, they make less mistakes. I think as fatigue begins to set in. That’s what happens sometimes, people get tired of that pounding.

Looking back at Tennessee After a sub-par defensive display against Tennessee, there are some concerns heading into South Carolina. Richt thinks the Tennessee offense should be applauded more than Georgia should be criticized. “I just think they blocked well,” Richt said. “We just weren’t able to get there and when we did get close enough, [Tennessee’s quarterback Tyler] Bray did a pretty good job of getting rid of the ball instead of taking a sack.” The Bulldogs had a stellar offensive game of their own. Once again, Richt praised his freshman tailback Todd Gurley who came out with another impressive performance. “Our man Gurley — he was running in such a way that no one really wanted to take him on, other than just trying to go low, trying to shoot at his legs,” Richt said. “I think that’s what happens sometimes, people get tired of that pounding.” — Benjamin Wolk

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Georgia-South Carolina biggest game in rivalry’s recent history Only a few hours after Georgia capped off their 51-44 win over Tennessee, ESPN Gameday announced that No. 5 Georgia versus No. 6 South Carolina would be the featured game this weekend. The top-10 matchup combined with the SEC East implications and the Gameday scene makes this one of the biggest games in recent memory for the Bulldogs. Senior linebacker Christian Robinson attested to the grander scale of the contest. “It’s the biggest one I’ve ever played in,” he said. “That’s what we’ve been talking about. If we win this one, the next one’s even bigger.” The winner of this game earns a huge advantage in the division race. “This is for the East,” Robinson said. “This is to decide who’s going to be in first place. If you lose this one, you’re two games back [because of headto-head tiebreaker]. And Florida is in the lead, so you have to win this game.” Despite the magnitude of the game, Lynch doesn’t expect the environment to be a detractor. “I get excited for every game,” Lynch said. “Obviously when you play away, communication is gonna be a big deal. We need to play within ourselves and don’t make it any bigger than it actually is.”

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Offensive line absent from interviews Georgia’s Chris Burnette is the only offensive lineman available to the media this week. Presumably, this is in an effort to save the Bulldogs’ young offensive line from a week filled with questions regarding the toughness of blocking the Gamecocks strong defensive line, namely Jadeveon Clowney and Devin Taylor. Tight end Arthur Lynch, who will have to take over a big blocking responsibility, shed some light into the difficulty of having to protect against such reputable defensive linemen. “On a personal level, it’s going to be a great challenge,” Lynch said. “I played against them last year. That kid Clowney, he’s very raw, real athletic. Taylor’s a veteran, he’s a very long guy, can move real well. So it’s going to be a big challenge for us up front.” Lynch points out that the offensive line has already been getting used to playing against talentBURNETTE ed defensive lines. “That’s how it goes in the SEC every week. We face athletic linebackers and offensive linemen, it’s just kind of the nature of the league,” Lynch said. “We played some pretty good guys last week, and we played pretty well against them.”

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On the other side of the ball The Georgia defense faces the tough challenge of stopping South Carolina’s standout running back Marcus Lattimore. The junior had one of the premier games of his career his freshman year in Columbia, S.C., when he rushed for 182 yards on 37 carries with two touchdowns in the Gamecocks’ 17-6 victory. Robinson credits Lattimore’s combination of size and speed to his major success thus far in his career. “He’s a big guy,” Robinson said. “He just keeps his feet moving and lowers his head.

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Lattimore’s had enough stamina to just pound people.”

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The Red & Black

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KNOW THE SCORE

VOLLEYBALL

SOCCER

AVCA Coaches Poll 1 T2 T2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Penn State (42) Oregon (13) Washington (5) Nebraska USC UCLA Stanford Hawai'i Texas Minnesota Florida Purdue Florida State Kansas State San Diego BYU Louisville Dayton Ohio State Western Kentucky Illinois Iowa State Pepperdine Kansas Michigan State SEC Standings W 5 4 3 2 2 2

L 0 2 2 3 3 4

verall O W L 11 2 12 4 9 6 9 5 8 6 13 4

W West 4 Texas A&M Arkansas 4 Auburn 3 Ole Miss 2 Alabama 2 LSU 2 Mississippi St. 0

L 1 1 3 3 4 4 5

W L 12 2 13 3 12 4 8 6 13 5 6 9 4 10

ast E Florida Missouri Kentucky Tennessee Georgia South Carolina

Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall, dubbed "Gurshall" by fans, rushed for 294 yards against Tennessee. Can No. 3 and No. 4 match the production of legendary No. 34, Herschel Walker? c.b. schmelter/Staff

FOOTBALL

NCAA Stat Leaders

USA Today Coaches Poll

AP Top 25 Poll 1 Alabama (60) 5-0 2 Oregon 5-0 3 Florida State 5-0 4 LSU 5-0 5 Georgia 5-0 6 South Carolina 5-0 7 Kansas State 4-0 8 West Virginia 4-0 9 Notre Dame 4-0 10 Florida 4-0 11 Texas 4-0 12 Ohio State 5-0 13 USC 3-1 14 Oregon State 3-0 15 TCU 4-0 15 Clemson 4-1 17 Oklahoma 2-1 18 Stanford 3-1 19 Louisville 5-0 20 Mississippi State 3-1 21 Nebraska 4-1 22 Rutgers 4-0 23 Washington 3-1 24 Northwestern 5-0 25 UCLA 4-1 Others Receiving Votes: Cincinnati 72, Boise State 53, Texas A&M 51, Michigan State 43, Texas Tech 39, Michigan 38, Louisiana Tech 37, Baylor 31, Ohio 30, Arizona State 15, Arizona 4, Miami (Fla.) 4, Iowa State 3, Tennessee 3.

SEC Standings Conference East W L Florida 3 0 Georgia 3 0 South Carolina 3 0 Tennessee 0 3 Missouri 0 2 Kentucky 0 2 Vanderbilt 0 2

Overall W L 4 0 5 0 5 0 3 2 3 2 1 4 1 3

est W Alabama Miss. State LSU Texas A&M Ole Miss Auburn Arkansas

W 5 4 4 3 3 1 1

W 2 1 1 0 1 0 0

L 0 0 0 1 1 2 2

1 Alabama (57) 5-0 2 Oregon 5-0 3 LSU (1) 5-0 4 Florida State (1) 5-0 5 Georgia 5-0 6 South Carolina 5-0 7 West Virginia 4-0 8 Kansas State 4-0 9 Texas 4-0 10 Notre Dame 4-0 11 Florida 4-0 12 Southern California 3-1 13 TCU 4-0 14 Oklahoma 2-1 15 Clemson 4-1 16 Louisville 5-0 17 Oregon State 3-0 18 Stanford 2-1 19 Mississippi State 4-0 20 Nebraska 4-1 21 Rutgers 4-0 22 Northwestern 5-0 23 Cincinnati 3-0 24 Texas Tech 4-0 25 Boise State 3-1 Others Receiving Votes: Washington 65, Texas A&M 61, UCLA 58, Louisiana Tech 56, Michigan State 45, Baylor 41, Arizona State 40, Miami (Fla.) 17, Michigan 11, Ohio 11, Louisiana-Monroe 8, Wisconsin 6, Purdue 6, San Jose State 4, Oklahoma State 3, Virginia Tech 1, Tulsa 1, Toledo 1

Georgia Schedule

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vs. Buffalo @ Missouri vs. FAU vs. Vanderbilt vs. Tennessee @ So. Caro. @ Kentucky vs. Florida vs. Ole Miss @ Auburn vs. Ga. South. vs. Ga. Tech

Sept. 1 Sept. 8 Sept. 15 Sept. 22 Sept. 29 Oct. 6 Oct. 20 Oct. 27 Nov. 3 Nov. 10 Nov. 17 Nov. 24

45-23 W 41-20 W 56-20 W 48-3 W 51-44 W 7 p.m. TBD 3:30 p.m. TBD TBD TBD TBD

SEC Schedule, Oct. 6 Arkansas at Auburn No. 20 Mississippi State at Kentucky No. 4 LSU at No. 10 Florida Vanderbilt at Missouri Texas A&M at Ole Miss No. 5 Georgia at No.6 South Carolina Matchups of the Week No. 8 WVU at No. 11 Texas No. 21 Nebraska at No. 12 Ohio St. No. 23 Washington at No. 2 Oregon

SEC Stat Leaders

Passing Efficiency Rating

Passing Efficiency Rating

1. Geno Smith (WV) 208.4 2. David Ash (TX) 184.0 3. Aaron Murray-UGA 183.5 4. J.W. Walsh (OKST) 181.2 5. Casey Pachall (TXX) 180.0 6. Brett Smith (WY) 179.6 7. A.J. McCarron (AL) 177.0 8. E.J. Manuel (FLST) 176.7 9. Nick Florence (BAY) 175.8 10. Johnny Manziel (TXAM)170.9 11. Taylor Martinez (NE)169.6 12. Seth Doege (TXTECH)169.0 13. Colby Cameron (LATECH)168.4 14. Tino Sunseri (PITT) 166.8 15. Taylor Kelly (AZST) 166.3

1.Aaron Murray-UGA 183.5 2. AJ McCarron-UA 177.0 3.Connor Shaw-SC 172.6 4. Johnny Manziel-AM 170.9 5. Dylan Thompson-SC 162.9 6. Jeff Driskel-UF 158.0 7. Z. Mettenberger-LS 150.5 8. Tyler Bray-UT 147.7 9. Tyler Wilson-AR 146.6 10. Tyler Russell-MS 143.8 11. Barry Brunetti-UM 137.7 12. Maxwell Smith-UK 135.5 13. Bo Wallace-UM 135.4 14. Jordan Rodgers-VU 129.3 15. James Franklin-MO 127.4

Passing Yards

Passing Yards

1. Rakeem Cato (MARSH) 1920 2. Geno Smith (WV) 1728 3. Dalton Williams (AKR) 1679 4. Stephen Morris (MIAFL)1635 5. Matt Scott (AZ) 1608 6. Derek Carr (FREST) 1599 7. Nick Florence (BAY) 1585 8. Tyler Bray (TN) 1582 9. Corey Robinson (TROY)1489 10. Brett Hundley (UCLA)1470 11. Bryn Renner (NC) 1422 Mike Glennon (NCST) 1422 13. Zac Dysert (MIAOH) 1413 14. David Piland (HOU) 1401 15. David Fales (SJST) 1400

1. Tyler Bray-UT 1582 2. Aaron Murray-UGA 1378 3. Tyler Wilson-AR 1355 4. Johnny Manziel-AM 1094 5. Z. Mettenberger-LS 1016 999 6. AJ McCarron-UA 7. Maxwell Smith-UK 975 8. Bo Wallace-UM 840 9. Tyler Russel-MS 822 10. James Franklin 749 11. Jeff Driskel-UF 698 12. Jordan Rodgers-VU 649 13. Connor Shaw-SC 571 14. Kiehl Frazier-AU 546 15. Dylan Thompson-SC 510

Rushing Yards-Per-Carry

Rushing Yards-Per-Carry

1. Damien Williams (OK) 9.8 2. Chris Thompson (FLST) 8.8 3. Dri Archer (KENT) 8.7 4. Keith Marshall-UGA 8.2 5. Cody Getz (AF) 8.2 6. Tevin King (LATECH) 8.0 7. Trey Watts (TLS) 7.9 8. Todd Gurley-UGA 7.9 9. Gee Gee Greene (NAVY) 7.8 10. Johnathan Franklin (UCLA) 7.5 11. Zac Stacy (VAND) 7.4 12. Ja'Terian Douglas (TLS) 7.3 13. Jamaal Williams (BYU) 7.2 14. Desmond Roland (OKST) 7.2 15. Joseph Randle (OKST) 7.1 Rushing Yards

1. Keith Marshall-UGA 8.2 2. Todd Gurley-UGA 7.9 3. Zac Stacy-VU 7.4 4. Johnny Manziel-AM 7.0 5. Kenny Hilliard-LS 6.9 6. L. Perkins-MS 6.8 7. Raymond Sanders-UK 6.5 8. Jeff Scott-UM 6.3 9. Kendi Lawrence-MO 6.2 10.Mike Gillislee-UF 5.8 11. O. McCalebb-AU 5.7 12. Tre Mason-AU 5.2 13. Eddie Lacy-UA 4.9 14. M. Lattimore-SC 4.8 15. Rajion Neal-UT 4.5 Rushing Yards

1. Stefphon Jefferson (NV) 877 2. Beau Blankenship (OH) 757 3. Johnathan Franklin (UCLA) 697 4. Cody Getz (AF) 683 5. Le'Veon Bell (MIST) 655 6. Kenjon Barner (OR) 605 7. Robbie Rouse (FREST) 587 8. Jordan Lynch (NIL) 582 9. Braxton Miller (OHST) 577 10. Antonio Andrews (WKY) 542 11. Ka'Deem Carey (AZ) 538 Venric Mark (NWEST) 538 13. Todd Gurley-UGA 536 14. Joseph Randle (OKST) 534 15. Adam Muema (SDGST) 520

1. Todd Gurley-UGA 536 2. Rajion Neal-UT 460 3. M. Lattimore-SC 440 4. Keith Marshall-UGA 428 5. Mike Gillislee-UF 402 6. Kendi Lawrence-MO 395 7. L. Perkins-MS 389 8. Johnny Manziel-AM 366 Kenny Hilliard-LS 366 10. Zac Stacy-VU 341 11. Jeff Scott-UM 317 12. Eddie Lacy-UA 314 13. Tre Mason-AU 275 14. Raymond Sanders-UK 260 15. O. McCalebb-AU 238

NSCAA Coaches Poll 14-1 13-0 13-0 1114-2 10-3 12-2 12-2 11-3 12-3 11-2 13-2 12-2 15-1 12-2 15-1 14-2 12-4 11-5 17-3 8-6 8-5 10-6 14-2 14-2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Florida State (33) Stanford UCLA Duke Boston College Texas A&M Virginia Penn State BYU UCF Missouri San Diego State North Carolina Georgetown Wake Forest Virginia Tech Oklahoma State Maryland Marquette Pepperdine Long Beach State Michigan Oregon State Florida Santa Clara

9-0-0 7-1-1 7-0-2 7-2-1 8-1-2 10-1-0 9-1-1 8-2-0 9-1-0 7-2-1 9-1-0 9-1-1 5-2-2 1-1-0 8-3-1 9-2-0 9-3-0 7-2-2 7-2-1 7-3-0 7-3-0 9-2-0 9-1-0 6-3-1 6-2-3

SEC Standings Overall ast E W L-Tie W L-Tie Missouri 5 1 10 2 Florida 5 1 8 3-1 Kentucky 3 2-1 8 3-1 8 3-2 Tennessee 3 2-1 Vanderbilt 1 1-4 4 4-5 Georgia 1 3-2 5 6-2 South Carolina 0 3 -3 3 5 -4 West Texas A&M Auburn Alabama Arkansas Ole Miss LSU Mississippi St.

W L-Tie 5 0-1 3 3-0 2 2-2 2 3 -1 2 4-0 1 3-2 0 5-1

W 11 7 7 5 9 5 7

Player of the Week

Player of the Week

Brittany Bahr

Nicole Locandro

Schedule Opponent Date Georgia Southern 8/24 Troy 8/25 Georgia State 8/26 Slovenia 8/26 Fla. International 8/31 Florida A&M 8/31 @ Florida State 9/01 Albany 9/07 IPFW 9/08 @ Michigan State 9/08 @ South Carolina 9/14 @ Miss. State 9/16 Alabama 9/21 Arkansas 9/23 @ Missouri 9/30 @ LSU 10/03 @ Tennessee 10/07 Auburn 10/12 Ole Miss 10/14 Georgia Tech 10/16 @ Alabama 10/21 10/24 Missouri Kentucky 10/28 @ Florida 11/02 @ Auburn 11/04 LSU 11/09 Texas A&M 11/11 @ Arkansas 11/16 @ Kentucky 11/18 @ Miss. State 11/21 @ Florida 11/23

L-Tie 1-1 6-0 3-2 6-1 4-0 4-4 5-1

Schedule Score 3-1 W 3-0 W 3-0 W 3-0 L 3-0 W 3-0 W 3-1 L 3-1 W 3-1 L 3-0 L 3-0 L 3-1 W 3-2 W 3-0 L 3-0 L 7 p.m. 1 p.m. 7 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 8 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 5 p.m. 7 p.m.

Opponent Date Score 1-0 W UNC Greensboro 8/17 8/19 2-1 W Furman 8/24 1-0 L @ Kansas 5-0 W South Dakota St. 8/26 8/31 2-1 W South Florida 9/02 1-0 L @ UCF 9/07 2-0 L New Mexico 9/14 0-0 Tie Vanderbilt 9/16 2-0 W Arkansas 9/21 2-1 L @ Alabama 9/23 4-1 L @ Florida 9/28 2-1 L Missouri 9/30 2-2 Tie LSU 10/05 8 p.m. @ Ole Miss 1 p.m. @ South Carolina 10/07 10/12 7 p.m. Auburn 10/14 2 p.m. Kentucky 8 p.m. @ Mississippi State 10/19 10/21 2:30 p.m. @ Texas A&M 10/25 7 p.m. @ Tennessee

For weekly practice reports and updates search: soccer ››

A Look Back

A Look Back

The Georgia volleyball team lost against Missouri in the team's second meeting with the Tigers in school-history, losing 3-0 and dropping to 2-3 in the conference. Brittany Bahr only had seven kills in the contest, but she played better than most.

Georgia took 35 shots against LSU, yet still came up with the disappointing tie. The draw offered a conciliatory point, but wasn't enough to make Georgia soccer fans feel warm on the rainy day. The Bulldogs are now second-worst in the East at 1-3-2 in conference play.

MEN'S TENNIS

WOMEN'S TENNIS

Player of the Week

Player of the Week

Nathan Pasha

Lauren Herring

A Look Back

A Look Back

Georgia sophomore Nathan Pasha won the Napa Valley Tennis Classic last week, then advanced in the All-American Championships this week.

Georgia women's tennis player Lauren Herring was named singles co-champion with fellow Bulldog Maho Kowase at the Wolverine Invitational Sept. 23.


Thursday, October 4, 2012

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SPORTS

15

Georgia women's tennis player adjusts from Japan to Athens By Preston Smith The Red & Black

The Georgia football team is getting national coverage and prime-time spots on TV, but waiting for night games can be a hassle for players. Sean taylor/Staff

Night games a bonus, but also can be taxing By Ryan Black The Red & Black Judging how relevant a college football team is at any point during its season is usually based on two conspicuous and readily-accessible marks: the team’s record and whether it is ranked in the polls. One number perhaps lurking under-the-radar — but still every bit an indicator of a team’s relevance — is a game’s start time. As a general rule of thumb, it is better to play later on Saturday, i.e., after 3:30 p.m., than it is early. And Georgia knows how quickly these things change. Coming off of a 6-7 campaign in 2010, the Bulldogs’ 12 regular season games last year consisted of only three night appointments. After Saturday’s game against South Carolina concludes, it will already be Georgia’s fourth night assignment in six contests. Mark Richt admits it’s a good feeling when your team is in the spotlight. “It’s nice to be in the middle of the college football world,” Georgia’s head coach said. “A couple of years ago when we were 6-7, it wasn’t very long into that season where no one really cared what Georgia did on any given Saturday. It’s not a lot of fun, it’s not where you want to be.” Players agreed with Richt. They love playing games at night, too. There’s always one drawback, though. “The only thing that’s really bad about playing at night is having to wait for it,” linebacker Christian Robinson said. “I feel more awake in the later afternoon games because you have time to get up, get two good meals in you and once you get to the game, it’s like playing in high school, like Friday night lights. There’s nothing like it. Saturday night, big-time games, that means you’re doing something well if you’re playing late. If you’re playing at 12 [noon], that means you’ve got to improve.” Noon still isn’t early enough for Mike Bobo. Heck, he would play at 9 a.m. if the television broadcasters allowed it. To him, the sooner the game is over with, the better. “I’d love to play Saturday morning, win the game and then go watch everybody else sweat,” he said. “It’s no fun earlier in the day watching somebody else sweat and then still thinking

about the stuff you’ve got to go through during a game.” Jay Rome, a redshirt freshman tight end, believes it “can go either way.” “With the early games, you’re anxious to play. You wake up early and you’re ready to get everything out of the way so you can go on and play” Rome said. “With the night games, you might have a little more rest. It’s good having more downtime, but at the same time, you’re just sitting around all day like, ‘Man, let’s go.'" Bobo echoed Rome’s sentiments as he recalled his schedule on Sept. 15, when Georgia hosted Florida Atlantic at 7 p.m. “We got up early and had to drive to Lake Lanier, where the team stays and we had a short walk-through and a short meeting with the guys and then we [drove] all the way back [to Athens],” he said, “and then you’re sitting around here [the Butts-Mehre football facility] waiting for recruits until 3:30. So you’re here for about three and a half hours sitting around. And then you go to the stadium and you wait around two more hours." Robinson said there is little difference between a night game at home versus one on the road — aside from the traveling, of course. “Once we get to the hotel on gameday, it’s not any different,” he said. “It’s just about where you’re doing it. It’s fun playing at home, while it’s more intense playing on the road. You’re hated and nobody likes you.” Rantavious Wooten hates sitting around and waiting just as much as his coaches and teammates. It’s a double-edged emotional sword, the junior wide receiver pointed out. You’re bored, yet at the same time, thoughts are constantly swirling around in your head, thinking about the things you have to get done for the team to come out victorious. Once the ball is kicked off and the game has begun, all of the griping and moaning about the late start time are gone. Players have their responsibilities to attend to, after all. “You’re like, ‘You know what? I’m glad it’s night,’” Wooten said. “You don’t have to worry about the sun. It’s cool outside, and you know you’re playing in a big game in front of millions of people.”

Maho Kowase is not the same athlete she was two years ago. Now a junior, she is one of the key returning players on the Georgia women's tennis team. While she seems to have it altogether, it wasn't always this easy for the student from Chiba, Japan. The language barrier was an issue at first, along with American culture in general. "I am really looking forward to this year," Kowase said. "My first and second years I was just trying to figure this school out and work on time management and my English ability. This year I know what is coming, and I know how to handle everything, so I think I should do well." Kowase acknowledged the differences in tennis between the two cultures. "In Japan, there aren't that many tennis players, so I know everybody," Kowase said. "I know how they play, because I've played them a million times. So when I came over here, especially as a freshman, I didn't know anybody, as a player or a school. I had to figure it out during my match, which makes it more mental." However, since Kowase joined the Georgia squad in 2010, she has thrived, both on the court and academically. She was named an ITA ScholarAthlete as a sophomore and to the SEC Academic Honor Roll twice during her career. Georgia head coach Jeff Wallace also praised Kowase for learning the language so fast, something that is all too often an issue for student athletes who come from overseas. "She's done a great job since she's been here," Wallace said. "Getting high enough scores on the English tests aren't easy, and she had to work really hard and take them a few times, but since she's been here she's been a phenomenal student." Wallace recruited Kowase on the recommendation of a mutual friend, Tom Shimada,

while she was traveling through the United States. "When I stayed [in America] for two months, a lot of coaches came to see me," Kowase said. "Jeff and his wife Sabrina came to see me, and I decided to come here to visit, and felt like this was a great school. I met my teammate Kate [Fuller] at that time, and really liked her a lot, so I decided to come here." Kowase attended high school in her hometown of Kashiwa, but always knew she wanted to come stateside for college. "My friend, who was like an older sister to me, went to UCLA," Kowase said. "Since then I have dreamed of coming over here. Even before high school, I was committed to coming to America for college." In Japan, tennis is much more of an individual sport. For the most part, tennis teams are hard to find, and especially in high school, everyone is your competition. "Here I can have my coach on the bench, so he can advise me, which is helping me a lot," Kowase said. "I think the best thing has to be teammates. Having teammates to cheer on and to cheer you on is big." Kowase finished her sophomore year with a singles record of 25-8, and she is the 37th-ranked player in the nation, according to the ITA's annual preseason rankings. Wallace said he has

Maho Kowase 2011-2012: An AllSEC 1st Team selection, earned school record for consecutive doubles victories (22) with Lauren Herring. 2010-2011: An AllSEC 1st team selection after going 31-11 in singles play. Juniors/HS: graduated from Shibuya Makuhari HS, trained in Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan. high expectations for Kowase this year. "We're looking for a big junior year out of her, to take that next step and to improve upon her ranking," Wallace said. "We would like to see her jump up into the top 25, and go from there. There's no reason it shouldn't happen; she certainly works hard, and that's the first thing you have to do. She's got a purpose, and that is to get better, and so I feel that her junior and senior years will be two of her best years."

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Georgia women's tennis junior Maho Kowase had to bridge a language barrier when she arrived in Athens, but has excelled. File/Staff

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SPORTS

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The 2012-13 student-athlete handbook eliminated the phrase "controlled substances," changing the prior drug policy. photo illustration by jan michael-Cart

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two (2) offenses is a DUI or involves a controlled substance.” But in the 2012-13 handbook, which was updated June 1, three months after Rambo and Ogletree’s transgressions became public, the policy left out the term “controlled substances.” The new policy reads: “The student-athlete will be suspended from competition during the athletic season for no less than 30 [percent] of the total sport season. If either of the two offenses is a DUI, the competition suspension will be no less than 50 [percent] of the total sport season.” University officials dispute any changes were made in Georgia’s substance abuse policy. Senior Associate Athletic Director Claude Felton said marijuana “would not be included in that controlled substance clause.” Director of Sports Medicine Ron Courson said the policy hadn’t changed in regard to marijuanarelated offenses, because marijuana was not interpreted as a controlled substance by the athletic association. “We have changed absolutely nothing from a penalty standpoint,” Courson said. “Marijuana is not a controlled substance. A controlled substance, they’re talking about prescription narcotics that are used illegally.” But the state and federal government disagree. Marijuana is included under the list of Schedule 1 Controlled Substances in the state of Georgia and is listed as a controlled substance under the U.S. Controlled Substances Act.

Marijuana is also listed in the NCAA List of Banned Substances. This week the Bulldogs face the biggest game of the season against No. 6 South Carolina, which would have been the last game of a sixgame suspension.Courson said a strictly marijuana-related second offense would have always resulted in a minimum of 30 percent of games suspended. But Georgia Athletic Director Greg McGarity told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in 2011 the suspension for a failed drug test as a second offense is a 50 percent game suspension. Since the Athletic Association does not report failed drug tests or suspensions of student-athletes, there was no way to confirm how the policy has been interpreted in the past. But former Bulldog tight end Bruce Figgins was suspended for the first six games of the 2009 season after failing a drug test for a second time, according to ESPN.com. Courson said the NCAA does not provide guidelines for institutional drug testing and suspensions, and the elimination of the phrase “controlled substance” stemmed from a desire to eliminate ambiguity. “Controlled substance is such an ambiguous term. Any time you write a policy you want to eliminate ambiguity as much as you can,” Courson said. “But quite honestly, in the 18 years that I’ve been administering this policy, we’ve only had one issue ever with those substances ... from a pure interpretation standpoint, we don’t do anything [different] now than what we already have.”

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8/21/12 9:01 PM

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R&B

PLAY

Thursday, October 4, 2012

Yonder Mountain Powerhouse bluegrass is back in town with the Yonder Mountain String Band. Catch the group that sported banjos at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.

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Courtesy Eyton Zelazo

EVENT LISTINGS, 2 • SUDOKU, 8 • CROSSWORD, 9 • DRINK & DINING GRID, 6-7


2

PLAY Thursday, Oct. 4 UGA Campus Kitchens Kickoff Celebration When: 1 p.m. Where: 135 Hoyt St. Cost: Free Contact: campuskitchen@uga.edu Workshop: The World Wide Library When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: SLC/ MLC Room 368 Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5422712 Visiting Lecturer: Benjamin Reiss When: 4 p.m. Where: SLC/ MLC Room 171 Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5423966 Author Michelle Gillespie Book Launch When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Reynolds House Cost: $40 (includes book) Contact: (706) 5424145 Film: In the Mood for Love (2000) When: 8 p.m. Where: Tate Student Center Theatre Cost: $2; $1 for feespaid students with valid UGACards on the Athens campus Contact: (706) 5426396 9th Annual Dixie Film Festival When: 12 p.m. to 12 a.m Where: Morton Theatre Price: $10 to $35 Contact: www.mortontheatre.com “Wild Things vs. Sleep Nazis: How Children’s

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Bedtime Became a Problem” When: 4 p.m. Where: MLC Price: Free Contact: www.willson. uga.edu Tre Powell When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: Free Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com Kongjian Yu Lecture & Reception When: 6 p.m. Where: UGA Special Collections Library Building Price: Free Contact: (706) 5421816 Pumpkinfest 2012 When: All Day Where: Aromas Price: Free Contact: (706) 2080059 Mariachi Night When: 6 p.m. Where: Sr. Sol (W. Broad Location) Price: Free Contact: (706) 8507112 Poetry Book Signing When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: www.avidbookshop.com Open Bluegrass Jam When: 7 p.m. Where: Barbeque Shack Price: Free Contact: (706) 6136752 A Bird’s Eye View of Climate Change When: 7 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek

Nature Center Price: Free Contact: www.oconeeriversaudubon.org Latin American Film Series When: 7 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Community Snapshot: “Abandoned Rural Georgia” When: 7 p.m. Where: Lyndon House Arts Center Price: Free Contact: www.boomersinathens.org Casa de Amistad Benefit When: 7 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Benefit Donations Accepted Contact: (706) 3693144 “Peering into the Musical Brain” When: 7:30 p.m. Where: UGA Edge Recital Hall Price: Free Contact: www.willson. uga.edu Yonder Mountain String Band w/ Brown Bird When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $25 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com Dog Bite, Rituals, Pretty Bird, Blunt Fang When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $4 Contact: www.40watt. com

2012: A Space Jam When: 8 p.m. Where: Nuci’s Space Price: $5 Contact: www.nuci.org

Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18+) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com

Franco Funicello When: 8 p.m. Where: WUOG Price: Free Contact: www.wuog.org

Evan Barber and the Dead Gamblers When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742

Blues Night with The Shadow Executives When: 9 p.m. Where: Office Lounge Price: Free Contact: (706) 5460840 Nurture, Dana Swimmer, Of the Vine When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Dank Sinatra, Earphunk When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $6 Contact: www.newearthmusichall.com John King Band, Daniel Lee Band When: 9 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: $5 (adv), $7 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com Arvin Scott Trio When: 9 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Come What May, Boomfox, Cloak and Dagger Dating Service, Lorraine When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia

Dr. Fred’s Karaoke When: 11 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5465609 Mac DeMarco, The Barlettas, k i d s When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: www.farm255. com

Friday, Oct. 5 Women’s Studies Friday Speaker Series When: 12:20 to 1:10 p.m. Where: SLC/ MLC Room 214 Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5422846 Men’s Tennis hosts Bulldog Invitational When: All Day Where: Dan Magill Tennis Complex Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5421621 Power Partners Manufacturing Open House and Plant Tour When: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Where: 200 Newton Bridge Rd Price: Free Contact: www.mfgday. com/event/44/power-

partners-inc-facility-tourpresentation Guest Recital: Peter Wood When: 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Where: UGA Edge Recital Hall Price: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu Pumpkinfest 2012 When: All Day Where: Aromas Price: Free Contact: (706) 2080059 9th Annual Dixie Film Festival When: Noon to midnight Where: Morton Theatre Price: $10 - $35 Contact: www.mortontheatre.com Farmers Market When: 4 to 7 p.m. Where: 790 Gaines School Rd. Price: Free Contact: (706) 2542248 Nick Driver When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: Free Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com Opening Reception When: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Where: ARTini’s Open Art Studio, Gallery & Lounge Price: Free Contact: (706) 3538530 Louis Phillip Pelot When: 6 p.m. Where: Mirko Pasta (Gaines School Rd. location) Price: Free


Thursday, October 4, 2012 Moonlight Paddle and Cookout When: 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek Park Price: $20 to $30 Contact: www.recsports. uga.edu/out_gorp_trips. php Zombie Farms When: 8 to 12 a.m. Where: Highwater Farm, 4965 Lexington Rd Price: $16/ single, $13/ group (10 or more) Contact: www.zombiefarms.com Space Camp Art Exhibition When: 7 p.m. Where: Lamar Dodd School of Art Price: Free Contact: www.art.uga. edu Gorilla Zoe When: 7 p.m. Where: Manor Price: $5 Contact: www.manorathens.com Kindred Spirits When: 7 to 10 p.m. Where: Athens Institute for Contemporary Art Price: $10 requested donation Contact: caathens@ gmail.com Where on Earth is My Bike? When: 7 p.m. Where: Cine Price: $5 Contact: www.athenscine.com Pre-Festival Contra Dance When: 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Where: Lay Park Price: Free (ages 18 & under), $7

Contact: www.athensfolk.org Rand Lines When: 8 to 11 p.m. Where: Highwire Lounge Price: Free Contact: www.highwirelounge.com Royal Chant When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: $5 Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com See How They Run When: 8 p.m. Where: Town and Gown Players Price: $8 to $15 Contact: www.townandgownplayers.org Andrew Bird, Here We Go Magic When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $30 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com Hott with Harry Legs When: 11 p.m. Where: Amici Price: Free Contact: (706) 3530000 White Rabbit, Easter Island When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $11 (adv.), $13 (door) Contact: www.40watt. com Deep Chatham, Caroline Aiken, Michael Guthrie, Norma Rae When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com

search keywords on our website and twitter ›› Archnemesis, Satoru When: 9 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $8 Contact: www.newearthmusichall.com Darrell Scott, Jim Avett When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: $16 (adv), $20 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com (Nothing But) Covers, DJ Mahogany When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5465609 Muuy Biien Record Release w/ TaterZandra, The Rodney Kings, Bad Girls When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $3 (21+), $5 (18+) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Funk You When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742 Carla LeFever and The Rays When: 10 p.m. Where: Georgia Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5469884 Daffodil, Cars Can Be Blue, DJ Z-Dog When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Free Contact: (706) 3693144

Andrew Kahs, TAJ When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: www.farm255. com

Saturday, Oct. 6 National Symposium and Research Conference When: All Day Where: Georgia Center for Continuing Education Conference Center and Hotel Cost: $150, $100 for student members Contact: (706) 4253158 Men’s Tennis hosts Bulldog Invitational When: All Day Where: Dan Magill

PLAY

Tennis Complex Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5421621 UGA at South Carolina When: 7 p.m. Where: televised on ESPN Contact: www.georgiadogs.com Athens Farmers Market w/ Dave Howard, Todd Lister When: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Where: Bishop Park Price: Free Contact: www.athensfarmersmarket.net

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Price: Free Contact: (706) 6133615 Native Plant Sale and Family Event When: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Price: Free Contact: www.botgarden.uga.edu 6th Annual Pedal for Paws When: 9 a.m. Where: Jittery Joe’s Coffee Roaster Price: $25-$35 Contact: www.active. com

21st Annual Rivers Alive When: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Where: Dudley Park

OCT 4 ............................. Yonder Mountain String Band with Brown Bird OCT 5 .................... Andrew Bird with Here We Go Magic OCT 6 ...........UGA vs South Carolina on the big screen! OCT 6 ....................................The Heavy Pets (Rooftop 21+) OCT 9 ................................................... Leftover Salmon OCT 9 .............. The Ton Tons & Immuzikation (Rooftop 21+) OCT 10 ........ The Revivalists with Hil’s B-Day (Rooftop 21+)


4

PLAY Listen UP!

The Suex Effect, ‘Phases’ “Phases” is like having conversation with someone you had a class with three semesters ago; it’s interesting for the first few minutes, then quickly turns awkward and stale. The Suex Effect, who recently released its album “Phases,” is a hard rock jam band. I didn’t know anything like that existed, yet here it was waving its dreadlocked mane of proof in my face. The songs feel unnecessarily long. I looked up at my stereo at one point after what felt like 15 minutes, and to my horror the album wasn’t even through its second track. The track in question, a mostly instrumental ditty called “Succubus,” was particularly inane. I often forgot it was playing until the random vocals kicked in, which were just repeated shouts of “Succubus!” — pretty entertaining, in spite of itself. Not all of the songs are bad. “In the City,” for example, has a smooth reggae feel that was hard not to get into. The problem is most of the songs take too long to pick up and then don’t know when to quit. The jams also have a tendency to get sloppy and disjointed. I have to give credit where credit is due — the musicianship is top-notch. The solos add flourishes without being overbearing. The drumming is technical and precise. The bass hold its own and gives a hearty kick of funk right in the teeth. The production isn’t lacking either. Everything is fluid and clear, setting the stage for the musicians to do what they want. There is no evidence of auto-tuning or any other sleazy tricks. In a musical world overrun by over-production, you have to admire a band that chooses to keep it simple. But “Phases” is not an album that I would listen to again. If alternative jams are your bag, then The Suex Effect will be right up your ally. Somewhere, there is a market for bands like this — one where The Suex Effect will probably shine. — Tyler Evans

search: phases ››

The Red & Black

search keywords on our website and twitter ›› Athens Heritage Walk When: 12 a.m. Where: Boulevard Historic District Price: $12-$15 Contact: www.athensclarkeheritagefoundation.bigcartel.com Naturalist Walk When: 10 to 11 a.m. Where: Sandy Creek Nature Center Price: Free Contact: (706) 613-3615 2nd Annual Apple Festival When: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Where: Arrow Price: Free Contact: www.ourarrow. com 28th Annual North Georgia Folk Festival When: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek Park Price: $9-$14 Contact: www.athensfolk. org Pumpkinfest 2012 When: All Day Where: Aromas Price: Free Contact: (706) 208-0059 Zoo Day 2012 When: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Where: Memorial Park Price: $2-$3 Contact: (706) 613-3616 Middle Eastern Drum Circle When: 12:30 p.m. Where: Floorspace Price: $6-$12 donation Contact: www.floorspaceathens.com Pet Care Clinic When: 1 to 4 p.m. Where: Pet Supplies Plus Price: Free Contact: www.athenshumanesociety.org

Free Painting Demo When: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Where: Loft Art Supplies Price: Free Contact: www.loftartsupply.com See How They Run When: 2 p.m. Where: Town and Gown Players Price: $8–15 Contact: www.townandgownplayers.org Banned Books Bash When: 4 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: (706) 352-2060 Third Annual Hop Harvest Festival w/ The Welfare Liners, BorderHop Five When: 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: $20 Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com 2nd Annual Pulaski St. Art Crawl When: 5 to 9 p.m. Where: Pints and Paints Price: Free Contact: www.facebook. com/AthensArtCrawls Karaoke When: 7 p.m. Where: Dickey’s Barbecue Pit Price: Free Contact: (706) 850-7561 Zombie Farms When: 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. Where: Highwater Farm, 4965 Lexington Rd Price: $16/ single, $13/ group (10 or more) Contact: www.zombiefarms.com Royal Chant When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: $5

Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Antibalas, Tumbleweed Stampede When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $10 (adv.), $12 (door) Contact: www.40watt. com Salsafest 2012 When: 9 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: $10 (adv.), $12 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com The Stumblin’ Toads When: 11 p.m. Where: Amici Price: Free Contact: (706) 353-0000 The Humms, Uncle Skunkle, Mother the Car, DJ Fog Juice When: 9 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 546-5609 Antlered Auntlord, Young Benjamin When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Spirit Hair Album Release w/ Ice Chrome and T. Hardy Morris When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18+) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Ken Will Morton and The Contenders, Louis Phillip Pelot When: 10 p.m. Where: Roadhouse Price: Free Contact: (706) 613-2324

The Heavy Pets On the Rooftop! When: 10 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $5 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com Immuzikation, DJ Z-Dog, Twin Powers When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Free Contact: (706) 369-3144 Lazy Locomotive When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 546-4742 Bubbly Mommy Gun CD release w/ TOPS, Rebecca Jones, Sleeping Friends When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: farm255.com

Sunday, Oct. 7 The Eclectic Bazaar When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: Vic’s Vintage lot Price: Free Contact: www.facebook. com/eclecticbazaar Men’s Tennis hosts Bulldog Invitational When: All day Where: Dan Magill Tennis Complex Cost: Free Contact: georgiadogs. com Gallery Talk When: 1 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org


Thursday, October 4, 2012 Community Dance Day When: 1 to 4 p.m. Where: UGA New Dance Theatre Price: Free Contact: www.communitydanceday.weebly.com/ Kopelman String Quartet When: 3 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Hall Price: Free Contact: willson.uga.edu Athens Ceili Band When: 4 p.m. Where: Globe Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3534721 Freddie & the 509 When: 5 p.m. Where: Walker’s Coffee & Pub Cost: Free Contact: www.walkerscoffee.com See How They Run When: 8 p.m. Where: Town and Gown Players Price: $8–15 Contact: www.townandgownplayers.org The Suitcase Junket When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: $5 Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com

Monday, Oct. 8 Recital: Dennis Baraw When: 3:35 p.m. Where: UGA Edge Recital Hall Price: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu The Segar Jazz Affair When: 6 p.m.

Where: The Grotto Cost: Free Eureka California, Brick Mower When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre and Bar Cost: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Solid Gold Country Revival When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5464742

Tuesday, Oct. 9 Athens Fibercraft Guild When: 12:30 p.m. Where: Lyndon House Arts Center Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5434319 Winter Gardening Workshop When: 4 p.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Cost: $50 Contact: www.botgarden.uga.edu Student Recital: Olivia Greene When: 5 p.m. Where: UGA Edge Recital Hall Cost: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu Visiting Artist Lecture: Michael Arcega When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Lamar Dodd School of Art, Room S151 Cost: Free Contact: artinfo@uga. edu Evening in the Garden

search keywords on our website and twitter ›› When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Cost: $5 Contact: botgarden.uga. edu ACHF Athenaeum Club When: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Where: 189 Fortson Circle Cost: Free Contact: athenaeumclub@gmail.com Louis Phillip Pelot When: 6 p.m. Where: Mirko Pasta, Gaines School Rd. Cost: Free Contact: (706) 8505641 Tribal Style Bellydance Basics When: 6 p.m. Where: Floorspace Cost: $10-$12 donation Contact: www.floorspaceathens.com Pints and Paints When: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Pints and Paints Cost: $20-$30 Contact: www.pintsandpaints.com Terrapin Tuesday w/ Big Daddy Love When: 6 p.m. Where: Melting Point Cost: $5 Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com Ike Stubblefield and Friends When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Cost: $5 Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Three Sisters When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts

Building Cellar Theatre Cost: $7 (students), $12 Contact: (706) 5434400 Faculty Recital: Connie Frigo When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Ramsey Concert Hall Cost: $5-$10 Contact: www.pac.uga. edu Band of Skulls, Ponderosa When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Cost: $15 Contact: www.40watt. com Leftover Salmon When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Cost: $15 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com Nobra Noma When: 8 p.m. Where: WUOG Cost: Free Contact: www.wuog.org Tuesday Night Confessional w/ Adam Payne, Dave Griffin, Sean Clark When: 9 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5464742 Adron, Micah Dalton When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Cost: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Get Up Get Down feat. The Tontons and Immuzikation When: 11 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Cost: $2

PLAY

Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

Wednesday, Oct. 10

5

Cost: $7 (students), $12 Contact: (706) 5434400

Blue Sky Concert Series w/ Marty Winkler When: 12 p.m. Where: College Square Cost: Free Contact: www.downtownathensga.com

Kenney-Blackmon String Band, Von Grey When: 8 p.m. Where: Melting Point Cost: $5 (adv.), $8 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

Athens Farmers Market When: 4 to 7 p.m. Where: City Hall/ College Avenue Cost: Free Contact: www.athensfarmersmarket.net

Tennis, Wild Belle When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Cost: $12 Contact: www.40watt. com

Buddhist Book Study When: 6 p.m. Where: Body, Mind, & Spirit Cost: Donations Accepted Contact: (706) 3516024 Life Drawing Open Studio When: 5:45 to 8:45 p.m. Where: Lamar Dodd School of Art Cost: $7 Contact: cementflounder@gmail.com Eric Sommer When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Cost: Free Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com Porterhouse Jazz Night When: 7 p.m. Where: Porterhouse Grill Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3690990 Three Sisters When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Building Cellar Theatre

Greek Grind 2012 (Live Streaming) When: 8 p.m. Where: Manor Cost: $5 Contact: www.manorathens.com Blues with Caleb Darnell When: 8 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Cost: Free Contact: www.farm255. com Spicy Salsa Dancing When: 9 p.m. Where: Jerzees Cost: $3 (21+), $5 Contact: (706) 8507320 The Revivalists, Hil’s B-day When: 9 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com DJ FOG JUICE When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5465609


Drink/DINING specials:

Your weekly guide to Athens’ daily deals

TRANSMET Thursday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

1/2 OFF Wine or Sangria

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Rooftop Restaurant and Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75

FRIDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

$1 Draft Miller High Life, $1 Bottle Miller Lite, $3 Wells, $4 Pitcher Miller High Life

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.75 Rooftop Restaurant and Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $2.75

Saturday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Sunday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Monday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Tuesday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Terrapin pints $2

1/2 Off Bottle of Wine, HAPPY HOUR all day $2.75 Well Drinks & Guinness, late night slices

Loose-leaf tea 16 oz. - $2.85

Thursday Bomb Night: $2 Cruzan Bombs, $3 Jager Bombs, $3 Barcardi Bombs $5 Moonshine Margarita

1/2 doz wings + domestic pitcher $10

$1 Off all Draft Beers, late night slices

Cubano Con Leche with cinnamon & sugar 12 oz. - $4.45

$3 Domestics, $3 Gameday Shot, $4 Jack Drinks, $5 Moonshine Margarita

$1 Draft Miller High Life, $1 Bottle Miller Lite, $3 Wells, $4 Pitcher Miller High Life

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.75 Rooftop Restaurant and Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, $5 Pitchers Coors/High Life 1/2 doz wings + domestic Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am pitcher $10 Miller Light, Coors $3 Wells Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $2.75

Open regular business hours, late night slices

Real-Fruit Smoothies - $4.25

$3 Domestics, $3 Gameday Shot, $4 Jack Drink, $5 Moonshine Margarita

$1 Draft Miller High Life, $1 Bottle Miller Lite, $3 Wells, $4 Pitcher Miller High Life

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Rooftop Restaurant and Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, $5 Pitchers Coors/High Life Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am Miller Light, Coors $3 Wells Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75

N/A

Italian Soda with cream - $2.65

N/A

$6 Frozen drinks, $13 House wine bottles

$3 Well drinks & shots

N/A

10% off w/ valid Student ID

$2 Specialty Martini’s

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75

$2 Miller High Life

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75

Wednesday

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Rooftop Restaurant and $1 off of everything, $2.50 Buffalo Canyon-ritas Miller Light, Coors Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am Build your own Bloody Mary Light, Yuengling, Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m. Rolling Rock - $1.7

allgood

Where: 256 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 549-0166 Website:

allgoodlounge.com

On Facebook:

facebook.com/pages/ Allgood-Bar/ 152530911447853

buffalo’s

Where: 96 Alps Rd., Suite #49 Phone: (706) 354-6655 Website: buffaloscafe. com/athens.php On Facebook: facebook.com/ BuffalosCafeAthens

georgia theatre

Where: 215 North Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 850-7670 Website: georgiatheatre.com On Facebook: facebook.com/ GeorgiaTheatre?ref=ts

locos

Where: 581 S. Harris St. Phone: (706) 548-7803 Website: locosgrill.com/ On Facebook: facebook.com/pages/ Locos-Grill-PubCampusHarrisSt/307232036555

WANT TO BE A PART OF THE DRINK AND DINING GRID?

Pitcher Monday Night Football:

$6 Yuengling Pitchers, $6 Solarita Pitchers, $7 Bud Light Pitchers, $8 All other pitchers, $5 Moonshine Margarita

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life

Mini mega nachos + PBR $10

$2.50 Terrapin Rye Pale Ale

Personal French Press 16oz - $2.95

HAPPY HOUR $1 Pints of High Life all day

Frozen Margarita pints $2.75

$2.75 Well Drinks & $3 Guinness

Cappuccino 6 oz. - $3.15

Tuesday Dollar Night: $1 Shots/shooters, $1 Wells, $5 Moonshine Margarita

8pm - Trivia $7 Domestic pitchers, $1 High Life pints

Selected craft/import beers $2

1/2 Off Bottle of Wine

Frozen Latte Ghiaccio - $4.45

Wednesday Ladies Night: $3 Martinis, $6 Bottles of House Wine, $5 Moonshine Margarita

Trivia at 8:30pm

$1 OFF Terrapin pints

ARE YOU A LOCAL BAR OR RESTAURANT WITH WEEKLY SPECIALS?

Mellow mushroom

Where: 320 E. Clayton St. Suite 201 Phone: (706) 613-0892 Website: mellowmushroom.com

Taco Stand

Where: 247 E. Washington St. Phone: (706) 850-6277 On Facebook: facebook. com/pages/Tapped/ 261405617235309

transmet

Where: 145 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 613-8773 On Facebook: facebook. com/pages/ Transmetropolitan/ 100870599957408

two story coffee

Where: 1680 S. Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 850-5422 Website: twostorycoffeehouse.com/ On Facebook: facebook. com/pages/Two-StoryCoffee-House/ 118625911559586

ADVERTISE WITH US AND BE SEEN BY THOUSANDS EVERY WEEK!

the whistlebury

Where: 321 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 612-1650 Foursquare: foursquare.com/ v/the-bubury/ 4f971277e4b04b568876c118

706.433.3000 REDANDBLACK.COM

You wont miss a thing


8

PUZZLES

The Red & Black

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

TRANSMETROPOLITAN Pizza

Pasta

Paninis

now serving slices uPstairs until 2 am thursday, friday & saturday nights

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

Solution available online. redandblack.com

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

Solution available online. redandblack.com

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Difficulty level: 10

SAA

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www.alumni.uga.edu/SAA 1-800-606-8786

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

Solution available online. redandblack.com

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Solution available online. redandblack.com

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$3

2375 W. Broad St. (across from Arby’s) Hours of operation: Monday-Saturday 8-6, Sunday 10-5 www.3minutecarwashdetail.com

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

1

EXPRESS WASH Game Day Special!

$15

FULL SERVICE WASH

Free Regular Skate Rental 295 Commerce Blvd. Bogart GA Near the Mall | 706.353.3113


Thursday, October 4, 2012

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

PUZZLES

9

trivia every wed @ 8 and Sun @ 6

$.50 wingS every Mon!

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Oct. 4 ACROSS 1 Carpets 5 Remembered mission 10 Pretense 14 Huge continent 15 Sensible reasoning 16 Cab 17 Bridges or Foxworthy 18 Dwelling 19 Small brook 20 Dancer Fred 22 Harmed 24 St. Louis football player 25 Capital of Vietnam 26 Madrid’s nation 29 Doris or Dennis 30 Unexpected obstacles 34 Helpful suggestions 35 Blood analysis site 36 Save from danger 37 Mont Blanc or the Matterhorn 38 “__ Rex”; Greek tragedy 40 Laying bird 41 Short jacket 43 Actor __ Hunter 44 Clutter 45 Spirited horse 46 Evil 47 Group formed to help a sheriff 48 Adjust a clock 50 Hope or Barker 51 Accepts one’s pension 54 Snide remark 58 Farmland unit 59 Audio’s buddy 61 Adhesive strip

FRIDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Oct. 5

62 63 64 65 ing 66 67

Greek letters King’s order __ if; although Chimney flue coatStinks Monthly expense

DOWN 1 Indian prince 2 Does drugs 3 Present 4 African hunting expeditions 5 Ringing clock 6 Part of the ear 7 In the past 8 Noon

9 Body of water 10 Puts through a sieve 11 Reagan’s Sec. of State Alexander __ 12 Wheel rod 13 Not at all harsh 21 Actor McKellen 23 Exodus leader 25 Natural environment 26 Punctures 27 Aviator 28 Mac maker 29 Papa 31 Pains 32 Reckon 33 Good judgment

35 36 38 39 42 44 46 47 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 60

Zodiac lion Massage Command Cushion Spookiest Gang member Next to Kettle Cut Cowboy shoes Knocks Canyon sound Threesome Actor Gregory Own Unlocked Canvas shelter Pass away

ACROSS 1 Dug for ore 6 Argument 10 Infant 14 Dunne or Ryan 15 Saga 16 Competent 17 Lions’ cries 18 On __ own; independent 19 First king of Israel 20 Tantalizing 22 Graduation cap dangler 24 Relinquish 25 Parts shielding car wheels 26 Author __ du Maurier 29 Flowering birch tree 30 Anger 31 Cuckoo 33 Sausage 37 Chicks’ cry 39 Old stringed instruments 41 List of dishes 42 Alaska’s Palin 44 Watery part of the blood 46 And not 47 High-intensity beam 49 Refuse to acknowledge 51 Amounts paid back to the buyer 54 Window glass 55 Singer Franklin 56 Golfer’s hazard 60 Surrealist Salvador __ 61 Jump

63 Kitchen range 64 China’s continent 65 Actress Samms 66 Arm joint 67 Rod and __; fishing gear 68 Sword fight 69 Adolescents

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

DOWN Deep mud Press clothes Orderly Embellish Go downward Smooth rock Spasm of pain Stein contents

9 Tried out 10 One of Ringo’s instruments 11 Degrade 12 Unhappier 13 Shouts 21 Just right 23 Once more 25 Advertising circular 26 Dunks briefly 27 Zone 28 Equal 29 Run __; chase 32 Combines 34 City in Nevada 35 Winter flakes 36 Rotate

38 Like a grand castle 40 Nation whose capital is Khartoum 43 “Hell __ no fury like a woman scorned” 45 Attitude 48 Made airtight 50 Put down roots 51 Speeder’s nemesis 52 Clear the slate 53 Misrepresent 54 Of Benedict XVI, e.g. 56 Identical 57 Royal vestment 58 Cosmetics name 59 Church seats 62 Australian bird

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SUNDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Oct. 7 ACROSS 1 Actor __ Nolte 5 Tiny oval fruit on a relish tray 10 Reach across 14 Arthur of tennis 15 Religious doctrine 16 Piece of evidence 17 Make arrangements 18 __ to; of the same value as 20 Hatch or Feinstein: abbr. 21 Launch sites 22 Removes from office 23 Sketches 25 Tavern 26 Girl’s name 28 Population survey 31 Actress Berry 32 Regions 34 Oslo’s nation: abbr. 36 Wicked 37 Paddle 38 German wife 39 Female deer 40 Snoozed 41 Looks for 42 Wooden boxes 44 Word in a polite request 45 Female pig 46 Youngster 47 Deep rift in the earth’s surface 50 Street 51 Spring month: abbr. 54 Parties after weddings

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57 Capable 58 Weapons 59 Saying 60 Hopping insect 61 Hive residents 62 Wanderer 63 Dodgers or Yankees, e.g. DOWN 1 Short rests 2 __ of Capri 3 Hanging light fixture 4 Barbie’s beau 5 Canada’s capital 6 Goes first 7 Hostels 8 11/11 honoree

9 Greek letter 10 Scrubs 11 In addition to 12 Dad’s sister 13 Earns, after expenses 19 Complains 21 Lacking vivid color 24 Small brook 25 Bird’s bill 26 Lean-to 27 Chaos 28 Penny 29 Illegible 30 __ up; absorbs 32 Ridicules 33 Dr. Dre’s music 35 Trick

37 Killed 38 Have a hunch 40 Pound the foot on the ground 41 Went down easily 43 Evaluate 44 __ out; got rid of gradually 46 Cuban line dance 47 Grouchy one 48 In this place 49 Pinnacle 50 Meander 52 Entreaty 53 Enlarge a hole 55 Light brown 56 Wedding words 57 Fore and __

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ACROSS 1 Read the riot __ to; sternly reprimand 4 Deep pit 9 Big coffee cups 13 “That __ it!”; cry of disgust 15 Feel about blindly 16 Iran’s continent 17 “Phooey!” 18 Wrestler Hulk 19 Letters on an invitation 20 Playwright 22 Uno, dos, __... 23 Tiny amount, in a recipe 24 Extremely cold 26 Monet or Picasso 29 Pet birds 34 Computer data destroyer 35 Might; strength 36 Took a chair 37 Dutch cheese 38 Absorbent cloth 39 Additionally 40 Scarlet or ruby 41 Nat King and Natalie 42 Iron alloy 43 Shook 45 Irritate; annoy 46 Take advantage of 47 Dishonest one 48 Quarrel 51 Loath; unwilling 56 Housetop 57 With it; savvy 58 Hairdo 60 Away without permission, for short 61 Whiplash sites

62 63 64 65

Accept Sickly looking Lovers’ meeting Rush

DOWN 1 Use a plus sign 2 Drape puller 3 Rip 4 Shocked 5 Thin soup 6 Cartoon bear 7 Hot tubs 8 Guard 9 One who dies for his faith 10 Letters on an old map

11 __ up; quit 12 Fools 14 Arena 21 Tumor 25 Automobile 26 Turn away, as the eyes 27 Equestrian 28 Swap 29 Intimidated; daunted 30 Fills with holy wonder 31 Tiny bit of land in the sea 32 Portrait stand 33 Took illegally 35 North __; Santa’s home 38 Broad-minded

39 Draw; entice 41 Major TV network 42 Chair or bench 44 Deaden the sound of 45 Friendliest 47 Skulks; sneaks 48 Pitfall 49 Des Moines, __ 50 Bamboozle 52 Pitcher with a flaring spout 53 Frilly around the edges 54 Ark builder 55 Polynesian carved image 59 Stipend


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ACROSS 1 Unsightly growth 5 Pierces 10 Boston __ chowder 14 Again 15 Aviator 16 Tramp 17 Ignoramus 18 Licoricelike flavoring 19 In the sack 20 Sudden 22 Pollywog 24 Type; sort 25 Local __; small town resident 26 Chopped-down tree remains 29 Two and eight 30 Leg bone 34 Melody 35 Sheep’s cry 36 Actress Annette 37 Major TV network 38 Funeral attendee 40 Athlete Fouts 41 Actor Grammer 43 Old horse 44 Trait transmitter 45 Build 46 Title for House members: abbr. 47 Wyman and Seymour 48 Rowed 50 Unhappy 51 Baltimore team 54 Listless; dull 58 Nincompoop 59 Fibromyalgia symptoms 61 Sicilian volcano

62 British peer 63 Destroys 64 20th-century U.S. president 65 Night twinkler 66 Sloppy 67 Oxford or loafer

DOWN 1 Stream bed 2 Shortly 3 Communists 4 Betray, as a lover 5 Punish 6 Slight coloring 7 Muhammad __ 8 Capital of Massachusetts 9 T-bone, for one

10 Silent film star Charlie __ 11 Gray wolf 12 Cain’s brother 13 Pie à la __ 21 Mont Blanc, for one 23 Discourage 25 Longed 26 At __; being risked 27 Yam or potato 28 __ Sam; U.S. government 29 Greek “T” 31 VP Joe __ 32 Ridiculous 33 Ms. Moorehead 35 Lad 36 Plead

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38 Copper or tin 39 Siesta 42 Child’s vehicle 44 Gizmos 46 Save from danger 47 Winter month: abbr. 49 Provide with fresh weapons 50 Impudent 51 Likelihood 52 Drive out 53 Actress Chase 54 Camera’s eye 55 “Beehive State” 56 News, for short 57 Palm tree fruit 60 __ and hers

P U Z Z L E S P O N S O R

ACROSS 1 Nonconformist 6 Equipment 10 Fragrance 14 Think the world of 15 Bridal veil material, often 16 Island east of Java 17 __ firma; solid ground 18 Miners’ finds 19 In a __; miffed 20 Athletic shoes 22 Cling; hang on 24 Dark blue 25 Estimates 26 Smear 29 Zones 30 Skillet 31 Clear the slate 33 Passes out cards 37 Tallies up 39 Courtroom event 41 Lemon __; hard candy 42 Capital of South Korea 44 Went out with 46 Tax-deferred acct. 47 Actor Matt __ 49 Sore to the touch 51 Mrs. Roosevelt 54 Enormous 55 Car to use while yours is in the shop 56 High-voiced singers 60 Farmland unit 61 Opera solo 63 Sports building 64 Sunbathes 65 Yearn

66 Actress Bo __ 67 “Or __!”; words of a threat

11 Delany and Carvey 12 Green shade

68 Nervous

13 Ceremonies

69 Uneven; jagged

21 Chris of tennis

23 Pencil’s core DOWN

1 “Phooey!”

25 Fantastic 26 Seated baths

2 Biblical garden

27 Created

3 Monotonous speaker

28 Take apart

4 Gofer’s trip

29 From Japan or China, e.g.

5 Seepage

32 Zeal

6 Worshipful praise

34 Extremely dry

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35 Traditional knowledge

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36 Ship’s pole

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40 Ease; relax 43 Walkway 45 Lower in rank 48 Self-esteem 50 Closer 51 Gladden 52 Skin-numbing injection 53 Deserves 54 Mr. Carmichael 56 Warble 57 Fiddling Roman emperor 58 Small bills 59 “Oh, for Pete’s __!” 62 Curtain holder


12

PLAY

Listen up!

Yonder Mountain sets focus on music, not hits

Konrad’s ‘Shadow Boxing’ Konrad’s “Shadow Boxing” is a strange yet mildly enjoyable musical journey. Konrad is actually Jeffrey Konrad, a multi-instrumentalist and vocalist hailing from Rock Island, Illinois. He specializes in bringing techno and folk together, expanding his work on previous albums, “Loose Canyons” and “Beautiful Love.” Blending repetitive rhythms with an arsenal of instruments, Konrad produces a decent progressive folk album. Emphasis on decent — it isn’t truly great by any stretch. The album sets up a series of dualities that make it impossible to truly dislike or love. Konrad’s vocals leave something to be desired and become more burdensome to listen to as the album progresses. The instrumentation, on the other hand, grows more three-dimensional with each track. Another example of this frustrating duality: “Time is After,” which feels like Pink Floyd’s “Time” meets the Beach Boys. The bubblegum-pop feel drags it down, but what makes it interesting is the Pink Floyd-esque use of ambient clock sounds at the beginning. “Sticks and Stones” blends bass with highflying horns and bouncy keyboard lines. A similar fusion in “Silence Inside Us,” featuring some rather tasty trumpet improv. “Puppet Strings” drags the listener by the hand into the whimsical land of folk. Lines of Kristian Svennevig’s tabla and violin lend a pleasant infusion of sounds well at home on a Bollywood soundtrack. It’s a shame it only offers 2 minutes and 47 seconds of adventure. Though songs like

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By WIL PETTY The Red & Black

“Sticks and Songs” and “Silence Inside Us” showcase Konrad’s strengths, every album has its oddball track. For “Shadow Boxing,” “Klairvoyance” is that track. The song features Konrad singing about a “revolution” in a monotone voice for over 3 minutes. I don’t know what “revolution” he keeps singing of, but I want no part of it. As if the repetitive and non-evolving rhythm section was not bad enough, it features a nauseating sound byte of Charlie Sheen’s quote, “winning.” Really. It could have been such a good song. It had so much potential beginning with the haunting sounds of a distorted keyboard. But the hodgepodge of sounds that comprise “Klairvoyance” make it sound like a wannabe dubstep track. Though “Klairvoyance” leaves a mark on “Shadow Boxing,” what really makes it a good enough album to go through the trouble of listening to is Konrad’s backing band. Konrad’s vocals and songwriting often fall short, but accompanying musicians, violinist Svennivig, trumpet player Jeff Wichmann and trombonist Greg Etzel make listening to “Shadow Boxing” a worthwhile experience.

— Ashlee Davis

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Yonder Mountain String Band is popular. When discussing modern bluegrass music, the fourpiece from Nederland, Colo. will be amongst the first mentioned. But popular and pop are two different beasts. “If I am put in a situation where I am compelled to play one song — or a hit, for a lack of better word — every show we ever play for the rest of our lives, or else people are going to be pissed? No thanks,” said bass player and vocalist Ben Kaufmann. “I’m not interested. Not at all.” The band was established in 1998, as the group planned to open up for another band in Boulder, Colo. “The short version is we just all showed up at the same bar on the same night,” Kaufmann said. “We had our instruments, played a couple of tunes together, sang a couple of tunes together and pretty much the next day decided we wanted to be in a band.” From there the group has gained a huge following, selling out venues nationwide and performing at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver. Yonder Mountain hosts a festival in Arkansas yearly, owns its label, Frog Pad Records, and is set to start recording a new album this tour. “It’s been a long time since we’ve got in the studio, so we are going back in the studio this tour,” Kaufmann said. “We just want to find some cool spots to settle down and go in. But we’ve got too much material.” So much material the group doesn’t know what to do with it. Dozens of unrecorded songs are in its repertoire, something to be expected since its last album, “The Show,” was released in 2009. But Kaufmann doesn’t

Becoming big has never been a concern for Yonder Mountain String Band bassist Ben Kaufmann. Courtesy Volker Neumann believe the material on the upcoming album will be the music they have been playing on previous tours. “We don’t want to go in and record that stuff, because even if the song is two months old, it’s still old,” he said. “We want to go in there with a blank canvas because the studio is so different than the stage and you get to do some many different, interesting things that you otherwise wouldn’t get to do.” Athens is a frequent stop for the four-piece. Usually the tour stops have the group entering and leaving town the same day. “Athens has tons of history with music and the music that comes out of that town,” Kaufmann said. “You can’t say the same thing about Fargo (N.D.), or Chico, Calif., or a lot of these places that we go to. Yeah, there’s a music scene but the music scene isn’t producing or developing or growing bands that are going to come out and make their mark on the world. Athens does that.” While Athens continues

to churn out band-after-band, the bluegrass genre is starting to do the same thing. In fact, bands with bluegrass influences are becoming more well-renowned. “You can see the influence of [bluegrass], so far as even getting into pop music,” Kaufmann said. “It’s a big deal, even though it remains underground and even though we are lucky to go to places and sell a lot of tickets, it’s still an underground thing.” It’s the underground sort of success that helps the band remain successful while independent. Yonder Mountain prefers the creativity it can garner by not having terms and conditions. “We tried the whole minor [or] major label record deal once and it didn’t work out for us,” Kaufmann said. “Wise man once said the bluegrass band always gets f---ked and that is absolutely true. And the idea about having a big label it’s really sort of irrelevant at this point. It’s a dying thing.”

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October 4, 2012 edition of The Red & Black