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The Truckers drive by for a weekend of concerts. THE WEEK: Page 4-5.

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Thursday, January 14, 2010

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Vol. 117, No. 83 | Athens, Georgia

Veazey able to embark on dream trip Ex-Brave helps fund excursion By DREW KANN The Red & Black In the past two and a half months, freshman baseball player Chance Veazey has made astonishing progress towards restoring a sense of normalcy to his life. After injuries sustained in an Oct. 28 motor scooter accident, Veazey was left paralyzed from the waist down. On Jan. 8, Veazey passed his driver’s examination at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta, and will be back

on the road as soon as his car is outfitted with the necessary modifications. The same day, Veazey returned to his family’s Tifton home for the first time since his accident. And on Tuesday, VEAZEY Veazey made the three-and-a-half hour trip from Tifton back to Athens, where he participated in team pictures with his Georgia baseball teammates. “It was exciting for him. I think it was good for him to be back around all the players [Tuesday],” said

DONATE TO VEAZEY Text “Chance” to 38066 to be entered into a drawing with a chance to go along with Veazey on the hunting trip. Phone service providers will charge $3.99 per text, which will be donated to the trip, with leftover funds going to the Chance Veazey Foundation and the Shepherd’s Clinic. Chance’s sister Carly, a senior risk management and insurance major at the University. An avid outdoorsman, Chance has also been on a number of hunts in recent weeks, but thanks to exAtlanta Braves slugger Ryan Klesko See VEAZEY, Page 8

Yeah, Baby!

ASHLEY STRICKLAND | The Red & Black

▲ Forward Trey Thompkins led the Bulldogs with 21 points their 80-76 loss to Ole Miss.

Bulldogs fall to Rebels in back and forth game Dogs lose 80-76 at home By NICK PARKER The Red & Black Head coach Mark Fox’s team was unable to give him the 41st birthday present he wanted — his first SEC win — as his Dogs (8-7) lost 80-76 to No. 23 Ole Miss (13-3). The game included 11 lead changes as neither team seemed to be able to pull ahead. With a minute left and Georgia down one, forward Jeremy Price made a great move around the defender, but the scoop shot rimmed out. Ole Miss forward Murphy Holloway knocked down one of his two free throws, giving Georgia another chance. Fox called a timeout, setting up Dustin Ware with an open look from three-point land. Again, the ball just refused to go down for the Dogs,. “Dustin’s shot was a terrific shot. Wide open,

Thespian students counter conventional themes in new play By KATHLEEN DAILEY The Red & Black So long to the Shakespearean days with all-male casts. The University Of Georgia Thalian Blackfriars’ newest play, “The Well Of Horniness,” turns the tradition on its head with an all-female ensemble performing both male and female characters. The play follows the experience of Vicky, an ex-lesbian, who is framed for her future sister-inlaw’s murder at the hands of an evil lesbian villainess. According to director Susana Baker, the play’s risque plot line and inappropriate innuendos make for quite an entertaining production. “The show is hilarious, but definitely not for those who are easily offended,” Baker said. “It

is an over-the-top, lesbian love triangle comedy/murder mystery melodrama.” Stage manager Nathan Cowling describes the show as being a spectacle for the audience. “The show is silly and fun, and thus makes the audience have fun while watching it,” Cowling said. The show was written in the 1980s as a radio drama, but was later staged as a play with a six-woman cast, though the script consists of 33 characters. Since this production is totally student-run, the flexible casting played a large role in why Baker chose this production to direct. “I chose this particular play because I had studied it in class and thought it was funny, different and I knew the name would attract some attention,” Baker said.

and one he should have taken. I’d tell him to take it again,” Fox said. “Didn’t go in, Jeremy Price hit a great shot late that didn’t go in. Sometimes the ball didn’t go in, and you take those five points — if we had those five ... wow, different story.” “It rimmed in and out, and I seriously thought we were about to go up one right there and then we were just going to have to get a stop up,” Ware said. “But it didn’t go down, and they made a wild play on the inbounds.” That “wild play” came on the next possession, as Ole Miss guard Eniel Polynice threw the inbounds pass off the back of the Georgia defender and jumped inbounds to grab the ball and score a layup, putting Ole Miss up four and ending the game there. “We can’t call it down to one play,” Georgia forward Trey Thompkins said. “There were 39 other minutes where we didn’t take care of business and didn’t play hard, and it came back to get us.”

Candidate criticizes free tickets for officials By RAISA HABERSHAM The Red & Black PHotos by daniel shirey | The Red & Black

▲ The only two males involved in “The Well of Horniness” are Graham Wallis, shown above, as the narrator, and Nathan Cowling as stage manager. The cast of 11 plays all 33 roles, with the narrator also acting as the sound effects specialist. “One interesting thing about the play is that the entire cast is female, with the exception of the narrator,” actress Andi Buda said. In fact, only two males were involved in the production: Cowling, the stage manager, and Graham Wallis, the actor

portraying the narrator. “I think the boys have really enjoyed being able to work with all these girls all the time for the past few months,” Buda said. Buda, who plays the lead role of Vicky, praises the hard work of her castmates even through times of struggle and turmoil. “We were [cast] in See HORNY, Page 7

Former Governor Roy Barnes said state officials receiving free tickets from the Board of Regents to University System of Georgia sporting events need to start paying out of pocket — especially at a time when students are faced with fee increases. According to a document sent to the The Red & Black from Chris Carpenter, Barnes’ campaign manager, state officials have received more than $93,000 worth of free tickets from the Board of Regents to attend events including football and basketball games. The amount also includes meals, lodging and transportation. “What prompted this is the symbolism of raising tuition and fees while legislators are coming down and getting tickets,” Barnes said in a phone interview Wednesday. “When I was governor, if I wanted to go to a football game, I paid for it. Legislators should do the same thing.” Barnes said he obtained his information from the Georgia Ethics Commission Web site. The athletic associations from the schools in the University System of Georgia are required to report any gifts given to the See TIX, Page 2

LEADING THE WAY Flip to page 2 to find out what Vince Dooley has been up to on campus — and around the world.

sunny. High 58| Low 28

Index

SUSHI FOR THE EARS Want to hear the shamisen and other traditional Japanese instruments played live with an updated twist? Page 3. News......................... 2 Opinions................... 6

Variety......................3 Sports....................... 7

ROAD TRIP! The Lady Dogs embark on a two-game, five-day road stint before returning to Athens for competition. Page 7. Crossword................2 Sudoku..................... 7


NEWS

2 | Thursday, January 14, 2010 | The Red & Black

Education school Dooley on looks to receive campus to national funding address By JACOB LOVELL THE RED & BLACK

There may be a new source of funding for the University’s College of Education. On Jan. 6, President Barack Obama announced an expansion of his “Educate to Innovate” campaign, providing more funding to support programs training math and science teachers. The expansion allocates funds to private foundations and other special interest groups, which can aid university programs geared toward helping students become teachers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or “STEM,” areas. This announcement has yet to have any effect on the University’s College of Education. “In most cases, such as with the American Renewal and Reinvestment Act funds that were available last spring, a federal agency... [publishes] a request for proposals,” said Steve Oliver, professor and program coordinator for science education. “I am aware of these [new] funds being announced, but to date I have not seen a request for proposals from a federal agency that would allow us to seek them.” Once the paperwork is made available to request the funds, there is no guarantee that they will make their way to the University. “My research collaborators and I submitted proposals for approximately $1 million of the ARRA funds, but did not get funded,” he said. When asked what the college would do with new funds, Oliver pointed to student recruitment. “In the department of mathematics and science education, we have a grant from the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Program that is designed to recruit persons with bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and the sciences into math or science teaching,” he said. “I suspect that the new funds [would] have a similar purpose.” But some professors in the College of Education said they feel that this is only a part of the bigger picture. “Preparing more STEM secondary teachers is certainly not a new goal,” said Jim Wilson, a professor of math education. “[But] it is only a small part of our national efforts to improve STEM education. The comprehensive look at STEM education, however, must address the quality of the preparation.” David Jackson, an associate professor of science education, voiced similar concerns. “The biggest challenge from my perspective is that of trying to maintain high standards yet maintain a large enough number of students to keep the program going and at least make a significant quantitative contribution to the need for teachers in the state,” Jackson said. Jackson also noted concerns about teaching math and science as a whole. “The biggest issue — and this has not changed appreciably in decades, and is not likely to do so anytime soon — is that the salary potential in a teaching career is so much lower than in other fields for those with a truly strong background in math or science,” Jackson said. In addition to the benefit of extensive vacation time, which Jackson said is a “serious consideration,” math and science teachers must be primarily motivated by “the love of [teaching]” in those fields. Jackson said the University’s science education program is a good way for students who are majoring in a core science field to get into teaching. “Biology, chemistry, physics or geology majors can easily switch — our undergrad program is little different from those majors through the end of junior year,” he said. Jackson said students interested in becoming math or science teachers should visit the department’s Web site or speak to him directly.

LEADers By ADINA SOLOMON THE RED & BLACK

Vince Dooley, Africa and volunteering have more in common than you might think. The three come together in one study abroad program called Global LEAD. Global LEAD — which stands for leadership, education, adventure and diplomacy — is a summer study abroad program that takes students to either Greece, Rio de Janeiro or Cape Town, Africa. For six weeks, students help impoverished communities and earn six hours of University course credit. But students aren’t the only ones going on LEAD. Vince Dooley, a renowned former University football coach, is also involved in the program. He traveled to Cape Town last year. “[LEAD] has a service component that separates it from the other studies abroad programs,” Dooley said. “[It’s] a real education for someone’s heart.” Dooley and his wife Barbara first went on LEAD last summer when Kevin Scott and Garrett Gravesen, both Global LEAD program directors, called them up and asked them to join the newly-formed LEAD program. “We watched [Scott and Gravesen] raise phenomenal amounts of money and touch lives,” Barbara said. “When we realized what they could do...we jumped on the bandwagon.” University student Scott Sumner, a senior from Sylvester, went with LEAD last year to Cape Town. “I care a lot about service,” Sumner

WES BLANKENSHIP | The Red & Black

S Vince Dooley brainstorms with members of UGA’s Global LEAD Program, which lets students volunteer and take classes abroad. said. He described one experience during his summer with LEAD where he lived for a day like the poor families he was helping. “I lived off a dollar a day,” he said. This year, the program is expanding to involve other colleges in the trips, something both Vince and Barbara said they are happy about. “Service is a part of maturity,” Barbara said. Vince and Barbara — who will travel

with the group to Greece this summer — said LEAD is really about the students volunteering for others. “We’ll enjoy the experience of being with [the students],” Vince said. Barbara said that helping those in need is a rewarding experience. “When you give, you receive a lot more,” she said. A Global LEAD information session open to all students will be held at 6 p.m. in the Miller Learning Center, room 248.

TIX: Barnes plans to increase research opportunities ¢From Page 1 Georgia general assembly. There is no limit on the gifts given. Damon Evans, athletic director, was unable to be reached for comment Wednesday night. Barnes, who is running for governor for the fourth time after being defeated in 2002 by incumbent Sonny Perdue, said the state needs to better handle the struggles associated with public higher education. “If elected, I will issue an executive order that prohibits legislators from using free tickets,” he said. Barnes said increasing tuition begins to set the price too high for deserving students who come to the University System of Georgia. “We need to stop the tuition and fee increases because all you are doing is pricing out good, young kids,” he said. “If legislators are doing that, they should trade in their free perks.” Barnes said to prohibit tuition

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increases, education should be a priority in allocating state money. “When you do that, you should be able to stop the raid on the HOPE Scholarship,” he said. “When you increase tuition, you are taking more out of the HOPE Scholarship.” Tuition increases need to be kept at a minimum so that HOPE will last longer, Barnes said, adding that it drains lottery dollars. Barnes also suggested expanding research opportunities in ways similar to the University of North Carolina system. “I want to create in Georgia a research triangle to attract industries,” he said. “We need to improve education, create new jobs and have better play of Georgia that will prosper all.” Wednesday afternoon, Barnes and former Attorney General Michael Bowers received the Distinguished Advocate Alumni Award from the Law School. Barnes spoke on the importance of

jurors in the court room, saying the most disturbing trend is cases tried by judges. “Fewer and fewer cases are being tried by jurors,” he said. “It is easier for 12 people to decide a case than one mediocre judge.” Barnes said he has dealt with several cases in which a jury has “seldom made a mistake.” “Jurors learn a lot from each other. They teach each other and apply life experiences to a case,” he said. “They know how to shape the facts of a case and see past the lie of a lawyer.” Barnes said he encourages law students to advocate for citizens who don’t have access to a lawyer. He said he remembered meeting one such citizen, and fortunately the person eventually came to him for help. “I thought about what had happened if she hadn’t had a lawyer,” he said. “She would have lost her case, but she also would have lost her faith in this law system as well.”

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ACROSS Perhaps Lunch spot Actor Garrett Egg-shaped Very eager Solitary “Aida” composer Make a deal Before Couples Beneath Marquee light Choose Created anew In a __; blue Gobbled up Plow animals Social blunder Become firm Aboveboard Slip up Castle surroundings Ascend Pronounce Undersized One making

progress 48 Casual farewell 49 Has to 50 Of the eye 53 “Why don’t we!” 54 Hairy animal 57 Man’s heavy outer garment 60 Prefix for violet or sound 62 One whose pants are on fire? 6 63 A single time 7 64 Muffles 8 65 Actress 9 Samms 10 66 Do garden work 67 Cairo’s nation 11 12 13 DOWN 1 Relocate 19 2 Declare 3 Long ago days 4 eBay offer 22 5 Reviewed a

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32 Not wordy 33 Firstborn of two 35 African nation 38 Have a direct effect on 39 Form of arthritis 40 Court order 46 Stomach 47 Accept as true 48 Regal headwear 49 Doled out 50 Make eyes at

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VARIETY

The Red & Black | Thursday, January 14, 2010 | 3

Traditional Japanese music performed with a modern flair By BECKY ATKINSON THE RED & BLACK Tonight, the Athens community has the chance to experience a new kind of music: traditional Japanese instruments and sounds with a modern, updated twist. This free event, called Hogaku: New Sounds of Japan 2010, is a rare opportunity to hear the modern-sounding music of three traditional Japanese instruments — the koto, shamisen and taiko. “[The performers are combining] traditional music with other Western instruments,” said Hijiri Hattori, Japan outreach coordinator at the Center for Asian Studies. “They will bring something new to the American perspective of Japanese traditions.” The concert will showcase three ensembles, each featuring a different instrument played by some of Japan’s best young performers in the traditional performing arts. The Japan Foundation, the University of Georgia Center for Asian Studies and the Consulate General of Japan in Atlanta are sponsoring the event, which will be held in the Ramsey Recital Hall. Before the music, Hogaku Journal editor Takafumi Tanaka will give a lecture on the history of Japanese traditional music and the instruments used during the concert. The performers will also demonstrate their instruments. “The performers are all young artists keeping the tradition of their instruments alive through modern interpretation,” said Jessica Cork, advisor for educational and cultural affairs at the Consulate General of Japan in Atlanta. “It will be interesting to see what kind of modern innovations the artists will bring to centuries-old music.” One of the ensembles, called Tsugukaji, consists of Ai Kajigano and Tsugumi Yamamoto. The duo will perform using the koto, a Japanese zither. Tsugukaji is known for its rare blend of vocals

HOGAKU: NEW SOUNDS OF JAPAN When: 7 p.m. - Lecture by Hogaku Journal editor Takafumi Tanaka 8 p.m. - Concert Where: Ramsey Recital Hall Price: Free

with koto music. A second ensemble, Oyama x Nitta, features musicians Yutaka Oyama and Masahiro Nitta. They will perform with the tsugaru-shamisen, a fretless lute from northern Japan. Oyama has performed his music widely on Japanese television and Nitta starred in the 2004 motion picture “Overdrive.” The ensemble Hide & Miho, composed of Hideyoshi Saito and Miho, will showcase a variety of percussion instruments, including the taiko drum. Saito is well known for his performance of the chappa, small cymbals, and is the only chappa soloist in Japan. Miho has played all over the world, including Africa, Australia and the Middle East. “Since the concert features three different types of instruments being played by six performers, there should be something for everyone,” Cork said. “[Also, the] tempo and style of each [instrument] is different. For example, the koto is soft and soothing, whereas the taiko has a rhythmic sound.” Cork said he hopes the event contributes to the understanding of Japanese culture for everyone who attends. “This is a very big opportunity for the people in Athens because they can actually enjoy [Japanese music] in their hometown,” said I. “Wil” Chi, the events, performance and exhibits coordinator for the Japan Information Center at the Consulate General of Japan in Atlanta. “It will be a great opportunity for [the people of Athens] to see music from the other side of the world.”

Courtesy Hijiri Hattori

SMiho, a percussionist in the Hide & Miho ensemble, will perform along with five other musicians tonight at the Ramsey Recital Hall as part of the Hogaku: New Sounds of Japan concert.


6 | Thursday, January 14, 2010 | The Red & Black

Chelsea Cook | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Daniel Burnett | Managing Editor me@randb.com Yasmin Yonis | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Our Take

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

Teachers trained Science and math education needs to maintain priority status in America

It is about time. Science and math education are finally getting the attention they deserve from the White House. Ten-thousand math and science teachers will be trained in the next five years with President Barack Obama’s “Educate to Innovate” campaign. The United States is far behind its goal of leading its counterparts around the world in math and science. Studies in the past few years showed American students have some of the lowest scores in math and science literacy. American students ranked 25th out of 30 developed countries in math literacy and 21st in science literacy. The editorial board of The Red & Black believes this is unacceptable. We are slowly but surely losing our position as a dominant global leader. The quality of the education we provide our country’s youth will help decide if America will maintain a strong presence in the world or become obsolete in decades to come. “So make no mistake. Our future is on the line,” President Obama said according to a Jan. 6 press release. “The nation that out-educates us today is going to out-compete us tomorrow. To continue to cede our leadership in education is to cede our position in the world.” Action on this issue has been in the works with The University System of Georgia Math and Science Partnership’s “math + science = success” campaign. The program has helped the state of Georgia increase test scores and graduation rates since it began. Our own school has also been making a difference in this national problem. The University has been working hard to recruit and train math and science teachers through its Department of Mathematics and Science Education. We must continue all efforts to provide what all American students deserve — an education that will provide them a chance at the American dream. — Yasmin Yonis for the editorial board.

Mailbox

E-mail and letters from our readers

Column needed in the national media forums I am writing to express my appreciation for Yamanucci Molin’s thoughtful and extremely well-written piece, “‘Negro’ comment dialogue necessary” in your Jan. 12 issue. I agree with her viewpoints, and wish that her nuanced reason and fine writing were out in the national media space, instead of the trite agitation out there today. DEBORAH CHASTEEN Graduate student, Journalism

Religion not main reason for laws Megan Otto paints an inaccurate picture of Georgia’s “Blue Laws” in her Jan. 8 opinion, “No place for religion in government.” Sure, religious beliefs put such laws in place, but that was several generations ago. Today, religious groups are not necessarily to blame for their continued enforcement. Believe it or not, the Georgia Alcohol Dealer’s Association is the driving force behind Georgia’s dry Sundays. Liquor store owners argue that the extra operational costs of opening on Sunday (which, without blue laws, they would have to do to compete with 7-day grocery stores), would be greater than the extra revenue. Yes, religion in govern-

ment is bad, but I would like to see some arguments against it that are a bit more informed and original. WES JACKSON Alumnus, Gainesville English and finance

Time spent on Facebook is ‘sad’ [This letter is in response to Jason Andrews’ Jan. 12 opinion, “Facebook guidelines for newest users.”] Dear Mr. Andrews: I find it somewhat humorous and sad that you as a graduate student spend enough time on Facebook to actually have a running dialogue of what goes on. Now that is funny! The part that is sad is that you haven’t grown up enough to learn that you are not the center of the universe. You only have control over you! Just because you don’t like something, does not mean they have to change for you. You only have control over your attitude and reaction. In other words, if you don’t like it, don’t read it. They can’t upset you, unless you let it! It’s time to grow up Mr. Andrews. I think that would make a good Rule #5, don’t you? JACQUEE ROSUMNY Faculty, Athens Kinesiology department

Disaster offers chance to make difference

O

ne of the worst earthquakes to ever strike the Western Hemisphere has sent the small Caribbean country of Haiti into a tailspin. estimated that there might be more than 100,000 dead, due in large part to the collapse of countless buildings. Many citizens of this poor country lived in makeshift huts. Registering a 7.0 on the Richter Scale, the quake was the hardest to hit the embattled country in over 200 years and could not have been located in a worse place, with the epicenter only 10 miles outside the densely populated capital city of Port-au-Prince. We can only imagine the level of destruction that must be present when two of the country’s most well-built structures — the presidential palace and national cathedral — both collapsed. All of the main hospitals in and around Port-au-Prince were also destroyed or have been abandoned for fear of lack of remaining structural integrity. At this point, you may be thinking, “we’re talking about Haiti here, isn’t that a failed state where these sorts of things happen often?” Well, unfortunately, this situation is far more precarious than any other disaster Haiti or any other country has seen since the 2005 tsunamis. The death toll is rising by the hour and the situation is looking increasingly despondent as officials learn more about this horrible situation. Moreover, with almost all the medical and governmental infra-

News Editor: Carey O’Neil Associate News Editor: Mimi Ensley Sports Editor: Rachel Bowers Variety Editor: Courtney Smith Photo Editor: Katherine Poss Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editor: Beth Pollak Recruitment Editor: Brittany Binowski Editorial Cartoonist: Bill Richards Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Casey Bridgeman

LUCAS PUENTE structure ruined, things have gotten flat-out gruesome. An Associated Press report put the situation quite bluntly: “Death was everywhere in Port-au-Prince. Bodies of tiny children were piled next to schools. Corpses of women lay on the street with stunned expressions frozen on their faces as flies began to gather. Bodies of men were covered with plastic tarps or cotton sheets.” Fortunately, a variety of actors have sprung into action. The Obama administration has already pledged the “unwavering support” of the U.S. and sent out an official e-mail urging Americans to donate to organizations active in the response. Other countries and international institutions have been similarly proactive with at least $10 million pledged by the U.N., $4.4 million by the European Union, $5 million by Canada, $2.9 million from the Netherlands and $2.2 from Germany. Roughly three dozen other countries have mobilized their disaster teams and are contributing on several other levels. I hope that the Bulldog nation can join this list and show a helping a hand to this country that is in such desperate need. The University has a tremendous record in responding to major humanitarian crisis. Students directly raised $53,660 and provided countless hours of volunteer service in response to

Text ‘HAITI’ to ‘90999’ to donate $10 to the American Red Cross’ relief efforts in Haiti. The donation will be charged to your phone bill. You can also donate online to organizations such as IRC, CARE and UNICEF. the humanitarian disaster caused by Hurricane Katrina. This time around, I hope we can have a similar outpouring of support for this disaster that is of an even greater magnitude. Campus organizations have already began to help. Volunteer UGA, which has relationships with 35 other student groups, is starting a campus-wide fundraising drive to raise money for relief efforts. However, you don’t have to be part of any organization or group to help. All you need is a credit card and a few minutes of your time. Your small donation can have an enormous impact on people’s lives. If you remain unconvinced, I urge you to simply peruse some of the pictures coming out of the devastation of Port-au-Prince. I personally didn’t grasp the true level of this crisis until seeing pictures of children covered in dirt and the collapsed shanties with body bags being carried in the background. Those images convinced me that was truly a disaster of biblical proportions and compelled to donate to Oxfam’s relief fund. I hope you will do the same. — Lucas Puente is a senior from Wilmington N.C., majoring in international affairs and finance

Tuition must increase to keep quality T

uition and the accompanying fees are touchy subjects these days. During this current recession, more families find themselves struggling to pay tuition for their children. And if they have multiple kids in college, I wish them luck. I think too many students at the University of Georgia take for granted how good their situation actually is. The University is ranked sixth by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine for best public in-state value. And for the quality of education UGA provides, this school should cost a lot more. The reality is University President Michael Adams must continue to spend to ensure we continue to maintain the educational prestige and quality of the University. That is the reality of the situation. Furloughing professors and cutting down on magazine subscriptions are equivalent to placing bandages on a gunshot wound. It’s only a matter of time before we bleed out. The only way to remedy this situation is to raise tuition of in-state students and not allow the HOPE Scholarship to pay for this increase. An astronomical 79 percent of students are from the Peach State, according to the University. And I would be willing to bet the vast majority of those 79 percent still have HOPE. Approximately 97 percent of the 2008 incoming fresh-

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

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MICHAEL FITZPATRICK

men received the scholarship. Unless you wish to attend a university where classes overflow into adjacent rooms and students listen to their professor lecture on a projection screen — and this happened to me as a freshman at Arizona State University — keep fighting the inevitable. It is not only unfair, but unrealistic, to expect HOPE or out-of-state students like myself to continually bear the burden of skyrocketing educational costs. At over $34,000 a year, out-ofstate students already pay more than double the costs of in-state students, and we don’t have the luxury of HOPE. This University already lacks the diversity of out-of-state students, and if out-of-state tuition keeps rising year after year, after year, we won’t be able to afford to attend this school. In-state tuition will then surely rise. I have very little desire to attend the University of MassachusettsAmherst, ranked 79th in the same Kiplinger best in-state value ranking. HOPE is a beautiful thing, and I hope you realize how lucky you all are that have it — or had it. It allows students from all over the

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state and from all walks of life to have the same college experience. It allows a student from a low-income town in southern Georgia like Blakely to attend the same institution as a student from Alpharetta. Yet, HOPE only has a finite amount of funding available. Student Government Association President Katie Barlow told The Red & Black in Monday’s story, “New ranking could mean tuition is too low,” that it was “more important” for any rise in fees to be through tuition increases instead of mandatory fees. Is it, Miss Barlow? How many tuition increases of thousands of dollars a semester will it be before HOPE can’t pay for any of it? HOPE has to pay the tuition of students at not only UGA, but at Georgia Tech, Georgia Southern and all the other public institutions in this state. Instead, place a cap on the amount of tuition HOPE will cover each year, and if that cap is exceeded, the remainder of the bill becomes the responsibility of the students. My dad pays nearly $12,000 in out-of-state tuition and fees each semester, and he can’t pay much more. And I know we are not alone in this financial situation. And if in-state students can’t help with more of the tab, it will cost us all more than just tuition. — Michael Fitzpatrick is a sportswriter for The Red & Black

Editorial board members include Daniel Burnett, Chelsea Cook, Michael Fitzpatrick and Yasmin Yonis.

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Production Manager: Sam Pittard Production Staff: Josh Barnett, Dru Fickling, Priscilla Kathe, Elaine Kelch Receptionist: Amanda Goforth Office Manager: Erin Beasley Assistant Office Manager: Megan Yue Cleaning Person: Mary Jones Publisher: Harry Montevideo The Red & Black is published Monday through Friday fall and spring semesters and each Thursday summer semester, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a nonprofit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


VARIETY & SPORTS

The Red & Black | Thursday, January 14, 2010 | 7

James ‘opens up things’ for teammates By BEN BUSSARD THE RED & BLACK

DANIEL SHIREY | The Red & Black

SAlthough the cast of “The Well of Horniness� is composed of only 11 actresses, the flexible script allows them to cover all 33 parts.

HORNY: Director given “freedom� with show “THE WELL OF HORNINESS�

¢From Page 1 early November and are putting up the show early this semester, so we have had to work through two breaks and finals,â€? Buda said. “We have really had to come together and work as a team and be committed.â€? Like any good play, there was drama during the pre-staging rehearsals. The crew lost their costume designer at the last minute, creating panic, but they came through in the end. The actors also act as stagehands and are responsible for moving the set on and off the stage as needed. “The cast is great,â€? Cowling said. “They have a lot of energy and are always willing to help myself, Susana and the rest of the cast out anytime.â€? Baker and Cowling have been working together on the show since the beginning. As members of the Thalian Blackfriars, the campus thespian soci-

When: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. Where: Balcony Theatre of the Fine Arts Building Price: $2 More Information: All proceeds benefit the Boybutante AIDS Foundation ety, they were allotted a certain budget and given total creative freedom. “This project is sort of like our baby,� Baker said. “We sent out the notices, cast the play, blocked, choreographed and designed the play on our own,� Baker said. “The Thalian Blackfriars has been great to give us such freedom with the show.� The crew has decided to donate all the profits from the show to the Boybutante AIDS foundation. “The show is fantastic and entertaining to watch,� Cowling said. “It is fun, funny and for a great cause.�

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

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(Private Party Merchandise, Under $101) (0-15 words) 3 Consecutive Days..................................................FREE (Merchandise must be priced. One item per hsld per week. Ads must be received from UGA e-mail address only. No walk-ins or standard mail accepted.)

1BR 1BA IN a 3BR 3BA in a large house in Bridgewater. $400 Rent. Lease for August 2010-July 2011. Call Amie for details 404-803-2528 AVAILABLE NOW! SPACIOUS room for rent in 3BR 2.5BA house. Great location on East Side! $350/ mo. + 1/2 utils. Extras! tyler_brabson@yahoo.com or 706-254-7889 ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP for 2BR 2BA apartment. Furnished except extra BR/BA. Barnett Ridge apartments, walking distance from Publix, Kroger, Kmart. $285 + ? utilities. No pets. ipower@uga.edu. ROOMMATE NEEDED. 2BR 2.5BA townhome off church street! Solid location! $500/mo total. Email ticos@uga.edu ROOMMATE WANTED FOR a 2BR 2.5BA townhome in Arbor Creek. Rent and utilities combined are $400/person. Call or Email Amanda @ 770-314-6045 or amac0203@yahoo.com or Anna at 770-815-3387

The Georgia women’s basketball team hits the road tonight looking to continue its record start to the season. The Lady Dogs (16-0, 3-0) are one of just five teams remaining in Division I who still have a goose egg in the loss column, and are looking to extend its historical and unblemished record. That road quest begins in Nashville, Tenn., as Georgia will face its toughest road test of the season against the No. 24 Vanderbilt Commodores (12-4, 1-2). As Georgia heads out on its first true road trip of the season — traveling directly from Nashville to Fayetteville, Ark., for its Sunday matchup against the Razorbacks — head coach Andy Landers realizes the challenges that accompany being away from home. “When you go on the road, your schedule is different. You worry about young kids, and I think that they have adjusted to the routine,� Landers said. “Also, they’ve realized that it’s different on the road and they’ll find

$450/ MO ALEXI Apartments 1 lg. BR 1BA. w/ lg living room. Laundry facilities. Picnic tables and grill. block off Milledge w/ bus. 706-207-9902, 706-8358401. 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 5 Bedroom. Awesome Walk and Bike to downtown and campus Houses Pre-leasing for Fall! Many historical houses with old world charm, modern amenities. Porches, yards. Pet friendly. $350-$1800 mo. These go fast! Email for list: luckydawg96@hotmail.com 1BR APTS CLOSE to campus, downtown and shopping. Starting at $380. ONE MONTH FREE ON SELECT UNITS! Pets Welcome! 706-549-2500

out again in Nashville ... we still haven’t been in that fiery pit on the road yet with eight to 10,000 fans breathing down our throat.� One player the Lady Dogs will continue to build confidence in and turn to for solid play is four-time SEC Freshman of the Week Jasmine James, who won the award for the fourth time in just eight weeks on Monday. The Memphis, Tenn., native has made a name for JAMES herself thus far in her blossoming career at Georgia. “It’s a pretty good accomplishment, but like I’ve been saying quite a few times that what really makes me happy about it is that we’re being successful as a team and were 16-0,� James said. “We could be 0-16 and it would mean nothing, but the fact that we’re 16-0 and to get that honor means a lot,� she said. James’ ability to take pressure off senior guard Ashley Houts with her ball handling skills and ability to run

GEORGIA VS. VANDERBILT Tip-off Time: 8 tonight Where: Nashville, Tenn. More Information: Airs on Fox Sports Net the offense has been paramount for the Lady Dogs’ success this season. “It makes my game much easier because it’s hard to really focus and be able to decide what to stop, but it also opens up other things for my teammates because people have to focus more on me and Ashley and the things that we do, which is driving and shooting,� James said. In addition to her offensive explosiveness, James has surprised the coaching staff with her defensive intensity and overall versatility on all 94 square feet of the basketball court. “She’s developed into an extremely effective defensive player. She can put it on the deck and drive it and score but she can also beat you from three [point line]. We haven’t had that in the same player other than [Ashley] Houts,� Landers said.

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Classifieds

2BR 2BA DUPLEX. One month free rent and no security deposit with acceptable credit! 2 miles from the arch, W/D, DW, Microwave, ceiling fans, pest control, and free security system. Large yard, no pet fee. $650/mo. Security deposit of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 2BR APTS STARTING at $550. ONE MONTH FREE! Close to campus, downtown and shopping. W/D included in unit. Pets Welcome! 706-549-2500. 3BR 1BA HOUSE, newly remodeled, all hardwood flrs, ceiling fans, HVAC, W/D. Located along bus line, walking distance to Kroger, movies, library, drugstore, shopping. Approx. 20 minute walk to UGA! $800/mo. Available Jan 1, can move in sooner. 706-248-7100. 3BR 2BA AWESOME Victorian. Price reduced. Close to campus. High ceilings, HWflrs, big yd., DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available 7/27/10. Call 706-3692908. 3BR 2BA DUPLEX One month free rent and no security deposit with acceptable credit. 2 miles from the Arch, W/D, DW, Microwave, ceiling fans, & alarm system. Large yard, no pet fee, $750. S/D $600 fully refundable. Owner/ Agent 706-549-2500 3BR 2BA HOUSE renovated Victorian. 1/2 mi. to UGA. Lg. rms., high ceilings, HWflrs, front porch, back deck, nice yd. lots of parking. W/D, DW, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1250/mo. 706-369-2908. 4BR 2BA VICTORIAN home. 1/2 mi. from campus. New kitchen, W/D, DW, fenced yd., HWflrs, $1600/mo. Huge rooms! Lots of character. Avail. 8/1. Pets OK. 706-3692908. 5BR 3BA, PLUS study downtown All hardwood floors, concrete countertops, full tile baths. Avail Aug 10th. Pets ok. $2000/mo. 706-540-2432 ADORABLE 3BR 2BA House, close to campus. New master BA w/ double sink. HWflrs., fenced backyd, W/D, DW, CHAC. Avail. 8/1. $1250/mo. 706369-2908.

2BR 1BA IN 5Pts. Great for Grad Students. Close to campus. W/D, DW, CHAC, Pets OK. Avail. 8/1 $700/mo. 706-396-2908.

AMAZING RENOVATED 5BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. from campus. 2 LRs, 2 kitchens, big BRs, huge deck, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $2100/mo. 706-369-2908.

2BR 2BA ON College Station. Huge apartment, FP, deck, lots of closets, DW, W/D, CHAC. Avail. now. Pets OK. $575/mo. 706-369-2908.

CONDO OFF MILLEDGE, on UGA busline. Available June 1st. 2BR 2.5BA. Remodeled. Tile Floors. Private Parking. 425 Peabody St. $999/month. Call Billy 770-851-0263.

BEAUTIFUL 2BR 2.5BA, 2 story, hardwood floors, gated community, pool, great area 1 mile from campus. Available Now $900/ mo. + utilities. Call Peter 404-625-8627 or pmicciche@wasteindustryleasing.com EXCELLENT RENOVATED 4BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. to campus. Lots of character! Big rms. New Kitchen, DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1650/mo. Call 706369-2908. FALL PRELEASES. BEST rentals in Athens! 1-5BR houses, apts, condos, In the heart of UGA/Dwntn/5pts. Avail Aug! Call 706-369-2908 for more info. GIGANTIC 5BR 3BA condo. End of Lumpkin St. 2500 sq. ft. 2 LRs, huge laundry rm., DR, FP, big deck. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1500/mo. 706-3692908. GRAD STUDENT/ YOUNG professionals. 3BR 1BA House. Quiet family n’hood. HWflrs. Separate garage/ workshop. Huge fenced dog pen. Avail. 8/1. $750/mo. Call 706-3692908.

S. MILLEDGE, CLOSE to campus Hunter’s Run. 2, 3, & 4BRs. Alarm systems, W/D, no pets 706-552-3500 hancockpropertiesinc.com

STUDENT LIVING BLACKMON Shoals off Milledge Ave. Adorable cottages within 1.5 miles of UGA. Brand new 2, 3 & 4BR homes, ready to move in. Lease options available. Call Greg for more information 770-827-7492.

COED LOOKING TO Sublease, University Apartments. 2BR 1BA, 1st Floor. M/F, $445/mo. includes utilities! Call 912596-7366 or 912-3519166. FREE RENT 1BR in a 2BR 2.5BA Townhouse. Sublease $385 + 1/2 utilities. Female Subleaser needed ASAP. Large bedroom, 2 closets, personal bathroom, furnished large living room, fully equipped kitchen, furnished dining room w/ laundry closet, on UGA bus and Athens transit route. Great roommate! Lease runs through August with the option to renew lease. Call Leah @ 678-787-8290

NEED SUBLEASER FOR 1BR in 3BR apt. 909 BROAD. Downtown. 5 min walk to UGA. Gated/ Parking deck. Available IMMEDIATELY. $480/mo. Jan rent PAID! 404-3722085

RIVERWALK, TOWNHOMES, TIMOTHY Rd, furnished, available now (end of sublease negotiable), $319/mth (reg $359), prvt BR w/ windows on two walls, prvt bath. On bus line. 3 male roommates. 770-310-1121 ROOMMATE NEEDED TO sublease through July! 4BR 2BA house near campus on University Cir. $300/ mo. + 1/4 utilities. Contact Caitlin: cooper13@uga.edu or Niki: 912-293-4874 SUBLEASING APARTMENT, ORIGINAL price is $505, subleasing for $353/mo. 1 great roommate. 2BR 2BA apt, Rivermill, 5 min walk to campus and downtown. 703-3388042 kmac11@uga.edu

2002 RAV-4 Toyota for sale. Excellent condition. Pearl white. $7000. Contact 706-340-9091

THE RED & BLACK NEWSPAPER is looking for a classified representative. Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday 10:00 am - 3:30 pm. Must be a registered UGA student. Please send inquiries to Natalie McClure, Advertising Director: nataliem@randb.com.

ELITE HORSE BOARDING offered at premier facility. Stall and pasture available. Covered dressage arena, sand jumping arena, cross country area, miles of trails. Trainers on site. Call Beth at 706-207-1722 RIDING LESSONS STARTING at only $25! Experienced instructor, great school horses, wonderful facility. Lessons offered in hunter/jumper, dressage, and eventing. Call Beth at 706-207-1722. TEXTBOOK BUYBACK, MULTIPLE online buyers gets you the most cash for your book, even no longer used editions. Buy, Sell, Rent at www.cheapbooks.com 260399-6111, EspaĂąol 212380-1763.

UGA EQUESTRIAN BARN is hiring student workers. Some weekends. Horse Experience Required. rgarrison@sports.uga.edu

BAHAMAS SPRING BREAK $189 for 5 DAYS or $239 for 7 DAYS. All prices include: Roundtrip luxury cruise with food. Accommodations on the island at your choice of thirteen resorts. Appalachia Travel. 800-867-5018 www.BahamaSun.com

! BARTENDERS WANTED! Up to $250/day. No experience necessary. Training provided. 1-800965-6520 ext 106. NEED A SIMPLE web site done for my voiceover business. Interested? Please call Kelley at 706-453-6005.

GREAT 4BR 4BA house. 1/2 mi. from campus. Front porch, back deck, nice yd., DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. Special! $1500/mo. 706-369-2908.

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MOBILE HOME 2BR 2BA located 2.5 miles from UGA campus. $15,000 or best offer call Matt 706-215-1507 or email mpenix@hotmail.com.

Athens’ Original Sushi Bar

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Come celebrate your birthday at Utage and receive a $10 gift certificate w/ ID. (Dinner & Dine in Only.)

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Previous puzzle’s solution 3

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NOW PRE-LEASING for Fall! 1 to 4 bedroom houses. $350-$1,500. Close to downtown and Pet Friendly. These lease up fast! www.deklerealty.com 706-548-0580

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2, 3 & 4 BR, W/D, alarm system, pets welcome. 24 hr. maint. response * SPECIAL $900 4BR/4BA HOUSE * 706-552-3500 hancockpropertiesinc.com

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Who is the Most Interesting Man in Athens? Find out during Mental Health America of Northeast Georgia’s Most Interesting Benefit Week

January 24 - 30, 2010

www.facebook.com/MHANEGA


8 | Thursday, January 14, 2010 | The Red & Black

SPORTS

Close squad ready for season By CHRIS D’ANIELLO and RACHEL G. BOWERS THE RED & BLACK There are six tennis courts to compete on, six spots to fill. That’s the same number on the roster of the Georgia women’s tennis team. There’s no wiggle room, no room for a pull, a tweak or a tear of any kind. But that’s how the Lady Bulldogs like it. “I think it’s going to make us more aggressive, and it’s going to make us more intense because we know that if anything happens, it really doesn’t matter, we’re just all going to have to get through our injuries. We’re going to have to play through the pain. It’s us six girls right now,� said sophomore Chelsey Gullickson, who is ranked No. 14 nationally in singles play. “I don’t think we’re going to hold anything back. We’re just going to play with everything.� Though a less-than-desirable number of athletes makes up the squad, that leaves the Lady Bulldogs with the unique advantage of forming an impenetrable bond that can withstand the strains of grueling competition. That bond acts as a second gas tank when

the first begins to run on pure fumes. “Last year, we had a really small team too. After last season, I feel like we all grew as a team and everything. We all got so much closer not just on the court, but off the court as well,� Gullickson said. After a fall season filled with injuries and sessions with team trainers to rehab a knee, a foot and a shoulder injury suffered by Gullickson, seniors Yvette Hyndman and Naoko Ueshima, respectively, each member of the team has returned to practice and hit the ground running in preparations for start of the dual match season. “I feel like we all feel great physically, shapewise. We’re all hitting great, we just need more match play, and more points ... We’re just trying to play with our [doubles] teams again, just getting used to all the stuff we have to do in doubles,� Gullickson said. “We’re just going to keep playing points to get our match tolerance up.� That “match tolerance� will be key for Georgia as it kicks off the dual match season Friday by hosting the Georgia Invitational, and takes on South Florida at home Jan. 23

VEAZEY: Hunting trip to help ‘boost spirits’ ¢From Page 1 and the generous donations of family, friends and members of the University community, Veazey hopes to embark on his dream adventure: a three-day whitetail deer hunt in South Texas. Klesko’s Blue Ryno Foundation — a nonprofit public benefit corporation devoted to providing support to critically ill children and their families — has donated two three-day Texas Whitetail hunts to Rancho Venado Grande in Freer, Texas, as part of the “Chance to Hunt in Texasâ€? fundraiser. “Because he’s always been so busy with sports and baseball, he’s never been able to have the opportunity or the time to do anything like this, of this magnitude,â€? Carly said. “It gives him a chance to let out some of his competitive genes when he’s hunting outdoors. He’s a very outdoorsy kid anyway, and to have the opportunity to go on such a big, nice hunt, I think it would really boost his spirits.â€?

“[This season] will be tons of fun for our team, for the community, and for the University,� head coach Jeff Wallace said. Despite setbacks that occurred in the fall, the team is pushing forward with an unwavering commitment to win a fourthconsecutive SEC Tournament title, and uphold its No. 4 spot in the rankings. “It’s Georgia women’s tennis,� Wallace said. “There are always going to be expectations. It’s a good thing though, because high expectations mean I’m doing my job and the team is performing.�

KATHERINE POSS | The Red & Black

S Sophomore Chelsey Gullickson will play at the No. 1 singles spot for the Georgia women’s tennis, as the dual match season kicks off Friday.

Courses that fit your schedule!

UGA Online Courses MORE THAN 75 COURSES ONLINE For more information or to register:

www.georgiacenter.uga.edu/randb 706-542-3243 1-800-877-3243 See your academic advisor about applying specific IDL courses to your program of study.

Independent and Distance Learning (IDL) Suite 193 s 1197 South Lumpkin Street s Athens, GA                    


1-14-10 issue