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I N F O R M I N G FA C I L I T I E S M A N A G E M E N T P R O F E S S I O N A L S

fm-world.co.uk / March 2018

TA ST E R E D I T I O N

FINDING THE BALANCE How new business models are changing energy management equations

STRESS TEST Reacting to one of the biggest mental health issues in the workplace

CARILLION LESSONS Firm’s failure keeps service outsourcing in the public spotlight

FUEL FOR THOUGHT The technologies influencing energy procurement choice


F M WO R LD

MARCH 2018

CONTENTS COM M UNI TY

24 PE R SPE C TIV E S The four most interesting and insightful opinions on FM this month

27 A BIT A BOU T YOU Chantilly Cole, recipient of the Pattenmakers Young FM Award for 2018

KNOW LE DGE

37 FLOORED BY BOTS Q-Bot’s cute floor-laying robots speed up the insulating process

28 THINK TA NK The supervisor’s role is changing as people expect more from the FM team

ANA LYS I S

7 TH E F UTURE OF BIFM Members are being asked to vote on changing the name of the institute

36 CAN WE TALK? The warning signs that highly stressed FMs should look out for

3 0 M A RC H @ BIF M The people and projects currently informing BIFM activity

10 CARI LLI O N: THE AFTE RMATH Two months after Carillion’s collapse the government inquiry is under way

3 4 C A LL S TO AC T ION The events, surveys and discussions that deserve your attention

40 THE HE AT IS O N Tips on mobile heating in factories and warehouses during cold snaps

12 OXFORD UN ITE D The University of Oxford took two titles at CIBSE’s Building Performance Awards

41 SE E ING T HE LIGH T Choosing lighting as a service is a cost-saving way to kit out a building

13 NEWS MAK E RS The stories proving most popular with FM World’s online visitors this month

44 STAY COOL Five steps to assuring successful maintenance of cooling systems

18 BY ROYAL APPOIN TME N T Bill Heath of Polyteck says the FM profession should have a Royal Charter

45 M A KING A SPLA S H How to settle on the best shower system for your workplace

FM World’s in-depth analysis section 50 MAKING THE MOST OF MEES As the clock ticks down to the deadline to meet the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards regulations for buildings, we look at its implications for landlords, tenants and facilities managers.

54 FOCUSING ON LENS Tapping into a local energy network is not just about accessing cheaper power. It’s about self-generation, energy efficiency and giving users a new revenue stream. Here’s how it works.

58 BATTERIES POSSIBLY INCLUDED The ability of firms to generate their own power is pushing on-site energy storage further up the business agenda. We look at the battery storage options that firms are already deploying.

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62 DEMANDING ATTENTION Cutting energy bills is an incentive for MA RC H ’ S any business, but TO P I C THE FUTURE OF generating revenue ENERGY – FOUR from surplus power FEATURES ON AN EVOLVING is even better. LANDSCAPE Exploring the intricacies demandWof W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N side response.

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F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

PHOTOGRAPHY: BLOOMBERG/GETTY

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lmost two months after Carillion collapsed, the extent of the fallout is still being felt. During February, larger players came forward to salvage some of the former support services and construction giant’s contracts, and the former Carillion directors were grilled by MPs. As FM World went to press, Engie had reached an agreement to acquire long-term heating and building maintenance contracts with the Northern Ireland Housing Executive that had been previously operated by Carillion Energy Services Ltd. And Mitie Group plc had been awarded the FM services contract at Heathrow Terminal 5 that Carillion had been carrying out. In total, to date 7,610 jobs threatened by the collapse have been saved and 1,141 jobs have been made redundant through the liquidation. Earlier in February, Brookfield Global Integrated Solutions (BGIS), a Canadian global real estate and facilities management services provider, entered into an agreement with the special manager for the official receiver to buy a large portfolio of Carillion FM contracts in the UK. Under the terms of the transaction, BGIS will acquire a portfolio of deals for delivery of services in the hospital, education, justice, transport and emergency services markets. The transaction is subject to closing conditions, and is expected to close in the first quarter of 2018. More than 2,500 Carillion employees will join the BGIS team upon closing, according to Gord Hicks, chief executive officer of BGIS. Hicks said: “This deal provides continuity of services for a large number of customers providing critical infrastructure within the UK market. Our team is looking forward to engaging both customers and employees in the days ahead to effect the transaction and ensure a smooth transition.” Mark Marquis, chief commercial officer at BGIS, added that the

CA RILLION - MON TH 2

CARILLION: THE AFTERMATH WORDS: HERPREE T K AU R G R E WA L

company had “a long-established track record of serving federal and regional government as well as large corporate clients and onboarding complex, multi-site contracts around the world”. He added: “With this transaction, we look forward to building a large presence in the UK facilities management market and providing customers with the same industryleading service and capabilities that we do throughout the globe.” In January 2016, BGIS said it would acquire the remaining 50 per cent of the Canadian and Australian FM businesses from Johnson Controls Inc. Both companies previously held the businesses in a joint venture arrangement. Another Canadian firm, the

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7,610 1,141

insurance company Fairfax Financial Holdings, has agreed to acquire certain assets of Carillion Canada Holdings Incorporated. jobs threatened by Fairfax will also assume some the collapse have been saved liabilities related to Carillion’s Canadian operations. More than 4,500 members of Carillion Canada’s team will be joining Fairfax. Fairfax will acquire the services carried on by Carillion in Canada jobs have been made redundant relating to facilities management through the of airports, commercial and retail liquidation. properties, defence facilities, select healthcare facilities and on behalf of oil, gas and mining clients, including under the Outland brand. The deal is subject to customary closing conditions, including approval by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Carillion Canada’s proceedings under the Companies’ Creditors (Canada), WArrangement W W. B I F M .OAct RG .U K / F M WJ O I N applicable regulatory approvals and due diligence by

March 2018

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S U P P LY S I D E

BUSINESS NEWS

For more FM business news, analysis and contract wins, sign up for the FM World daily newsletter at www.fm-world.co.uk/news/e-zine

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CO M M E NTARY

IS OUTSOURCING PAST ITS SELL-BY DATE? G R A E M E D AV I E S newsdesk@fm-world.co.uk

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he one thing markets and investors hate more than anything else is uncertainty. That is why for years those firms who were involved in the delivery of long-term government contracts were viewed as mainstays of many an investment portfolio. It is also why a significant industry has grown up around infrastructure funds that have bought exposure to long-term solid returns from government contracts on the secondary market, allowing them to offer predictable dividend streams that can form the bedrock of an investment portfolio. But the collapse of Carillion has hit investor sentiment hard. This was exacerbated in January when Capita, seen as a bellwether for the outsourced government services sector, halted dividend payments and indicated that it would need to ask investors to shore up its business amid a strategic restructuring. Capita is the latest UK support services and outsourcing specialist to have fallen foul of overexpanding and hoovering up work on thin margins only to stumble when market conditions change. Many of the infrastructure funds that were set up to buy PFI and PPP assets once they were built and running have seen share prices wobble. Some have had to quantify their exposure. HICL Infrastructure said Carillion was providing FM services to 10 projects it is invested in and was responsible for repairs on another five, equivalent to 14 per cent of its projects by value – so its net asset value would take a £50 million hit. John Laing Infrastructure Fund said it would incur costs of £3m replacing Carillion on nine projects, and International Public Partnerships is looking at up to £1.5m in additional costs. HICL and John Laing scrambled to reassure investors that their dividends are safe. Some commentators have suggested that the hit to share prices at secondary funds has opened up a buying opportunity and that the long-term outlook remains as solid as the bricks and mortar in which they are invested. With share prices currently around 12-month lows and dividend yields looking tempting the secondary infrastructure sector will be of appeal to some investors. But the government is going to struggle to justify continuing to dole out hefty contracts if there are any more corporate collapses.

“SHOCKWAVES HAVE HIT INVESTOR SENTIMENT HARD”

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NHS trust picks Capital City College Training for FM course The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has awarded an apprenticeships contract – involving 36 FM roles – to Capital City College Training, the specialist training arm of the Capital City College Group. Initially scheduled to run for two years, Capital City College Training’s course will recruit and train 191 apprentices for the Royal Marsden across a range of support roles at their sites in Chelsea and Sutton, including catering and hospitality, and facilities management. The FM apprenticeships are Level 2 (five GSCEs equivalent), Level 3 (two or more A Levels equivalent) and Level 4 (HND/ HNC equivalent), and cover junior, supervisory and management positions. Raj Kakaiya, deputy managing director of Capital City College Training, said: “Apprenticeships have moved a long way from the old stereotype of being the sole preserve of young people in manual labour roles. Our range of modern apprenticeships are for anyone of any age in any sector and increasingly are for supervisory and management.” Nina Singh, director of workforce at the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, said the apprenticeships were a chance to “increase opportunities for staff within facilities W W W.the B I Fhospitality M .O RG .U and K/FM WJ O I N management areas”.

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GRAEME DAVIES writes for Investors Chronicle fm-world.co.uk

A PPR E N TI CE S H I PS

March 2018


V I E W P O I NT PERSPECTIVES

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Men, FM now includes Me Too

Voices of change

HERPREET KAUR GREWAL is news editor of FM World

SOPHIA LEE is solution team lead at iSite

here is the queue for the men’s toilets longer than the women’s? A facilities management conference. That’s not a joke. It happened at a recent event. We have strong female voices in FM, but it’s a male culture, as I’ve been reminded more than once. Like the time I was groped while in a throng of FMs on a dance floor at an august event; or when a man at a conference said: “I am surrounded by women. I have two girls at home and the dog’s a bitch too.” Aware suddenly of women around him, he offered: “Whoops, am I being sexist?” Or when a company at an FM exhibition used women dressed as Playboy bunnies to advertise itself. Read about it here: tinyurl.com/fmplayboy. Or how a successful woman working in FM cried in front of me about all of the times she has been patronised and propositioned. I could go on. We are still fighting for pay equality and representation at senior levels of all professions. But the fight is also about challenging microaggressions (intentional and unintentional insults, invalidations and assaults based on gender or any marginalised identity). These are what keep alive a

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at the same rate as careers of some of my male colleagues. What is happening? Where are the other women exemplars at executive leadership level? I am from a traditional Chinese background and struggle to self-promote while respecting the strict boundaries within the levels of hierarchy. So how can organisations ensure that cultural background differences do not influence one’s ability to have a voice that is heard and accepted? Technological advances in communication offering information transparency can help to gauge value in FM through collaboration and raise awareness of well-being, the challenges women face, cultural differences and organisational values. What about using technology to foster a culture of empowerment in a safe working environment in which employees challenge But one of the challenges in others, ask ‘difficult’ my career to date is working questions and seek help? beside men who understand Groups such as Women my abilities, but do not in Facilities Management necessarily provide me with and Business within the the same levels of trust and Community, organisation empowerment as they do campaigns and industry their male colleagues. institutes are working to While my deliverables, raise awareness. I can’t wait pressure and workload have see can all increased exponentially, W W W. B I F Mto.O RGhow .U Kwe /FM WJenable OIN technology to bridge the gaps. my career has not progressed work in two maledominated industries – technology and the built environment. There is an abundance of opportunities for techsavvy people and, as these two environments become more reliant on each other, respect for women involved is growing. For two years I’ve run a big project to develop software to provide state-of-the-art business intelligence and strategic foresight across the entire operational built environment.

culture in which there is a gender pay gap and women are objectified. At the end of the Workplace Futures conference last month, consultant Lucy Jeynes pointed out how pay inequality or the controversy around a recent men-only fundraising dinner – featuring

“AWARE SUDDENLY OF WOMEN AROUND HIM, HE OFFERED: ‘WHOOPS, AM I BEING SEXIST?’”

“WHERE ARE THE OTHER WOMEN EXEMPLARS AT EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP LEVEL?”

scantily clad hostesses and attended by senior figures in business, politics and finance that sit closely with FM – had barely been mentioned. I may have glimpsed the future at the recent BIFM Women in FM conference, where women and men spoke honestly and with mutual respect about mental illness,menopause, cyberbullying, sexual abuse, acid attacks, and the profession. An industry where such conversations can be had alongside those about workplace management is surely a better ideal, but it’s far from the norm.

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V I E W P O I NT

SEEN AND HEARD

“UK Gov steps into #facman contracts. V interesting move although in reality not many other options. The question now is whether this is a short-term contingency plan or are we going to see a longer-term shift in strategy?”

Ideas and comments made around the sector this month

FM@LARGE

“ THE MOST IMPORTANT “AND TTIP! ASK EMPLOYEES TO STAY HHOME! IN THIS AGE WHEN PPEOPLE HAVE THE ABILITY TO WORK REMOTELY WHY SPREAD W YYOUR GERMS TO OTHERS?” D DENISE M TRAYLOR, AREA MANAGER AT REGUS IN THE HE U S US, IN RESPONSE TO A LINKEDIN POST ABOUT FMS D DURING THE FLU SEASON

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF ISS TECH SERVICES KATH FONTANA WEIGHS IN ON THE MINISTRY OF JUSTICE’S NEW FM COMPANY TO MANAGE PRISON SERVICES

“CONTENT AT THE @BIFM_WIFM IS SO GOOD (AND AT TIMES SO HEARTWRENCHING)... I KEEP FORGETTING TO TWEET! WELL DONE TO @FUREYJACKIE AND THE COMMITTEE”

Photo of chris jeffers?

JULIE KORTENS TWEETING FROM THE WIFM 2018 CONFERENCE

“60% EMPLOYEES WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES SAY THE STIGMA SURROUNDING MENTAL HEALTH IS MORE CHALLENGING THAN MENTAL HEALTH ITSELF. IT’S TIME TO CHANGE #WIFM18”

“PROUD AND DELIGHTED TO BE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO BUILD ON THE FANTASTIC WORK OF WENDY SUTHERLAND AND @ BIFMPROCUREMENT COMMITTEE, AND TAKE THE CHAIR FOR 2018. GOING TO BE A GREAT YEAR AHEAD!” CHRIS JEFFERS ON HIS RECENT APPOINTMENT

NOTED&QUOTED

EMMA COUTTS, BID MANAGER AT APLEONA, TWEETING FROM THE WIFM 2018 CONFERENCE

“A HARD-HITTING #WIFM18 CONFERENCE TODAY WITH SPEAKERS – WOMEN AND MEN – SHARING EXPERIENCES LINKED TO SEXUAL ABUSE, ACID ATTACKS, NERVOUS BREAKDOWNS, MENTAL HEALTH, CYBERBULLYING. ALL ALONGSIDE LONGSIDE THE USUAL TOPICS OF WORKPLACE MANAGEMENT ENT STRATEGY, TECHNOLOGY,Y, WELL-BEING... #FACMAN.” N.” FM WORLD NEWS EDITOR HERPREET KAUR GREWAL

“IF FM COMPANIES AS A WHOLE DON’T STOP THE RACE TO BE THE CHEAPEST ON THE BLOCK THEY WILL BE IN THE SAME PLACE AS CARILLION. CUSTOMERS WANT MORE FOR LESS AND IT’S ABOUT TIME COMPANIES CAME CLEAN AND SIMPLY SAID, NO YOU CAN’T DO THAT.”

“It’s scandalous that SENIOR AUTHORISING ENGINEER there’s a funding RICHARD EMERY IN RESPONSE TO A POST FROM BIFM CALLING FOR cap of £18k on FM PARTICIPATION IN ITS FM BUSINESS CONFIDENCE MONITOR degrees, compared to £27k for general degrees. Perhaps d tthe industry should propose they pay p TO ACCESS THE FULL only two-thirds of o VERSION OF FM tthe levy?” WORLD MAGAZINE, MARTIN EDWARDS, MANAGING DIRECTOR AT M JOIN BIFM O OCS GROUP UK, IN RESPONSE TO BIFM’S CALL F FOR THE SECTOR TO LOBBY FOR CHANGES T TO THE APPRENTICESHIP LEVY

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INSIDE

39 40 41 42 44

What can managers do about stress? The heat is on – industrial mobile heaters Illuminating matters – lighting as a service Head start on ESOS compliance Five steps to maintaining cooling systems

KNOW HOW THE L ATE ST L E A RN I N G A N D BE ST P RAC TI CE

ROBOTI CS

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ROBOTIC UNDERLORDS

small robot busily works beneath the flooring, spraying insulation to help make the building more energy efficient. It looks futuristic, and even a bit cute, but it turns out that robotics can considerably speed up the insulating process. Usually when human labourers, often less cute, apply insulation under suspended timber floors they have to clear buildings of furniture, carpets and floorboards. Then they have to cut and fit insulation material between the floor joists by hand before refitting the

floorboards and carpets and replacing the furniture. Using a robot means that all of those tasks are avoided and insulating happens in the space of a day or two, depending on the building’s size. The right kind of insulation can be a cost-effective, energy-saving tactic, improving a floor’s U-value by up to 85 per cent. The building services industry has also given its stamp of approval for this modern means of tackling an old problem. Q-Bot, which develops robots for the construction industry, recently

won a CIBSE Building Performance Award in the Energy Saving Product or Innovation category for its Q-Floor, applied by its robotic workers. The company’s Q-Floor product has been adopted by housing associations and local authorities to help reduce fuel poverty and improve energy efficiency. The CIBSE judges said of the award: “Q-Floor is an innovative product that could really make a difference… This is a great, fun product that makes it much easier to save money on your energy bills.”

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K N OW H OW

MICHAEL DENT is managing director at business energy procurement and energy management consultant Inprova Energy

What is ESOS?

ESOS, the mandatory UK energy assessment scheme, applies to large, mainly private sector organisations with more than 250 employees or a turnover of more than €50 million and a balance sheet in excess of €43 million. ESOS Phase Two covers a four-year period from 6 December 2015 to 5 December 2019. It is likely that any business that participated in

the first phase of ESOS will need to participate again, assuming that they still meet the qualification criteria, however, they cannot use the same data. Eligible organisations must record and collect 100 per cent of their business-wide energy data for a 12-month continuous period, which must be used to identify areas of significant energy use to be assessed for energysaving opportunities.

ENERGY USE

HEAD START ON ESOS COMPLIANCE The responsibility for compliance with the Energy Saving Opportunity Scheme (ESOS) often rests with facilities managers. Michael Dent explains what’s required of them

LEGAL EXPL AINER

How can FMs ensure compliance?

The most popular route to ESOS compliance is implementing surveys across a representative sample of business activities and buildings. But other methods include commissioning Display Energy Certificates (DECs) with accompanying advisory reports for the energy-efficiency assessment of buildings or Green Deal assessments. ESOS lead assessors may also consider qualifying audit work as part of other schemes, such as activity under the Carbon Trust Standard and logistics and green fleet reviews. Organisations can achieve compliance by gaining accreditation under the ISO 50001 Energy Management Standard if it covers an organisation’s entire energy use data, across all activities. In instances where it doesn’t cover 100 per cent of energy use, it can contribute to ESOS compliance.

supplier invoices. By acting promptly, businesses can rectify inevitable data gaps or inaccuracies and verify everything. This will avoid delays in the final ESOS assessment and guarantee timely submission to the regulator. During ESOS Phase One, last-minute bottlenecks were caused by the limited availability of accredited lead assessors, so it is wise to secure expert assistance quickly. For those selecting the ISO 50001 route, timing is critical as it can take 12-18 months to introduce a high-performing, energymanagement system and achieve certification. The sooner businesses complete the process, the sooner they could see their energy bills fall by as much as a fifth.

THE COMPLIANCE PROCESS

1

What are the risks of non-compliance?

Large financial and reputational risks await those who fail to comply with ESOS, which is rigorously enforced. The Environment Agency has investigated 2,400 organisations in England and issued hundreds of enforcement notices.

Why is it vital to start now?

Appoint an accredited ESOS lead assessor, who must be used to verify the overall compliance process.

2

Measure and record total UK energy use. This must include all buildings, industrial processes and transport activities, and cover a continuous 12-month period, including the qualification date of 31 December 2018.

3

Identify areas of significant energy use that account for at least 90 per cent of total energy consumption and carry out assessment activities/audits for the compliance phase of 20152019, identifying cost-effective, energy-saving opportunities.

The final compliance deadline for submission of ESOS assessments is 5 December 2019, but businesses should Collate and review evidence start data collection as soon and complete evidence pack, which must be stored. Submit as possible because it takes ESOS notification of compliance time to collate this complex to the Environment Agency by data from the original sources, 5 December 2019. such as meter readings, W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N tinyurl.com/FMW0318-esos delivery notes, mileage logs or

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ENABLING PRODUC TIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR PEOPLE AND BUSINESS

Battery charge Four features looking at the future of energy management – including on-site battery storage

A PIECE ON MEES What do Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards require?

FOCUSING ON LENS The potential benefits of joining local energy networks

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DEMAND SIDE RESPONSE W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N Cutting costs by controlling consumption in real time


FAC I LITATE

LOC AL ENERGY NET WORKS

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oining a local energy network (LEN) is a bit like being a good dinner guest: you shouldn’t arrive empty-handed and expect to enjoy the party. “If FMs want to access the local network, the first thing is to get some of your own generation where you’re actually contributing to that network,” says Kayla Ente, CEO and founder of Brighton and Hove Energy Services Co-operative (BHESCo), a community energy services cooperative. “If you can generate energy, you can generate another income stream.” There is no specific definition of what a LEN is, but Ofgem calls it “energy arrangements led by (or for the benefit of) a local group and for the benefit of local consumers”. A local group refers to “people and organisations with shared interests in local energy outcomes within a common geographical area”. Essentially, these networks run on a decentralised model in which users can consume, generate and store energy or sell surplus back to the National Grid or other users in a peer-to-peer market. While LENs are relatively new sources of energy, BHESCo, for instance, has completed 27 projects since 2012, and only two of those are residential. There is a push towards LENs from government, says Sunil Shah, chair of BIFM Sustainability SIG and

FOCUSING ON LENs

TO ACCESS THE FULL Tapping into a local energy network is not just about accessing VERSION OF FM cheaper power. It’s about self-generation, energy effi ciency and WORLD MAGAZINE, JOIN BIFM giving users a new revenue stream. Bradford Keen explores what a W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N move towards decentralisation means for energy consumers fm-world.co.uk

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March 2018


FAC I LITATE

DEMAND SIDE PROFIT

DEMANDING ATTENTION

Cutting energy bills is an incentive for any business, butTHE FULL TO ACCESS VERSION OF FM generating revenue from surplus power is even better. Nicholas WORLD MAGAZINE, Newman explores the intricacies of demand-side response JOIN BIFM W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N

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FMWORLD

BAC K PAG E

EPHFMERA

FM World is the publication of the BIFM, the professional body for facilities management. For more information on membership, qualifications and training contact us:

The facilities management stories that just don’t fit anywhere else (Email us: editorial@fm-world.co.uk)

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f FMs put cameras in washrooms they’d probably be arrested – but they’d also gain insight into the hygiene practices of facilities’ users. Failing surveillance, they will have to settle for third-party research. According to the Bradley Corp’s Healthy Hand Washing Survey, 57 per cent of people flush the toilet using their foot, 55 per cent use a paper towel to grip the door handle, 45 per cent close the door with their bottoms and 69 per cent favour using an elbow for as many operational needs as possible. The survey doesn’t discuss hand dryers, but you may have been one of the more than 500,000 people on Facebook who saw Californian nursing student Nichole Ward’s Petri dish populated with matter from a hand dryer in a public toilet. Tasked with an assignment for her microbiology course, Ward placed the Petri dish inside a Dyson Airblade dryer (she posted the name of the brand but soon deleted it) for three minutes and waited to see what grew in two days. What happened next resulted in the predictable: disgust, denials, disclaimers and death threats, Ward told the New York Times. She wrote of “several strains of possible pathogenic fungi and bacteria that you’re swirling around your hands, and you think you’re walking out with clean hands”. han

Dyson spoke of its surprise at the results and queried the methodology. “All Dyson Airblade hand dryers have HEPA filters that capture particles as small as bacteria from the washroom air before it leaves the machine. Dyson Airblade hand dryers are proven hygienic by university research and are trusted by hospitals, food manufacturers and businesses worldwide,” it told news outlets.

Foot handles (footles?)

Of course, toilet-goers could just keep their hands in their pockets and use their feet instead. This is what Canadian company Flow Products is suggesting with its patent-pending DoorWave – a stainless steel door pull that attaches to the bottom of any unlatched door so people can use their foot to exit a washroom. Users needn’t worry about shoe size or type, says the company – it works with open-toed and high-heel shoes has no contact with h skin, and it won’t entangle shoelaces.. Now all someone e has to do is invent a shoe sanitiser and we’ll be completely y germ-free, right? Best foot forward: Flow Products’ DoorWave

British Institute of Facilities Management Charringtons House, 1st Floor South, The Causeway, Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 2ER, UK Tel: +44 (0)1279 712 620 Email: admin@bifm.org.uk Web: www.bifm.org.uk

Redactive Publishing Ltd 78 Chamber Street London E1 8BL www.fm-world.co.uk EDITOR Martin Read 020 7880 7664 martin.read@fm-world.co.uk

DEPUTY EDITOR Bradford Keen 020 7880 7615 bradford.keen@fm-world.co.uk NEWS EDITOR Herpreet Grewal 020 7880 8544 newsdesk@fm-world.co.uk

SUB-EDITOR Deborah Shrewsbury 020 7880 6223 deborah.shrewsbury@fm-world.co.uk SENIOR DESIGNER David Twardawa 020 7324 2704 david.twardawa@redactive.co.uk PICTURE EDITOR Claire Echavarry 020 7324 2701 claire.echavarry@redactive.co.uk CONTENT ASSISTANT Prithvi Pandya 020 7880 6229 prithvi.pandya@redactive.co.uk

SALES MANAGER Daniel Goodwin 020 7880 6206 daniel.goodwin@redactive.co.uk

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT MANAGER Josh Hannagan 020 7880 6220 josh.hannagan@redactive.co.uk SALES EXECUTIVE Gemma Davies 020 7880 7614 gemma.davies@redactive.co.uk

SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVE (RECRUITMENT) Paul Wade 020 7880 6212 paul.wade@redactive.co.uk

SENIOR PRODUCTION EXECUTIVE Aysha Miah-Edwards 020 7880 6241 aysha.miah@redactive.co.uk PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Joanna Marsh 020 7880 8542 joanna.marsh@redactive.co.uk

Subscriptions BIFM members with FM World subscription or delivery queries should call the BIFM’s membership department on +44 (0)1279 712650. FM World is sent to all members of the British Institute of Facilities Management and is available on subscription to non-members. Annual subscription rates are UK £110, Europe £120 and rest of world £130. To subscribe call 020 8950 9117 or email subscriptions@fm-world.co.uk – alternatively, you can subscribe online at www.fm-world.co.uk/about-us/subscribe/ Editorial Advisory Board Simon Ball, business development director, Mitie Peter Brogan, Research & Information Manager, BIFM Georgina Emery, Marketing & Communications Manager, BIFM Lucy Jeynes, Larch Consulting Rob Greenfield, director, Assured Safety & Risk Management Ian Jones, director of facilities, ITV Liz Kentish, managing director, Kentish and Co. Chris Morris, director, Xenon Group Anne Lennox Martin, FM consultant Geoff Prudence, chair, CIBSE FM Group Jeremy Waud, chairman, Incentive FM group Jane Wiggins, FM tutor and author

Towels or dryers? Air we go again

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FM World 05 March 2018  

Taster edition of FM World for March 2018.

FM World 05 March 2018  

Taster edition of FM World for March 2018.