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RecycleMania:
 Reduce,
Reuse,
Recylce
 Today
we
live
in
a
world
filled
with
luxuries
beyond
our
wildest
 imaginations.

We
live
in
the
most
technologically
advanced
nation
in
the
world,
 we
belong
to
a
country
where
we
are
free
to
make
our
own
decisions,
and
every
 time
we
step
outside,
we
are
looking
at
some
of
the
most
beautiful
land
that
 exists.

At
least
that
used
to
be
the
case.

What
was
once
a
stunning
countryside
 of
amber
waves
of
grain
has
rapidly
turned
into
a
polluted,
contaminated,
factory‐ driven
nightmare
that
is
only
getting
worse.

Global
warming
is
becoming
the
kind
 of
problem
that
no
one
can
reasonably
deny
and
it
is
destroying
our
planet.

By
 2050,
35%
of
all
plant
and
animal
species
are
projected
to
be
completely
wiped
 out
as
a
result
of
this
phenomenon.

And
this
is
all
thanks
to
us.

Humans
are
 completely
responsible
for
this
destruction
and
Americans
are
the
ones
leading
 the
way.

The
US
is
ranked
number
one
in
the
world
in
terms
of
global
warming
 pollution
and
despite
it
being
a
catastrophic
problem
that
is
staring
us
right
in
the
 face,
it
seems
like
nobody
is
doing
anything
to
help
the
cause.

In
the
following
 pages,
we
will
hear
about
five
people
who
have
something
to
say
about
that
 assumption.
 
 Dr.
Riese
Narcisse
is
an
environmental
advocate
that
specializes
in
 technology.

He
stresses
the
importance
of
recycling
not
only
paper
and
plastic,
 but
electronic
devices
such
as
cell
phones
and
televisions.

These
are
usually
not
 items
that
people
associate
with
recycling
but
Dr.
Riese
explains
just
how
 significant
these
devices
are
and
how,
when
not
properly
reused,
can
have
a
 devastating
impact
on
our
environment.

 
 Dr.
Jenna
Ambrosi
is
the
Professor
of
Environmental
Studies
at
Harvard
 University.

She
has
traveled
across
the
globe
emphasizing
environmental
safety
 and
in
this
particular
article
she
gives
us
her
opinions
on
how
to
lead
a
no
impact
 life.

No
impact
living
is
the
attempt
of
minimizing
an
individual’s
carbon
footprint
 and
Dr.
Ambrosi
shares
ten
tips
on
how
to
be
a
no
impact
person.


 
 



Dr.
Kacey
Stark
is
another
Environmental
Studies
Professor
that
comes
to
 us
from
Yale
University.

She
has
had
this
position
for
twenty‐five
years
and
by
 now,
she
knows
the
ins
and
outs
of
college
life.

She
has
been
helping
students
to
 become
more
environmentally
conscious
for
years
and
she
says
that
the
biggest
 challenge
that
these
kids
face
comes
from
their
dorm
rooms.

While
trying
to
get
 the
coolest
new
stuff,
they
don’t
even
have
a
second
thought
about
how
much
 money
they
are
spending
for
things
that
hurt
the
environment.

She
shares
some
 insight
that
she
has
acquired
from
teaching
college
students
and
she
gives
us
 more
than
enough
ideas
on
how
to
decorate
your
room
while
saving
money
by
 shopping
green.


 
 Spenser
Sussan,
the
editor
of
Real
Simple
Magazine,
explains
an
idea
that
 most
people
have
probably
never
heard
of
–
upcycling.

This
is
the
process
of
 finding
a
use
for
something
that
most
people
would
deem
useless.

She
explains
 how
it
is
more
efficient
to
upcycle
that
it
is
to
recycle.

In
her
post,
she
gives
 specific
example
of
how
to
do
this
with
everyday
items
that
can
be
found
around
 the
house.

But
these
are
simply
examples
that
she
has
thought
of
herself.

The
 real
idea
of
upcycling
is
to
find
items
that
no
longer
have
a
use
and
to
create
 something
new
with
them.

Susan
gives
a
few
examples
for
inspiration
but
the
 truth
is,
there
are
infinite
ways
to
use
upcyling
to
your
advantage.


 
 Our
last
expert
is
Molly
Curtiss
who
is
the
CEO
of
Global
Enterprises,
INC.

 She
focuses
on
how
big
businesses
have
been
trying
to
make
a
difference
in
their
 green
efforts.

The
corporations
that
are
mentioned
have
some
very
good
ideas
 for
making
their
products
more
environmentally
friendly
including
a
jacket
that
 can
actually
charge
your
phone
and
ipod
using
solar
panels
on
the
sleeves.

Curtiss
 gives
a
few
examples
of
some
green
products
that
are
on
the
market
and
I
can
 assure
you
that
you
definitely
want
to
give
these
a
look.

Not
only
are
they
easy
 on
the
earth,
but
they
also
fit
today’s
fashion‐obsessed
world.


 
 Without
further
ado,
here
are
the
articles
in
their
entirety
and
with
the
help
 of
these
experts,
we
can
learn
to
make
our
earth
a
little
more
sustainable
so
that
 it
won’t
die
with
our
generation.











Electronics Waste By: Dr Riese Narcisse

Technology is very much a part of our lives from day to day, so much that the 
 recycling of such products should be just as common as recycling a plastic bottle or paper. However, much of our old technology ends up getting completely trashed upon the sight of the slightest malfunctions, or because something more advanced was made. The amount of Electronic waste or E-Waste produced by the U.S is very high due to our quick advances in technology. Out of the 205.5 million units of computers trashed in the United States in 2007 alone, only 48.2 million of those units are actually recycled, that is about 18% of our computers being recycled. Televisions get recycled at this Did you know??? same percentage with U.S consumers in 2008 6.3 million units recycled out of the 26.9 million disposed of. Cell phones come in at purchased 172 billion dollars in an even lower rate with 14 million units being recycled out of 140.3 million units consumer electronics. disposed of.

Mercury Poisoning Effects: Damage to kidneys, lungs, and brain. Symptoms: • •

sensory impairment disturbed sensation and lack of coordination

Severity of symptoms depends on the dose, the individual toxin and the method and duration of exposure. It is possible for mercury poisoning to result in several diseases such as acrodynia, Hunter-Russell syndrome, and Minamata disease. 
 
 


The main problem of not recycling electronics is the pollution that comes from them. Electronics are made up of materials that are very hazardous to the environment, such as Lead Poisoning mercury and lead. Since Feb 19, 2009 the Effects: (in adults) FCC requires that all televisions run a digital • increase blood pressure signal, this requires • infertility people who do not • nerve disorders already use LCD • muscle and joint pain (liquid crystal display) televisions to purchase Effects: (in children) new ones. Why does this matter? This now • anemia means a great disposal • severe stomach rate of CRT (cathode • muscle weakness ray tubes) televisions • brain damage which contain high amount of lead. Lead

These effects of lead poisoning can occur in a child when a child swallows large amounts of lead. 
 



is also in CRT computer monitors. Mercury, the other toxic element that I mentioned above, is found in the small fluorescent lamp placed behind most laptop screens. Mercury is also found in computer circuit boards. Small amounts of lead or mercury can be very harmful alone, now imagine a whole landfill filled with it! This can be very detrimental to an area’s soil or water supply. This is a serious problem; however, we can do something about it.

Figure 1: Here is a diagram depicting the process of how water contamination happens.


 Instead of trashing our useless electronics we can recycle them! Below is a

Cool Fact

video showing how to do this effectively.

http://www.howcast.com/videos/120585-How-To-Recycle-Your-OldElectronics


 In 1998, the amount of gold recovered from electronic scrap in the United States was equivalent to the amount recovered from more than 2 million metric tons of gold ore and waste! This is because PCs actually contain gold, in several parts such as the motherboard, transistors, circuits, USB and serial ports.


“No Impact World” Jenna Ambrosi Professor of Environmental Studies, PhD. Harvard University “No Impact Man is a blog by Colin Beavan about what each of us can do to end our environmental crisis, make a better place to live for ourselves and everyone else, and hopefully come up with a happier way of life along the way.” This article discusses what Beaven believes we can do to eliminate all carbon and environmental impacts. He, and everyone else who participates in his “No Impact Week,” are trying to change their lifestyles in order to eliminate them. They want to make the earth safer for themselves and future generations. Beavan believes that the more resources we use, the more harm we are doing to the planet. Erasing your carbon footprint is not something that can be achieved in a single action or in a short time frame. “No Impact Man” describes what can be done in order to begin to erase all environmental impacts on the earth. Beaven’s “top ten eco-lifestyle changes” list what he thinks are the best ways to achieve happier, more eco-friendly lives. At least half of his list is manageable for a college student. With the space, money, and time that a college student possesses, it is impossible to do them all but the ones that really matter, in my opinion, are the easiest to achieve. One: according to Beaven, beef production greatly contributes to climate change and is not the greatest for your body. His first lifestyle change is to eliminate beef from the diet. Because there are so many options to choose from in campus dining, it is not that difficult to cut out beef entirely. Two: give up bottled water. This is one of the easiest and most helpful of his suggestions. Bottled water is more expensive than tap water and the effect of the plastic on the environment is detrimental. According to Earth911.com, Americans buy about 29.8 billion plastic bottles every year and nearly 80 percent of them will end up in a landfill. It takes a long time for these bottles to break down and many of them contain harmful chemicals that can seep into the ground. By eliminating the use of plastic water bottles, we save the plastic and the ground in which it’s buried. If you must use these, then here’s an easier suggestion; recycle them when you are through rather than throwing them away. “give the planet a break.”


Three: for one day, do not use any resources. Do not go shopping and do not use electricity. Take some time for yourself and relax. Beaven calls this an “eco-sabbath.” Taking some time for yourself will leave you rejuvenated and “give the planet a break.” Four: Beaven suggests taking a small portion of your income and giving it to a non-profit organization. While donation is always a good choice, many college students do not work and have very limited spending money, therefore making it difficult to give any money to anyone. The most charitable foundation at the moment is “Feed the Hungry College Student Fund.” However, for a well off, middle-aged person with a house and a car, donating some of his income is not such a bad idea. Giving back is always appreciated and makes you feel good, too. Five: don’t drive. For a certain number of days per month walk or ride a bike to reduce the amount of fossil fuels into the environment. From the experience of living in both a city and suburb, I can attest that air with less fumes in it is much more enjoyable than air with a lot. Transportation is not the only cause of polluted air; it is also due to factories and how they dump their garbage. Many factories do not follow EPA regulations when it comes to their run-off and are letting debris fall into the air and water supply. Since this is also such a large contributor to poor air quality, cutting back on our transportation emissions will be able to reduce at least half the problem. “Wasting resources costs the planet and your wallet.” Six: don’t waste energy. Beaven says, “Wasting resources costs the planet and your wallet.” He means that the more energy you use the more you have to pay. Keeping your house at a constant temperature in the summer and winter will cut back on your heating bill and a few degrees up or down can make a big difference in the price. Also, hanging clothes to dry is more cost and energy efficient than putting them in the dryer. Many dorms on campuses give students the ability to control the thermostat and simply setting it to neutral will save you, and the university, big bucks. The simple act of turning off the lights when you leave the room and not letting the water run as you brush your teeth will save energy and money as well.


“Following the lifestyle changes suggested by Beaven is an ensured way to not only reduce the amount of Earth’s resources we use and waste we create, but also a way to lower your monthly energy bills. And who doesn’t like to save a penny here and there in these economic crisis days?” --Johnson K. Williams, Professor of Economics, Tumbletown University Seven: play with your community. This is perhaps the most relevant to a college student’s life. How often do students drive somewhere to do something? For those without cars, very little. The only other option is to hang out with the people around you. This is how the foundation of friendship is built in college, by associating with the people who live near you. Not only is this great for future friendships and relationships, but it is great for saving the earth’s resources. Eight: Beaven wants people to “take their principles to work.” He dismisses the adage “the cost of doing business,” and believes company CEOs can make a difference through their companies. This tip is the least relevant to the student. While they cannot control what goes on inside a company, they can limit their buying choices to only those companies that make good environmental choices. Nine: volunteer. Donate an hour of your time every week to eco-service. Volunteering is beneficial to the earth because you are not using its resources, but giving them back. Beaven says it is also a great way to find a community you fit in with and to be able to do something to fix the environmental issues. Although the life of a college student is hectic, many should be able to find an hour a week to give their service to something that spends its entire time providing for humans. The Earth. “We are the masters of our destinies,” Ten: Believe that you are making a difference. Everything one person does affects multiple other people. Every time we make an effort to move towards a more sustainable life, it is helping those around us. As does the consequences of our actions. “We are the masters of our destinies,” Beaven says. If we want to make a difference, we will.


All these tips are intended to help people live a more environmentally friendly lifestyle without having to give up too much. A simple change in what we do can lead to a happier, more ecofriendly life. Many people are taking it upon themselves to “go green” and eventually eliminate their carbon and environmental footprint just like Beaven. Students in an Environmental Studies class at Denison University are taking part in the “No Impact Week” and are discussing ways in which they can make no impact. Some of the suggestions students make are to bring cloth napkins in order to eliminate the paper waste, use Tupperware containers in order to eliminate extra food waste, and use the stairs as often as possible in order to eliminate extra use of electricity. By fixing something that is broken instead of buying something new will save your money and resources. Olivia Aguilar, assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at the university, sets the example for “No Impact Week.” She brings to class a “tool kit” of environmentally friendly products such as a reusable mug, plastic containers, reusable water bottle, cloth napkins, and a paper compost bag. Aguilar is leading the way for her and her students to live a more eco friendly life and completely erase their environmental impact. If you would like to see what the students at Denison University, and other people around the globe, are doing to make no impact, visit http://noimpactman.typepad.com/blog/ .


FURNISNED ECO-FRIENDLY By Dr. Kacey Stark, Professor of Environmental Studies at Yale University For college students across the nation, this time of year means exams, graduation, summer internship plans…and new housing. “According to the National Retail Federation, $3.6 billion will be spent this year outfitting dorms”. Many students need to furnish an apartment as they move from a dorm to off-campus housing. There are many choices students can make to have environmentally sustainable housing. One can reduce energy by lessening the demand on factories to produce décor. By purchasing used furniture, the waste produced by those factories is diminished. By reusing existing items that would otherwise be thrown away, you are lessening the amount of waste that would end up in a landfill. Furniture is usable for years after its production. If just one university made stringent efforts to sell furniture among students, there would be significantly less impact on the environment. There are several options for obtaining secondhand furniture. THRIFT STORES First, purchasing items from thrift stores and secondhand furniture shops is a way to recycle décor, as well as support those in need often employed by such institutions. Goodwill and the Salvation Army are great places to start looking. There are many stores that specialize in second-hand furniture, the majority of which is in nearly new condition. For unique pieces with a bit of history that will add character to any room, antique stores offer excellent finds. SHOP LOCALLY A second option is utilizing websites such as Craig’s List and Ebay to find local owners looking to sell their décor. This is a perfect outlet to work with the owner to set a price within your budget. Another useful website is FreeCycle.com, where you can actually find free items. By shopping locally, rather than transporting items across the country, carbon emissions and are reduced and energy is conserved. SENIORITIS Finally, many graduating seniors are eager to sell their furniture. This is convenient since the furniture is already located in such close proximity; transporting furniture within campus utilizes less energy and reduces carbon emissions as well. It is easy to find an affordable price, since students graduating generally hope to transport a minimum of their belongings, thus easing their move. Many Greek organizations and other clubs will send emails to their members with information about furniture they have for sale. One member of TriSigma at Elon University says she receives numerous emails in the spring from seniors seeking to pass along their furniture.


ECO-FRIENDLY COMPANIES If you prefer to purchase new furniture, there are many eco-friendly options as well. Many companies produce items from environmentally friendly material. You can contact your local U.S. Green Building Council for a complete directory of local stores carrying these materials. One popular brand of eco-friendly indoor furniture is EcoSelect Furniture. The companies Gaiam, Reforest Teak, Maku Furnishings, Loll Designs, and Thos. Baker all produce environmentally friendly outdoor furniture.

OTHER WAYS TO KEEP YOUR ROOM GREEN Aside from purchasing used and eco-friendly furniture, there are other ways to make your dorm or apartment green. • • • • • •

To reduce energy, plug your computer, television, printer, and lights into a power strip. With the flip of a switch, you can greatly reduce your energy use. Remembering to use lights and your AC Unit only when you need them. When possible, just use an open window or a fan to keep your room cool. If possible, use compact florescent light bulbs, which are much more environmentally efficient. Share a refrigerator among suitemates if possible. When purchasing a refrigerator, opt for an energy-star or low-energy certified product. Purchase organic cotton sheets. Microwave ovens, rice cookers, crock pots, and toaster ovens are more energy efficient than a conventional ovens and frying pans since the heat is concentrated on the food. Utilizing these options for cooking is much more environmentally friendly. You can purchase cookbooks written specifically for cooking delicious meals with just a microwave oven.

RESOURCES

The website, www.GreenHome.com caters to all the needs of a household providing eco-friendly products. Green products including everything from bedding, to furniture, to lighting, to pest control products can be purchased.


www.TreeHugger.com offers great tips for living an environmentally sustainable lifestyle. Another source is www.GreenYourDecor.com,a blog that provides practical ways to stylishly decorate with environmentally sustainable options. They feature brands of organic fabric, recycled dĂŠcor and home accessories.


Upcycling, The New Recycling  By Spenser Sussan, Chief Editor of Real Simple Magazine  When it comes to eco‐living, creativity is a necessity. Instead of chucking what we  normally would, we should learn to upcycle. While this may be a foreign term to some, it is  the process of taking something that you would most likely throw away and finding a way to  make something else out of it. It is taking something that is waste and making it into  something of equal or greater value and use, instead of recycling which often reduces the  quality of the material or plastic.     Entrepreneurs on the forefront of the green movement have made many successful  businesses based on the idea of upcycling. For example, the company Seabags, based out of  Maine makes adorable bags out of recycled sails. However, Seabags.com does not only just  make totes bags of various sizes, but they also make coasters, placemats, shaving kits, and  wallets. A similar company like Rebagz makes handbags and pencil cases out of nylon grain  and rice sacks along with pieces of old juice boxes. This not only takes materials with a short  lifespan out of landfills but these pieces also had some flair to your ever day style.     Many companies both large and small are taking the initiative to go right in their field  of business. For example, companies like Nike are kicking off recycling programs where Nike  collects, along with old shoes their manufacturing waste, and repurposes them into  different athletic fields, courts, and tracks. Smaller companies like ReSurf.org upcycles  broken surfboards into asphalt filler.  On a smaller scale, Etsy.com is stocked with handmade items, most of which are  made from upcycled material. Coffee sleeves, coin purses, laptop cases made from upcycled  sweaters, clocks made out of old travel cases, jewelry made out of industrial material like  vinyl records, and house ware made from about anything and everything you can imagine.  Upcycling can be done for items used at home or even at your office. Here are some cute  ideas.   ‐With old clothes  ‐Make an apron with the fabric from an old dress  ‐Turn a leaky rubber boot into a cute planter by adding a few extra holes for  drainage  ‐T‐shirts that are not wearable anymore   

‐Rags

‐Quilts


‐Wrapping paper 

‐Transform a broken stapler into a modern paperweight with a little low‐VOC spray  paint   

‐Paper towel rolls or toilet paper rolls  ‐Use them to organize cords and Christmas lights, bundle them together tie  them with string and make your life a little easier.  

There’s nothing more depressing than unpacking acres of plastic from a new  purchase to get to the contents. So why not put all your unwanted newspapers,  magazines and junk mail to good use instead of putting them in a recycling bag?  Scrunched up, they make just as good packing material as those non‐degrading foam  chips or reams of bubble wrap. 

Also use your scrap paper effectively. We all know there is nothing more annoying  than mounds of junk mail, multiple copies of bad department store catalogs, and  excess paper.  o namely envelopes, letters and flyers – are a great source of paper for  telephone notebooks or shopping lists. Chop up (into, say, A5 sized pages)  and bind with a strong needle and some string. Or if you have a fire, a few  pages twisted together make great firelighters. Let your imagination run wild  –like these people.   


Once a toothbrush hits their shelf life there are plenty of ways to resuse them if  recycling isn’t an option.   o Take make‐up brushes – fine and soft enough to dust your camera lens. I also  have a couple of worn toothbrushes I’ve kept to clean the chain of my  mountain‐bike.            

   

If your out door furniture is looking so chipped, scuffed and scratched that even the  best varnish can’t do much for its appearance – why not spray paint it? Another  advantage is that you can hide some pretty major repair work with a clever lick of  paint.   

  •

        Oops – butterfingers. And now there’s the remains of a plate in a sad pile of swept‐ up pot fragments, ready for the trash. But there are ways you can use them  effectively   o are you planning to pot any plants in the near future? Line the base of each  pot with some of these fragments – they let water drain out the hole in the  base without carrying away the soil.  o Or if you’re crafty make a mosaic that would look great in any garden or patio 

o


Used coffee grounds  o in moderation, can do wonders for the garden by adding nitrogen to the soil.   

Wine bottles are destined for the bottle bin…or are they?  Look at what those clever  people at transglass did with theirs. You can do better? That’s the spirit!   

        Whether it’s using a local recycle centre or a council‐provided green bin, it’s never  been easier to get your household waste processed back into useful raw materials. But that  takes energy – and why spend that energy when this “rubbish” can be turned into  something useful in its present form?               


Corporate
Sustainability:

The
Future
of
Industrialization
 



























By
Molly
Curtiss,
CEO
Global
Enterprises,
INC.
 The
corporate
world
is
probably
one
of
the
biggest
institutions
in
society
that
ignores
efforts
for
 environmental
sustainability.

Cheap
labor,
materials,
and
waste
disposal
all
support
mass
 manufacturing
of
products
that
can
be
sold
at
cheap
prices
to
gain
the
greatest
profit.

Although
this
 trend
of
neglecting
safety
and
environmental
regulations
has
been
prevalent
among
the
industrialized
 world
for
almost
two
centuries,
there
have
recently
been
many
companies
emerging
from
under
the
 woodwork
of
corporate
America
to
lead
a
movement
and
demonstrate
that
environmentally
conscious
 and
sustainable
companies
can
also
be
not
only
profitable,
but
competitive
too.
 
Nike,
a
popular
athletic
footwear
company,
has
developed
a
 program
known
as
ReUse
a
Shoe.

This
program
uses
old
 sneakers
and
converts
every
part
of
the
old
shoe
into
athletic
 running
tracks,
top
coverings
for
tennis
courts,
new
soles
for
 new
shoes,
and
even
as
the
zipper
on
a
new
hoodie.

It
begins
 by
someone
dropping
off
their
old
sneakers
at
a
Nike
ReUse
a
 Shoe
recycling
location,
which
can
be
found
all
over
North
 America,
Europe,
and
even
Australia.

Once
a
large
enough
 collection
has
been
made,
the
shoes
are
shipped
to
either
 Memphis,
Tennessee
or
Meerhout,
Belgium.





 
Maximum
capacity
for
 shipments
must
also
be
 met
to
ensure
the
most
 carbon‐efficient
shipping
 methods
possible
are
 used.


Once
the
shoes
 reach
the
processing
 plant,
they
are
stripped
 into
three
categories;
rubber
from
the
outsole,
foam
from
the
 midsole,
and
fabric
fibers
from
the
upper
portion
of
the
shoe
are
 known
as
the
Nike
Grind.

This
rubber
is
used
to
create
new
athletic
 surfaces
while
the
foam
is
used
as
padding
for
basketball
courts.

 Even
new
shoes
and
clothes
can
be
created
from
the
fabric!

Nike
 has
developed
an
innovative
system
to
recycle
their
own
product
 and
reuse
it
for
even
more
profit.
 Another
company
dedicated
to
environmental
sustainability
is
 Preserve,
founded
in
1996.

With
“nothing
wasted,
everything
 gained”
as
their
motto,
this
company
creates
“stylish,
high
performance,
eco‐friendly”
products
for
the
 home
and
uses
only
100%
recycled
plastics
and
100%
post‐consumer
paper.

Every
product
is
created



within
the
United
States
to
reduce
shipping
distances
and
carbon
emissions
and
is
100%
recyclable,
 either
through
postage‐paid
labels
and
mailers
or
through
community
pickups
that
recycle
#5
plastics.

 Almost
100
tons
of
plastic
have
been
recycled
so
far
by
the
Preserve
company
and
further
efforts
to
live
 sustainably
by
this
company
include
having
wind
powered
offices
where
employees
dress
for
the
 weather
outside
to
reduce
dependency
on
heating
and
air‐conditioning.
 Some
impressive
products
they
promote
are
the
toothbrush
made
from
yogurt
cups
and
cutting
boards
 from
takeout
containers.



 Many
people
believe
that
to
be
fashionable,
you
must
wear
the
latest
duds
and
own
to
most
current
 sytle.

This
mentality
isn’t
very
environmentally
friendly,
especially
 when
you
have
people
throwing
away
last
year’s
shoes
because
this
 year
they
apparently
aren’t
the
right
style.

However,
there
are
 some
designers
in
the
fashion
industry
becoming
more
conscious
of
 the
steps
they
can
take
to
produce
eco‐friendly
products
that
will
 still
create
a
product.

Organic
clothing
has
made
huge
headway
in
 the
fashion
industry,
especially
with
companies
like
Levi
Jeans.

 More
innovative
ideas
include
the
Ecotech
solar
jacket,
by
Zegna
 Sport,
where
the
sleeves
conatin
solar
panels
that
convert
the
sun’s
 rays
into
energy
that
can
be
used
to
charge
your
cell
phone
or
ipod,
 or
even
power
a
heating
system
in
the
jacket!
 Timberland
has
also
jumped
on
board
by
manufacturing
 Earthkeepers
boat
shoes
with
soles
made
from
recycled
tires.
 



Finally,
students
are
probably
 the
biggest
culprits
of
 wastefulness,
especially
 when
it
comes
to
school
 supplies.

Notebooks
come
in
 all
different
styles
and
can
be
 made
out
of
either
plastic
or
 cardboard.

Recently
though,
 a
UK
based
company
known
as
Remarkable
has
marketed
many
products
from
recycle
materials.

The
 most
remarkable
of
which
being
the
writing
pen
from
the
Sony
playstation
or
a
notebook
from
car
tires.


 
 In
2000,
their
most
impressive
accomplishment
was
produced
when
they
were
able
to
turn
CD
cases
and
 plastic
cups
into
pencils
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Sustainable
living
is
not
only
possible,
but
it
can
be
more
convenient
and
enjoyable.

 Consumerism
does
not
need
to
be
eliminated
from
our
lives
entirely
for
humanity
to
exist
as
an
 environmentally
friendly
species.

The
companies
that
practice
eco‐friendly
methods
and
that
are
 environmentally
responsible
in
their
businesses
do
exist.

It
is
the
responsibility
of
the
individuals
in
 society
to
shift
our
habits
from
supporting
convenient,
profit‐driven
corporations
to
those
that
have
the
 future
of
our
planet
in
mind
when
they
decide
to
ship
a
product
or
use
a
resource
material.

We
must
 demand
a
mass
shift
in
the
industrialized
world
and
a
revolution
in
the
practices
of
the
majority
of
the
 corporate
community
The
future
of
humanity
is
in
our
hands.

The
future
of
the
planet
is
in
our
hands.

 Let
us
not
drop
the
ball.
 
 



Hearing
these
experts’
take
on
environmental
safety,
we
really
have
no
excuse
not
to
do
our


part.

It
is
just
too
simple
and
the
rewards
are
too
great
not
to
make
an
attempt.

Thanks
to
their
advice
 and
tips,
we
have
somewhere
to
begin.

The
rest
is
up
to
us.

We
need
to
continue
what
they
started
and
 then
expand
it.

People
are
becoming
more
aware
of
this
trend
of
going
green
and
it
is
starting
to
gain
 steam.

If
we
keep
it
going
then
we
might
just
be
able
to
save
what
is
left
of
our
planet.

In
keeping
our
 children’s
best
interest
at
heart,
we
really
have
no
choice.

The
people
in
this
issue
have
opened
the
 door.

Now
it
is
time
for
the
rest
of
us
to
follow
their
lead
and
make
this
movement
stronger.

Not
doing
 so
would
just
be
plain
selfish.

The
earth
is
our
home
and
we
have
been
destroying
it
at
the
expense
of
 future
generations.

It’s
time
we
started
to
give
them
a
little
help.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



RecylceMania  

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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