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FEBRUARY 2013

NEWS SATIRE YOU CAN TRUST

Recoil

FR

EE

Spider launches new web site

Internet privacy concerns rising, finds secret online spyware study Unisom now available in liquid form

Architect’s style largely influenced by Hot Wheels Glass blown

The data, collected from Americans over the age of 26 via cleverly disguised pop-up windows, also suggests that Americans over the age of 50 are more likely to click on these pop-ups.

According to secret data-gathering software, 59 percent of adult Americans are “very or extremely concerned” about the fate of personal information when shopping online, an increase from 43 percent in 2009. The data, collected from Americans over

Above: Internet users unknowingly participate in the online study of privacy concerns.

the age of 26 via cleverly disguised popup windows, also suggests that Americans over the age of 50 are more likely to click on these pop-ups.

Furthermore, the computer-debilitating spyware found that 80 percent of participants had third-party insidious

see PRIVACY page 6

Area man accused of staging own life

quikSTAT How are our wives behaving at restaurants?

• Sending back every meal that isn’t exactly the way she ordered it

New York, N.Y. – As the theft of credit card data and other personal information rose to record levels in 2012, so did privacy concerns over online shopping, a new secret online spyware study has found.

50%

• Sucking it up and simply complaining through every meal that isn’t exactly the way she ordered it 50%

CONTENTS Worldwide Headlines.................................4 Community.............................................5 Editorial...................................................6 Ask A............................................................7 Recoil Handbook........................................8 Eye on Dick..................................................8

Mt. Union, Penn. – According to Huntingdon County, Penn., with 87 counts charges filed Tuesday by friends and of wasting people’s time and more than family members, a 200 counts of falsifying Pennsylvania auto Raffield’s repeated, deliberate ambition by a panel of lies and half-truths were salesman is accused family members and of attempting to fake allegedly designed to convince acquaintances. his own life, spending those around him into believing Local associates believe more than 36 years purposely the depressed and reclusive Raffield pretending to be deceived both close capable of productivity salesman was certifiably alive. family members as and holding social relationships in an well as lifelong friends through repeated, effort to make his existence look genuine. deliberate lies and half-truths designed to Jacob Raffield, 36, was charged in convince those around him into believing Left: Jacob Raffield, 36.

see LIFE page 7


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WORLDWIDE HEADLINES meeting. “About half of the people there Courtesy call anything but Omaha, Neb. – Describing his intrusive dialing as a “courtesy call,” an anonymous bill collector interrupted Emily Taylor during the dinner hour Tuesday night to aggressively alert the 35-year-old homemaker regarding the overdue status of her cell phone bill. “Yes, Misses Taylor, this is a courtesy call from T-Mobile in regards of [sic] your account, showing that you currently have a past due amount of one hundred thirty four dollars and seventy six cents; would you like to arrange to make a payment today?” the voice forcibly trumpeted during the unsolicited call, overpowering Taylor’s timid attempts to postpone the intrusive communication. “If that’s their version of courtesy, I’d really hate to hear what rude and obnoxious sounds like. Maybe it involves gunplay.”

Half of community members at anti-crime meeting look like they belong in jail

Atlanta, Ga. – Roughly half of the concerned community members that gathered at a coffee shop in the alternative district of Little Five Points to discuss a recent upsurge in crime Tuesday night themselves looked like they belonged behind bars, sources said following the meeting. “The folks that make up the community of Little Five Points are, well, let’s just say they’re an eccentric group of people,” said Atlanta’s Chief of Police Neil Gaines, who led the town hall-style

for the anti-crime meeting – many of them residents who are genuinely concerned about the safety of the area – had tattoos, odd piercings, leather jackets, dreadlocks, mohawks, you name it. From the look of them, I’m sure most of them, if they haven’t been there yet, will see the inside of a jail cell before long.” Gaines noted that he had reasonable cause to search each person at the meeting, at least 50 percent of the roughly 200 people in attendance would likely have been immediately arrested on drug possession charges.

Furious meteorologist forecasts major shitstorm

Philadelphia, Penn. – Television news meteorologist Kent Moore, enraged by rumors of his wife Karrie’s infidelity moments before his live broadcast of the 6 p.m. weather report, forecasted that a “major shitstorm of epic proportion” would reign down upon his cheating wife before late evening Friday. “And if you are Karrie, the no good slut of a wife whom I’ve devoted my entire life to and never even once considered screwing around on, well then I’m afraid your part of the state is looking at a one hundred percent chance of there being a major fucking shitstorm the second I get home from work,” Moore reported using his soothing but sassy on-air voice. “So, just to recap, if you exchanged wedding vows with me eighteen years ago, you can expect to see a major storm tonight. You might want to consider moving into a hotel at least until

this storm settles.” Added Moore: “Now here’s Neil Warren with a look at sports.”

Man strains back applying back pain cream

Tempe, Ariz. – Elderly back pain sufferer Walter Matthews strained a muscle in his upper left back Friday when the 64-yearold retired plumber attempted to apply Ben Gay to his lower back, a painful area for which he has sought relief for years. “A friend recommended this cream – [he] said it wouldn’t feel as much pain in my lower back,” explained Matthews. “In a sense he was right, because I pulled a [muscle] in my upper back trying to apply it and now that spot hurts so much that I don’t even really notice the pain in my lower back anymore.” “Let’s hear it for the miracle cure,” Matthews added sardonically. Matthews’ injury comes only weeks after the widowed retiree, stretching awkwardly to apply Ben Gay to a tender calf muscle, incurred a tearinducing Charlie horse in his upper thigh.

Planetary leaders agree global domination what it used to be

Jalagana 5 – Amortis the Hated, feared leader of the planet Jalagana 5, agreed with members of the Interplanetary Leaders Conglomeration Tuesday when he voiced the opinion that being the sole dominating force of a planet’s population is not as personally gratifying as it used

recoilmag.com to be. “Centuries ago, when I would arbitrarily decide to exterminate a section of a planet’s population, an increased sense of power, incomprehensible monetary gain, or at the very least a feeling of great pleasure, would always follow – but anymore it’s like, I don’t know, like it’s almost more of a headache than anything else, what with all of the public outcry and threats of uprising and all,” Amoris stated in loud Jalaganian tongue. Members of the Conglomerate, convening via holographic imaging system, groaned in universal agreement of Amorits’ venting.

Drug-seeking student accidentally sneaks into math lab

Atlanta, Ga. – An area high school student looking to score speed slipped into the Bedford High School math lab by mistake Tuesday. All Todd Hobson wanted was to tiptoe without being noticed into and out of a room which he believed contained a methamptheamine lab. However, upon carefully entering and gently closing the door, 13 Bedford High Mathmateers members greeted him with welcome eyes. Taken completely by surprise, Hobson pretended to harbor an interest in joinging the arithmetic fraternity and stayed for the remainder of the four-hour session. The school’s math lab has caused mix-ups in the past and the common confusion is reportedly responsible for at least 30 percent of the Bedford High Mathmateers membership.


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LITERARY

Novelist incorporates real-life experiences she can’t otherwise get anyone to listen to

Steinberg’s four published novels experience onto paper in the form of incorporate at least a couple of the author’s fiction. unremarkable real-life experiences, “Traditionally, great prose is born of For The Ages, a morose tale of a small- personal experience,” said Sims. “Granted, town girl’s desperate struggle to escape that personal experience is usually some the work-a-day life of her perpetually sort of unimaginable personal tragedy or unhappy middle-class parents, draws an fiery romance, but in the case of authors David Blue (above) was found wed in his suburban home Sunday. unapologetically parallel to the author’s such as Colleen, that experience can be an mind-numbingly dull upbringing. event as commonplace and emotionally “Everything that happens to Daphne lifeless as failing to make the pom-pon in For The Ages is pulled straight from squad three decades ago or running out of Colleen’s life growing up in Tennessee sticky notes on Sweetest Day.” – just as she’ll try to explain to you in Sims agreed that listening to Steinberg great detail if you give her half a chance,” orally chronicle the highpoints of her said Morris. “Don’t get me wrong, I love notably mundane existence is significantly Colleen, but Lord knows why she thinks less appealing than reading versions of anyone would be the least bit interested in similar accounts in her novels. hearing a half-hour story about the time “You know that sense of boredom you the dog she had in high school got sprayed get when someone insists on telling you by a skunk.” all about a dream they had recently? That’s Above: Steinberg weaves her boring experiences into her mediocre-selling mystery novels. “At least with her books there’s usually what it’s like listening to Colleen talk about Seattle, Wash. – Friends and associates like the main character Daphne’s situation enough fiction and exaggeration worked anything that has to do with her life,” said of 39-year-old fiction novelist Colleen in For The Ages,” said longtime friend in to make her real-life stories mildly Sims. “It’s so uninteresting that you’re Steinberg confirmed Wednesday that the Gale Morris, referring to Steinberg’s debut alluring,” Morris added. practically in tears wishing someone moderately successful murder-mystery novel. “A lot of people close to would step in and interrupt you writer consistently weaves into her Colleen don’t usually recognize “People close to Colleen pretty much tune her out with a phone call or something. storylines tales of personal experience these similarities, however, whenever she starts talking at length about one of And the whole time all you can that she is otherwise unable to procure the because they pretty much tune the other half-million painfully boring stories that do is nod sympathetically and slightest bit of interest in during friendly her out whenever she starts she feels obligated to divulge at the drop of a hat.” think about how sad it is that conversations. she doesn’t realize how much talking at length about her “Having known Colleen since family, childhood, recent problems or one Steinberg’s editor, Audrey Sims of Shining nobody cares.“ kindergarten, I often recognize parts of of the other half-million painfully boring Beacon Books, was quick to point out that Sims added: “If Colleen ever does figure her books as being drawn from real-life stories that she feels obligated to divulge at even the most trivial and humdrum of out that she’s boring people to death with events she’s experienced, such as having a the drop of a hat.” life experiences can magically be brought her stories, she’ll probably end up writing borderline alcoholic for a step-father – just Morris said that although each of to life when a talented writer puts the a best-selling book about it.”

HEALTH

Johnson & Johnson test-market new weight-loss patch Side-effects include improved marital relations

“Oh, and diet and exercise,” added David. “I always forget that one.” According to consumer polls, a majority of satisfied GorgeDerm users said that not being able to open their mouths or chew New Brunswick, N.J. – At Johnson and swallow a large variety of foods was & Johnson Corporation’s annual key to successfully dropping the unwanted shareholders meeting Monday night, pounds. A large percentage of patients, company officials expressed excitement however, reported incurring a number regarding its ongoing test-marketing of of side-effects including dry mouth, GorgeDerm, a revolutionary new weight- fatigue, difficulty breathing and, perhaps loss patch which developers claim can help most commonly, vastly improved marital patients lose significant amounts of weight relations. by curbing their ability to eat. “My wife and I have gotten along great “One GorgeDerm patch placed over since she started using the patch,” said Mark the mouth works all day to impede the Droge, whose wife of nine years began patient’s consumption using GorgeDerm “Patients may still experience the in early January. “I of proteins, fats, carbohydrates and psychological compulsion to eat noticed a difference other nutrients that everything that isn’t nailed down, almost immediately. can lead to obesity,” but GorgeDerm ensures that they It’s not just that she’s explained Johnson & will not be able to act on these becoming more and Johnson Research and more attractive to me, impulses,” said David. Development Team but she’s more fun to Leader Jonathon David, who spearheaded be around, too. I’ve even been helping out the product’s development. “The patch by reminding her to put her patch on every adheres itself to the upper and lower lips morning.” using a special bonding agent that lasts up “Mmmmff, mmff eff ummm,” added to sixteen hours, fully restricting use of the Droge’s wife, Kathy. “Umfff efmm mmmff.” mouth and thereby preventing the patient Though marketed primarily toward adult from ‘cheating.’” women – statistically the most at-risk Aesthetically similar to the popular demographic – this breakthrough weapon NicoDerm nicotine patch that has helped in the battle of the bulge is designed to Above: GorgeDerm user Kathy Droge is one of the many weight-conscious consumers who thousands of smokers kick the habit, the treat obese children as well. would sing the product’s praises if she was able.


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recoil Publishers

Cliff & Kimberly Frantz

cliff.frantz@recoilmag.com kim.frantz@recoilmag.com

Entertainment/Music Editor Eric Mitts

eric.mitts@recoilmag.com

Culture Editor & Director of Promotions Benjamin Hunter

benjamin.hunter@recoilmag.com

Writers

Mike Church Sherrie Coke Ryan Cunningham Wes Eaton Naomi Goedert Dr. Steve Mikulak Eric Mitts Mark Ritzema Jeff Smith Sheila Streeter Andrew Watson David Zann

Advertising Cliff Frantz

616.776.0211 cliff.frantz@recoilmag.com

Benjamin Hunter 616.822.7131 benjamin.hunter@recoilmag.com

Ad Design Shi Briggs

Web Design Matt Schilstra

IT Wizard Ira A. Briggs

Safety Officer Dick Bill

Entertainment Calendar Naomi Goedert

Recoil

955 Paw Paw Drive Holland, MI 49423 Ph: 616.776.0211 info@recoilmag.com MISSION STATEMENT Recoil offers a humorous and provocative reflection of the state of modern society through the use of satire, in an effort to maintain awareness of our culture’s imperfections. PUBLICATION INFORMATION Recoil uses invented names in all its stories, except in cases when public figures are being satirized. Any other use of real names is accidental and coincidental. The content of this publication is © Copyright 2013 by Blue V Productions, LLC, and may not be reprinted or retransmitted in whole or in part without the expressed written consent of the publishers and a pretty goddamned good reason. Recoil is free to the West Michigan community, but please, one per person. Anyone removing issues in bulk will be promptly executed. MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions are available for $25 for one year (12 issues). Mail check or money order payable to: Recoil 955 Paw Paw Drive Holland, MI 49423

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EDITORIAL

Damn you, Google! Now my employees want a bunch of crazy shit in the workplace

I consider myself a decent, reasonable profitable business. This is exactly why I’ve of our employee dress code manual sort and generally well-liked boss. Or at least I made the company spring for a hotdog of pales in comparison. When you happy, always have – up until you guys, the made- cookout in my backyard every other shiny management people are encouraging of-money summer, so employees can bond with your employees to think and share ideas i n t e r n e t management and their fellow laborers. freely, without fear of a bureaucratic smack g i a n t That gig costs us upward of $500 bi- down and unpaid time off for coming up G o o g l e , anually. But the stuff you guys do is simply with what eventually may prove to be s t a r t e d unreasonable to try to match: slides in winning strategies, how am I supposed upstaging place of stairs, foosball and ping-pong to hold my head up when I trade my e v e r y tables, five star chefs preparing breakfast, employees’ collective genius for a handful s i n g l e lunch and dinner – for FREE no less – pets of Chuck E. Cheese tokens? o t h e r allowed at work… and I even heard you As long as you do-Googlers keep ramping c o m p a n y considered moving your headquarters to up the employee morale to unmatchable in the a cruise ship off the coast of La Jolla. Did heights, the majority of my employees w o r l d you ever stop to think that perhaps you’re are going to suffer from Google envy. You as far as going too far? I mean, sure, you want your want your employees to get to know each By Dick Klein, Manager offering its employees happy, but never so happy that other, to use each others’ creativity and employees they won’t eventually quit so you can hire positivity as a springboard for their own. just about every goddamned luxury under some fresh college graduates who’ll accept You say a happy employee is a productive the sun. These days, from what I can tell, half the salary of their more-experienced employee, and worker camaraderie results the Google office appears to be more like predecessors. in problem solving strategies. I say that a luxury vacation spa than a place You want your employees happy, but workers putting their heads together of international business. Well, let is more likely to result in a workers me just say to you, Google, from the never so happy that they won’t eventually union, or the staging of a coup d’ etat. bottom of my heart: thanks a billion quit so you can hire some fresh college I’ve had it. I’m ditching the Mr. Nice for setting the employee workplace graduates who’ll accept half the salary of Guy attitude. I just can’t compete. bar so impossibly high that my meager Around here, a happy employee their more-experienced predecessors. may give 100 percent, but a fearful attempts to lighten my own company’s office atmosphere, compared to yours, When my employees drool over your employee will give 110 – if he or she wants makes me look like Liona Helmsley. Jobs At Google page, with its photos of to keep their job, that is. It’s an employer’s I for one know how important keeping employees parking their laptops and market right now; we’ve got them over a employee morale up is to running a keisters in lawn chairs in a sandbox, with barrel and they know it. In fact, I think I’ll their feet soaking in a wading pool while skip this year’s hot dog cookout, and use they work, my lift of the ban on wearing that money to purchase a gross of new colorful socks that is detailed on page 93 pink slips pads.

from PRIVACY page 1 software on their personal computers prior to clicking on the pop-up survey that falsely promised to pay participants $500 for taking part. “Even the twenty percent of participants that did not have any third-party spyware [on their computers] when the study began now have ours,” said Kent Young, code writer for the invasive software that gauges privacy concerns and automatically redirects users to fraudulent e-commerce websites. “It also installs false spyware protection software, so that when a user tries to run it, it only enhances my browser-redirecting program.” The findings also suggest privacy fears are warranted in at least half of studied cases. In fact, a person does not even need to be using a personal computer to have their identity or personal information stolen.

“My friend told me I shouldn’t be an organ donor,” said Molly Collins, a 52-year-old participant in the study. “She said they can pull all your information from the organ donor database or whatever and then they can start to do things like unlock your car and stuff.” Collins, whose Internet Explorer browser is now mostly covered by spywareinstalled toolbars, said she is considering getting rid of her computer because of her privacy worries. The study of 4,452 Americans was conducted in January of 2013, with participants selected randomly and without informed consent. The survey was designed to gauge the level of security Americans feel when providing personal information online and to install vicious computer-attacking software.

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from LIFE page 1

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SELF-HELP

the depressed and reclusive mechanic years of piled-up dirty clothes and more was certifiably alive – which involved than 30 open Cheez Whiz containers in Raffield attending junior college, taking Raffield’s apartment, where he had been civil service tests, performing volunteer assumed to be carrying on a life. work, and coupling with women, so as to In light of the discovery, authorities have externally appear to have simply lived of accused Raffieldof faking his own life for natural causes. more than 30 years, including much of his Family members and friends became time spent in high school, where, it has suspicious of Raffield’s reported life been discovered, he failed to participate almost four years ago, when the then- in any social activities, educational construction worker failed to react functions, or drug abuse. emotionally when “It’s just beyond my Fears were confirmed last month when understanding how his long-time girlfriend moved Raffield’s mother discovered two years someone would out of their shared of piled-up dirty clothes and more think they could get apartment. Since than 30 open Cheez Whiz containers away with anything that time, no clear in Raffield’s apartment, where he had this deceptive,” evidence has been said Raffield’s been assumed to be carrying on a life. friend of 15 years, found to prove Raffield had intentionally staged an Hank Grafton, of the auto mechanic’s illusion of his own life, but suspicions misrepresented vivacity. “I knew he wasn’t remained. the most motivated or outgoing, but all Those fears were confirmed last month this time I guess I held out hope he was when Raffield’s mother discovered two still maintaining some kind of existence.” It is not known what awaits Raffield now that his secret has been uncovered, but friends and family members say they will pursue the greatest possible action to see that justice is served, intending to force Raffield to get dressed on weekends and purchase a mop.

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WORLDWIDE HEADLINES

Sensitivity Meter Are you emotionally equipped to handle human interaction?

Zoological studies have shown that cruelty is a trait universally common to all mammals at every level of maturity. Consequentially, navigating today’s sea of emotional storms demands that one develop a strong mental hull. Find out how thick of a skin you’ve evolved by gauging your reaction to the following scenarios. Assign yourself three points for every answer of A, two points for B, one point for C and zero points for every D. Which of these unexpected events would provoke the most personal grief? A. An immediate family member is killed by a drunk driver. B. A member of your favorite boy band is struck by tragedy. C. Your cellblock starts cracking down on prison rape. D. Your dental hygienist gets breast reduction surgery. Which verbal exchange do you find the most embarrassing? A. Confessing your sins to a priest or lawyer. B. That part of the meeting when you have to introduce yourself as being an alcoholic. C. Admitting to your doctor that you really don’t mind the itching and swelling. D. Explaining to the cop how your pants got up in the tree in the first place. What would you do if a friend mentioned he’s considering suicide? A. Phone police in a panic; refuse to leave his side until he’s counseled. B. Pretend you didn’t hear him and quickly change the subject. C. Delicately explain that killing someone else might make him feel better. D. Understand and support his decision; assist.

Dear bottle return machine, Are people who contribute to the environment by recycling privy to any tax breaks?– Ten Cents At A Time, Janesville, Wis.

Which situation would you find most insulting? A. Having your sexual preference questioned. B. Being asked if you are pregnant because of your obesity. C. Someone questioning your sobriety before you drive home. D. Reading Recoil.

Dear Ten Cents, Please insert bottom of container first. Insert empty can. Push receipt button when finished. **PLEASE WAIT** Can’t read barcode, try bottom first. Remove rejected can. Push receipt button when finished. **PLEASE WAIT** Bin full, can’t accept more containers. Please ask for assistance. Push receipt button when finished. Printing receipt. **PLEASE WAIT OUT OF PAPER**

Which scene’s sheer beauty could bring you to tears? A. Children playing in a field on Sunday morning. B. A refrigerator completely filled with beer on Saturday night. C. A face card after doubling down on eleven. D. Anything (while on mushrooms).

Ask A...

Bottle Return Machine

How do you best express your emotions? A. Writing a daily blog. B. Presenting thoroughly perverted performance art. C. Randomly demeaning or beating your spouse. D. Systematically executing international genocide. If you scored… 18-15: You are a delicate flower struggling to survive in an emotionally barren wasteland. Calm your emotive hyperactivity by gobbling Prozac like it’s popcorn, before you cry yourself into dehydration. 14-10: No, you’re not exactly a geyser of drama drawing from a seemingly endless tear reserve, but consider your lack of party invites a hint that you’re a bit too emotionally unstable to appear in public. 9-5: Good for you you’re rational enough to know that there is a specific time and place for expressing emotion: on bowling night, after your fifth round of Blatz. 4-0: You must be of Vulcan descent. Take pride in your ability to repress public displays of emotion, even if it’s only because years of plastic surgery have soldered your tear ducts shut.


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HOW TO...

AVOID BEING POISONED

Drink

Granted, modern dinner etiquette typically forbids tossing a strip of litmus paper into your White Zinfandel – but hey, would you rather pass out dead during the soup service? If the litmus paper turns blue, your host has probably poisoned your drink (better check your brake line before driving home). Also, observe the liquid’s distribution process; if your portion came from a sealed bottle or others are sampling from the same source, you’re probably safe. Oh yeah, check the bottle you’re drinking from for a gigantic red sticker marked “POISON.”

Food

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EYE ON DICK

DICK’S KITCHEN When he’s not thorax-deep in Lady Godiva’s 4 a.m. breakfast buffet, cultural icon and Extreme Iron Chef producer Dick Bill mostly cooks his own food at home from scratch – a notable achievement considering he doesn’t own any cooking appliances beyond a portable outdoor grill and a MIG welder, and his only refrigerator is indefinitely filled by a half-barrel keg. Using a number of cooking methods invented during his time touring with Great White, Dick creates delicacies so unique that they test even his own pallet – a man who once drank transmission fluid as a chaser. So if you’re ever in the mood for a great home-cooked meal, remember Dick Bill’s slogan: “Go somewhere the fuck else.”

After making sure you’re not in Denny’s take a small amount of the questionable entrée and place it on the lips – a burning or bitter taste is a warning sign. If you suspect a tainted dish, eat only a small quantity (a low quantity of poison may not prove fatal) and wait five hours without eating or drinking anything else. Food immediately not agreeing with your digestive system should be regurgitated; vomiting can be induced by putting your fingers down your throat or by watching Oprah. Long-term poisoning can be more difficult to detect, but if you experience an unexplainable, extended bout of illness while the same person has been preparing your daily food, you might consider starting to dine out.

Ecstasy

If you’re one of the many bent on poisoning your body with drugs (good ones), you’ve got to be careful that an unscrupulous drug dealer doesn’t trick you into poisoning your body with drugs (bad ones). Ecstasy tablets laced with toxins can be discovered using one of the many home test kits available through websites such as DanceSafe.org; these kits verify the presence of MDMA (that’s good) as well as all of the common substitute drugs on the ecstasy market, including DXM (that’s bad).

Mail

Think the boss has it out for you? Make sure his attempts to spike the adhesive strips of your envelopes with cyanide or ricin are in vain by keeping your tongue at home and relying on a bottle moistener. And, of course, if you still insist on purchasing your cocaine through mail order, don’t forget to check for anthrax.

CROSSWORD

A SCURRY OF SQUIRRELS

crossword by kimberly frantz

ACROSS

1. Group of lions 6. Head coverings 10. Of or in the air 12. Graduate (abbrev.) 13. Sun god 14. Mineral rock 15. Nothing more than what is specified 16. Asner, McMahon, Sullivan, Mr. 18. Brief daytime slumbering 20. Necessary item 22. Enemy 23. Mode of transport mama was (almost) thrown from 25. Frees from moisture 29. Point at target 31. Animal droppings 32. Hemmed in, restricted 36. The rate at which red blood cells settle out in a tube of blood under

standardized conditions 37. The Curse of ____ by Hunter S. Thompson 38. A character in the sci-fi animated TV series Futurama 40. “__ da!” (mock exclamation to draw attention) 41. Good ____ 42. “He’s __ ____ book” 44. Columnist Maureen 45. Sentinel

DOWN

1. Mother or father 2. Book consumer 3. Chemical symbol for Iridium 4. Ronnie James ___ 5. To gain for the performance of labor 6. Rock radio icon Aris 7. A Hawaiian garland

8. Rotate 9. Italian appliance manufacturer 11. Nissan’s electric car 17. Moses parted the Red one 19. Pea home 21. Baseball field shape 24. Sharp quick bite 26. Frozen water 27. Spring holiday featuring eggs and bunnies 28. Famous NYC bookstore 30. ____ Boogie – hand built custom guitar and bass amplifiers 32. Lump of earth or clay 33. Dallas quarterback Tony 34. In a new or different form 35. Milder alteration of Damn! 39. Hulk actor Ferrigno 43. Laura Ingall’s dad (what she called him)

THE SOLUTION FOR THIS PUZZLE CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 7


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C O N T E N T S

recoil 2.01-2.28 VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2 FEBRUARY 2013

Columns

Page 24 Page 26 Page 27 Page 27 Page 29

Mike Church – Food Jeff Smith – Media Awareness Wes Eaton – Food & Drink Dr. Steve Mikulak – Health Ryan Cunningham – Recording

Interviews

The Avett Brothers Neon Trees Man Man Foghorn Stringband

Local acts

Page 15 Page 17 Page 18 Page 22

Page 26 Page 29

Ice Cream Gallery Arena District Mardi Gras

Page 24 Page 34

Serita’s Black Rose George Moss

Features Reviews

NEON TREES Their name now up in lights, Neon Trees have grown into their unexpected pop-stardom. Formed in Provo, Utah, in 2005 by vocalist Tyler Glenn and guitarist Chris Allen, the alt-rock band soon solidified their lineup with bassist Branden Campbell and drummer Elaine Bradley. All members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, they swore to stay off drugs and alcohol, and committed themselves to making the best music they could, quickly gaining popularity around Salt Lake City, Las Vegas and Southern California, where some of them spent time growing up. Neon Trees’ first big break came when The Killers’ drummer Ronnie Vannucci Jr. – who had previously played in a ska band with Campbell – caught one of their small club shows and invited them to open for The Killers on their 2008 tour. Not long after they signed with Mercury Records, who released their debut album, Habits, in 2010. That album’s lead single,“Animal,” went wild on radio and online, topping the Alternative Rock charts. Not resting on their success, the band hit the studio in late 2011 to record their follow-up, Picture Show, starting with the single,“Everybody Talks,” which has become an even bigger hit for the band, cracking the Top Ten on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Fresh from ringing in the New Year with a performance in Times Square, Branden Campbell talked with Recoil via phone last month about what it means to be famous, Neon Trees’ opening slot on Maroon 5’s current tour (coming to Van Andel Arena Feb. 25), and how they inadvertently took over a commercial for Buick. Page 17

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Entertainment Guide Venue guide Event guide

Every moment is precious to The Avett Brothers. Pouring their hearts into every word of their songs, while pouring every ounce of their energy into their live shows, they’ve come to cherish every opportunity they’ve gotten, and there have been many now. Since starting out in Charlotte, N.C., in 2001, The Avett Brothers have built themselves up, one town, one track and one fan at a time. So even though their latest album, last year’s The Carpenter had a huge debut, landing at Number Four on the Billboard Albums chart, in conversation Scott Avett still sounds like someone closely connected to his days of driving in a van and sleeping on floors.The follow-up to their major label smash, 2009’s critically-acclaimed I and Love and You, The Carpenter (their seventh studio album overall), found Scott and his brother Seth (as well as longtime bassist Bob Crawford, cellist Joe Kwon, and drummer Jacob Edwards) reteaming with legendary producer Rick Rubin for a varied folk-rock set that embraced everything from their punk/altrock past to their love for acoustic instruments and delicately lush arrangements. Speaking via phone last month, Scott Avett told Recoil more about the making of The Carpenter, his heartfelt connection to Michigan, and why he was born to play the banjo. Page 15

The views and opinions expressed by Recoil columnists do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of this publication.

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THE AVETT BROTHERS

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is now online

ADVERTISING INDEX Arena District...........................................................2 Billy’s Lounge........................................................25 Bobarino’s.............................................................19 Body Armor Tattoos...............................................40 Cooper’s Run........................................................30 Drop 35.................................................................38 Erica’s...................................................................42 Founders...............................................................21 Fratelli’s...................................................................4 Grand Rapids Brewing Company..........................11 Growco..................................................................30 HopCat...................................................................11 Intersection...........................................................23 King Krimson.........................................................12 Lady Godiva’s........................................................42 Lemonjello’s..........................................................26 Hominian...............................................................41

MeanwhileTavern.......................................................28 Monarchs’...................................................................35 Moshpitnation.............................................................18 Mulligans....................................................................31 New Holland Brewing Company.................................30 The Orbit Room.........................................................14 ParkwayTropics..........................................................44 PotatoeBabies..............................................................9 Pyramid Scheme........................................................20 Quaker Steak & Lube.................................................38 Rocky’s Bar & Grill.....................................................16 Sensations.................................................................43 Studs..........................................................................42 Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill..........................................33 Triton............................................................................3 Waveform Audio.........................................................39

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COVER STORY

Every moment is precious to The Avett Brothers. Pouring their hearts into every word of their songs, while pouring every ounce of their energy into their live shows, they’ve come to cherish every opportunity they’ve gotten, and there have been many now. Since starting out in Charlotte, N.C., in 2001,The Avett Brothers have built themselves up, one town, one track and one fan at a time. So even though their latest album, last year’s The Carpenter had a huge debut, landing at Number Four on the Billboard Albums chart, in conversation Scott Avett still sounds like someone closely connected to his days of driving in a van and sleeping on floors. The follow-up to their major label smash, 2009’s critically-acclaimed I and Love and You, The Carpenter (their seventh studio album overall), found Scott and his brother Seth (as well as longtime bassist Bob Crawford, cellist Joe Kwon, and drummer Jacob Edwards) reteaming with legendary producer Rick Rubin for a varied folk-rock set that embraced everything from their punk/alt-rock past to their love for acoustic instruments and delicately lush arrangements. Speaking via phone last month, Scott Avett told Recoil more about the making of The Carpenter, his heartfelt connection to Michigan, and why he was born to play the banjo.

York to go to, of course San Francisco is beautiful and all of these things, but the sleeper, I guess that’s what I always calm them, the sleeper parts of the country are out there and I have very fond memories of them, and I throw a lot of parts of Michigan in that mix, because a place like Pontiac, Michigan, where we just had a very nice little moment that I’ll never forget, not that it was that special more than just a great show, but it was just something I don’t forgot. So those kinds of things are very nice. R: On the other side of things, what does it mean to you to still call North Carolina home and still remain connected with the community there, even though you’ve spent more and more time on the road and experiencing all these other places? SA: I think that seeing more interview by places, I think for me, at times I think to myself, ‘Man, this is so different,’ but I always come back, and I think what’s held me in the same general area of where I grew up, is really the similarities to all the places. So I was gone enough and I started to notice the similarities, and there are many more similarities than there are differences among people, and you start to say to yourself, ‘Wow, I’d love to live here. Or I’d love to live there. Or wow this is great!’ And you’ve got this long list, and you just stop and say, ‘What about where I live? All these places with their rights and wrongs about them, mine has the same.’ [Laughs] And maybe

eric mitts sort of influence? SA: I feel obligated to not let my vulnerabilities and weaknesses just run wild and take hold of me, so I feel obligated to be respectable, because my path to the instrument that I play was very different. The people I was looking up to felt probably very alienated to or by their choice of instrument, particularly the banjo. [It] was a very different relationship [for me] being interested in rock ‘n’ roll and punk and all these other things, and then being affected by the acoustic music that’s out there that wasn’t as central of a figure. I’m told this, and I’ve spoken with the people that build banjos, and fourteen or sixteen year-old kids come to me and tell me – or even fifty-year-olds, come to me and tell they picked up the banjo because of me, and it makes you very proud, and it makes me want to hold that and respect that and cherish it, and help it if I can.

“Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio... The diversity is huge, but the blue-collar nature of it is something I didn’t really Recoil: You guys are getting ready to realize until I started travelling as much head back out on the road again, and we are so excited that you’ll becoming as we did, and it’s something that I up here to Grand Rapids, Michigan [at the Deltaplex on Feb. 10], where we’re R: connected to instantly.” based. What excites you about this upcoming tour? Scott Avett: I’m very excited. All the places [that we’re playing on this tour] and those parts of the country are just so special to us, and they go way back to the early years of touring for us, back in the early 2000s. So it’s terrific, because it is part of the country that it just seems like we combed over with the van. We just drove and drove over every square inch [laughs] of the highways of all the Midwest. From the Northeast to the Midwest, has been very special to us.

R: That is something that I wanted to ask you a little bit about, is how close Michigan is to your heart. Over the years, how much have you connected or identified or drawn inspiration from Michigan? SA: Well, I think right off the bat, places like Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, something automatically that you don’t realize as a kid growing up in the South, is that these states are very rural, as well as having some great cities and great towns, and the people are very bluecollar. The diversity is huge, but the blue-collar nature of it is something I didn’t really realize until I started travelling as much as we did, and it’s something that I connected to instantly. And I think that’s one of the reasons we got on well with people in states like Michigan is because there was a very common dominator, I guess, relation between us, because we grew up with a father that was a welder on lots of farmland, and there’s just something that just felt very warm and homey about it. It’s nice and edgy and raw enough, but also beautiful and colorful and great as well. So I really can’t say enough about it. I’m drawn to those places where… It’s so easy to say, like some of the grander places, like of course Chicago is great to go to, of course New

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it’s a matter of staying so confused that you just stay still, like a deer in the headlights, sort of just stay where you’re at, because you love many places, but you always feel comfortable here, and you always know what to expect. So I think part of it is that. I think North Carolina is very similar to Michigan, and is very similar to Indiana, is very similar to Texas, and I think we’ll find a lot of the same things that we all love in the same places. R: Your new album The Carpenter deals a lot with the subject of life and death, particularly on songs like ‘Through My Prayers’ and ‘A Father’s First Spring.’ How much did that just emerge on its own as sort of the theme for the album? SA: It did, it did. And we were really, after I and Love and You, we were attempting to write, or present an album that [sighs] I guess maybe wasn’t on the lighter side, but we didn’t want it to be a downer again, but all we could do is what we do, and what we were, and represent what we were trying to represent, and it turned out exactly what it was supposed to be. So, I don’t know. We didn’t set out for anything, and if we did set out for something it was different than that [laughs]. But that’s pretty typical and you just have to follow that call and be honest with yourself and stuff.

Looking back on when you first picked up the banjo yourself, what was it about the banjo that drew you to it, or that connected you to it as a songwriter? SA: Yeah, there’s no doubt that I was born to play the banjo. Just like everything else, I was a late bloomer. I didn’t pick it up until I was twenty, I think, and I feel like I was a late bloomer because I think if I would have started even earlier, I would have been even further along with it, but I started when I was twenty, and I think I was born to play it. The reason why I say that is as far as instruments are concerned, I think that its voice, the sound that it projects, is the closest to my actual voice. There’s kind of a longing for melody and for beauty, but there’s this impending abrasiveness – it has the ability to be so annoying if it allows itself to be – and all those aspects are perfect for my expression. They’re part of my expression and how I want the ups and the downs to be delivered. So in that regard, I feel like I was born to play the

“I believe that the banjo should have been a rock ‘n’ roll instrument years ago.”

R: For you, as a banjo player, you’ve been cited more and more frequently as an inspiration or an influence. What does it mean to you to hear that you’re an inspiration or an influence for a lot of younger musicians getting into playing the banjo? How do you approach having that

banjo. I think another instrument like that could be the trumpet. I think the fiddle is similar to that. There’re similar instruments that can be like that. Although the violin can be very beautiful and very sweet, if you dig into the fiddle, it can really tear into some people, and the banjo is very much like that. You know, mainly I believe that the banjo should have been a rock ‘n’ roll instrument years ago. I think we’re realizing it as a mainstream instrument, once again, like

it was maybe in the twenties. And I think that after this sort of awakening to it, I think that it will remain in the mix, much more unobtrusively, and much more naturally. R: One thing I have to ask about is everything that’s going on with bassist Bob [Crawford’s] daughter [Hallie, who had developed a brain tumor last year]. How is everything with her and will Bob be able to

“There are many more similarities than there are differences among people.” join you guys on this upcoming tour? SA: We have all intention to have him at every show possible, and I think he’ll be at many shows this year, because I believe that Hallie will remain healthy. I believe it’s a likelihood that she can hold on. I think a lot of people care about Hallie and they’re doing everything they can to keep her healthy. Right now she���s still heading out to get more scans to see if they’re not detecting any cancer. She’s not receiving chemo anymore. They live at home, and they live a new normal. It’s not a normal for me, and not normal for most people, but it’s a new normal for them, and Bob and his wife Melanie, the responsibility and the duty that has been bestowed upon them is beyond my understanding and my comprehension, but they’re there and they’re present, and Hallie is alive and she’s here, and you just would not believe from the little girl that we saw when we came from Germany a year and a half ago, to now, it’s just miraculous. It’s a beautiful thing. R: So how do you look ahead to the rest of 2013? What are you most looking forward to after this tour or later in the year? SA: I don’t know if I look that far ahead. This tour coming up is just awesome to think about doing, and like I said, when I got off the road last year, I was itching to get back on it. We’ve had some good rest; we’re feeling very strong, so I think I’m very much due to be back onstage. And I have to say, mechanically speaking I guess, I’m very excited about some of the visual opportunities we’ll have this year. I want to take the look of what we do to another level, and I think we’re taking those steps to bring that element of the show up a notch, and have more opportunities to do that. The Avett Brothers will play the Deltaplex Feb. 10. The Carpenter is in stores and online now. To read Recoil’s full interview with Scott Avett, check out recoilmag.com. For more, click over to theavettbrothers.com.


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INTERVIEW

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any intention of, ‘Well if we do this then we’re going to tour and become friends with Maroon 5.’ It was just like, ‘No, they’re a really good band and just really cool people.’ So months later, after all was said and done, they were like, ‘We’re going to do this Maroon 5 thing, why don’t you guys come on out?’ So it’s good to have those relationships and common respect for players.

interview by eric mitts Their name now up in lights, Neon Trees have grown into their unexpected pop-stardom. Formed in Provo, Utah, in 2005 by vocalist Tyler Glenn and guitarist Chris Allen, the alt-rock band soon solidified their lineup with bassist Branden Campbell and drummer Elaine Bradley. All members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, they swore to stay off drugs and alcohol, and committed themselves to making the best music they could, quickly gaining popularity around Salt Lake City, Las Vegas and Southern California, where some of them spent time growing up. Neon Trees’ first big break came when The Killers’ drummer Ronnie Vannucci Jr. – who had previously played in a ska band with Campbell – caught one of their small club shows and invited them to open for The Killers on their 2008 tour. Not long after they signed with Mercury Records, who released their debut album, Habits, in 2010. That album’s lead single, “Animal,” went wild on radio and online, topping the Alternative Rock charts. Not resting on their success, the band hit the studio in late 2011 to record their follow-up, Picture Show, starting with the single, “Everybody Talks,” which has become an even bigger hit for the band, cracking the Top Ten on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Fresh from ringing in the New Year with a performance in Times Square, Branden Campbell talked with Recoil via phone last month about what it means to be famous, Neon Trees’ opening slot on Maroon 5’s current tour (coming to Van Andel Arena Feb. 25), and how they inadvertently took over a commercial for Buick. Recoil: I’ve got to ask about your upcoming tour with Maroon 5, who you will be opening for when you come back here [on Feb. 25]. What excites you the most about being a part of that tour? How do you feel it will be different from a lot of the tours you’ve done before? Branden Campbell: You know, what’s cool is for all of us to see how far Maroon 5 have come. I grew up in Vegas and some of the other guys grew up in Southern California, and we used to see them play at clubs. I remember seeing their old band, Kara’s Flowers, open for Reel Big Fish, and I think Blink 182 as well, that was the tour. But yeah, to see them over the last decade make all that progress is really cool. I think what happens, too, is people forget because they’re such a big pop-rock band that they forget that at their core is a rock band, that started off with jam sessions, and I think our band can relate to that because depending on where people find out about us, like if they find out about us through pop radio, or live on Times Square, and after we play they see Justin Bieber play, they think, ‘Okay, what kind of band is this really?’ And for us, we’re still just a rock band. Point being, it’s cool to see the progress that can be made over the years and we’re stoked that of all the bands out there that they could invite out, they’re going to invite us. I can’t help but think that part of that connection is through their guitar player James [Valentine]. Over the summer when [Maroon 5 frontman] Adam Levine does [NBC’s The Voice], James has another band (JJAMZ) that he started with some friends, and we actually invited them out on tour with Neon Trees, and they came out and opened for us over the summer, not with

R: At this point, as a band, do you all still like the challenge of winning people over as the opening act? BC: Oh yeah, because when you think about, any band that’s out there, that, you know, you think, Neon Trees are at this stage, but then there’s that stage above where The Killers are, and then there’s that stage above that where there’s Coldplay, and above that there’s U2, and above that there’s The [Rolling] Stones. So there’s always someone reaching for that next step on the ladder. And I think part of it too, I like to consider kind of an athletic attitude of reaching for that extra mile and just really challenging yourself. And not in a way where I see some artists try to bring down some of their contemporaries, or they say so-and-so sucks. It’s like, ‘Dude, there’s room for enough bands. There’s room for everybody.’ I always say, don’t get out of the way, just make a little bit of room, ‘cause we’re coming. So just make some room and let’s do it. But there is always that challenge of becoming bigger and better, so we’re just glad to convert some of those Maroon 5 fans. R: On those same sort of lines, you guys have your website as Fameisdead.com [from the lyrics to ‘Teenage Sounds’ off Neon Trees’ newest album Picture Show]. What does that phrase “Fame Is Dead” mean to you personally, and how have you as a band come to terms with your own fame? BC: Yeah, I think sometimes people see that as ironic, because, ‘Oh, you guys are famous, and you guys are always posting pictures of yourselves, and are always in the spotlight.’ But I think, for me, what it comes back to is there are people who are famous, and I respect that they’re famous for doing something great, whether that’s The Beatles or Michael Jordan or Neil Armstrong, or even Lance Armstrong. People that are famous because they did something great. I think what we’re talking about [on the site] especially in this age of reality TV, is where people can be famous just for being these socialites and different things who are not

BC: I thought it was very important. It’s one of those things where you have to be smart about it. You never want to make what Bono has called “the interesting second album,” where you think, ‘Okay, now we’re really going to prove to everyone who we really are,’ because then people go, ‘Wait, aren’t you you? Because we liked that. We liked that first album.’ So yeah, don’t flip the script too much, but a lot of it came naturally because it was still just playing music that we like. I think what our producer Justin [Meldal-Johnsen] helped us with was tapping into sounds that we’d been trying to get for a long time but we just didn’t know how. We always think that Neon Trees is a rock band playing pop music, because we like the pop sensibility, you know, three-minute songs, verse-chorus-bridge, sing-a-longs, all that stuff. And, dude, we would’ve tried to sound like Whitney Houston a long time ago if we knew how. [Laughs] Like what keyboards to use or what drum machines or stuff like that. But at the heart of it, we also love bands like Led Zeppelin and R.E.M. that are just guitars, drums, bass. So I think it ends up being that combination of exploring a little bit, but still keeping it consistent so that it’s familiar.

“There used to be a time where bands couldn’t get away with [being in a Buick commerical] – it was considered selling out. These days all the gloves are off.”

R: I have to ask about your TV commercial for Buick that also took off in 2012. What was it like working on that, and what do you make of the reaction the ad has gotten so far? BC: It’s awesome because there are people that didn’t realize it was a Buick commercial. They thought it was a Pandora commercial, and some people just thought it was a Neon Trees commercial. It launched last March, around March Madness for the NCAA basketball tournament, and you’d see messages on Twitter like, ‘I don’t know who’s playing the game, but I think Neon Trees are winning.’ Those kinds of things. Or the flipside like, ‘If I see that Neon Trees commercial one more time, I’m gonna punch somebody.’ Which, I love, because that tells me, ‘Wow, they’re showing the commercial a lot, you know.’ So we’re cool with that. There used to be a time where bands couldn’t get away with that – it was considered selling out. These days all the gloves are off. The rules have changed, and it’s not like it was in the past, otherwise you’re going to have a short lifespan [as a band] because you’ve got to figure out ways to get the word out there. I don’t mean that you should have to do things you don’t agree with. I have nothing against Buick. I drive cars. I like automobiles, and I actually lived in Detroit and Flint, Michigan, so it all makes sense.

“There’s always someone reaching for that next step on the ladder. And I think part of it too, I like to consider kind of an athletic attitude of reaching for that extra mile and just really challenging yourself.” doing anything and just want to be famous to be famous. And I think kids are catching onto that, and it’s unfortunate. Do something great, and be known for that. And to me, the way I see it, it’s a gauge for if what you’re doing is catching on, whether it’s art or science or sports. So I guess ‘Fame Is Dead’ is just those people just trying to be famous just for the sake of it. R: On [your new album] Picture Show you guys explore a wider range of your sound, particularly working with Kaskade on ‘Lessons In Love (All Day All Night)’ and just exploring more of your other influences. How important was it to you to not deviate too far from what you’re known for, but also explore those new sounds?

your son Connor has autism and that you did a benefit for his school, Giant Steps, back home in Utah. What does it mean to you to be able to have the band help raise both funds and awareness for autism? BC: Oh, it’s great. He’s such a special little guy. It’s interesting how you can have someone like that where you can think, ‘Why me? Why us?’ And then you realize, “Actually, we get that opportunity. We get to have that opportunity to have someone special like that and how it can change our perspective on life, and I think the band sees that opportunity as well, whenever we have the opportunity to provide a service for others.”’ You’ll meet people that’ll listen to the music and they’ll say, ‘You don’t know how much

R: On more of a personal level, I read that

this means’ when they talk about this song or these words or how much this connected with their heart. And it just makes you think, ‘Yeah, we just wrote the song, whatever.’ And I think it’s important to step back and realize that those things are really important to people, and you can take it to the next level and do something like a benefit show, where not only are you touching the heart, but you’re touching the bank account as well where these people need that. That particular school that we were helping out is only partially funded by the state, so they were going to lose a couple of their teachers, and one thing that people should know about autistic kids is that, like kids with ADD, it’s hard for them to pay attention. And so right now, they have basically one teacher per every two kids so they can help them stay focused, so they were going to go down to like four kids per teacher. And my son, he finished the school and he’s in kindergarten now, so we could have just walked away, and gone ‘Oh, we don’t even go to that school anymore,’ that kind of thing. But, you know what, when we were there with our son, people were still there volunteering for activities or different auctions that they do, and their kids went their twenty years ago. So I saw that it’s a lifelong commitment, so we wanted to do what we could do. So through that show the band raised more than they’ve ever been given at one time. Neon Trees will open for Maroon 5 at Van Andel Arena Feb. 25. Picture Show is in stores and online now. To read Recoil’s full interview with Brendan Campbell, check out recoilmag.com. For more, click over to fameisdead.com.


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INTERVIEW There’s no predicting what Man Man will do next. Talking with drummer Christopher Powell (aka Pow Pow) via phone last month, Recoil was surprised to find out that the experimental rock band had just finished recording their fifth album, due out some time later this year. The as-yetuntitled set has entered the mixing stages, and will be the first to feature Man Man’s latest lineup, which includes several new members alongside Powell and vocalist/lyricist/keyboardist Ryan Kattner (aka Honus Honus). The Philadelphiabased band once again worked with producer Mike Mogis (of Bright Eyes), who had previously produced their last set, 2011’s Life Fantastic. Now entering their 10th year, Man Man has earned a reputation for playing wild live shows that can include everything from fireworks to xylophones to pots and pans, all while clad in plain white outfits and decked out with warpaint.Their set at the 2009 Rothbury Festival has become the stuff of bad-trip legend, and their upcoming co-headlining tour with Murder By Death (coming to the Intersection Feb. 20) promises to have its share of tales, as Powell discussed how the band will bring out some of their earliest material for the first time in years, while also debuting some of the brand new songs with their brand new lineup. Recoil: So what do you remember from the last time you were up here in GR [in May 2010]? Christopher Powell: I remember I got a fucking hella fresh jacket. [Laughs] That’s one thing I definitely remember. I remember it being a crazy, crazy fun show. The shows in Michigan are just awesome. R: What excites you about this upcoming tour with Murder By Death? CP: We’re just really excited to try out some of the new stuff. We’ve got some new players in the band, so we’re just excited to get travelling and basically start up the whole year. We’re just wrapping up the new record, so we’re excited to play the new tunes. R: You mentioned having some new players in the band, how long has this group of Man Man been together? CP: Uhh, this week. [Laughs] Yeah, we started rehearsing and we’ve been rehearsing all week this week. There were a few rehearsals previous just to get acclimated to the songs, but we’re just going over the details now. But yeah, we some of the fellas went on to pursue some of the things that they were doing. We’re all just really really busy guys and some of the projects that the other fellas were working were just kind of too good to pass up, just doing residencies and artist residencies and things like that, so everything just peacefully [split, and] we had to get some new players in the mix.

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Honus and myself being the most consistent the whole time, and with these new players it’s great to bring some new life to the band. We’re doing some new versions to some stuff from the first record [2004’s The Man in a Blue Turban with a Face] and just reworking some things. R: Yeah, you mentioned how you and Honus have been kind of the center of the band now with people coming and going, and that’s kind of how it is when you play live, too, with both of you facing each other at the front of the stage while you perform. For you as a drummer, what has it been like having everything going on all around you while you play drums in the middle? CP: It’s just great. It’s funny, I actually did a gig the other night in Philly and it was the first time in I can’t remember how long… It was actually a rotating cast of players, like a little bit more of a variety show sort of evening, and it was the first time that I had been in a drum set that was in the back in I can’t remember how long. And it’s a bummer being back there, man. [Laughs] But, yeah, it’s really fun being up front and I just think the drums being such a huge part… Really any band that has drums, to have the drums and the voice of the band, in Honus, upfront, I think it just works really well to push things, and it just helps with the energy tremendously. R: How did you guys first decide to be facing each other onstage, and how have you come to use that to almost telepathically communicate while performing? CP: Yeah, it really is a communication thing. It was originally mixed with just actual space issues that we have onstage, having as many things as we have in the band, and playing smaller clubs, and just getting as cozy as possible, but then, if we were all facing out forward, the kind of communication that we need to have to play in this band, to kind of have all these really fun things that happen during the set, essentially without being able to see each other during every point of the set, without that it would just be a bummer. So not only is it functional, but it’s also aesthetically interesting.

“We were listening to a lot of Talking Heads, a lot of hip-hop, and a lot of different things, so it just naturally sounds a lot different. There are a lot of electronic compositions, so there are just a ton of new things happening, and R: So for you, from your experiences, a ton of new sounds.” how would you describe the evolution of the Man Man live show then? CP: The thing when you have new players – everything takes on a new life, so it’s totally taking on a new life right now, which is really exciting for us. I would definitely speak for Ryan, sorry, Honus, and myself, I would definitely speak for us and say that we’re not the type that gets bored playing the same tunes on tour. I know with some bands that can get boring, but we make music that isn’t boring, so it just stays fresh and exciting for us. And that’s nice because you end up having a few players come and go over the years, and now with just

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R: Not to ask you to give too much away about the new record, but how would you describe it as being similar or a departure from Life Fantastic? CP: Oh, yeah, it’s a big departure actually. We’re trying not to talk too much about it, but it’s a very exciting new direction for us. Like it still definitely sounds like Man Man, absolutely, but we just tried some different things. One of the things that the band does is we try new instruments, and I guess one of the things, we just have a whole bunch of new sounds in there. It definitely made us write

differently because of it. R: Some critics and a lot of other people thought of Life Fantastic as being a more accessible record than your previous records before it. Is that the reaction you thought that that record would have at that time? CP: We just genuinely wanted to try something different. I guess some bands enjoy writing the same record over and over again, or feel that they have to. We’re definitely not the type to do that. We’re just interested in trying new stuff. We all listen to tons of different music, and genuinely want to try playing lots of different styles and lots of different music, and it’s very far from a shtick or that sort of thing. We just genuinely want to try a lot of different things. It’s just very natural for us to do that. Like on the last record, for example, both myself and Honus are huge fans of doo-wop and a lot of the girl-groups, like a lot of the fifties kinds of stuff, and it’s just something we really wanted to try, and it just ended up influencing the last record, which just means a lot less craziness and a lot less junk, essentially hitting a bunch of random shit. So it’s just aesthetically a whole different thing, but it was music we were excited to make, and this is a very similar thing where we were listening to a lot of Talking Heads, a lot of hip-hop, and a lot of different things, so it just naturally sounds a lot different. There are a lot of electronic compositions, so there are just a ton of new things happening, and a ton of new sounds. R: You mentioned how Man Man doesn’t have

a shtick to what you do, yet you’re a band that obviously has a sense of humor creatively, but who clearly take your work very seriously as well. Why do you think it’s so difficult to have a sense of humor and be taken seriously while playing music? CP: You know, it’s funny; everybody’s just too fucking serious. [Laughs] No, but seriously, we don’t make music that’s funny, because as much as it’s flattering when people will say things like how it reminds them of [Frank] Zappa… I mean people always have to mention something that it reminds them of when they’re describing a band, but it’s funny when people mention Zappa, because it’s very flattering in one way because Zappa is totally the man, but we actually don’t really listen to most of his catalog of music because it’s just a little too jokey. But the thing is, you just can’t take yourself too seriously, because it’s also got to translate into the live show, and watching some serious-ass band is just boring. The thing is, the music is really chaotic, and a lot of times really dark lyrically, and sometimes not at all, but when you mix it with some of the zaniness and some of the sense of humor, it turns into something joyous and fun, so you get a real good contrast there. If you’re just playing serious songs, it’s just too fucking boring, and I’d just rather do a lot of other things than do that. Man Man’s co-headlining tour with Murder By Death will hit The Intersection Feb. 20. To read Recoil’s full interview with Christopher Powell, check out recoilmag.com. For more, click over to manmanbandband.com.


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THE

volume 13 issue 2 february interview by amanda bulthouse

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TOURING ACT

FOGHORN STRINGBAND

the next time around? SL: I don’t know, I can’t really say I’d do anything differently. We did take part in the polar bear swim, the morning after the festival; we all swam in the Bering Sea, with about one hundred other people, so that was pretty cool.

R: Is the band planning on taking any sort of a break anytime soon, or is being on the road pretty much a year-round thing for you? SL: We do take a bit of a break every November and December from Foghorn Stringband, and we go off and do something a bit different. We actually just got back from being in Australia for two months, and we’re planning on going back this coming year, to do a little tour as a band. I feel like I made some really good contacts, to where we could go back and play and have a really good time. It’s not every day a band like Portalnd’s Foghorn Stringband comes to town. It’s almost impossible to listen to any one of their songs and not want to stomp your feet and clap along to the beat of the band’s bluegrass-, honky-tonk- and even Cajun-influenced style of music. During their almost endless touring cycle they have shared stage with the likes of Doc Watson and Dirk Powell, and have played countless festivals with no intention of slowing down anytime soon. Foghorn Stringband will starting its tour in the Midwest and performing at the Great Lakes Acoustic Music Festival in downtown Kalamazoo Feb. 15 and 16. Recoil spoke with fiddler Stephen “Sammy” Lind by phone in January. Recoil: What’s your favorite city to play in the U.S.? Sammy Lind: We love the Midwest for sure. I’m originally from Minnesota, so it’s a real treat to come back and play.

days it’s easy to not have to be tied to one genre or another. I know Caleb was in a rock band as well for a long period of time. He also has a honky-tonk band right now called the Caleb Klauder Country Band. Caleb, Nadin, and myself along with two other guys we know from Louisiana also play in a band called the Cajun Country Revival. The guys from Louisiana bring out a whole bunch of Cajun music, and then we mix it up with a bit of honky-tonk. R: In your experience with touring, have you found it to be difficult to break in to the music scene, being a bluegrass band, as opposed to say, more mainstream genres, such as rock or pop? SL: The one thing about the style we play is that we have to travel with a lot of equipment, so when we go to a place we’ve never been, we’re not just another random tourist, so people tend to treat us a bit better. That’s one thing I’ve always felt really lucky, being able to do. Also, there’s usually a little bit of a community in every city, of musicians and fans, who are interested in our style of music.

“Our music is just all about bringing people together. It’s music that R: Where do you you’d hear and think, think you get the biggest response in ‘Oh, I could do that.’” America? SL: That’s hard to say; everywhere we go there are really good communities. One place we always have a blast though is Louisiana. R: What about favorite place out of the country? SL: We always do well in Ireland. We’ve been touring there for the past few years, and every time we go there, it’s just fantastic. R: What are some of your biggest influences, musically? SL: I’d say Dirk Powell is very important for us, influentially. In a couple of weeks we’ll be doing a collaboration with him. In the summertime we go up to his place with him and his grandfather and play old-time traditional music. It’s really just all about bringing people together through music. R: What, if any, were some of your earlier bands like, before Foghorn Stringband came to be? SL: I think we all kind of came to this style of music a little bit later in life. I started playing as a teenager, but back then I was playing a lot of electric guitar and more of your rock ‘n’ roll kind of style of music, which I still like today. These

R: So you’ve been pretty accepted most places you’ve played? SL: Yeah, I’d say so. Our music is just all about bringing people together. It’s music that you’d hear and think, ‘Oh, I could do that.’ R: You played the Midnight Sun Folk Festival last summer in Alaska. Tell us a bit about that; will you be attending it again next summer? SL: We’ll be back there this year, for sure. Alaska in general, is another place that’s really close to our hearts; we have a lot of friends up there. That particular fest was not Foghorn Stringband, just some of us were in it. That was the Klauder Country Band, but we have gone there several times as a band, as well. That was another place, that when you go, the state is so different, the wildlife and the scenery makes you feel like you’re an inch tall. It’s so grandiose and incredible, but then all the people there are just ready to dance and stay up all night, and it makes you feel right at home. R: What would you change about the trip,

R: The band just released your latest album, Outside the Sun, just last year. Any plans in the works for another album in the near future? SL: Nothing really in the works right now. I think it will be at least another year before we start talking about making a new album. We did just record for this really neat documentary called The Winding Stream, which is a documentary about the Carter family. For that we played two

half-hour sets – all of old Carter family songs.

R: So you guys aren’t necessarily making albums but you’re still doing work, per say. SL: Yeah, we’re part of this big show sort of celebrating this new movie that’s coming out, and it was just a really cool project to be a part of. We’re also really excited about this tour we have coming up in the next few weeks. We’ll be in the Midwest for two weeks then on the east coast for a few weeks in the last half of March. R: If you could bring one person back to life for a day, who would you choose? SL: There was this guy named Tommy Jarrell, who we’d all love to be able to play with again. He was a real typical story; he learned to play early on in life and spent most of his years doing so but then kind of put the music aside to raise a family, and worked his whole life for the North Carolina Highway Department. Shortly after he retired his wife passed, and after that happened he pretty much spent the last twenty years of his life playing music for people all over the world. He had just the most amazing personality; he was super funny, and he loved his moonshine. His music was amazing, but it was so much more than that when it came to Tommy. He was just one of those people that were able to bring everyone together just by playing.


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FOOD

On a roll: butter vs. margarine

his is a hot topic – always has been. This war brings speculation, rumors, mysterious ad campaigns and know-it-alls. Butter is known as king and the Devil. Margarine has had the same bum rap since it was created. Was margarine created to fatten turkeys? Is it one molecule away from being plastic? Does butter make you as fat as Paula Deen? Can you make butter out of breast milk? In this article I will address all of these important concerns so we can all sleep peacefully and awake to a couple slices of by Mike Church warm toast with (blank) spread medium-thin to accompany your morning coffee.

pervert. She was churning milk into an emulsion called “butter.” Like Michael Jackson and Lisa Marie Presley, an emulsion is a marriage of two things that aren’t really supposed to marry. You agitate two opposing things long enough and eventually they will cave in and mesh together, which is exactly what we’re talking about here. Milk is a fat in water emulsion and we need to make it a fat in water emulsion to make butter. Milk is agitated long enough to make the fat molecules pop their membranes and start to clump together. After the fat clumps together it separates from the water and you have butter. It’s that simple. The leftover liquid is called buttermilk. Butter has been made from the milk of yak, goat, cow and buffalo, and yes – no matter how gross to some or beautiful to others it may seem – humans make butter out of breast milk. Sometimes during research I accidentally go too far down the rabbit hole. I should have taken the blue pill on that one. Margarine by my understanding and research was not created to make turkeys fat. It was actually created by a French guy to fulfill a challenge by an emperor to make a substitute for butter for soldiers and the common-folk “Eat butter first, and eat it last, and live till a (a.k.a. poor people). This guy named Hippolyte hundred years be past.”–old Dutch proverb created the first faux-butter in 1869 using beef tallow (rendered fat) and milk. Eventually To understand butter we must talk milk. Let’s production started using the much cheaper and make this easy; milk is composed of water, more available vegetable fats instead of animal proteins and fat. Sounds good, huh? Well we fats, and combining it with skim milk to make don’t just stick it Just Like Michael Jackson and Lisa Marie margarine. in an oven and like butter, it is 45 minutes later Presley, an emulsion is a marriage of two a fat in liquid we get butter. The things that aren’t really supposed to marry. emulsion. Close your eyes vegetable oil and picture an old-school prairie farm girl in is hydrogenated; hydrogen is added through a long blue and white dress, a bonnet and a a catalyst to harden the fat. If it’s only partially big stick in her hand pounding it into a bucket hydrogenated you get the dreaded transover and over and over… Okay – snap out of it, fat – linked to all sorts of health problems. So

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nowadays the object is to stay away from partially hydrogenated, trans-fat-filled margarines. There are better alternatives now that use emulsifiers instead of hydrogen to thicken the product.

Was margarine created to fatten turkeys? Is it one molecule away from being plastic? Does butter make you as fat as Paula Deen? Can you make butter out of breast milk? Let’s talk nutrition. Butter and margarine have right around the same amount of calories. Butter is higher in saturated fats, which is linked to health problems. Margarines that use partially-hydrogenated oils (trans-fats) are linked to all sorts of health problems. Note: The harder the margarine, the more transfat. Margarine is not one molecule away from being plastic any more than butter would be. I guess it all comes down to a matter of preference. Both of these products are going to clog up your body if you eat too much of it. My choice is butter. Butter has been found in Egyptian tombs.

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Remember, folks, they used to stuff things in there for the afterlife and butter just wasn’t a thing they could live without; that tells me something. And it’s true that bugs won’t eat margarine, and that scares me more than the first Alien. Fresh butter on warm bread is pure magic and I can’t imagine living without it. I’m leaving you with an Indian hymn I thought was very fitting for my outro. “Tongue of the gods,” “navel of immortality.” We will proclaim the name of Butter; We will sustain it in this sacrifice by bowing low. These waves of Butter flow like gazelles before the hunter... Streams of Butter caress the burning wood. Agni, the fire, loves them and is satisfied.

Lowbrow Art is hanging high at Ice Cream Gallery

I scream, you scream, we all scream for Ice Cream Gallery! And here’s the scoop: fierce and flavorful treats of art, cool toys and clothing which gallery owner Ronnie Mack Edison describes as “lowbrow art” are waiting to whet your palette in Grand Rapids. So what is lowbrow art, you ask? Lowbrow art is a new breed of modern art. Lowbrow artists tend to make fun of convention, adding humor on all different levels. The by Sherrie Coke artists know the “rules” of art and deliberately disobey them. They are driven to do something different. Lowbrow draws heavily on icons of the popular baby-boomer culture, and in Grand Rapids Ronnie Mack Edison is the force behind it. As Edison puts it, “Lowbrow is the stuff your mom warned you about: sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll.

Ice Cream Gallery opened its doors last autumn with the perfect location and energy. “The flooring, the walls, the neighborhood… couldn’t be any better,” states Edison. Edison’s goal is to bring the talented works of local street artists and designers into the spotlight and give them exposure by bringing art in for the collector as well as the novice who is looking for that special something for their pad. Situated on Division Avenue, amongst the backdrop of the colorful Heartside District, lowbrow artists have found their haven in Grand Rapids. Pieces range in price from $20 to $2,500, with originals, limited editions, prints and silk-screens. “I hope to open up a world of art and artists which are not seen enough around here,” states Edison. He also is considering adding an ice cream stand in the gallery in the near future, complete with original flavors of ice cream in containers designed by the featured artists in his gallery. A collection of works by artists both new and established has drawn out the city’s creative types. Recoil Safety Officer and cultural icon Dick Bill has some of his work hanging at the Ice Cream Gallery, among many other local artists. As Edison states: “We feature the art of Dick Bill, whose abstracts are complex and as hard to read as he is! Amazing work. We also the cyber-punk style “Art can be whatever you want it to be. What have of Myke Amend, whose some may find offensive, I find pure beauty. art places you in another I want to push some boundaries and open world at another time. Then there are the bright some eyes to explore subjects and styles from cartoon styles of Joe all walks of life in art and music…and maybe Parsaca, the dark moody water colors of Cameron cause a little controversy along the way.” Tyme, the unique spumco Born from the custom car culture of the latestyles of Steven ‘Frogger’ Stroghbrige with his fifties and early-sixties by Big Daddy Roth and stable of behorned beauties. Also featured are Rat Fink, underground comics, outlaw art, pinthe twisted, dark and detailed works of Mark striping, concert posters, graffiti and tattoos Fettig, our master monster man Roger Scholz – all gave birth to a mix of wired, high-octane, who is an epic illustrator and the candy colors of sexually-charged, left-field outsider art, which Glucose girl.” Edison goes on to add: “We have is considered by the mainstream art world as newcomer Logan Firer with his Andy Warhol lowbrow/low class.” POP styles and another fav is local art genius

Ronnie Mack Edison inside the Ice Cream Gallery. Anthony Carpenter with his loony tunes pop culture meets Playboy illustrations and a touch of that one thing you can’t seem to name!” Edison is passionate in his quest to pave the way for the lowbrow movement in Grand Rapids. He states: “Art can be whatever you want it to be. What some may find offensive, I find pure beauty. I want to push some boundaries and open some eyes to explore subjects and styles from all walks of life in art and music…and maybe cause a little controversy along the way.” Ice Cream Gallery’s open house this month will be a celebration of the Tiki. The Freaky Tiki Lowbrow Luau, with live surf music, Tahitian

treats, grass skirts and Polynesian play things will take place on Feb. 15 from 6 p.m. to midnight. The event will showcase local and international talented artists’ Tiki-inspired works. Ice Cream Gallery is located at 117 S. Division, between Cherry and Oakes Streets. Ice Cream is open on Tuesday and Wednesday from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursday, Friday and Saturday from noon to 9 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 6 p.m. The gallery will feature live music every second Saturday night of the month and Sunday matinee shows here and there. Find out more on facebook.


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The money connection between ArtPrize and the Right to Work law in Michigan For months I have been attempting to get the 990 financial reports from ArtPrize for 2011, but every time I would send a request I was ignored. Fortunately, this is public information which the online nonprofit resource GuideStar recently posted. We have written in previous years about the political economy of ArtPrize and who were the main funders of ArtPrize – both primary sources and by Jeff Smith sponsors. The 990 for ArtPrize in 2011 is consistent with

the first few years, in that the primary funding source is the Dick & Betsy DeVos Foundation.

SERITA’S BLACK ROSE

For over a decade, in some form or fashion, instrumentation to produce a more organic Serita’s Black Rose has been delivering their sound. It will be a collaboration of many own blend of funk and soul to the eager fans of musicians from different backgrounds.” West Michigan. With the new year brings new The passion and love translates, and this year opportunities. Recoil sat down and enjoyed a Serita’s Black Rose is a WYCE Jammie Award beer over some delicious crack fries and get nominee. It’s a validation of their hard work and some insight into what drives this duo to create. proof that the community is taking notice. “The Lyrics such as “Living off my paycheck from Jammie nominations mean a lot to us, more week to week/Rolling up my pennies so I can than what people realize because WYCE has eat,” from the song “Something Somebody contributed to our community tremendously. It Said” come from a place of truth, a theme that gives people the opportunity to gain exposure seems to run throughout while bringing the the band’s work. Serita “Regardless of the struggles community together,” Crowley explains: “[My we all face, many people have gushes Crowley. “I music] does have a lot have talked to previous to do with struggles the choice to maintain integrity Jammie winners and I and hardships that I as a human being, without feel that some may not have been through with realize how significant people and relationships taking advantage of those less this honor is to them. that we can all relate to. We feel very blessed fortunate than they are.” Another line says, ‘Stole to be able to contribute my words, made them absurd/It’s all good our talents to the community. We have because I knew that you would/Now it’s time worked with so many musicians throughout for me to say/What’s been up in my mind all of West Michigan over the years and it is nice the time.’ It explains how people try to run their to get recognized for all of our hard work.” game on other people and take advantage of Serita’s voice may be intimidating but her spirit those that are just trying to eat like they are. is not. Although she may have heard the term Regardless of the struggles we all face, many diva thrown around a couple times, Crowley people have the choice to maintain integrity has perspective. “I have a strong personality as a human being, without taking advantage and enormous stage presence,” said Crowley. of those less fortunate than they are.” “Some musicians that I know personally may As with all artists, inspiration also comes from perceive me as being a diva because they relationships. Serita’s thoughts are clear: “It have told me that they are intimidated by me. is not easy to be in a long-lasting relationship I am not the legendary Chaka khan, Diana with someone... But deep down I believe Ross, Gladys Knight or Aretha Franklin, who that everyone wants someone to share the have paid their dues and have earned their rest of their lives with. Someone who can suggested titles as divas.  I am a down-to-earth be their best friend more than anything else.” person with a love for music, a big heart and Coincidentally, the pair that make up Serita’s I’m very good at what I do. I’m not a diva. I have Black Rose, Serita Crowley and Jon Hayes, not paid enough dues to earn that title yet. I’m have been just that as they’ve written music. It’s simply Serita L. Crowley, AKA Black Rose.” clear from the way that they bounce ideas and Serita’s Black Rose will be play at The Taste sentences back and forth from one another that Of Soul Event at Grand Rapids Public Library’s there is a deep and strong connection, made Main Branch Feb. 17 at 1:30 p.m. with Karisa even more powerful by being able to create and Wilson. Admission is free and so is the soul perform beautiful music together. food. The WYCE Jammies Award Ceremony “We are working on a full record for 2013,” is Feb. 22 at the Intersection at 7 p.m.–Naomi Crowley offers. “We are using more acoustic Goedert

MEDIA AWARENESS

Right to Work a law in Michigan. This should Additional financial information worth noting is that there were three “independent contractors” raise lots of questions for all of us, whether you used by ArtPrize in 2011: On Stage are a supporter of ArtPrize or not. What is the Services ($192.852), Square One significance of the relationship between people Design ($152,617) and Pomegranate who funded a 19-day art event in downtown Grand Rapids and the same people who attack Studios ($559, 327). Independent is a loose term to use considering that workers and unions in Michigan? Another way to frame this is by asking what Square One Designs does lots of other DeVos family business work (Amway, is the significance of those who engage in Windquest and Reserve Bar) and cultural management who also engage in the Pomegranate Studios is run by the management of public policy? The DeVos DeVos family. family understands the importance of public One last aspect of the financials of relations and ArtPrize is in many ways a PR ArtPrize is based on a question that is asked coup for the family. How could anyone be critical of non-profit entities in the 990 form, section IV, of people who put on such a large cultural event which asks: “Did the organization What is the significance of the engage in direct or indirect political campaign activities on behalf of or relationship between people who funded in opposition to candidates for public office?” The answer that ArtPrize a 19-day art event in downtown Grand checked for this was no, which is Rapids and the same people who attack technically correct. However, this workers and unions in Michigan? does not mean the public shouldn’t reconsider the significance of such a question, as ArtPrize? particularly as it relates to what the Dick & Betsy It’s not a question of whether or not there are DeVos Foundation funds. any positive outcomes of ArtPrize. The world is After the Michigan Legislature pushed through not black and white and we must avoid looking a Right to Work law in December it was revealed at the world through a binary lens of good and that Dick and Betsy DeVos have been major evil. Instead we have to think critically about the funders of Rights to Work policies, primarily nuances of how systems of power work. through their contributions to the Mackinac If labor unions and other sectors of Michigan Center for Public Policy. The Mackinac Center want to come to terms with how the Right to has been pushing Right to Work policies in Work law came into being, they are going Michigan for years and was one of the main to have to grapple with the strategic use of architects for the state’s new law. DeVos family money. Such grappling will have Dick and Betsy DeVos (along with other DeVos to go beyond the simplistic GOP vs. Democrats family members) have been part of the work of analysis and see how their funding strategies the West Michigan Policy Forum, which has are primarily about wealth accumulation and made Right to Work one of its main priorities social management. since the group was founded in 2008. Right to If I wanted to fight back against the Right to Work policy was a significant part of the last Work policies, I would use ArtPrize as a forum conference, held in September of 2012. to challenge the DeVos family’s political and What this all means is that the same people who economic influence. fund ArtPrize are the same people that made Jeff Smith edits the blog griid.org.

The same people who fund ArtPrize are the same people that made Right to Work a law in Michigan. This should raise lots of questions for all of us, whether you are a supporter of ArtPrize or not. According to the 990 for 2011, the Dick and Betsy DeVos Foundation have provided ArtPrize with $5.2 million. There is some income from merchandize and sponsors, but the bulk of the money is provided by the foundation of the parents of Rick DeVos.

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FOOD & DRINK

Craft beer as a social movement?

Social movements are collective actions organized by institutional outsiders that challenge existing power structures. The civil rights battles of the 1960s and the ongoing struggles of American Indians or the LGBT community are iconic examples. These groups demand recognition not only from the state for their legitimate rights to be treated as equals under the law. More than this, these groups form new collective identities – a sense of “we-ness” – to challenge dominant cultural mores. There are transferrable lessons here for the craft beer community. In the world of craft beer, home, micro, and craft breweries, retailers, and enthusiasts challenge giants like Anheuserby Wes Eaton Busch InBev and MillerCoors. These challenges consist of more than contests over market shares – these are challenges over cultural acceptance, distinction, and legitimacy more broadly.

lens to understand how it was possible for a craft “chicken-feedy” lagers – as in tasting brewing movement to gain traction in a market so too much like corn. Within this myth, heavily dominated (98 percent in 2003) by well-known however, is a wedge of pertinence that brands with well-established distribution networks can give insight into social movements and centralized planning. To understand this question applicability: consumers might be open folks like us who are immersed in beer culture need to alternative tastes. Adding to this was to take a few steps back. Industrial economics theory the modern home brewing movement, points out that, over time, industries concentrate, and championed and popularized by in doing so, move folks like Charlie from specialists Papazian, who did to generalists. for home brewing This is helpful as what Carl Sagan it sheds some did for science. light on things From these ranks like the taste of were born folks like Little Caesars Sam Calagione, versus the pies at Harmony Brewing Company, or who, like his counterparts, is voracious Coors or Fat Tire compared with Founders Solid Gold about creating and defending the or Bell’s Amber. Furthermore, according to theory, as standards that separate craft beer generalists move more to the center, room opens up at from the cultural slums of Miller Lite. the peripheries. This is the space Rao wants to explore No matter that MillerCoors brands Making beer at Brewery Vivant. in the world of craft beer. unequivocally outsell 90 Minute IPA – battles are clearly ongoing. There is no clear distinction The craft beer movement is clearly a success, they lack terroir, the sense of place associated with between craft and non-craft. Instead, differences are however one might define success. This is important products made within certain locales. In the emerging socially constructed by interested groups. For example, because not all movements, of course, are successful. craft beer identity, generalist victories are not the point. as Brewing Consultant John Haggerty pointed out to Understanding how craft beer, as a culture, a market, As I have warned in previous essays, however, this me years ago, Budweiser, like Boston Beer, and so a lifestyle, became successful sheds light on the way presents a slippery slope. How exclusive ought craft many others, indeed uses some of the finest malts and cultures develop and are themselves responded to. beer culture be? Where do we draw the line, and hops and well cared for water in the world of beer. Unpacking this requires that we who draws it? Rao points out that contract breweries But it is the intangibility of identity that ultimately can look at the people involved, the like Boston Beer Company (Sam Adams) make help us make sense of such technical incongruences. contexts they shape and operate substantially different claims about what is at the root Overall Rao’s point is that without the network of within, and the way they work with of craft beer cultural identities. For Boston Beer, fresh “evang-ale-ists” – home brewers and enthusiasts others to achieve their aims. Rao’s ingredients equal craft beer. For others, like those – craft beer would hardly be the market and argument is close to arguments I have been making for some Understanding how craft beer, as a culture, cultural success it is today. Of course successful breweries, and brewpubs know this well. time in this column: from home a market, a lifestyle, became successful retailers, My argument is that in thinking of craft beer as a to micro and craft segments, craft beer is by definition less sheds light on the way cultures develop social movement, one that so many of us have been affected by, we can see that this is an ongoing about market share and more and are themselves responded to. movement, whose boundaries are porous, aims an expression of a new identity are fluid, champions are varied and contested, and – one premised on smallthat we ourselves, as home or professional brewers or scale, authentic, and traditional who drafted the American Craft Brewer Definition for industry folk, or especially as beer drinkers, can have a methods of production. Last month the Brewer’s Association, craft brewers must be small hand in steering. Like other popular movements, such I wrote about the “Local Trap” – the (less than 6,000,000 barrels a year), independent as environmental movements, one could argue that tendency to confuse scale, which (less than 25 percent of the brewery is owned by nonwhat’s really going on here is the coinciding of several is a means, with taste, an end. The craft breweries), and traditional (meaning adjuncts are movements. Steve Siciliano of Siciliano’s Market point then is that taste, as in both used to enhance, not simplify the product). pointed this out when he discussed the symbiotic the cultivated tastes of enthusiasts These tensions demonstrate a few nuances I relationships that emerge between various players in and the way a product tastes, is a would like to add to Rao’s argument. While the craft regional markets. I think this is accurate, and in West significant component of identity. beer movement is a success, by no means is it Michigan, we certainly seem to be situated at the front Now we are nearing the “creation homogenous. People who identify with this cultural lines of this convergence. story” of craft beer. WWII vets returned home from movement harbor a range of perspectives and Germany, Belgium and France, where beers were as interests that are not always harmonious. Moreover, diverse as dog breeds, to what Michael Jackson termed although successful, the cultural, market, and identity

The handles at Mt. Pleasant Brewing Co. In his 2009 book Market Rebels: How Activists Make or Break Radical Innovations, the young social scientist Hayagreeva Rao uses a social movements

HEALTH January is out and February is now up to bat. The resolutionists are slowly beginning their migration away from the gyms and their new diets. Flu season is reportedly in full swing and “worse than ever” this year, so as usual, the local and national news is telling us that there are shortages of the vaccine and you “had better get vaccinated now!” This article is intended to open some of your sheeple minds and give the other side of the story in the hopes that you make an informed decision about whether to get yourself or your kids vaccinated. In West Michigan and around the world, by Dr. Steve Mikulak viewpoints on vaccines vary greatly. The information reported on the news is completely for routine vaccination of pregnant and nursing women, children, elderly and everyone in-between. There are vaccines for seemingly most illnesses that we are bound to encounter throughout our lives. So should we get vaccinated, you ask? This is a question that I often encounter in my practice and it is a difficult one to answer. Personally, I haven’t been vaccinated for anything since I was a child and I have never gotten the flu shot in my adult life nor will I ever. Back in the early-80s, when I was young; I was vaccinated for ten “diseases.” Now, our kiddos are facing a crazy vaccine schedule of more than 30 different things! Chew on this for a minute: if I had a can of PBR and injected it with Thimerosal (Methyl Mercury), aluminum salts, formaldehyde and some chicken embryos, would you drink it? Guess what: those are just a few of the ingredients listed by the CDC on its website (www. cdc.gov) that are contained in those awesome flu

There is no clear distinction between craft and non-craft. Instead, differences are socially constructed by interested groups.

Calling all sheeple shots that we’re supposed to be getting. You could not pay me to inject that crap into my body. In fact, a few weeks ago I was doing some research and happened upon the information sheet inserted with the Flulaval vaccine for the flu virus this year.

How do you get and keep a healthy immune system? It takes work and time. It says in black and white: “…there have been no controlled trials adequately demonstrating a decrease in influenza disease after vaccination with FLULAVAL.” Also: “Safety and effectiveness of FLULAVAL have not been established in pregnant women, nursing mothers, or children.” In other words, it does not work and it is not safe! Are you kidding me!? Yet, we’re supposed to get vaccinated with this stuff? I’m not buying it. I may have a slightly bias view being a natural holistic health-care practitioner who specializes in the nervous system and uses scientifically proven and safe methods for reaching and maintaining optimal nervous system function in the body. Yet, I never learned that our amazing bodies needed the help of a syntheticallymade virus to be injected into us so that when we encounter the “real thing” our bodies will already have the right tools to kick the illness in the butt. Nope, I never learned that people had a Tamiflu deficiency or that people were lacking mercury in their body either. Believers of the vaccines miraculous and necessary abilities would condemn those who oppose their view. Whether you believe they work or not is your choice. I just hope that you have done your research and are not just following the herd and doing what you’re told. There is misinformation everywhere, but recently more and more cases of damages caused by vaccines have been reported and are actually being rewarded large sums of money for the expected damages to the rest of their lives. In fact, there is a National Vaccine Injury Compensation Fund that pays out millions of dollars to victims of the damaging effects of vaccinations every year. But you will never see these stories on the news. Considering most TV stations are highly funded

by the drug companies who produce these vaccines, you will never see them reporting on vaccines in a bad way. They would stand to lose millions of dollars in ad revenue every year and that’s just bad business. Sadly, you have to follow the money trail – and all roads lead to Big Pharma, who stands to make billions of dollars every year on vaccines alone regardless of who they injure or kill. Some people argue that by not vaccinating we would be inviting diseases like polio, measles, and small pox back into the modern world. I don’t think so. Did you know that before vaccines were even introduced in the early 1950s, most of the big killers (measles, small pox and polio) were already on the decline? Medicine and supportive care were improving and so were nutritional choices. It wasn’t the vaccines that saved the world. It was our nation’s health improving. Our sanitary conditions improved and people learned to wash their hands. The difference between a sick person and a not sick person is how well their immune system is

functioning. A healthy immune system will kick the snot out of anything that it comes into contact with. A not-so-healthy immune system will ensure illness and sickness over and over again. You may get swine flu, bird flu, pig flu, duck flu or any other kind of flu that the news is reporting will cause the next pandemic and kill all of the people of the world. How do you get and keep a healthy immune system? It takes work and time. Let’s start with exercise, healthy eating habits, portion control, de-stressing, and a fully connected, optimally-communicating nervous system that is running the whole show. That is as natural as it gets. Unfortunately, most sheeple of the world do not think for themselves. They treat their bodies like they can just replace them someday by being injected them with poisons, eating processed foods that have the nutritional equivalent of crap and living lazy, uninspired lives because that may be all that they choose to know. Every day more people are waking up to the real world that we live in and are beginning to understand and question the powers that be. Don’t be a sheeple and open your eyes. You are responsible for your health – not the government or your insurance company.


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LOCAL ACT

GEORGE MOSS

Stepping away from all things typical, George Moss is setting the Grand Rapids hip-hop scene on fire, proving that you don’t always need a gimmick and the performance doesn’t have to be about hype. His current single,“Hands Up,” reached Number 28 on the Billboard Chart last month. He is hoping to reach out from a positive, uplifting place. Recoil had the opportunity to ask the lyricist a few questions about his upcoming performance at The Pyramid Scheme Feb. 7, and where Moss’ drive comes from. Recoil: What sets you apart from other hip-hop artists?

RECORDING One of the most fun things about making a record is getting the artwork together and having the thing pressed. Unfortunately, just as in the recording process itself, every idiot with MSPaint thinks they can create interesting packaging. For the rest of us who know better, here are the elements involved. First, you need really sweet artwork. If your by Ryan Cunningham girlfriend is a cool artist type and you really like her work, then by all means use it. If you don’t know anybody, then you should really get out of the house more. Awesome artists are always around, and they don’t tend to advertise. In fact, sometimes

George Moss: Everyone has something about them that makes them unique. Often times what sets me apart from other artists is simply the fact that I don’t try to emulate other people. This isn’t something that happened overnight though – finding out who you are as a person takes time. When I first started out, I looked up to my favorite rappers and tried to do what they did. I don’t think there is anything wrong with that when you’re first starting out. That’s just the natural way of learning. Just like a child learns how to be an

adult by watching and emulating adults, artists also watch and emulate other artists. But as a child grows, he learns how to become his own man. He learns to think his own way and make his own decisions. In the same way, after doing this for over fifteen years now, I’ve come to have an understanding of who I am as an artist, and probably what’s even more important is that I’ve learn who I am not. Just simply understanding who I am, and being who I am automatically sets me apart from other artists, because there is only one me.

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venues in the city right now, so it’s an honor to be able to have that local platform. I’m still pretty new to the local hip-hop scene, so I’m excited to be able to share these songs with a new audience.

R: What has been your favorite place to perform? GM: In 2011 I had the opportunity to perform with KJ52 on a tour called WinterJam. That year it was the most-attended tours in the world according to Pollstar, so it was extremely fun to play to sold out arenas all over the country R: Do you think it’s harder to make it as a including 18,000 at Phillips Arena in Atlanta clean, spiritual-based performer? 22,000 at the American Airlines Center. But GM: ‘Making it’ is pretty my favorite place I’ve subjective. For some “Just simply understanding played was actually the people, ‘making it’ means who I am, and being who I am sold out show at the lucrative financial gains, Van Andel Arena here fame, or power; while for automatically sets me apart in Grand Rapids on other people that may from other artists, because that tour. It wasn’t the mean being able to finish biggest show of the tour, there is only one me.” a CD, or hear their song but there is nothing like on the radio. But whatever definition someone the feeling of being able to perform in front has for success, the route you choose to get of a sold out crowd in your own hometown. there will most always be difficult. The way I personally define ‘making it’ is by making R: How important has your fan base been? an eternal impact on peoples life, and that’s GM: My fans are extremely important in something I’ve been doing since day one... everything I do. I’ve never been signed to a even when at times I’ve felt that impact is only record label, or have had million-dollar budgets for myself. So no, ‘making it’ for me has not been to do any sort of mass media campaign to get that difficult because I don’t base my success exposure for my music. My fanbase has grown on money, fame or accolades. I’ve been blessed almost exclusively through word of mouth. By to experience all of those things to a degree, my fans sharing my music with their friends. but I try not to allow any of that to have an effect And honestly, I wouldn’t have it any other way. on my sense of fulfillment as an artist. I make Because when your fanbase is based on real music for a much larger purpose than that. people sharing songs that are important to them with other people, it feels way more like R: What message are you trying to convey friends than it does fans. I personally answer with your music? every facebook message, e-mail, Twitter GM: Ultimately the message I want to convey comment, etc. I know I may not always be with my music is hope. A hope that there is a able to realistically keep up with that, but for greater purpose in our lives far beyond what right now it’s a priority of mine. My ‘marketing we can see. Not only hope for a better future strategy,’ if you really want to call it that, is to beyond this life, but also hope for the lives we pour out everything I’ve got into the people who live in the here and now.  already support me. My goal is to make music that is important to the people that already R: Are you excited to play at The Pyramid embrace who I am and what I do. If I serve them Scheme? well, they will spread the word on their own, GM: Very. It seems to be one of the hottest and I believe that’s how true fans are made.

Recording Your Band Responsibly: Production

isn’t all that difficult for someone who does aesthetic as a band. I’ve also seen people out, not only in level of professionalism but graphic design and layout for a living. Yes, you with horrible recordings really go wild with artistic approach. In addition to a regular run of could do this yourself, but someone who You want your packaging to match the CDs, for example: really understands visual mediums (not just somebody who can draw well!) can make product you put out, not only in level of Rock band = lunch sack with stencil paint the difference between having a “cool’ album band = cassette single with download professionalism but artistic approach. Artsy jacket, and a truly great one which draws code the eye and represents your material which you the packaging, creating the terrible effect of Newbie band = CD-R with sharpie worked so fucking hard on. “our packaging is much more interesting and Bands with day jobs = 1,000 pressed discs, A lot of the actual layout will depend on the professional than our music, and you will be five- page foldout, distribution on iTunes template you get from whatever disc production horribly disappointed, most certainly telling Electro band = flash drives with your logo on it folks you’re using. Maybe you want to put these everyone to avoid our shows.” things in DVD cases. Maybe you just want a little Really what it comes down to is that you want You get the idea. Just don’t put out something sleeve because it’s an EP and it feels silly to go your packaging to match the product you put cheap unless you mean it. whole hog in the production. In any case, your budget and your audience will determine this part of things. Discmakers (or the equivalent) will be great for large-scale production. Can your band sell 1,000 units at $10 a pop? Is this just for the 20 or 30 fans who come to see you in your basement? There are great solutions for each. Kunaki.com is a popular service for short(under 500 – or even just five discs). Just because it’s DIY doesn’t make run The major difference is that short run discs it good, but if you can be inventive are “burned” instead of “replicated,” which that nobody made a glass master with your packaging, then do it. means (like a printing press) and stamped them out. they need you to discover for them that they are This used to mean a lot more than it does now... awesome, because artistic people all think their not only because burned discs are nowadays own art is terrible. When it comes down to it, guaranteed to play in any CD player, but also you should find someone appropriate. Come because people are just going to rip the damn up with a concept for the art, and approach an thing and stick the disc on their shelf. Replicated art student trying to build their portfolio. Or ask discs last two decades instead of one, but who other bands who they have used. Just because gives a fuck – nobody checks the bottom of the someone you don’t really know created the disc to see what color it is except for assholes. artwork on your disc doesn’t mean that it’s any Just because it’s DIY doesn’t make it good, less personal – just more professional. but if you can be inventive with your packaging, Also, you will need a Photoshop and Illustrator then do it. I’ve seen people make disc sheaths jockey to make things look nice. Album layout from paper lunch bags, and it totally fit their


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REQUIRED LISTENING YO LA TENGO FADE

9/10

MATADOR While less fortunate rock bands have followed the highly travelled road of obscure toil and fruitless endeavor, making it big then breaking it up then getting it all back together again (or not) to cash in (maybe) on whichever decade-oriented reunion cycle happens to be winding up, Yo La Tengo, the pride of Hoboken, New Jersey, has benefitted from a classier, less erratic path. Opting for careful refinement and subtle experimentation over wild highs and crushing lows, Yo La Tengo has done more than merely survive, they have flourished, and they continue to do so. Fade, the band’s 14th album in a miraculous 30-year career, is only 10 songs and 45 minutes long. It’s their shortest effort since 1990’s breakthrough Fakebook and the first recorded without beloved producer Roger Moutenot since 1993’s Painful. Fade was instead produced by John McEntire (Tortoise, The Sea and Cake) in his Chicago studio. Not particularly given to thematic projects, the band seems to be acknowledging the importance of serenity with these songs. Even the enormous tree of life on the album’s cover gives a sense of endurance and calm – and yet the title, Fade, would not seem to apply to this band, which show absolutely no signs of slowing down even now, on the eve of their fourth decade. “I always know that when we wake up/You’re mine,” sings Ira Kaplan in the elegant “Stupid Things,” and in that moment you sense the comfort he feels in permanence, in his relationship with his wife (drummer Georgia) or with the band – even with the song. This is a band that lives and breathes songwriting. Their ongoing fascination with ‘60s soul reappears on the fantastic “Well You Better” and the fuzzy, irresistible clatter of “Paddle Forward” should bring a faint whispering of the group’s classic “Sugarcube” into the ears of any longtime listener. Certain bands last in spite of themselves while others are just too perfect to fail. Life will be slightly less comfortable when Yo La Tengo pulls out the plug.–Andrew Watson

VILLAGERS {AWAYLAND} DOMINO

6/10

When a song begins – begins, I say – with a visual as egregiously upsetting as the one that introduces “Earthly Pleasure” (“Naked on the toilet/with a toothbrush in his mouth”), there is a sense that the only way to go is up, that it cannot possibly get worse. And yet it does. To be fair, Connor O’Brien is no Conor Oberst, no matter how quivery his voice, or how erudite his lyrics (previous example notwithstanding). The songs on this record drift unremarkably and with little of the charm that characterized his debut, 2010’s Becoming A Jackal. “The Waves” features some nifty electronic flourishes that hold your attention, but the bulk of this material is severely underwhelming.–Andrew Watson

BIG BOI

VICIOUS LIES AND DANGEROUS RUMORS DEF JAM

8/10

Those of us clinging to (slimmer) hopes of an Outkast reunion will survive easily on Big Boi records; I wouldn’t expect Andre3000GiletteBlades to get back to rhyming anytime soon. Vicious Lies and Dangerous Rumors screams “experimental project” – stylistically, it can’t make up its mind how to act. Electro-pop bands play catch with battle MCs in one corner (“Thom Pettie”) while indie stoners and drama queens play footsy and eat Cheetos in the other (“Shoes For Running”). It’s a dazzling mishmash of incongruous talent anchored by Mr. Playalistic himself, Antwan Patton, King of Bawdy One-Liners and All Things Metaphorically Sexual. There’s a lot of depth hidden between the dirty jokes, though; Patton succeeds through effortless cool and a willingness to fail.–AW

LOW

THE INVISIBLE WAY SUB POP

7.5/10

Let it not go unnoticed that 2013 marks 20 years of Low. Twenty years of methodical grace and chilly harmonies. Twenty years of isolated genius. They are among the most reliable acts in popular music, aging as well or better than the vast majority of their peers. Alan and Mimi teamed up with Jeff Tweedy for the recording of this LP, the follow-up to 2011’s remarkable C’mon, setting up in Wilco’s Chicago-based studio loft last fall. The result is a more subdued sound, even by this band’s standards, and is not likely to knock anyone out of their chair. It is, however, the most recent Low record, and by that right is deserving of any music lover’s attention, no matter how brief.–AW

DROPKICK MURPHYS

SIGNED AND SEALED IN BLOOD BORN & BRED RECORDS

7.5/10

Delivered to fans faster than any other Dropkick Murphys record, Signed and Sealed arrives just in time for postholiday hangovers and pre-St. Patty’s Day drinking. The new disc clearly sounds similar to their last set, 2011’s Going Out In Style, but it drops that album’s characterdriven concept in favor of packing in as much of their signature Celtic punk as possible. Highlights include the dysfunctional family Christmas song “The Season’s Upon Us,” the swinging, swaggering sing-a-long “Out on the Town,” and the last call loser lament of “End of the Night.” The band doesn’t fight their formula – only occasionally trying out some different arrangements – but at this point banging out barroom anthems is more than just the Murphys’ home base, it’s their very lifeblood.–Eric Mitts


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REQUIRED LISTENING

volume 13 issue 2 february

NEW DVD RELEASES

MELODY’S ECHO CHAMBER MELODY’S ECHO CHAMBER WEIRD WORLD RECORDS

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8.5/10

When Trish Keenan, vocalist for the outstanding English outfit Broadcast, tragically and suddenly passed, she left an atomic-sized hole in the world of dark, dreamlike pop art. Melody Prochet is a classically schooled French chanteuse from the same school as Keenan, (albeit a lower grade level) and her debut record is as impressive a display of that particular kind of sound as we’ve heard since Broadcast’s 2005 triumph, Tender Buttons. Credit for the bulk of the success of Melody’s Echo Chamber goes to an unlikely source, Tame Impala wunderkind Kevin Parker, who was initially enlisted to produce the thing, but after hooking up with Prochet (like, you know) his final title ends up reading more like “producer/performer/chief contributor/ co-composer.” His hands are all over this thing, from the smeared-psyche guitar figures that wander through “I Follow You” to the crisp, sunny-side folk shuffle of “Some Time Alone, Alone.” Prochet brings her own talents to the project, occupying a vocal space just this side of Laetitia Sadier – particularly (fittingly) on the jazzy, Stereolab-sounding “Snowcapped Andes Crash” – but her efforts are almost secondary compared to the fantastic sounds Parker and his mates are cruising through. “Crystallized” is a brilliant mash of distorted drum hits and circular guitar patterns that finishes by diving headfirst into a krautrock meltdown. This record, paired with his own most recent effort, Tame Impala’s exceptional Lonerism, makes a strong case for Kevin Parker as this year’s Indie Rocker of the Year. As for Prochet, it’s her face on the cover and her name on the spine so her contributions should probably not be totally underestimated. One wonders, however, why her previous band, My Bee’s Garden, failed to make an impression on anyone. Might it have been that she didn’t have Kevin Parker back then, tossing off gnarly guitar magic all over her creations? This won’t make anyone forget Broadcast – it’s not nearly as dark for one thing – but these songs go a long way towards occupying the void.–Andrew Watson

TEGAN AND SARA HEARTTHROB SIRE

7.5/10

Tegan and Sara’s seventh album wears its studio polish on its sleeve as much as it wears their hearts. The Canadian twin sisters have never fully broken into the mainstream, despite making some the catchiest, deepest pop music around, and on their latest they enlist several hit-making producers who punch up their now almost entirely synth-centric songwriting. Never short on energy, even on the slower numbers, the Quin sisters will leave you breathless with some of the harmonies here (especially lead single “Closer”), and humming these hooks for days. Longtime fans might not want to share their beloved Tegan and Sara with a wider audience (or heaven forbid radio!), but cries of sellout are misguided as their hearts are clearly still in the right place, even while on full-display.–EM

TOMAHAWK

ODDFELLOWS IPECAC RECORDINGS

8/10

To say that Tomahawk is the most straightforward project that any one of the members of this supergroup has worked on in the six years since their last disc together (2007’s Native American-inspired Anonymous), just proves how strange these guys are. Fans of frontman Mike Patton (of Faith No More, Fantomas, etc.) know to expect the unexpected with his music, and that’s true this time, although that caveat also includes being ready for some of his most flat-out rocking tracks (like lead single “Stone Letter”) since Faith No More’s final album (1997’s Album of the Year). The band – made up of Patton, guitarist Duane Denison (formerly of The Jesus Lizard), drummer John Stanier (of Helmet/Battles fame), and new bassist Trevor Dunn (Secret Chiefs 3, Mr. Bungle) – share a love for the avant-garde and metal, in equal, if often uneven, measure, and the abrupt shifts between the two approaches keep this return interesting.–EM

THE JOY FORMIDABLE WOLF’S LAW ATLANTIC

8.5/10

The Joy Formidable play with the laws of physics on their sophomore set. As much as their debut (2011’s The Big Roar) was defined by its crushing crescendos and wall of sound distortion, its follow-up feels ascendant, defying gravity with sustained guitar swells and full-scale string arrangements, starting right with opener “This Ladder Is Ours.” The trio has spent the last two years playing humongous stages – opening for the likes of Muse and blowing away newcomers at major festivals around the world – so it’s only natural that they’ve grown into the even larger sound of tracks like “The Leopard and the Lung.” But the album’s barer moments, like the midalbum lament “Silent Treatment,” or the hidden piano-led title track, suggest a depth of creative composition that continues to lift even after the reverb stops.–EM

RA RA RIOT BETA LOVE BARSUK

6.5/10

Not all updates are necessarily upgrades, and in the case of indie outfit Ra Ra Riot, their recent redefinition doesn’t feel fully tested. For a third album departure, Beta Love doesn’t turn away completely from Ra Ra Riot’s first two discs, but with the exit of cellist Alexandra Lawn last year, the band clearly took this as an opportunity to make a break from their signature baroque-pop style, opting, instead, for synth-rock. At best the band sounds stuck in the shadow of Passion Pit (on songs like the falsetto-stretching title track), or, at worst, like trendjumping opportunists (the bass-dropping “What I Do For U”). “Is It Too Much” surprisingly strikes just the right balance, bridging elements of both their old and new sound with the bouncy rhythms that have always made their music easily enjoyable.–EM

BRAVE

Brave is the first film by PIXAR to be a period piece as well as feature a female lead. The film centers on a young Scottish princess named Merida (voiced by Kelly Macdonald) who lives a very liberated life for the timeframe of the film, and wants to be free from the duty that her birth forces upon her. To do this she visits a witch to get a potion to change her fate. The witch seems to be obsessed with bears and the potion causes Merida’s mother to turn into a large bear. The rest of the film is spent trying to undo the change and teach a message to all those that watch the movie. As PIXAR movies go, this is not the best out there, and one could argue that it comes across as Disney having a heavy hand in development (Merida is included in the Disney Princess line of toys), but the film still is very strong and, as with all PIXAR films, the animating is stunning. PIXAR created new pieces of software just for this film, one of which was used to render Merida’s hair so that her hair could be rendered as 1500 separate strands yet move together as hair in real life does. Brave feels a lot like WALL-E, in that it is a story that a younger child is not really going to understand as well as someone who is older, but hopefully the animation keeps the children entertained.– Mark Ritzema

pulls more from the newer Ultimate Spider-man comic series than it does from older comics. Luckily, many familiar features remain the same, such as the origin of his superpowers, and his friends and enemies. Spidey is back to having homemade web-slingers, returning some nerdiness to the Peter Parker character. However, possibly to enable younger audiences to relate with him, there is also an undertone of slacker, which doesn’t necessarily mesh with the attitude of a superhero. So, in a nutshell, nerdy slacker Perter Parker, who has been raised by his aunt and uncle since his parents’ disappearance, walks into the wrong area of a research lab and gets bitten by a genetically modified spider, thus gaining super-powers. There are some amusing scenes as our hero adjusts to his newfound powers, and an interesting sequence regarding the development of his costume. This film also contains one of the most humorous cameos to date of Stan Lee in a Marvel film. On the negative side of things, some of the shots from Spidey’s perspective while web-swinging prove more jarring than anything else when viewed in normal 2-D, though if you’re a fan of the 3-D effect, it may add to the film. The subplot regarding Parker’s missing parents also seems a bit muddled, with it unclear whether or not he’s aware of their fate. All told, though it may seem too soon to re-start this series, the film is well done, and ripe for sequels.–Sheila Streeter

THE CAMPAIGN

The Campaign follows a multi-term Congressman Cam Brady (Will Ferrell) running unopposed in a small district in North Carolina until two brothers, Glen and Wade Motch (Jon

IRON SKY

In 1945, Nazi Germany secretly sent ships to the dark side of the moon, where the colony remained and flourished. In 2018, the U.S. President sends a manned mission to the moon, which discovers this Nazi base, prompting a long-awaited retaliatory attack on Earth. With a concept like this, a movie can either be an SF extravaganza, or a hilarious B-movie. Strangely, Iron Sky lands itself somewhere between the two. The effects are sophisticated and polished, which is impressive, considering the sheer amount of CG involved, and the fact that much of the movie was funded by fans of the production group. On the other hand, the movie doesn’t entirely take itself seriously, and ends up being more of a comedy – although, because it’s also a foreign film, some of the humor could be missed by an American audience. It works best when taken as a satire, as the ending is a bit dark, and the entire film has an odd Dr. Strangelove feel to it. If you want some excellent examples of dieselpunk technology, though, this is the movie to see, just for the scenes of the moon-Nazi’s machines. As entertaining as that is, it’s unfortunate that the filmmakers decided that a society that could establish moon bases in 1945 would allow their technology to stagnate in such a manner. Regardless, this film has the potential to become the next big cult classic, so check it out before all your friends beat you to it.–Sheila Streeter

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN

This reboot of the Spider-man movie franchise

Lithgow and Dan Aykroyd, respectively), decide to run a tour guide, Marty Huggins (Zach Galifianakis), against him. What starts out as a laughable longshot soon becomes a close race as money, as well as other assistance from the Motch’s start to pour into the district. Soon with image consultants, underhanded ads and assistance for debates, Huggins is on his way to winning the election, and all he has to do is turn his back on his family and those that know him best. The Campaign is a comedy and makes effective use of satire to tell a story about our own political system. The Motch brothers are obviously a stand in for the Koch brothers who are known to, like so many other large corporations, put huge amounts of money behind candidates of their choice. Huggins is an allegorical common man who does not know how the system works and Brady is the Washington insider who seems to be just on the lookout for keeping the power he has. While the Motch’s were more than likely supposed to be the Koch brothers, one could not help but also see them as the Duke brothers from the Dan Aykroyd film Trading Places. The Campaign is very funny, but what really sold the movie to me was the use of satire.–Mark Ritzema


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RECONNAISANCE

LOCAL CD REVIEWS THE BETTER FIGHT

WORD GETS AROUND IN THIS SMALL TOWN EP KALAMAZOO, MICH.

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CAPESIDE RECORDS

This four-song EP came almost a year to the day after The Better Fight’s 2011 debut EP Castaway, and, sadly, it feels mostly like a stop-gap set. Opening with the new electric track, “Word Gets Around,” the band’s amped-up energy and guitar adrenaline push at the boundaries of the literal, and lyrical, boundaries of their small hometown. They then put a bit too much restriction on themselves, going acoustic for the three remaining songs, starting with an unplugged take on “Highways” off their debut, that takes the “let’s blow this town” track at a different speed, in a different light, and sticking to similar acoustic side-roads for the remaining two tracks. Still full of promise, The Better Fight should save up their best new hits before their next disc.–Eric Mitts

Arena District celebrates Mardi Gras Feb. 12

For eight years the Grand Rapids Arena District has been bringing a little piece of the Big Easy to our slice of The Mitten with its annual Mardi Gras Celebration. Working with a sizable grant and the hope of outdoing past celebrations, this year’s party is shaping up to be one of the first can’t-miss events of the year. Recoil

CHEVEAUX

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.

Now entering its third year, the Electric Forest Festival will return to the Double JJ Ranch in Rothbury, Mich., June 27-30. Tickets to multi-genre music and camping festival went on sale last month, and while various early-bird tickets sold out within days, general admission weekend tickets are available for $259. Good Life Village passes are also on sale for $575. Although the lineup for this year’s Electric Forest has not yet been announced, in its first two years the festival featured such artists as The String Cheese Incident, Skrillex, Tiesto, Bassnectar and Girl Talk, among many, many others. Co-produced by Insomniac Events and Madison House, the Electric Forest Festival has become known nationwide for its immersive, all-inclusive experience, and its elaborate illuminated Sherwood Forest. To purchase tickets or for more info, click over to electricforestfestival.com.

Attempting to describe instrumental music – especially the instrumental post-rock noise of GR four-piece expunk – quickly starts looking a lot like dancing about architecture. With a strong guitar-rock foundation, the group strives ever skyward, losing themselves in the dizzying beauty of the infinite, repeating patterns, and rising crescendos, as they lift listeners hundreds of stories from the crushing concrete below. Guitarists Jef Collis and Trevor Goldner fill songs like “This Page Intentionally Left Blank” with lush lead melodies, while the classically-inspired arrangements of opener “Trickle Down Economics” and closer “Pet Tigers” add to the aweinducing artistry of it all. Highly recommendable for fans of bands like My Blood Valentine or Explosions In The Sky, check out expunk’s latest now at expunk.bandcamp.com.–EM

SLUMLORD RADIO

TOKYO ROADHOUSE SONIC SEX CASTLE

SILVER MAPLE KILL

The new record by this power trio is a big, beefy rock fest – but not in a stupid way. In a “hello, my name is bass guitar, and here is my fuzzy furniture shaking glory” sort of way. The recording quality is excellent, turned in by drummer and band member Dave Flynn, capturing the raw (and sometimes goofy) spirit of songs like the highlights Old Zilwaukee and Fort Knox. This is music to drink beer by, and the album is the next best thing to being at the basement show listening to some jerk yell “whooo!” all night. Go to reverbnation.com/ slumlordradio to check them out.–Ryan Cunningham

SAM KENNY

WORLD WAR ONE

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.

This is a collection of songs by an acoustic guitar singersongwriter, but it is much more than that. It has an incredible amount of sonic textures spread out over its 17 tracks – genuinely everything but the kitchen sink, although that may be in there as well. The vibe is low-key enough that Pink Floyd or Phish would have this playing before a show, and the only significant issue with the disc is that it’s just too interesting, and you really feel you should be on some sort of drugs when you listen. It should come with a joint and some chamomile tea. Reverbnation.com/samkenny for a listen.–RC

KING CRABAPPLE CASTLE KEEP EP

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.

This is a hip-hop and funk five-piece reminiscent of Rage and 311 – but certainly its own thing, not relying so heavily on the guitar. In fact, strong vocal deliveries and a solid rhythm section are the main ingredients, but there are enough funky keyboard and guitar decorations to change up the feel from an outdoor Chicago funk festival to a legitimate full on rock n’ roller. If you’re down with the style, this is certainly an album to put on your car stereo and cruise around town. Go to reverbnation.com/kingcrabapple to see what it’s all about.– RC

MURDER PARTY! MURDER PARTY EP

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.

Equal parts spooky and silly, Murder Party! make punk rock that’s blatantly smartass but sinfully brilliant. With lyrics about the undead and outlaws, the band’s six-song debut EP plays like a retro B-movie marathon on fast-forward. Running through influences ranging from ‘50s rockabilly to ‘70s punk, with touches of Motown, ska and garage rock thrown in for good measure – all in under 20 minutes – the set proves these three vets of Grand Rapids punk scene know their history as well as their hooks. For the sake of full disclosure, Recoil’s own Ryan Cunningham produced/mixed/mastered the disc, however, Murder Party! have more than enough originality to make this a must-listen for any local music fan. Check it out now at murder-party. bandcamp.com.–EM

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Grand Rapids first and foremost  through musical entertainment. We’ll have wandering musicians playing everything from trombones to washboards, Creolization will be playing in the Gallery at Bar Divani, and Zydacrunch will be at The B.O.B. We’ll also be providing our participating venues with Mardi Gras beads to hand out to attendees, and we’ll be selling masks at a couple of locations. Some of the bars and restaurants  will be participating in a themed  bar decorating contest – reminiscent of the Mardi Gras ‘krews’ seen in New Orleans – and all venues  are providing food and/or  drink specials, many of which are New Orleans- or Mardi Gras-themed. We’ll also have a couple of fire performers in the streets!” The Arena Distrtict’s Mardi Gras event will be held Feb. 12 in the many Grand Rapids Arena District venues from 4 to 11 p.m.–Naomi Goedert

Electric Forest returns to Rothbury June 27-30

EXPUNK

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.

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Celebrate Mardi Gras in the Arena District Feb. 12. talked to the Arena District’s Assistant Director Ryan Waldron during the crazy last-minute preps to get her thoughts on the excitement this day is already generating. “The event has gone through a lot of changes since it first started, but we think that this year’s version will be the best yet,” said Waldron. “Early February can be a slow time – it’s cold, the holidays are over – so Mardi Gras a perfect opportunity to get people out and about enjoying their downtown when they otherwise might have stayed at home.” Convincing Arena District member bars and restaurants was fairly easy – after all, who wouldn’t want to be a part of such a high-energy event of wide appeal. “Many [businesses] jumped right onboard. It’s a fun event that brings people through their doors on

“It's always a challenge to plan a large-scale event with a dozen partner establishments. We're so lucky to have an awesome team of volunteers and interns who've helped us bring everything together.” what otherwise might be a slow night downtown,” said Waldron. “As for all of our events, the goal of Mardi Gras is both to encourage people to enjoy their downtown and also to bring people into our member venues who may not otherwise have checked them out. Our hope is that attendees will stop by  all of our participating bars and restaurants; we’ll be encouraging them to follow the musicians from bar to bar, take advantage of each venue’s food and drink specials, collect a different colored bead at each stop, and vote for their favorite bar decorations. It’s always a challenge to plan a large-scale event with a dozen partner establishments.  We’re so lucky to have an awesome team of volunteers and interns who’ve helped us bring everything together. We couldn’t do it without them.” Helping the Arena District achieve their goal was a sizable grant from the Downtown Development Authority, which they have put to good use for Mardi Gras. “We were very excited to hear that we had been awarded the grant from the Downtown Development Authority. The grant money will help fund the wandering musician that will be playing in and out of our participating venues throughout the evening. The DDA is a great partner and we’re so thankful for their support of the event,” said a grateful Waldron. The evening will be packed with places to visit and things to do. Waldron gave us a rundown: “We’re hoping to bring a little bit of the Big Easy to downtown

Heavyweights to Crown Winner at Finals Feb. 9

After three competitive preliminary rounds last month, the 13th Annual Heavyweight Battle of the Metal Bands (the longest-running heavy metal/hard-rock band competition in the state of Michigan) has set the stage for its Finals, taking place Feb. 9 at the Intersection. Competing in the event will be The Severed Process, Seraphim, Flood The Desert, Divided They Fall, Aside The Ashes, and Burden of Ages. Co-sponsored by the Intersection and 101.3 the FOX FM, Heavyweights will have $2,500 in cash, studio time, a promotional photo shoot, and many more prizes up for grabs at the final bout. In between sets Moshpitnation.com will host its Second Annual Ultimate Shredder Showdown, where individual guitarists advancing from the preliminary rounds will compete for the title of Shred Master 2013. Beardcore and Glorious Beards of Michigan (G-BOM) will also host a beard contest, and there will be a tattoo contest hosted by Forever Ink Tattoos as well. Admission to the Heavyweights Finals is $8 in advance, or from any competing band, or $10 at the door. For more info, check out grheavyweights.com, sectionlive.com, or moshpitnation.com.

Harmony Brewing Company to celebrate first year in business

On Feb. 1 Harmony Brewing Company (1551 Lake Drive) in Eastown will celebrate its one-year anniversary by throwing a birthday party. As part of the festivities they will release the commemorative beer: Birthday Barleywine. According to co-owner and cobrewer Jackson Van Dyke: “We thought that because we are a new member to Beer City U.S.A. and part of a state that is emerging as a beer powerhouse, that to celebrate our anniversary we would brew a beer with hops grown in the city of Grand Rapids and use grain grown and malted in Michigan. It is a malty, slightly sweet beer that has a strong hop bitterness and aroma. It is also smooth, so its nine percent alcohol by volume is deceptive and will have you in a celebratory mood.” The party, which will include the normal birthday party traditions like cake and balloons, will celebrate Harmony’s tremendously successful first year. Harmony quickly established itself as a fixture in the Eastown neighborhood and drew large crowds and a loyal customer base with its small batches of well-balanced beer and rustic wood fired pizzas. In November Harmony was awarded the prestigious Gerald R. Hemholdt Award for excellence in a Neighborhood Business District. They were also awarded the first ever “Best Neighborhood Pint” award. For more information check out our www. HarmonyBeer.com.

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WEST MICHIGAN VENUES

GRAND RAPIDS

Last Chance Saloon

608 Bridge

Logan’s Alley

Bangers

1132 Burton SE

616.742.6600

Viceroy 53 Commerce Ave. 616.774.VICE

616.458.1612

Wealthy Street Theatre

20 Monroe

Log Cabin

1130 Wealthy SE

616.356.2000

Mangiamo!

616.451.9755

Bobarino’s (inside The B.O.B.)

Bistro Bella Vita 44 Grandville SW 616.222.4600

Billy’s Lounge 1437 Wealthy SE 616.459.5757

The B.O.B. 20 Monroe 616.356.2000 thebob.com

Bull’s Head 188 Monroe 616.454.3580

Calvin College 3201 Burton St. 616.957.6282

Century Post Pub 203 E. Main St. (Lowell) 616.987.9188

Crush 20 Monroe

(inside The B.O.B.)

616.356.2000

Deltaplex 2500 Turner Ave.

916 Michigan NE 2401 S. Division

616.742.0600

The Annex 3645 Bannick Dr.

Monkey Bar

Bayview Gardens

1033 Lake Drive SE

616.774.5969

Mulligan’s 1518 Wealthy St.

The Muze 438 Bridge NW 616.774.5969

Nick Fink’s 3965 West River NE 616.784.9886

One Trick Pony 136 Fulton St. 616.235.7669

616.942.2335

The Pyramid Scheme Quinn & Tuite’s 616.363.8380

Raggs to Riches 106 Pearl NW 616.454.0770

Riverbend Bar

45 S. Division

(Conklin) 616.899.2640

Flanagan’s Pub 139 Pearl NW 616.454.7852

Founders 235 Grandville Ave. 616.776.1195

Gilly’s 20 Monroe

(inside The B.O.B.)

616.356.2000

Holiday Bar 801 5th St. 616.456.9058

Intersection 133 Grandville 616.451.8232

J. Gardella’s Tavern 11 Ionia SW 616.459.8824

The Landing 270 Ann St. NW

(inside the Radisson Hotel)

616.363.7748

1290 M-89 W (Plainwell) 269.685.0333

Corner Bar & Grille 1030 E. Vine 269.385.2028

Craftsman Chop Co. 6905 Sears Dr.

Daisy Mae’s 2688 Patterson Rd (Wayland) 269.792.9426

District Square

(Paw Paw) 269.657.5615

(Otsego) 269.694.6970

Rockwell’s

Main Street Grill 3013 Oakland Dr.

616.551.3563

269.342.5208

Rocky’s

Main Street Pub 5462 Gull Rd.

616.356.2346

269.344.7247

Root Gallery

Monaco Bay

The Reservoir

269.384.6044

2843 Eastern Ave. SE 300 E. Michigan 1418 Plainfield NE

Old Dog Tavern

616.451.0010

402 E. Kalamazoo

The Stache

269.370.1283

133 Grandville

Old Hat

616.363.7748

(Lawton) 269.624.6445

(inside the Intersection)

100 Ionia SW

The Venue

114 N. Main

Ouzo’s 269.373.6878

Paisano’s

Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill

16 N. Main St.

760 Butterworth

(Three Rivers) 269.278.8525

Papa Pete’s

Twisted Bull 3230 Eastern SE 616.245.0531

Van Andel Arena 130 W. Fulton

136 N. Whittaker St. (New Buffalo) 269.469.5800

Coral Gables/ Corner Bar 220 Water St.

(Richland)

Czars

State Theatre

(St. Joseph) 269.983.4111

404 S. Burdick

The Union 125 S. Kalamazoo Mall 269.384.6756

University Theatre

Gilmore Theatre Complex

506 Pleasant St.

Foundry Hall 422 Eagle St. (South Haven) 269.767.5453

Itty Bitty Bar & Grill 1136 Ottawa Beach Rd. (Holland)

1903 W. Washington 616.399.5731

The Venue

Kirby House

3750 E. Kilgore Rd. 2 Washington St. 269.345.1608

Waterfront 315 Columbia Ave. (Battle Creek) 269.962.7622

Wayside West

(Grand Haven) 616.846.3299

Lakeshore Tavern

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 1

Brown Bird, 9:30 p.m. Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Rick Chyme, Nixon Billy’s Lounge (GR) Sprague Brothers Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Bob Marley Birthday Bash Tour 2013 featuring Gizzae Czars (St. Joseph) Momcat, Rooster Illusion, 8:30-11:30 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Dan Cummins Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) The Skeletones Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Guy Voss H20 (Battle Creek) Harmony’s One-Year Birthday Party Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) Badfish: A Tribute To Sublime; Sin Theorem Intersection (GR) Flashback Fridays ‘80s Dance Party with DJ Kermit J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Glass House Jack’s Lounge (Spring Lake) Ladies Night In The Dark Room The Kirby House (Grand Haven) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) DJs Greg Knott & Jimmy Coe Monte’s (GR) Lo Mobb Mulligan’s (GR) Live DJ The Muze (Comstock Park) Sweet J Band, 10 p.m., free New Holland Brewing Co. (Holland) Ben Daniels Band Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Umphrey’s McGee, Greensky Bluegrass (18+) The Orbit Room (GR) Soap, Pleasant Drive, 8 p.m. Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) The Dread Return, Eye Remain, Blame The Victim, Through The Ashes, I Am Six, 7 p.m. Planet Rock (Battle Creek) Frontier Ruskus (Album Release), Pistolbrides, Pomegranates Pyramid Scheme (GR) Full Kontakt Karaoke Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Open Mic Night Quinn & Tuite’s (GR) Substance with DJ Brandon Hill, 10-2 a.m. Republic (GR) Dennie Middleton River Bend Bar (Ada)

1963 Lakeshore Dr. (Muskegon)

Lemonjello’s Coffee 61 E. 9th St.

Blackened Moon The Livery 190 5th St. Concert Hall 3208 S. MLK Blvd.

Colonial Bar & Grille 3425 S. MLK Blvd. 517.882.6132

Green Door 2005 E. Michigan 517.482.6376

Harper’s

502 S. Burdick 269.388.2196

Planet Live 191 Angell St. (Battle Creek) 269.962.2121

(Benton Harbor) 269.925.8760

New Holland Brewing Co. 66 E. 8th St. (Holland) 616.355.6422

Parrot’s Lounge

131 Albert Ave. 517.333.4040

Pint N’ Quart

Impulse II 600 N. Homer 517.333.9104

The Loft

950 W. Norton (Muskegon)

Red Dock

517.267.7898

269.857.2185

Mac’s Bar

Rosebud

Moriarty’s

100 Washington (Grand Haven) 616.846.7788

802 E. Michigan Ave. Rush Street 760 W. Broadway Ave. 517.485.5287 (Muskegon)

LAKESHORE

Val-Du-Lakes Bar & Grill

600 Fishermen St.

1511 N. Wilson Rd.

Boathouse (St. Joseph) 269.983.3455

Boathouse 449 Water St.

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 3

Sunday Night Hype 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Industry Night: Open Mich w/Big Nick,7 p.m.-close 36th Street Lounge Rock Room (Wyoming) Revival: 80s Dance Night w/ DJ Hustlah Billy’s Lounge (GR) Summer Sundays: American city themed events Blue Water Grill (GR) Trivia Sunday with Drew B. Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Industry Night Crush (found insde the B.O.B.) (GR) Blaze Dead Days Czars (St. Joseph) Grand Rapids Jazz Orchestra, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Founders (GR) HopCat Jazz Jam, 7 p.m.; Industry Night, 9 p.m. - close HopCat Brewery (GR) The Sunday Night Funnies with Twizz The Landing (GR) Mug Club, 2 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Bike Night Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) 7th Son, 6-9 p.m., TV for Superbowl Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Blues Jam, 6-9 p.m. Old Hat Brewery & Grill (Lawton) Request Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Action Item, Before You Exit, Hello Highway, Autumn’s Fall Pyramid Scheme (GR) Happy Hour, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Kermit’s Shit Show, 10 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR)

MONDAY FEBRUARY 4

219 Union St. 414 E. Michigan Ave. (Saugatuck) 2700 E. Michigan

Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Music Evolution Night with DJames JD Reardon’s (GR) Glass House Jack’s Lounge (Spring Lake) Karaoke Kuzzins Lounge (GR) The Skies Revolt, Adversary, All Wave, Heartside Hooligans, 7 p.m. Lemonjello’s Coffee (Holland) DJ Matt B Monte’s (GR) Daggerdown CD Release, Parkhurst, Bill Bondsmen, Nobody’s Favorite Mulligan’s (GR) Duffield Caron Project, 5-8 p.m.; Mushmen Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Desmond Jones, That Freak Quincy, 8 p.m. Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) David Allan Coe, 6:30 p.m. Planet Rock (Battle Creek) The Bergamot, Kari Lynch Trio, Zach DuBois, Alligator Blackbird Pyramid Scheme (GR) La Boutique with Sonnrize, Dawns on the Decks, 10 p.m. Republic (GR) Knives Are Quiet, Paucity, Soundmeetsound; Teazer’s 11th Annual Pub Crawl: Rocky’s is the 3rd Stop Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) First Annual Marleymas: Fundubmentals, Kalamazoo River Monsters, Skee Town Stylee, 10 p.m., free Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Static Saturday Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 2-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Male Dancing, 8 p.m. Studs Nightclub (GR) Filthy Cur and Jake Stilson Groundhogs Day Extravaganza! Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Hearts in Motion Dance Classes, 9:30 a.m.; Back Studio: AniJAM, 12:45 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR) DJ Creole, 11:30 p.m. Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

234 River (Holland) 616.396.4577

266 E. Michigan Ave. 517.484.6795

4072 Lake Michigan

616.272.3910

1601 Beach St.

(Silver Lake) 231.873.4901

West Side Inn 1635 Beidler St. (Muskegon)

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EVENT GUIDE

Wild Bull Saloon Kalamazoo Valley 139 S. Edward St. (Holland) 616.928.0699 Museum 269.978.8451 Little River 230 N. Rose St. Y Bar Casino 269.373.7990 2804 W. Michigan US-31 & M-22 Karovas/ (Manistee) Lamplighter 888.568.2244 LANSING

616.451.0044

633 Ottawa

M-43 & M-89

269.389.9349

M-89 Sports Bar River City Saloon 129 E. Allegan

45 S. Division SE

Captain Jack’s

Stage Coach Bar (Saugatuck) 269.857.2162

3406 Stadium Dr. 310 E. Michigan Ave. 269.375.1930

616.676.9785

HopCat Brewery Tavern on the 25 Ionia Ave. Square 616.451.HOPS

Brickyard Pub & Grille

8124 Fulton St. E (Ada) 5301 Comstock Ave.

Fenian’s Irish Pub 1152 Leonard NW 19683 Main St.

269.373.1412

The Orbit Room (Portage) 2525 Lake Eastbrook 269.327.2000

Republic

616.356.2000

126 E. Michigan

711 W. Michigan Ave. 269.629.9460

616.356.2000

(inside The B.O.B.)

Sportsman’s

Boomerang’s

20 Monroe

20 Monroe

(Fennville) 269.561.5889

Monte’s

1535 Plainfield NE

Eve

1590 56th St.

269.731.4911

438 Bridge NW

(Saugatuck) 269.857.2888

Side Track Bar & (Muskegon) 231.755.1555 Grille Casey’s

12504 East D Ave.

Division Avenue Arts Collective (DAAC)

(inside The B.O.B.)

269.342.7100

616.356.2000 thebob.com

68 Commerce

Dr. Grin’s Comedy Club

241 E. Kalamazoo

20 Monroe

616.559.8000

115 S. Division

KALAMAZOO

Shakespeare’s Lower Level

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OUTASIGHT

BassBin: Electronic Dance Night Billy’s Lounge (GR) Heartside Talent Show Auditions, 8 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Open Mic with John Sanger, 7-11 p.m. Gipper’s (GR) Adult Computer Class: Introduction to Computers, 11 a.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) Stone Thrown Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Michigan Monday, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Unplugged Open Mic, 9 p.m. JD Reardon’s (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) SIN: Service Industry Night, 7 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Open Mic Hosted by Gabriel James Monarchs’ Club (GR) Margarita Mondays Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Calling Clara Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Electronic Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) Monday Night Jazz, 8-11 p.m. Republic (GR) Free Bingo with prizes, 10 p.m. (21+) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Motown Monday with DJ Brandon Lawrence, free, 9 p.m. Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Hearts in Motion Dance Project, 5:30 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR)

@ PYRAMID SCHEME FEBRUARY 19 Live DJ Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Control with DJ Colin Clive Rocky’s Bar & Grill Uppercut (GR) Reggae, 10 p.m. The Root Gallery & Studio (GR) DJames and Friends The Score (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Salsa Friday: DJ Tropicz, 9 p.m., free Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Black Friday featuring DJ Jason Ash with special guests Sixx Nightclub (GR) Ladies Night (18+) Stagecoach Barn (Richland) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Male Dancing, 8 p.m. Studs Nightclub (GR) Nikki Hill, Delilah DeWylde & the Lost Boys Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) DJ LA, 11:30 p.m. Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 2

Whitey Morgan & the 78s Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Bob Marley Birthday Bash 2013 Billy’s Lounge (GR) John Barbush Trio, 8:30-11:30 p.m. Bistro Bella Vita (GR) The Turnips Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Kent County Teen Film Festival, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Celebration Cinema North (GR) Vince Miller Craftsman Chop Co. (Portage) Dani Jamerson Band Czars (St. Joseph) Of Virtue, Arson Our Savior, The After Effect, Aside The Ashes, Amoura, 7-11 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Dan Cummins Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) The Cheap Dates Flanagan’s (GR) Mega 80’s Intersection (GR) Shake It Saturday -- Top 40/Dub step with DJ Kermit J.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 5

Reggae with Ray Townsend 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Pastiche Open Mic, sign-up 7 p.m., free Acorn Theater (Three Oaks) Open Mic with Rebekah Rhys, full band or acoustic, plus free set recording Billy’s Lounge (GR) Heartside Talent Show Auditions, 8 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Poetry Begins with Azizi Hasani, 9-11 p.m. Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Scott Herriman Eastland Bowl (Kzoo) Open Mic Night featuring Jason Heystek & Nicholas James, 9 p.m. Founders (GR) Tuesday Evening Music Club Frederik Meijer Gardens (GR) Adult Computer Class: Introduction to E-mail, 3 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) Douglas James Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Black Squirrel University, 9 p.m. Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) Downtown Throwdown (half-off all booxe with food purchase), 6 p.m.-midnight HopCat Brewery (GR) Lotus, Moon Hooch Intersection (GR)


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EVENT GUIDE Open Mic with Valentiger J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Karaoke, 9 p.m. JD Reardon’s (GR) ARTbreak, 12 p.m. Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Mug Club, 4 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Meanwhile Film Series, 8 p.m., Wealthy Theatre Meanwhile (GR) 2-1-2 Party with DJ Jason Beeder Monte’s (GR) Toxic Trivia: Team Based Trivia, 10 p.m. - Midnight Mulligan’s (GR) Open Mic Night with Brendan Mann, 9 p.m., sign up at 7 p.m.; Tom Duffield, 5-8 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) 80’s & 90’s Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Trevor Atkinson, 9:30 p.m. (18+) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Open Mic Night with Adam Danis Sheakespeare’s Pub (Kzoo) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m.; Downtown Throwdown (half-off all booze 6 p.m.-midnight with $6 or more of food purchase) Stella’s Lounge (GR) Comedy Tuesdays, 9 p.m., free Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Meanwhile Film Series: Groundhog Day Wealthy Street Theatre (GR)

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 6

Karaoke 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Nathan Holley Live, free, 21+ Billy’s Lounge (GR) Gigatron Czars (St. Joseph) Comedy Night presented by Gary Fields, 7 & 9 p.m. Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Jazz Night Gilly’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Musical Open Mic with Adam Danis, 9 p.m. The Globe Theatre (Kzoo) Top Heavy Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Pitchers and Wings, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Open Mic Night with Teddy Roberts of Hampshire, 8-10 p.m. Lemonjello’s Coffee (Holland) Team Trivia, 7:30 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) STFU Dance with DJ Tyler & Mr. Lee (18+) The Loft @ Harem Urban Lounge (Lansing) Acoustic Reserve McFadden’s (GR) Karaoke The Muze (Comstock Park) Karaoke Night Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Ladies Night with Steven Lee Pesch Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Audition Night Parkway Tropics (GR) Team Trivia, 8:30 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Open Mic Wednesdays with Jim Prange, 9:30 p.m. The Rocket Lounge at Louie’s Bar (GR) New Holland Cabin Fever Promotion; Baconpalooza: free bacon night, 9-11 p.m. (or until out of bacon) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Open Mic w/ Adam Danis, sign up 8 p.m. Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) College Night Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Open Mic Night hosted by Nathan Kalish, 9 p.m. Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Point Eastown Meeting, 7 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR) Temple House Jam with King Crabapple West Side Inn (Musk)

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7

Open Mic w; Dirty Dave & Friends 36th Street Lounge Rock Room (Wyoming) Thursday Night at The Acorn, 9 p.m., free Acorn Theater (Three Oaks) Stray Birds Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Take Two Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Comedy Night featuring Bill Squire & Adam Degi Czars (St. Joseph) Shane Mauss Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Karaoke, 7-11 p.m. Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Gallo, Cabildo Founders (GR) Jazz Night Gilly’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Reading The Great Lakes, 7 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) The Cones Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Vinyl Thursday Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) $3 Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Kip Moore Intersection (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Three Buck Thursdays, 4 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Lifted Thursdays The Loft @ Harem Urban Lounge (Lansing) Wine School, on the lawn, 6-9 p.m. Mangiamo! (GR) 3-2-1 Party with DJ Mark Witz Monte’s (GR) The Welshie Project Mulligan’s (GR) Joe Seeley & featured guests Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) LGBT professional mixer, 6-9 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Candlebox, The Last Good Year, The Outer Vibe (16+) The Orbit Room (GR) Latin Salsa Night Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) The Come Up Vol. 5.1: Passalacqua, Mr. Everything, Famos Amos, Micky M-80 The Emcee, George Moss, DJ Ethan Stevens (Dirty Beatz) Pyramid Scheme (GR) Open Mic Night with Bruce Evans and Ian Flaherty, 8-11 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Flex.0, Murder Party!, guest Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Comedy Open Mic Night, 9 p.m. Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Country Thursday Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m.; $5 Burgers, 6-11 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) College Night with DJ Creole, 9-2 a.m. (18+) Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 8

Greensky Bluegrass, 9:30 p.m. Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo)

Hank Mowery Billy’s Lounge (GR) Rock Shop Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Shane Mauss Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Kathy Ford Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Jedi Mind Trip Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Guy Voss H20 (Battle Creek) Mushroomhead, Final Trigger, Gemini Syndrome, Society Vs Plague Intersection (GR) Flashback Fridays ‘80s Dance Party with DJ Kermit J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Paula Poundstone, 7:30 p.m., $24.50-$35 Kalamazoo State Theatre (Kzoo) Ladies Night In The Dark Room The Kirby House (Grand Haven) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) A benefit for The Opportunity Center: Joshua Davis Band The Livery (Benton Harbor) Decades McDuff’s Bar & Grill (Wayland) DJs Greg Knott & Jimmy Coe Monte’s (GR) Moto, Love Fossil, Bonehawk Mulligan’s (GR) Live DJ The Muze (Comstock Park) Delilah DeWylde & the Lost Boys, 10 p.m. New Holland Brewing Co. (Holland) Hired Hands, 5-8 p.m.; Ziggy and the Bitches Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Big Gigantic, Manic Focus (all-ages) The Orbit Room (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) The Darwin Project, 7 p.m. Planet Rock (Battle Creek) Talib Kweli, Mama Sol, A.B. Pyramid Scheme (GR) Full Kontakt Karaoke Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Open Mic Night Quinn & Tuite’s (GR) Substance with DJ Brandon Hill, 10-2 a.m. Republic (GR) Dennie Middleton River Bend Bar (Ada) The Moonrays Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Control with DJ Colin Clive Rocky’s Bar & Grill Uppercut (GR) Reggae, 10 p.m. The Root Gallery & Studio (GR) Briar Rabbit, 7 p.m., free Schuler’s Books & Music (GR) DJames and Friends The Score (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) ASSAULT II – The Return of DJ Assault, 10 p.m. Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Black Friday featuring DJ Jason Ash with special guests Sixx Nightclub (GR) Ladies Night (18+) Stagecoach Barn (Richland) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Male Dancing, 8 p.m. Studs Nightclub (GR) Part Time Warriorz, Patrick Weiland, Anastasia Gold Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Rock & Worship Roadshow Van Andel Arena (GR) DJ LA, 11:30 p.m. Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 9

Greensky Bluegrass, 9:30 p.m. Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Cabin Fever Blues Series featuring Reverend Raven Billy’s Lounge (GR) John Barbush Trio, 8:30-11:30 p.m. Bistro Bella Vita (GR) Rock Shop Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Fusion Czars (St. Joseph) Shane Mauss Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) The Mother Hips, Magic Box Founders (GR) ACT Prep Workshop, noon; Poetry Slam with Azizi Jasper, 3 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) Jedi Mind Trip Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Heavyweight Finals featuring The Severed Process, Seraphim, Flood The Desert, Divided They Fall, Aside The Ashes, Burden of Ages Intersection (GR) Shake It Saturday -- Top 40/Dub step with DJ Kermit J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Music Evolution Night with DJames JD Reardon’s (GR) Karaoke Kuzzins Lounge (GR) Exotic

Free Bingo with prizes, 10 p.m. (21+) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Motown Monday with DJ Brandon Lawrence, free, 9 p.m. Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Hearts in Motion Dance Project, 5:30 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR)

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 12

SHINEDOWN

KELLOGG ARENA FEBRUARY 13 Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Jim Prange & Justin Wierenga Last Chance Saloon (GR) Leo Nocentelli & Marcus Robinson The Livery (Benton Harbor) Decades McDuff’s Bar & Grill (Wayland) DJ Matt B Monte’s (GR) To Be Determined Mulligan’s (GR) Whiskey Pickers Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) Candlebox, 8 p.m. Planet Rock (Battle Creek) Joe Hertler and The Rainbow Seekers, The Soil & The Sun, Antrim Dells, Bennett Pyramid Scheme (GR) La Boutique with Sonnrize, Dawns on the Decks, 10 p.m. Republic (GR) The LoveHate, Nate & Cole Find A Radio, Bowery Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Ruth & Max Bloomquist Band, 8 p.m., $18 and up Seven Steps Up (Spring Lake) Double Shot of Rockin’ Soul Blues; Thirsty Perch Blues Band, The Root Doctor Band, 9 p.m., $10 Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Static Saturday Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 2-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Male Dancing, 8 p.m. Studs Nightclub (GR) Hangdog Hearts, Black Cat Bone, Uncle Don, Zack Godi Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Journey, Night Ranger, Loverboy Van Andel Arena (GR) Front Studio: Hearts in Motion Dance Classes, 9:30 a.m.; Back Studio: AniJAM, 12:45 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR) DJ Creole, 11:30 p.m. Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 10

Sunday Night Hype 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Industry Night: Open Mich w/Big Nick,7 p.m.-close 36th Street Lounge Rock Room (Wyoming) Revival: 80s Dance Night w/ DJ Hustlah Billy’s Lounge (GR) Summer Sundays: American city themed events Blue Water Grill (GR) Trivia Sunday with Drew B. Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Industry Night Crush (found insde the B.O.B.) (GR) An Evening With The Avett Brothers Deltaplex (GR) Lazy Blue Tunas Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) HopCat Jazz Jam, 7 p.m.; Industry Night, 9 p.m. - close HopCat Brewery (GR) The Sunday Night Funnies with Twizz The Landing (GR) Mug Club, 2 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Bike Night Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Anti-fracking Benefit for Michigan Land Air Water Defense: Andru Bemis, Red Tail Ring, 5-7 p.m., $10 Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Blues Jam, 6-9 p.m. Old Hat Brewery & Grill (Lawton) Request Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Happy Hour, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Kermit’s Shit Show, 10 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Jeff Dunham: Disorderly Conduct Van Andel Arena (GR)

MONDAY FEBRUARY 11

JEFF DUNHAM

VAN ANDEL ARENA FEBRUARY 10

Square Dance Kalamazoo! Old Clay Fields & Jo Mortland calling Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) BassBin: Electronic Dance Night Billy’s Lounge (GR) Open Mic with John Sanger, 7-11 p.m. Gipper’s (GR) Adult Computer Class: Basic Word Processing, 3 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) Yellow Brick Road Dueling Pianos Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Michigan Monday, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Unplugged Open Mic, 9 p.m. JD Reardon’s (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) SIN: Service Industry Night, 7 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Open Mic Hosted by Gabriel James Monarchs’ Club (GR) Margarita Mondays Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Old Dog Comedy Show: Alec Robbins Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Electronic Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) Speck Mountain, Tiger Waves, Fiona Dickinson Pyramid Scheme (GR) Monday Night Jazz, 8-11 p.m. Republic (GR)

Reggae with Ray Townsend 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Pastiche Open Mic, sign-up 7 p.m., free Acorn Theater (Three Oaks) Zydacrunch; Gumbo Challenge, 4 p.m. The B.O.B. (GR) Jimmie Stagger, David Molinari & Creolization Bar Divani (GR) Open Mic with Rebekah Rhys, full band or acoustic, plus free set recording Billy’s Lounge (GR) Fat Tuesday Gumbo Challenge: Zydecrunch, The Boscoe Gee Blues Band, Gumbo sampling, 4:30 p.m. Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Harry & the Potters, 7:30-11 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Arena District presents Mardi Gras, 4-11 p.m. Downtown Grand Rapids (GR) Poetry Begins with Azizi Hasani, 9-11 p.m. Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Scott Herriman Eastland Bowl (Kzoo) Open Mic Night featuring Jason Heystek & Nicholas James, 9 p.m. Founders (GR) Tuesday Evening Music Club Frederik Meijer Gardens (GR) The Cheap Dates Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Black Squirrel University, 9 p.m. Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) Downtown Throwdown (half-off all booxe with food purchase), 6 p.m.-midnight HopCat Brewery (GR) Misery Signals Intersection (GR) Open Mic with Valentiger J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Karaoke, 9 p.m. JD Reardon’s (GR) ARTbreak, 12 p.m. Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Mug Club, 4 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Meanwhile Film Series, 8 p.m., Wealthy Theatre Meanwhile (GR) 2-1-2 Party with DJ Jason Beeder Monte’s (GR) Toxic Trivia: Team Based Trivia, 10 p.m. - Midnight Mulligan’s (GR) Open Mic Night with Brendan Mann, 9 p.m., sign up at 7 p.m.; Tom Duffield, 5-8 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) 80’s & 90’s Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) Erin McKeown, Jenn Grant Pyramid Scheme (GR) Mardi Gras: Open Mic plus beads for all who show their Chest Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Open Mic Night with Adam Danis Sheakespeare’s Pub (Kzoo) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m.; Downtown Throwdown (half-off all booze 6 p.m.-midnight with $6 or more of food purchase) Stella’s Lounge (GR) Comedy Tuesdays, 9 p.m., free Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Meanwhile Film Series: Wizard Of Oz Wealthy Street Theatre (GR)

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 13

Karaoke 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Nathan Holley Live, free, 21+ Billy’s Lounge (GR) Gigatron Czars (St. Joseph) The Rutabaga, Nathan K, Strawberry Heritage, 8-11 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Comedy Night presented by Gary Fields, 7 & 9 p.m. Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Jazz Night Gilly’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Musical Open Mic with Adam Danis, 9 p.m. The Globe Theatre (Kzoo) Adult Computer Class: Basic Internet, 3 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) The Turnips Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Pitchers and Wings, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Team Trivia, 7:30 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) STFU Dance with DJ Tyler & Mr. Lee (18+) The Loft @ Harem Urban Lounge (Lansing) Acoustic Reserve McFadden’s (GR) Karaoke The Muze (Comstock Park) Karaoke Night Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Alison Wonderland with David Lloyd, 5-8 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Audition Night Parkway Tropics (GR) Almost Kings, Surrender The Fall, 8 p.m. Planet Rock (Battle Creek) Team Trivia, 8:30 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Open Mic Wednesdays with Jim Prange, 9:30 p.m. The Rocket Lounge at Louie’s Bar (GR) New Holland Cabin Fever Promotion; Baconpalooza: free bacon night, 9-11 p.m. (or until out of bacon) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Open Mic w/ Adam Danis, sign up 8 p.m. Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) College Night Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Open Mic Night hosted by Nathan Kalish, 9 p.m. Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Point Eastown Meeting, 7 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR) Temple House Jam with King Crabapple West Side Inn (Musk)

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 14

Open Mic w; Dirty Dave & Friends 36th Street Lounge Rock


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EVENT GUIDE Room (Wyoming) Thursday Night at The Acorn, 9 p.m., free Acorn Theater (Three Oaks) The Rachael Davis Band Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Sweet J Band Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Karaoke with D-Mic Czars (St. Joseph) Cloakroom, 7:30-11:30 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Karaoke, 7-11 p.m. Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) The Pimps Of Joytime, Lucas Wilson Founders (GR) Jazz Night Gilly’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Tony Reynolds Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Vinyl Thursday Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) $3 Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Three Buck Thursdays, 4 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Lifted Thursdays The Loft @ Harem Urban Lounge (Lansing) Wine School, on the lawn, 6-9 p.m. Mangiamo! (GR) 3-2-1 Party with DJ Mark Witz Monte’s (GR) Joe Seeley & featured guests Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Happy Valentines Day! Dinner Specials for Two, 5-8 p.m.; Singing Valentine Pinup Girls, 8 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Latin Salsa Night Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) Sun Tzu Cadre, Phillies Blunt with The Wisemen, Rick Chyme, Rod B Gutta, DJ Sicari Pyramid Scheme (GR) Open Mic Night with Bruce Evans and Ian Flaherty, 8-11 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) The Gentlemen At Large present: A Valentine’s Day Soiree: 80s Dance, 8:30 p.m. Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) The Malah, DJ Gami, 9 p.m., $5 adv, $8 dos Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Country Thursday Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m.; $5 Burgers, 6-11 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) College Night with DJ Creole, 9-2 a.m. (18+) Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 15

The Black Diamond Experience Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Rocket 8 Billy’s Lounge (GR) Sprague Brothers Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Delilah DeWylde & the Lost Boys Chamber Bar (Whitehall) J.R. Clark Blues Band Czars (St. Joseph) Hold For Kelby D.A.A.C. (GR) Skin Deep Body Art Expo Deltaplex (GR) Drop 35 Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Brena Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Guy Voss H20 (Battle Creek) Mega 80’s Intersection (GR) Flashback Fridays ‘80s Dance Party with DJ Kermit J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Ladies Night In The Dark Room The Kirby House (Grand Haven) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR)

Decades The Landing (GR) The Fever Haze, Natively Foreign, Elliot Street Lunatic, Cain Marko, Along the Shore, 7 p.m. Lemonjello’s Coffee (Holland)

Jake & the Carnies Radisson Hotel (GR) Substance with DJ Brandon Hill, 10-2 a.m. Republic (GR) Dennie Middleton River Bend Bar (Ada) Live DJ Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Control with DJ Colin Clive Rocky’s Bar & Grill Uppercut (GR) Reggae, 10 p.m. The Root Gallery & Studio (GR) DJames and Friends The Score (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Black Friday featuring DJ Jason Ash with special guests Sixx Nightclub (GR) Ladies Night (18+) Stagecoach Barn (Richland) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Male Dancing, 8 p.m. Studs Nightclub (GR) Greg Nagy, Deborah Kay and the Bluebloods Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) DJ LA, 11:30 p.m. Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 16

TALIB KWELI

@ PYRAMID SCHEME FEBRUARY 8 DJs Greg Knott & Jimmy Coe Monte’s (GR) Flex.0 Mulligan’s (GR) Live DJ The Muze (Comstock Park) Romance For Ransom, 10 p.m., free New Holland Brewing Co. (Holland) Fauxgrass Music Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Indigo Sun, Pleasant Drive Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) Eye Empire, 8 p.m. Planet Rock (Battle Creek) Full Kontakt Karaoke Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Open Mic Night Quinn & Tuite’s (GR) Cooper’s Glen: The Great Lakes Acoustic Music Festival featuring Foghorn Stringband, Detour, Mike Compton & David Grier, Joel Mabus, John Williams & Dean MaGraw, Reverend Robert Jones, Miss Tess & the Talkbacks, Black

Potato Moon Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Cabin Fever Blues Series featuring Damon Fowler Billy’s Lounge (GR) John Barbush Trio, 8:30-11:30 p.m. Bistro Bella Vita (GR) Brian Randall Band Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) PotatoeBabies Anti-Valentine Party to Benefit Crash’s Landing featuring The Jet Beats, Deborah Kay & the Bluebloods, Persistent Flashback Disorder, 8 p.m. Clique Lanes (GR) Tom Northrup Craftsman Chop Co. (Portage) Slim Gypsy Baggage Czars (St. Joseph) Three Cents Short, Kastanza, The Cardboard Swords, Fulton D.A.A.C. (GR) Skin Deep Body Art Expo Deltaplex (GR) Three’s A Crowd Flanagan’s (GR) Elephant Revival, Birds of Chicago Founders (GR) Brena Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Panama Intersection (GR) Shake It Saturday -- Top 40/Dub step with DJ Kermit J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Music Evolution Night with DJames JD Reardon’s (GR) Karaoke Kuzzins Lounge (GR) Decades The Landing (GR) DJ Matt B Monte’s (GR) The Legal Immigrants Mulligan’s (GR) Delilah DeWylde & the Lost Boys, 9 p.m. Odd Sides Ales (Grand Haven) Duffield Caron Project, 5-8 p.m.; Chuck Whiting and his Rowdy Friends, 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Another Lost Year, Trust No One, 10 Gauge Rage, 7 p.m. Planet Rock (Battle Creek) TEAM Benefit Pyramid Scheme (GR) Cooper’s Glen: The Great Lakes Acoustic Music Festival featuring Foghorn Stringband, Detour, Mike Compton & David Grier, Joel Mabus, John Williams & Dean MaGraw, Reverend Robert Jones, Miss Tess & the Talkbacks, Black

Jake & the Carnies Radisson Hotel (GR) La Boutique with Sonnrize, Dawns on the Decks, 10 p.m. Republic (GR) Post V-Day Massacre: Four Lincolns and Slow Buffalo, Pete Bass Band Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Crazy 80’s Party: Starfarm, 9:30 p.m., $5 Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Static Saturday Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 2-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Male Dancing, 8 p.m. Studs Nightclub (GR) Paul Collins Beat, The Boss Mustangs Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Luke Bryan: Dirt Road Diaries Tour Van Andel Arena (GR) Front Studio: Hearts in Motion Dance Classes, 9:30 a.m.; Back Studio: AniJAM, 12:45 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR) DJ Creole, 11:30 p.m. Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 17

Sunday Night Hype 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Industry Night: Open Mich w/Big Nick,7 p.m.-close 36th Street Lounge Rock Room (Wyoming) Revival: 80s Dance Night w/ DJ Hustlah Billy’s Lounge (GR) Summer Sundays: American city themed events Blue Water Grill (GR) Trivia Sunday with Drew B. Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Industry Night Crush (found insde the B.O.B.) (GR) Skin Deep Body Art Expo Deltaplex (GR) Taste Of Soul Sunday featuring Serita’s Black Rose, 1 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) Sweet J Band Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) HopCat Jazz Jam, 7 p.m.; Industry Night, 9 p.m. - close HopCat Brewery (GR) The Sunday Night Funnies with Twizz The Landing (GR) Mug Club, 2 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Bike Night Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Double Strung, 6-9 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Blues Jam, 6-9 p.m. Old Hat Brewery & Grill (Lawton) Request Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) The Last Vampyre on Earth (Movie Premier) Pyramid Scheme (GR) Happy Hour, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Kermit’s Shit Show, 10 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) RAIN: Experience The Beatles Van Andel Arena (GR)

MONDAY FEBRUARY 18

BassBin: Electronic Dance Night Billy’s Lounge (GR) Open Mic with John Sanger, 7-11 p.m. Gipper’s (GR) Shelagh Brown Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Michigan Monday, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Unplugged Open Mic, 9 p.m. JD Reardon’s (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR)


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EVENT GUIDE SIN: Service Industry Night, 7 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Open Mic Hosted by Gabriel James Monarchs’ Club (GR) Margarita Mondays Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) K.L.O.B.: Kalamazoo Libation Organization of Brewers Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Electronic Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) Monday Night Jazz, 8-11 p.m. Republic (GR) Free Bingo with prizes, 10 p.m. (21+) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Motown Monday with DJ Brandon Lawrence, free, 9 p.m. Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Hearts in Motion Dance Project, 5:30 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR)

ARTbreak, 12 p.m. Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Mug Club, 4 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Meanwhile Film Series, 8 p.m., Wealthy Theatre Meanwhile (GR) 2-1-2 Party with DJ Jason Beeder Monte’s (GR) Toxic Trivia: Team Based Trivia, 10 p.m. - Midnight Mulligan’s (GR) Open Mic Night with Brendan Mann, 9 p.m., sign up at 7 p.m.; Tom Duffield, 5-8 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) 80’s & 90’s Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Parkway Tropics (GR) The Ready Set, Outasight Pyramid Scheme (GR) Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Trevor Atkinson, 9:30 p.m. (18+) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Open Mic Night with Adam Danis Sheakespeare’s Pub

Open Mic Night with Bruce Evans and Ian Flaherty, 8-11 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Exotic Dancing, 11:30 a.m. Sensations (GR) Comedy Open Mic Night, 9 p.m. Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Country Thursday Sixx Nightclub (GR) Delilah DeWylde & the Lost Boys, The Crane Wives St. Cecilia (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m.; $5 Burgers, 6-11 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) The Deadstring Brothers, Nathan Kalish and the Wildfire, Dutch Henry Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) College Night with DJ Creole, 9-2 a.m. (18+) Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Male Dancing, 8 p.m. Studs Nightclub (GR) DJ LA, 11:30 p.m. Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo) Decades Woody’s (GR)

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22

Head For The Hills Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Brewers Guild Party featuring The Veloras, Cave People, DJ Dr. Joel Billy’s Lounge (GR) 3’s A Crowd Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Sam Goodie Czars (St. Joseph) Lakeland, She Screams Of Royalty, Designs, I’m William Cutting, The Dockside Fever, 7 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Kevin Pollack Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Montage Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Drop 35 H20 (Battle Creek) WYCU Jammie Awards Intersection (GR) Flashback Fridays ‘80s Dance Party with DJ Kermit J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Ladies Night In The Dark Room The Kirby House (Grand Haven) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) DJs Greg Knott & Jimmy Coe Monte’s (GR) Cult Pizza Benefit, Blank States (Release) Mulligan’s (GR) Live DJ The Muze (Comstock Park) Top Heavy, 10 p.m., free New Holland Brewing Co. (Holland) Captain Ivory wsg Branden Mann Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Short Tap Takeover for Winter Beer Fest; Super Happy Funtime Burlesque: Love Show Pyramid Scheme (GR) Full Kontakt Karaoke Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Open Mic Night Quinn & Tuite’s (GR) Substance with DJ Brandon Hill, 10-2 a.m. Republic (GR) Dennie Middleton River Bend Bar (Ada) The Moonrays Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Control with DJ Colin Clive Rocky’s Bar & Grill Uppercut (GR) Reggae, 10 p.m. The Root Gallery & Studio (GR) DJames and Friends The Score (GR) Jahman Brahman, That Freak Quincy, 10 p.m., $5 Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Black Friday featuring DJ Jason Ash with special guests Sixx Nightclub (GR) Ladies Night (18+) Stagecoach Barn (Richland)

SENA EHRHARDT

@ BILLY’S LOUNGE FEBRUARY 23

TESTAMENT @ INTERSECTION FEBRUARY 21 TUESDAY FEBRUARY 19

Reggae with Ray Townsend 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Pastiche Open Mic, sign-up 7 p.m., free Acorn Theater (Three Oaks) Open Mic with Rebekah Rhys, full band or acoustic, plus free set recording Billy’s Lounge (GR) Poetry Begins with Azizi Hasani, 9-11 p.m. Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Scott Herriman Eastland Bowl (Kzoo) Open Mic Night featuring Jason Heystek & Nicholas James, 9 p.m. Founders (GR) Tuesday Evening Music Club Frederik Meijer Gardens (GR) Adult Computer Class: Family Trees on Ancestry.com, 6:45 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) Michael Hawkes Show Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Black Squirrel University, 9 p.m. Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) Downtown Throwdown (half-off all booxe with food purchase), 6 p.m.-midnight HopCat Brewery (GR) Gaelic Storm Intersection (GR) Open Mic with Valentiger J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Karaoke, 9 p.m. JD Reardon’s (GR)

THE READY SET @ PYRAMID SCHEME FEBRUARY 19

(Kzoo) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m.; Downtown Throwdown (half-off all booze 6 p.m.-midnight with $6 or more of food purchase) Stella’s Lounge (GR) Comedy Tuesdays, 9 p.m., free Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Meanwhile Film Series: The Warriors Wealthy Street Theatre (GR)

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 20

Karaoke 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Nathan Holley Live, free, 21+ Billy’s Lounge (GR) Gigatron Czars (St. Joseph) Comedy Night presented by Gary Fields, 7 & 9 p.m. Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Jazz Night Gilly’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Musical Open Mic with Adam Danis, 9 p.m. The Globe Theatre (Kzoo) Adult Computer Class: Internet Security 101, 11 a.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) The Northern Skies Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Pitchers and Wings, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Man Man, Murder By Death Intersection (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Team Trivia, 7:30 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) STFU Dance with DJ Tyler & Mr. Lee (18+) The Loft @ Harem Urban Lounge (Lansing) Acoustic Reserve McFadden’s (GR) Karaoke The Muze (Comstock Park) Karaoke Night Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Ladies Night with Steven Lee Pesch Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Audition Night Parkway Tropics (GR) Team Trivia, 8:30 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Open Mic Wednesdays with Jim Prange, 9:30 p.m. The Rocket Lounge at Louie’s Bar (GR) New Holland Cabin Fever Promotion; Baconpalooza: free bacon night, 9-11 p.m. (or until out of bacon) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Open Mic w/ Adam Danis, sign up 8 p.m. Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) College Night Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Open Mic Night hosted by Nathan Kalish, 9 p.m. Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Point Eastown Meeting, 7 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR) Temple House Jam with King Crabapple West Side Inn (Musk)

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 21

Open Mic w; Dirty Dave & Friends 36th Street Lounge Rock Room (Wyoming) Thursday Night at The Acorn, 9 p.m., free Acorn Theater (Three Oaks) Madcat Midnight Blues Journey Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Brena Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Karaoke with D-Mic Czars (St. Joseph) Kevin Pollack Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Karaoke, 7-11 p.m. Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Oreo Jones, Punksuhate Founders (GR) Jazz Night Gilly’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Drop 35 Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Vinyl Thursday Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) $3 Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Testament, Over Kill, Flotsam and Jetsam, 4 Arm Intersection (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Three Buck Thursdays, 4 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Lifted Thursdays The Loft @ Harem Urban Lounge (Lansing) Wine School, on the lawn, 6-9 p.m. Mangiamo! (GR) 3-2-1 Party with DJ Mark Witz Monte’s (GR) Fine Fine Titans, Lakota De Kai, Motives Mulligan’s (GR) Joe Seeley & featured guests Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Latin Salsa Night Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Invisible Mansion, Mehrunes Dagon, Inflatable Best Friend, Astro Bats, The Fever Haze Pyramid Scheme (GR)

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 23

Cosby Sweater, DJ Bosco Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) Cabin Fever Blues Series featuring Sena Ehrhardt Billy’s Lounge (GR) John Barbush Trio, 8:30-11:30 p.m. Bistro Bella Vita (GR) 3’s A Crowd Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) The Recent Czars (St. Joseph) TNT Impact Wrestling Deltaplex (GR) Kevin Pollack Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Dragon Wagon Founders (GR) Using Facebook to Promote Your Business, 7 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) Montage Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Drop 35 H20 (Battle Creek) Hopsin; Conspirator, Break Science, Ty Beat Intersection (GR) Shake It Saturday -- Top 40/Dub step with DJ Kermit J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) Music Evolution Night with DJames JD Reardon’s (GR) Karaoke Kuzzins Lounge (GR) Fine Fine Titans, Good Luck Varsity, 1876, Narco Debut, Red Legs, 7 p.m. Lemonjello’s Coffee (Holland) Women with Heart Rock! Charlene Jones & Friends The Livery (Benton Harbor) Jim Prange Malarky’s (GR) DJ Matt B Monte’s (GR) The Hex Bombs, Murder Party! Mulligan’s (GR) Duffield Caron Project, 5-8 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo)


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EVENT GUIDE PFX: The Pink Floyd Experience (all-ages) The Orbit Room (GR) Haunted Leather (LP Release), HTAFM, Paucity Pyramid Scheme (GR) La Boutique with Sonnrize, Dawns on the Decks, 10 p.m. Republic (GR) The Sailor Kicks, A.C. Smith, AntiLogical Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Pat McGee wsg Liz Longley, 8 p.m., $30 and up Seven Steps Up (Spring Lake) Designer Drugs, Muzzy, Slim Tim, Popshit, 10 p.m. Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Static Saturday Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 2-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Male Dancing, 8 p.m. Studs Nightclub (GR) The Goddamn Gallows, Jayke Orvis, 3 p.m.; The ChupaCobras Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Hearts in Motion Dance Classes, 9:30 a.m.; Back Studio: AniJAM, 12:45 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR) DJ Creole, 11:30 p.m. Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo) Decades Woody’s (GR)

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 24

Sunday Night Hype 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Industry Night: Open Mich w/Big Nick,7 p.m.-close 36th Street Lounge Rock Room (Wyoming) Revival: 80s Dance Night w/ DJ Hustlah Billy’s Lounge (GR) Summer Sundays: American city themed events Blue Water Grill (GR) Trivia Sunday with Drew B. Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Industry Night Crush (found insde the B.O.B.) (GR) Diskfunktional Sunday Founders (GR) Decades Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) HopCat Jazz Jam, 7 p.m.; Industry Night, 9 p.m. - close HopCat Brewery (GR) The Sunday Night Funnies with Twizz The Landing (GR) Irish Session The Livery (Benton Harbor) Apostles, Antique Scream, Vedma Mulligan’s (GR) Bike Night Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Open Mic Fundraiser WMU Student Music Therepy, 2-5 p.m.; Crossroads Blues Band, 6-9 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Blues Jam, 6-9 p.m. Old Hat Brewery & Grill (Lawton) Request Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Happy Hour, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Kermit’s Shit Show, 10 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Ellen Jewell, Chuck Whiting and His Rowdy Friends Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR)

MONDAY FEBRUARY 25

BassBin: Electronic Dance Night Billy’s Lounge (GR) Hold For Mike, 5 p.m. D.A.A.C. (GR) Open Mic with John Sanger, 7-11 p.m. Gipper’s (GR) Great Scott Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Michigan Monday, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR)

Unplugged Open Mic, 9 p.m. JD Reardon’s (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) SIN: Service Industry Night, 7 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Open Mic Hosted by Gabriel James Monarchs’ Club (GR) Margarita Mondays Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) G.L.A.M.A.: Great Lakes Acoustic Music Association Jam Session Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Electronic Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Monday Night Jazz, 8-11 p.m. Republic (GR) Free Bingo with prizes, 10 p.m. (21+) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Motown Monday with DJ Brandon Lawrence, free, 9 p.m. Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Maroon 5, Neon Trees, Owl City Van Andel Arena (GR) Front Studio: Hearts in Motion Dance Project, 5:30 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR)

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 26

Reggae with Ray Townsend 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Pastiche Open Mic, sign-up 7 p.m., free Acorn Theater (Three Oaks) Open Mic with Rebekah Rhys, full band or acoustic, plus free set recording Billy’s Lounge (GR) Poetry Begins with Azizi Hasani, 9-11 p.m. Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Scott Herriman Eastland Bowl (Kzoo) Open Mic Night featuring Jason Heystek & Nicholas James, 9 p.m. Founders (GR) Tuesday Evening Music Club Frederik Meijer Gardens (GR) Adult Computer Class: Word Processing II & Spreadheets, 7 p.m. Grand Rapids Public Library (Main) (GR) Bryan Michael Fischer Band Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Black Squirrel University, 9 p.m. Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) Downtown Throwdown (half-off all booxe with food purchase), 6 p.m.-midnight HopCat Brewery (GR) Tom Keifer Intersection (GR) Open Mic with Valentiger J. Gardella’s Tavern (GR) ARTbreak, 12 p.m. Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (Kzoo) Mug Club, 4 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Meanwhile Film Series, 8 p.m., Wealthy Theatre Meanwhile (GR) 2-1-2 Party with DJ Jason Beeder Monte’s (GR) Toxic Trivia: Team Based Trivia, 10 p.m. - Midnight Mulligan’s (GR) Green Drinks Meeting, 6 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) 80’s & 90’s Night with DJ Gami Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) hed (PE), 8 p.m. Planet Rock (Battle Creek) Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Trevor Atkinson, 9:30 p.m. (18+) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Open Mic Night with Adam Danis Sheakespeare’s Pub (Kzoo) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m.; Downtown Throwdown (half-off all booze 6 p.m.-midnight with $6 or more of food purchase) Stella’s Lounge (GR) Comedy Tuesdays, 9 p.m., free Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR)

Meanwhile Film Series: Soylent Green Wealthy Street Theatre (GR)

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 27

Karaoke 36th Street Lounge (Wyoming) Nathan Holley Live, free, 21+ Billy’s Lounge (GR) Gigatron Czars (St. Joseph) Comedy Night presented by Gary Fields, 7 & 9 p.m. Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Jazz Night Gilly’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Musical Open Mic with Adam Danis, 9 p.m. The Globe Theatre (Kzoo) Blue Effect Gun Lake Casino (Wayland) Pitchers and Wings, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Exotic Dancing, 11 a.m. Lady Godiva’s (GR) Team Trivia, 7:30 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) STFU Dance with DJ Tyler & Mr. Lee (18+) The Loft @ Harem Urban Lounge (Lansing) Acoustic Reserve McFadden’s (GR) Karaoke Night Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Alison Wonderland with David Lloyd, 5-8 p.m. Old Dog Tavern (Kzoo) Audition Night Parkway Tropics (GR) Jimkata, Arpetrio Pyramid Scheme (GR) Team Trivia, 8:30 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Open Mic Wednesdays with Jim Prange, 9:30 p.m. The Rocket Lounge at Louie’s Bar (GR) New Holland Cabin

Fever Promotion; Baconpalooza: free bacon night, 9-11 p.m. (or until out of bacon) Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Open Mic w/ Adam Danis, sign up 8 p.m. Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) College Night Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) Open Mic Night hosted by Nathan Kalish, 9 p.m. Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill (GR) Front Studio: Point Eastown Meeting, 7 p.m. Wealthy Street Theatre (GR) Temple House Jam with King Crabapple West Side Inn (Musk)

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 28

Open Mic w; Dirty Dave & Friends 36th Street Lounge Rock Room (Wyoming) Thursday Night at The Acorn, 9 p.m., free Acorn Theater (Three Oaks) Zach Deputy Bell’s Eccentric Cafe (Kzoo) The Electric Red Bobarino’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Karaoke with D-Mic Czars (St. Joseph) Bret Ernst Dr. Grins Comedy Club (GR) Karaoke, 7-11 p.m. Firekeepers Casino (Battle Creek) Roster McCabe, The Floorwalkers Founders (GR) Jazz Night Gilly’s (found inside the B.O.B.) (GR) Vinyl Thursday Harmony Brewing Co. (GR) $3 Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. HopCat Brewery (GR) Dustin Lynch, Brian Lorente and the Usual Suspects, Kari Lynch Band Intersection (GR) Three Buck Thursdays, 4 p.m. The Livery (Benton Harbor) Lifted Thursdays The Loft @ Harem Urban Lounge (Lansing) Wine School, on the lawn, 6-9 p.m. Mangiamo! (GR) 3-2-1 Party with DJ Mark Witz Monte’s (GR) Small Town Victory Mulligan’s (GR) Joe Seeley & featured guests Nick Fink’s (Comstock Park) Latin Salsa Night Papa Pete’s (Kzoo) Open Mic Night with Bruce Evans and Ian Flaherty, 8-11 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube (Kentwood) Thundercats Thursday featuring Juxtapose, Gentlemen At Large Rocky’s Bar & Grill (GR) Jim Kata, Kyckstands, 9 p.m., $5 adv, $8 dos Shakespeare’s Lower Level (Kzoo) Country Thursday Sixx Nightclub (GR) Happy Hour, 4-6 p.m.; $5 Burgers, 6-11 p.m. Stella’s Lounge (GR) College Night with DJ Creole, 9-2 a.m. (18+) Wild Bull Saloon (Kzoo)

WILD BELLE

LADIES LITERARY CLUB FEBRUARY 20

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Recoil February 2013