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The Practice of Developing and Maintaining a Strategic Plan DISCOVERY WORKBOOK Congregational Development Edition – First Edition Copyright Š 2014 by Scarborough Consulting Services ISBN: 978-0-615-97564-1 Requests for information should be addressed to:

Scarborough Consulting Services 2130 Pecan Trail Dr. Richmond, Texas 77406 www.askscs.com

Cover Design by Jordan Doherty Printed and Assembled by KEPHA Resources, INC Church Communication Specialists Toll free: 800.342.3319 www.kepha.com

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means---electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other---except for brief quotations in printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher.


Congregational Development Strategic Planning WORKBOOK OUTLINE I.

THE PRACTICE a. Preface …………………………………………………………………………………………….…….…… 7 b. The Eight-Stage Process of Creating Major Change ..………………………….…..…... 9 c. Scarborough Consulting Services Overview ..……………………………………….…….. 10 d. The Basic Questions …………………………………………………………………………….…….. 12 e. Vision-Driven Planning Process …………………………………………………………….……. 13 f. Procedures PART 1 – Creating the Vision Document …………………………….……………. 17 PART 2 – Converting the Vision Document into an Actionable Plan .. 19 PART 3 – Following up on the Vision Document and Plan ……………….. 21 g. Epilogue – The Jesus Model and the 10 year old Soccer League …………………. 25 h. References …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 35

II.

BACKGROUND MATERIAL a. Current State Summary ……………………………………………………………………….…….. 39 b. Mapping Organization and Ministries …………………………………………………….….. 41 c. Taking a Current State Survey (12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior) ….…… 43 d. Developing a Communication Plan ……………………………………………………….……. 51 e. Discovering Future Members ……………………………………………………………….……. 53

III.

DEFINING YOUR CORE VALUES a. Definition …………………………………………………………………………………………….…….. 57 b. Worksheet …………………………………………………………………………………………….…… 59

IV.

AFFIRMING YOUR MISSION STATEMENT a. Definition …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 63 b. Worksheet ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 65

V.

DISCERNING YOUR VISION FOCUS a. Definition …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 73 b. Worksheet ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 75

VI.

REALIZING YOUR VISION – THE PLAN a. Definition …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 83 b. Worksheet ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 85 c. Example Plan ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 87

VII.

BIOGRAPHY ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 97

VIII.

NOTES ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 101

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning WORKBOOK WORKSHEETS Worksheet Name Exhibit Number 1. Current State Summary II-3 2. Ministry Map II-4 3. 12 Marks Survey II-5.2 4. 12 Marks Score Sheet II-5.3 5. Communication Planning II-6.1 6. Discovering Future Members II-7 7. Core Values – Write a Book III-4 8. Discerning Mission Statement IV-4 9. Vision Event V-4 10. Goal Development VI-4 11. Plan Example VI-5

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Section I THE PRACTICE


Congregational Development Strategic Planning WORKBOOK Strategic planning is set of processes and skills when applied will enable the congregation's vision. It creates a focused list of things-to-do that are shared by its leaders and members. However, if we are not practicing Jesus' commandment to love God and each other while working together, the planning process is simply a waste of time. Also, if we are not forming ourselves into the likeness of Christ and developing critical team skills we will find it difficult to be effective stewards of God's Kingdom. PREFACE Strategic Planning can be a consuming task, albeit important. Its importance drives the need to understand where we are, where we want to go and then make a list of things-to-do to get us there. It is as simple as that! Much like the golf, it is a simple game, it is just not easy. This Workbook has been developed to ease the burden, providing a tested approach for volunteer leadership teams to use in developing and maintaining a strategic plan. In a church environment, it can become a spiritual practice. Understanding where we are includes an honest assessment of current state - what’s working, not working, feedback on the various ministries, products, services, a clear sense of purpose/ mission, what we value most, as evidenced by our history/story and a clear understanding of how products, services and ministries are delivered. Where we want to go is a description of some future state, a real sense of expectation of something better. A vivid word picture that is achievable. The list of things-to-do includes goals, objectives, timing with assignments/ accountability, funding, and how the organization is to function with roles and responsibilities clearly defined to support these activities. These goals must be transparently aligned with the vision within the scope of the mission, acting through the core values. Strategic Planning is an act of stewardship. Strategic Planning is being a good steward. Stewardship is the careful and responsible management of something entrusted to one's care. From a Christian perspective, it is everything you do, with everything you have, after you say “I believe”. Everything includes time, talent and treasure. The strategic plan accounts for all these things. It is a year round process of monitoring progress, overcoming obstacles, celebrating successes, developing relationships, giving thanks, prayer, and managing changes and budgets. My clients are primarily volunteer leadership teams in churches, Boards and small businesses owners with limited staff, time and budget for planning, managing a plan or introspection of their business. They need simple processes and a reasonable set of skills to develop, implement and maintain the strategic plan.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning WORK BOOK

Based on 30 years of Engineering and Corporate Business experience including the application of Information Technology Enterprise Architecture, translating business plans into technology plans, Deming’s quality tools, Break Through Teamwork concepts by Dennis Romig and John Kotter’s “The Eight-Stage Process of Creating Major Change”, I have developed a set of basic questions, processes and procedures when used will generate a “Strategic Plan”. This approach can be used in a concentrated focus session, two day retreat, or over an extended period. The extended period is recommended, allowing for client and constituent feedback and ownership. Although most of the work is done through a series of 3 to 4 hour workshops, pre-work activities are required to document organization history and structure, community trends, business and ministry areas processes and a finally a current state survey. After the Vision Document has been approved and prior to developing goals and objectives, the task of describing future members, customers and those you impact is a follow up activity. The process is best lead by the incumbent leader assisted as necessary by an outside facilitator, someone who will honor the process and be willing to take an objective view of the results. This particular approach has broad application and has be used with over 35 church congregations ranging in size from 80 to 2000 average Sunday attendance (ASA), 3 Episcopal Dioceses, Small Businesses, Community Organizations, Trade Associations, and School and other Boards. For more information about the application of these tools and process, please contact me at reb@askscs.com. Reb Scarborough Richmond, TX February 2014 281 415-6086

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning The Eight-Stage Process of Creating Major Change - Kotter 1. ESTABLISHING A SENSE OF URGENCY  Examining the market and competitive realities  Identifying and discussing crises, potential crises, or major opportunities 2. CREATING THE GUIDING COALITION  Putting together a group with enough power to lead the change  Getting the group to work together like a team 3. DEVELOPING A VISION AND STRATEGY  Creating a vision to help direct the change effort  Developing strategies for achieving that vision 4. COMMUNCATING THE CHANGE VISION  Using every vehicle possible to constantly communicate the new vision and strategies  Having the guiding coalition role model the behavior expected of employees 5.   

EMPOWERING BROAD-BASED ACTION Getting rid of obstacles Changing systems of structures that undermine the change vision Encouraging risk taking and nontraditional ideas, activities, and actions

6.   

GENERATING SHORT-TERM WINS Planning for visible improvements in performance, or “wins” Creating those wins Visibly recognizing and rewarding people who make the wins possible

7. CONSOLIDATING GAINS AND PRODUCING MORE CHANGE  Using increased credibility to change all systems, structures, and policies that don’t fit the transformation vision  Hiring, promoting, and developing people who can implement the change vision  Reinvigorating the process with new projects, themes, and change agents 8. ANCHORING NEW APPROACHES IN THE CULTURE  Creating better performance through customer- and productivity-oriented behavior, more and better leadership, and more effective management  Articulating the connections between new behaviors and organizational success  Developing means to ensure leadership development and succession SOURCE: Adapted from John P. Kotter, “Why Transformation Efforts Fail,” Harvard Business Review (March-April 1995) 61. Reprinted with permission © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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“Realizing Your Vision” PROCESS OVERVIEW – All SCS Services Creating the Vision Document

Developing the Plan

“Creating your vision”

“Realizing your vision”

Follow Up

“Following up your vision”

Calling the New Rector

“Developing your Rector profile”

• Vision Driven Process

• Vision Driven Process

• Vision Driven Process

• Pre Search and Beyond

• Path to God’s Preferred Future

• Path to God’s Preferred Future

• Path to God’s Preferred Future

• Basic Steps

• Basic Steps

• Discerning your Core Values

• 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior

• The Follow Up Process Overview - Basic Steps

• Rector Profile Workshop Agenda

• Developing your Mission Statement • Prioritizing your Vision • Validation Survey and Vision Document approval • Example Vision Document (VD)

• Vision Document

• Continuous Team Formation

• Rector Profile Outline

• Ministry Map

• Advanced Leadership Concepts

• Workshop Guidelines

• Agenda for the Initial Planning Meeting (IPM)

• Assess Progress - 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behaviors Analysis

• Independent Reflection

• Example Plan • Communication Plan Template • Communication Plan Process • The Relationship Model

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• Small Group Consensus • Example Composite • STAR Training • Parish Self-Assessment Survey

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Creating the Vision Document

Developing the Plan

What is the Church’s purpose, why does it exist?

How will you live into the Vision Document?

What is it that says, “this is who we are, what we stand for, why we do what you do?

What will be required to meet the parish goals and objectives?

What will the church look like and how should it behave in 3 to 5 years?

What ministries are needed and how is the church organized to support the plan? In what ways and through what messages does the church share progress, celebrate successes, communicate needs and invite participation? How is the Vestry (Leadership Board) organized to promote stewardship, maintain focus and regularly report progress in terms of the plan?

Follow Up

Calling the New Rector

How well are we doing in terms of the 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behaviors

What are the past leadership experiences that are needed in the new rector?

What are now our strengths and opportunities to improve?

What is his/her personal theology?

What are the top 4 to 5 priorities?

What are his/her worship styles preferences and liturgical offerings?

How well are we organized to focus on those priorities? What are we doing to effectively communicate and invite? What does growth look like? How are we equipping and energizing the leadership and incorporating members into the life of the church? Do the leaders know their roles and have the skills to effectively contribute to the plan?

What is his/her communication and decision making styles? How about his/her Spiritual life? What Spiritual Gifts are needed by the new rector to best support our church in the future? What pastoral specialties are required by the new rector to be successful?

How effective are your meetings; where can we improve? How are we forming ourselves into the likeness of Jesus?

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning The BASIC Questions PART 1 – Creating a Vision Document VISION DOCUMENT

Vision Document Creation 1. What do you most care about/ value (3-5 things)? 2. What is the purpose of your effort (20 words or less)? 3. What do you want to happen in 3 to 5 years? 4. Who is impacted by this vision? WORKSHEETS: Core Values, Mission Statement, Vision Event, Vision Document Example and Discovering Future Members

PART 2 – Converting the Vision Document into an Actionable Plan BACKGROUND WORK

Current State Assessment 1. What are the ideals that you compare yourself to (things that can be measured)? 2. List major challenges? 3. What is working? 4. What is not working? WORKSHEET: Current State Summary, 12 Marks Survey and Score Sheet Organization Map Analysis 1. What work is being done today (categorize)? 2. Who is involved in that work? 3. What are the specific roles? 4. How does the work align to support the Vision Document? WORKSHEET: Ministry Map Communication Plan 1. Who is the audience? 2. What are the messages (content) and when do they need to go out (timing)? 3. What media will be used including its associated timing? 4. Who is responsible for content/ media? WORKSHEET: Communication Plan Template PLANNING and NEXT STEPS Planning Tool and Next Steps 1. What are your major Goals within the scope of the Vision Document? 2. What are the basic things that must happen to achieve each goal (objectives/ milestones)? 3. What are the expected results of achieving those Goals? 4. Who is the champion of that goal? WORKSHEETS: Goal Development and Plan Example PART 3 – Following Up on the Vision Documents and Plan REVIEW, UPDATE, COMMUNICATE AND EMPOWER 1. Was Annual assessment conducted? What’s completed, and what’s new? 2. What are the new Goals, Objectives, Expected Results, and Assignments? 3. How will the updated plan be shared with the Parish? 4. Who are the new leaders and how will they be developed? WORKSHEETS: Goal Development and Plan Example, Communication Plan Template, Ministry Map © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Vision-Driven Planning Process

“PART 1 - Creating a Vision Document” • •

Open to Recasting

• •

• •

Mission Statement Why do We Exist? What is our Purpose? Core Values Unique and Foundational Attributes Core Values say “This is what we stand for, this is what we are all about, this is who we are, this is what we strive to offer, this is why we do what we do.” 1 Vision Statement “The Parish We Aim to Become” Vivid word picture of our desired future state: Large enough to challenge, Clear enough to guide.

Informed by documents and oral history

“PART 2 - Converting the Vision Document into an Actionable Plan” • •

• • • •

Strategic Horizons Major programs or milestones in the 3-5 year timeframe Still in conceptualization and definition phase, but need to be kept in current discussion and thinking. Goals Key quantifiable and measurable accomplishments with specific deadlines that help to achieve the Vision 3-year timeframe for accomplishment

Informed by Rector, Staff, Vestry, and Councils

Annual Objectives Quantifiable and measurable objectives to be accomplished in a given year Each Objective supports one or more specific Goals; has a clear deadline; specifies the resource requirements; and, assigns responsibility for accomplishment.

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NOTES: ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Š 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Vision-Driven Planning Process

“PART 3 - Following Up on the Vision Document and Plan” An Annual Process

• • • •

Gather Documents Current Vision Document and Strategic Plan Ministry Map Communication Plan Community Trends

• •

Update Vision Document Validate Mission Statement, Core Values, Vision Areas Update as necessary

• • • • • • • • • •

Annual Assessment Congregational leaders take the 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior Survey. Analyze results, identify priorities Update the Plan Identify what goals and objectives have be completed and validate those that are a work in progress Identity gaps in the plan and add new goals, objectives, etc. Update the Strategic Plan, seek funding Update the Communication plan Empower and Develop Leaders Re-commission the Mission and Vision Sub committee Recruit Team leaders and members Apply the Jesus Model and 10 yr. old Soccer League principles Work the Plan, celebrate successes, overcome obstacles

1

Values-Driven Leadership. Discovering and Developing Your Core Values for Ministry. Aubrey Malphurs. Baker Books. 1996; 2002 Twenty-First Insight Strategic Consultants, Inc.

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NOTES: ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Š 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Procedures PART 1 - Creating a Vision Document 1. DISCERN YOUR CORE VALUES Core values of a Church say, "This is what we stand for, this is what we are all about, this is who we are, this is what we strive to offer, this is why we do what we do". The core values workshop, a two part meeting of approximately 2 hours each, is used to discover what the congregation values most. A good time for this meeting is on Saturday morning with lunch, followed by a short Saturday afternoon session. The first session writes a “Book about the Parish” in 4 chapters. See Core Values Worksheet, Section III. The second session uses what is created in the first session, identifying repeated words and phrases to construct a set of up to 5 Core Values, the outcome of this workshop. Sometimes a self-Assessment "Readiness for change" survey is conducted for those attending this meeting, especially if the 12 Marks of Health Church Behavior survey will not be used later in the process. The number of participants varies during the workshop. For example: Part I - 20 to 40 persons (a diverse group representing demographics of the Church) Part II - 8 to 12 (includes 4 or more Vestry members) 2. AFFIRM AND/ OR DEVELOP YOUR MISSION STATEMENT The Mission statement describes the purpose of the Church, why the Church exists. Attendance in this workshop includes Vestry, Ministry Leaders and Staff (+/- 20 folks). Using a Bible Study, scripture verses are read answering the questions, “Why does the Church exist, what is the purpose of the church?” See Mission Statement Worksheet in Section IV. From this discernment process, elements of a Mission Statement emerge and a unique statement is constructed for the local Parish as the outcome of this workshop. Time will be spent revising the current or developing a new mission statement as necessary. We will review the outcome of Core Values workshop and any survey results in the context of the current Mission Statement. 2 to 3 hours is required for the workshop depending on if a rewrite of the mission statement is required. 3. CONDUCT A CHURCH WIDE VISIONING EVENT The entire congregation is invited to participate in a 4 hour Visioning Event. At a minimum, 25% of the congregation and its leaders should be present. This event should be made a BIG deal and be well publicized. Give it a name, e.g., "A Day of Visioning" and assign a coordinator. Vision creation will be through a visualization exercise, small group exercises, report outs, summaries, consensus, and voting to indicate priority. The results of the event will be analyzed by the consultant and a report written with suggested vision statements in priority order. This completes the first draft of the Vision Document which the Vestry reviews and approved for inclusion in the Validation Survey. © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Procedures PART 1 - Creating a Vision Document 4. PERFORM A VALIDATION SURVEY The congregation is asked to complete a Vision Document Validation survey. This survey is built on the basic components of the Vision Document (Mission Statement, Core Values and Vision Statement with four Major Initiatives). The Validation survey provides an opportunity for the congregation to agree or disagree with Vision Document component details and provides an opportunity for specific comments. This process aids in communication, creates ownership and informs the leadership as they begin the planning work. Its findings will confirm the degree of consensus on the shared vision and ultimately provide direction for planning as the vision areas are converted into an actionable plan. The survey is online, with paper copies available. The recommended time to run for the survey is 3 Sundays. 5. APPROVE A FINAL DRAFT OF THE VISION DOCUMENT The Vestry will make any final changes to the Vision document based on the findings of the Validation Survey. Once approved, it can then be used as the basis for strategic planning. See “PART 2 – Converting the Vision Document into an Actionable Plan” procedure. 6. DISCOVERING FUTURE MEMBERS Once you have completed the Vision Document, you are now ready to discover and affirm who your church is reaching out to. It is important that you do not even think about who your target may be until after you’ve clarified the purpose of your church as described in the Vision Document. So, who is your target? “The bible determines your message, but your target determines when, where, and how you communicate it”. See Section II, “Discovering Future Members” worksheet.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Procedures PART 2 - Converting the Vision Document into an Actionable Plan 1. EDIT AND APPROVE FINAL DRAFT OF VISION DOCUMENT Depending on how the Vision Document was crafted, there may be opportunity for minor editing for clarity and amplification. Consider forming a small group as an “Editorial Team” to review and reflect on any feedback and make/ suggest appropriate updates to the Document. This updated version needs to be presented to the Governing/ Oversight group, the Vestry, for final approval. If necessary this Vestry may make minor changes for clarity and/ or completeness. The goal is an APPROVED FINAL DRAFT of the Vision Document. 2. CONDUCT A SERIES OF LEADER TOWN HALL MEETINGS Conduct a series Town Hall Meetings (2 hrs.) that offer an opportunity for the Congregation to hear firsthand from the Leaders how the Vision Document aligns with and augments their vision. Led by the Leader and a facilitator, these gatherings will jumpstart the planning process by asking input from those in attendance 4 questions, answered in small groups formed around each Vision Area. The 4 questions are: a) b) c) d)

What can be done right now to achieve the vision?, What are some obstacles to overcome as we work toward the vision?, As a member of the Congregation, how do you want to participate?, and What are some milestones to look forward to as we make progress living into this vision?

The results of the Town Halls are documented in a “Town Hall Voices Report” and used during the Initial Planning Meeting (see #6 below). 3. RECRUIT AN INITIAL PLANNING TEAM Select up to 30 leaders and stakeholders, including Ministry Team Leaders and staff to participate as an Initial Planning Team to create the Initial Strategic Plan. The Leader invites them to the Strategic Planning Workshop (see #6 below). At least 20 participants are required at this workshop. 4. DEVELOP A CONCEPTUAL ORGANIZATION CHART With help from the Leader and members of the Vestry (see #9 below), develop a conceptual organization chart of the Parish in terms of the Vision Document, Canonical Responsibilities and Office of the Rector. This chart will be used at the Initial Planning Workshop. See Section II “Ministry Map” Worksheet. 5. 12 MARKS HEALTH CHECK Use the 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior as a guide to help assess the degree of what is working and not working in 12 dimensions. This list is helpful in maintaining effective practices while identifying areas for improvement. The results are used at the Initial Planning Meeting. An online self-assessment tool is available at www.askscs.com. Short form survey is included in Section II. 6. CONDUCT THE INITIAL PLANNING WORKSHOP Assisted by the facilitator, the “Initial Planning Team” participates in a 4 hour Initial Planning Workshop with 20-30 Leaders, Ministry Team Leaders and Stake Holders (see #3 above) to convert the Vision Document into a clear and transparent plan of action, with goals, objectives, expected results, and ownership. The results of this workshop will become v.1.0 of the Strategic Plan. See EXAMPLE Plan in Section VI.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Procedures PART 2 - Converting the Vision Document into an Actionable Plan 7. DEVELOP AND MAINTAIN A COMMUNICATION PLAN Develop and maintain a Communication Plan insuring frequent updates on plan status, sharing stories of transformation, successes, issues, and seeking assistance as needed. Answer the following questions: Who is the Audience, What are the Messages, How will you tell them (Media), Who will tell them, and When will you tell them? Assign a Communication Coordinator to oversee maintenance the plan. See Section II “Communication Plan Template and Procedure”. 8. INITIAL REVIEW OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN Share the Initial Draft Strategic Plan with the Vestry, Staff and Ministry Team Leaders and solicit feedback. Answer questions for clarification and listen for suggested changes, additions, etc. Going through the list of “What’s Not Working” is helpful in looking for gaps in the plan. 9. FORM THE “MISSION AND VISION” VESTRY SUB COMMITTEE Consider forming the “Mission and Vision” (M&V) Vestry Sub Committee. This group needs to decide how it will maintain the plan, as they are the potential keepers, how they will work with the various “Project Managers” (Goal Keepers), how to align with the budget working with the Finance Sub Committee, and how they will report progress to the Vestry and Stake Holders. The several roles on the M&V Sub Committee are Leader (Sub Committee coordination), Plan Keeper (maintains the Plan current and publishes one page status updates), Communication Coordinator (maintains the Communication Plan) and Project Liaisons (maintains contact with the Project Managers). 10. UPDATE INITIAL PLAN TO VERSION V.2.0 Each “Ministry Owner” (generally a Vestry member, Staff or Head of Ministry) who is assigned to the various Goals needs to carefully review each Goal and update as necessary for completeness and viability. They also need to consider who the various “Project Managers” should be. The Project Manager is an explicit assignment with specific accountability and responsibilities. Once this level of assignment and clarification has been completed and documented in the Plan, the Plan gets promoted to v.2.0 and can be shared with the others as part of an overall awareness process. 11. INTEGRATE PLAN INTO THE PARISH BUDGET V.3.0 Integrate the plan with the Parish budget and assign priorities. Once the final budget has been approved, make adjustments to the plan, reflecting reality and priorities. Promote the Plan to v.3.0. If agreed, the M&V Sub Committee of the Vestry will take full responsibility from that point forward to deliver version updates. Remember this is just a “Tool” but it is a living breathing document. The updating process needs to be simple, transparent and current. It is really a lot easier than I’m making this sound. Think muscle memory. It is v.3.0 that should be shared with the congregation at the annual Parish Meeting. 12. WORK THE PLAN As progress is made, keep the Plan updated (monthly). Identify and celebrate successes, publish needs, add new Goals as they are identified ensuring that they are transparently aligned to the Vision Document, and record assignments and obligations. As progress is made achieving the Vision, work through the Vestry to periodically (annually – see PART 3) update the Vision Document. Communicate progress to the community on a regular basis. Create opportunities to connect with members’ spiritual gifts, passions, and talents.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Procedures PART 3 - Following Up on the Vision Document and Plan 1. GATHER DOCUMENTS Once a year in the Fall or early Winter, begin the follow up process by gathering following documents: a) b) c) d) e) f) g)

Current draft of the Vision Document, The associated plan, How you are organized for ministry, Communication plan, Prior 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior survey results, and List of current leadership and associated roles. Community Trends

2. REVIEW THE VISION DOCUMENT Review the Vision Document. Consider the following questions: a) How current is it? If it is five (5) years or older, or a significant leadership change has occurred in the past year, then consider a major refresh involving the whole congregation and its leaders. See PART 1. Otherwise, minor editing may only be necessary. a) Is the Mission Statement still relevant, easily understood, compelling, motivational, aligned with what Jesus has called his church to be, answering the question why the church exits and defines its propose? If not, consider a refresh. See PART 1. Otherwise, the Mission Statement is current. b) Are the Core Values practiced in everyday life of the congregation? The core values of a congregation answer the question, “Why do we do what we do around here. A ministry based on clearly articulated core values drives a fixed stake in the ground that says to all, ‘This is what we stand for; this is what we are all about; this is who we are; this is what we can do for you.’ ” If this is not the case, consider a refresh. See PART 1. Otherwise, the Core Values are current. If necessary, a new core value may be added and a current one retried, maintaining a maximum of 5. Should this be the case, a group of leaders can convene to discuss the change, develop the new core value, agree to any changes and add to the Vision Document. c) What progress has been made to achieve the several Vision Areas? At this stage, the assessment is qualitative only. Make notes where there are still gaps. If the Vision has been achieved, then consider adding a new Vision based on the analysis for the results of the 12 Marks Survey below. Also, there may have been recent changes in the life of the congregation in the past year that suggests a new Vision Area be developed. However, the specific changes to the Vision Areas should wait until after the analysis of the 12 Marks. 3. REQUEST THE CONGREGATIONAL LEADERS TAKE THE 12 MARKS OF HEALTHY CHURCH BEHAVIORS SURVEY Select up to 30 leaders and stakeholders, including Rector, Assistants, Vestry, Ministry Team Leaders, staff and other key leaders from the congregation to participate in this survey. Use the 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior as a guide to help assess the degree of what is working and not working in the 12 dimensions. These marks are helpful in maintaining effective practices while identifying areas for improvement. The results are used at the Planning Update Meeting. An online self-assessment tool is available at www.askscs.com. The short form of the 12 Marks survey is found in Section II.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Procedures PART 3 - Following Up on the Vision Document and Plan 4. THE PROCESS FOR VIEWING/ UNDERSTANDING/ USING THE 12 MARKS REPORT. a) Look at the graph. Identify the peaks (+), the valleys (-), and where there is low agreement (high deltas). b) Correct the average scores if necessary and repeat (1) above. c) For each (+) 12 Mark, read the comments, validate as a (+). Add additional observations. d) For each (-) 12 Mark, read the comments, validate as a (-). Add additional observations. e) For each (high delta) 12 Mark, read the comments, validate as a (high delta). Clarify any disagreements and decide if a resolution is a priority; if none, note and move on. f) Study Strengths and validate. g) Study Weaknesses, validate and prioritize. Construct a set of next year Goals based on overcoming the Weaknesses and High Deltas in priority order, building on the Strengths. For each Goal, assign to appropriate Ministry Team Leader/ Vestry Liaison/ Staff with Expected Results and Timing. 5. UPDATE THE MINISTRY MAP/ ORGANIZATION CHART With help from the Leaders and members of the Vestry, update the conceptual ministry map/ organization chart for the Parish. Include leader names. Each of the major ministries should have its own purpose statement and roles defined. See “Ministry Map” in Section II. 6. CONDUCT THE UPDATE PLANNING RETREAT/ WORKSHOP Assisted by a facilitator, the leaders who participated in the 12 Marks Survey will meet together in a retreat setting to identify 4-5 ideas that can be worked on in the coming year within the scope of the Vision Areas. These will become the basis for new goals that are integrated with their core ministry passions, and values. Informed by the 12 Marks survey results, specific Goals can be constructed. All the while, building relationships and strengthening community. Activities include Bible Study, Cove Values validation, 12 Marks Health Survey Analysis, and developing priority goals. 7. DEVELOP AND MAINTAIN A COMMUNICATION PLAN Update the Communication Plan insuring frequent updates on plan status, sharing stories of transformation, successes, issues, and seeking assistance as needed. Answer the following questions: Who is the Audience, What are the Messages, How will you tell them (Media), Who will tell them, and When will you tell them? See the associated template and process in Section II to help create the plan. Assign a Communication Coordinator to oversee maintenance the plan. 8. EMPOWER THE “MISSION AND VISION” VESTRY SUB COMMITTEE Empower/ re-commission the “Mission and Vision” (M&V) Vestry Sub Committee. This group needs to decide how it will maintain the plan, as they are the potential keepers, how they will work with the various “Project Managers” (Goal Keepers), how to align with the budget working with the Finance Sub Committee, and how they will report progress to the Vestry and Stake Holders. The several roles on the M&V Sub Committee are Leader (Sub Committee coordination), Plan Keeper (maintains the Plan current and publishes one page status updates), Communication Coordinator (maintains the Communication Plan) and Project Liaisons (maintains contact with the Project Managers). This committee also insures that all supporting documentation (see #1 above) is aligned and supports the Vision Document.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Procedures PART 3 - Following Up on the Vision Document and Plan 9. PROMOTE THE PLAN TO VERSION V.2.0 Each “Ministry Owner” (generally a Vestry member, Staff or Ministry Head) who is assigned to the various Goals needs to carefully review each Goal and update as necessary for completeness and viability. They also need to consider who the various “Project Managers” should be. The Project Manager is an explicit assignment with specific accountability and responsibilities. Once this level of assignment and clarification has been completed and documented in the Plan, the Plan gets promoted to v.2.0 and can be shared with the others as part of an overall education process. 10. INTEGRATE PLAN INTO THE PARISH BUDGET V.3.0 Integrate the plan with the Parish budget and assign priorities. Once the final budget has been approved, make adjustments to the plan, reflecting reality, and priorities. This will be v.3.0. If agreed, the M&V Sub Committee of the Vestry will take full responsibility from that point forward to deliver version updates. Remember this is just a “Tool” but it is a living breathing document. The updating process needs to be simple, transparent and current. It is really a lot easier than I’m making this sound. Think muscle memory. It is v.3.0 that should be shared with the congregation at the annual Parish Meeting. 11. WORK THE PLAN As progress is made, keep the Plan updated (monthly). Identify and celebrate successes, publish needs, add new Goals as they are identified ensuring that they are transparently aligned to the Vision Document, and record assignments and obligations. As progress is made achieving the Vision, work through the Vestry to periodically (annually) update the Vision Document. Communicate progress to the community on a regular basis. Create opportunities to connect with members’ spiritual gifts, passions, and talents.

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NOTES: _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning EPILOGUE Two stories about how to live and work together The Jesus Model

Not long ago, a young teenager working on a Bible study for the Jr. Daughters of the King asked me how many times the word committee was mentioned in the Bible. I thought about this for a minute and I said probably none. She said, “Exactly, so then why do we have all these committee meetings at church?” I thought this was a great question. I began to wonder how Jesus worked with his disciples. And then it occurred to me that every time Jesus met with his disciples it was a “committee meeting”. I believe he intended his “committee” to be a model for our committee meetings. So let's consider what it was that Jesus did during his committee meetings. Work generally gets done through committees. In many environments, committees are called teams and I use the terms interchangeably. It is vital to the success of the committee that there is clear and effective leadership and the members understand the purpose of the committee and roles of each of its members. What better example do we have than Jesus in understanding committee best practices? Therefore, I introduce Jesus’ team skills, skills the team members must master through what I’m calling the Jesus Model. If we do these things we honor each other’s time and talent, an expression of love for each other. In fact, if the team is not practicing Jesus’ Great Commandment to Love God and each other (Mathew 28: 16-20), then no list of things-to-do (strategic plan) has any relevance. We can live out this commandment each time we gather in committee. The Jesus Model 1: 1. One person trained twelve human beings who went on to so influence the world that time itself is now recorded as being before (B.C.) or (A.D.) his existence. 2. This person worked with staff that was totally human and not divine … a staff that in spite of illiteracy, questionable backgrounds, fractious feelings, and momentary cowardice went on to accomplish the tasks he trained them to do. They did this for one main reason – to be with him again. 3. His leadership style was intended to be put to use by any of us. Using Jesus’ Model, what would an ideal committee and its actions look like? Preparation Jesus was prepared for his ministry by spending 40 days in the desert. During this time he became focused on his purpose or mission, clarified his values and sorted out in his mind and heart what the next 3 years would bring. His ministry was validated and tested by the devil himself. As soon as he emerged from that desert experience, Jesus began his ministry by recruiting his team. He called each by name. He told each of his disciples what they were to be, “fishers of men”. He set the boundaries and established their roles. So following Jesus’ example, the sponsoring organization should also prepare the committee’s ministry by defining its purpose, values and vision for that committee. These things are recorded on a one page vision document and it should be used within the context of the larger organization. Prior to any committee work, preferably at the first gathering, individual roles of the members need to be clearly understood. This 1

Jesus, CEO, Using Ancient Wisdom for Visionary Leaders, Laurie Beth Jones, Hyperion, 1992

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning EPILOGUE is one of the first activities of the group. It includes defining and agreeing on rules of engagement and committee guidelines that help clarify how to interact with each other, thus honoring each other. I’m convinced when Jesus got together with his disciples he had an agenda. It may not have been written down but, in his mind, there was a purpose and an outcome which I’m sure he communicated clearly. He managed and allocated time based on all the things that Jesus wanted to do each time he was with his disciples. Likewise, the committee leader needs to be prepared starting with an agenda. The agenda should describe the purpose of the meeting and the expected outcomes. Based on the outcomes a list of activities are constructed to include the amount of time budgeted for the required work. The meeting starts on time and ends on time unless changes are agreed by the participants. This honors the time spent together. Behaviors and Skills So what did Jesus actually do during his committee meetings? He prayed, taught/ instructed, admonished, encouraged, listened, evaluated, planned and sent. They had fellowship, broke bread, drank wine, and celebrated their life together. What does each of these activities look like from Jesus’ perspective? Pray: Luke is the gospel that most emphasized the prayer life of Jesus. Nothing happens in Luke without prayer; Jesus prays before He calls the 12 (6:12), He often goes to the wilderness and prays all night long (5:16). Luke makes the point that the expulsion from the Temple was so that the Holy Place could be reestablished as a place of prayer (19:46). Only Luke tells us that the Transfiguration occurred as or perhaps because Jesus was praying (9:28). Jesus is also constantly teaching about prayer, devoting two parables exclusively to the topic. Jesus teaches us that what we ask for in prayer is rarely what we need. We usually ask for provision, when God, who knows how to give good gifts, is ready to give us His Presence and power through the Holy Spirit. Teach/ Instruct: Jesus’ teaching becomes the self-revelation of the Father. “Go ye into all the world and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you” (Matthew 28:19 KJV). His final command was a teaching command. Admonish: The bottom line is that we don’t grow without people speaking the truth into our lives. Truth is a vital nutrient. In Colossians 3:16 (NIV) Paul says, "Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom." Consider a simple formula for life transformation that a guy named Bill Donahue came up with some time ago. He says that, "Grace + Truth + Time = Transformation." Admonishing is all about applying this formula to our relationships with one another. Encourage: (John 14:1) "Do not let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God; trust also in me, Jesus said.” These words helped His friends see how much Jesus loved them and cared for them. Jesus knew that He would come back to life in three days, but His friends did not understand this. Jesus tried to encourage His friends when they were upset and hurt. He helped them understand that even though He was leaving, He would return.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning EPILOGUE Listen: Jesus knew the best ways to minister to people was by listening. The Lord was not ready to believe everything He heard because He was a discerning listener. Jesus was willing to listen to understand another person’s perspective. The Lord honestly appreciated learning about people’s concerns, values, and spiritual condition. Jesus did not listen to people just to find something to criticize. The Lord listened to people with His eyes, ears and his whole mind. Jesus was willing to put away negative feelings, grudges, hurts or misunderstandings to really hear what people were saying. Jesus was willing to listen without interrupting. The Lord learned how to listen to His heavenly Father every morning in prayer. Jesus spent a great deal of time listening to people who were hurting. Evaluate: Jesus helped his disciples to evaluate their values and separate themselves from the world to follow Christ fully. Many were following Jesus for temporal reasons: economic and health benefits, rather than for the "eternal" life He offered. They needed to be forced to choose between Christ and the World. Eternal values must take precedence over temporal concerns. Here the reality of their faith and repentance was tested repeatedly. This testing came about in a series of crisis: John the Baptist was first imprisoned, and then beheaded (Mt 14:13). Jesus resisted the crowds wanting to make him King, because his mission was to bring the Bread of life. (John 6). The Feeding of 5,000 (Jn 6:1-14), and the storm at sea (1621) [ Psa 107:23-32, Psa 77:19; Mark 6:52] also became tests of the disciples' faith in Him. In the Bread of Life discourse, Jesus confronted those who followed him for temporal benefits. This testing was necessary because the disciples needed to know who Jesus was if they were to remain with Him in the face of the growing opposition of the Pharisees and when the crowds deserted him. Jesus' bread of life discourse and other hard sayings caused many to depart. His disciples must be ready to hold fast to Him whatever the cost. Make sure those working for you understand both the committee’s goals and the methods to reach those goals. 2 There should be tools in place to help this evaluation. Measure the committee against its values, principles and ideals, goals, progress toward its vision from different perspectives. Plan: "Suppose one of you wants to build a tower. Will he not first sit down and estimate the cost to see if he has enough money to complete it?” (Luke 14:28 NIV) A plan puts you in charge of your energies and activities. 3 Knowing where the organization needs to be positioned in the future is the most important aspect in preparing daily To Do Lists. Jesus was the most prolific strategic planner in history. Send: And he called unto him the twelve, and began to send them forth by two and two; and gave them authority over unclean spirits” (Mark 6:7) Thus, the apostles were given not simply the raw ability to force spirits to leave, but also a certain status which meant that they were justified in so acting — a status which, presumably, the unclean spirits were expected to acknowledge.

2 3

The Management Methods of Jesus, Ancient Wisdom for Modern Business, Bob Briner, Nelson Business, 1996 The Management Methods of Jesus, Ancient Wisdom for Modern Business, Bob Briner, Nelson Business, 1996

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning EPILOGUE Fellowship: It is not enough just to imitate the external behavior of the New Testament church without going through the internal changes, led by the Spirit. True fellowship requires at least: repentance, light, judgment (discernment), protection, good stewardship, the grace gifts and fruit of the Holy Spirit, and real love. Mat 18:20 (Phi) "For wherever two or three people have come together in my name, I am there, right among them!" Fellowship is a great privilege, possible whenever the above occurs; in church, Bible studies, prayer meetings, home groups, with roommates or family. It is how God meets our needs--it is His "supply line". Are we taking advantage? Acts 4:32 (NIV) All the believers were one in heart and mind. No one claimed that any of his possessions was his own, but they shared everything they had. Definitions A disciple is a personal follower of Jesus during his life, esp. one of the twelve Apostles. Jesus personally recruited the first twelve disciples and later they were referred to as apostles. Why the change in title? Disciple is derived from the Greek word, pronounced “math-ay-tes”, which means learner, or student. The Biblical usage involved not just learning, but also agreement and acceptance of the teacher as a leader. Apostle is derived from the Greek word, pronounced “ap-os-tol-os”, which means messenger, or ambassador. In John chapters 13-15, Jesus is sending his disciples out as apostles to carry on His work. The work And at the end of the gathering, they would go out into the world together doing those things they agreed to do. As the apostle is someone who is sent, there is an implied action, a sense of doing something as an apostle. You still continue to study and learn, but you are now a leader/ teacher. The apostle becomes Jesus to those around him. The main thing Instead dreading committee meetings, we should look forward to practicing what Jesus did with his disciples. Think of this time together as a spiritual practice. Each time we gather as Christians, even at work or with family, we have the opportunity to show the love of Christ by being prepared, applying all of his skills, to come together for common purpose, and being sent out to build the Kingdom of God. Multiplication The model in Jesus’ case included his 12 disciples who then later became apostles. These apostles then went out and started the churches throughout the Roman Empire. The Apostles were later called bishops. We see this in the Episcopal Church were bishops are sent to establish more churches, recruiting and training priests to serve in those churches. The priests were sent to build the church up. Those that attended the church were discipled with the goal of making and sending more apostles. This can be thought of as a great pyramid scheme, disciples becoming apostles, creating disciples, who then become apostles, on and on, forever.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning EPILOGUE

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NOTES: _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ Š 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning EPILOGUE The 10-year-old Soccer League - a time of development

This story is about a significant phase change from little to no skills to being able to perform at a higher level, as part of a team. Every good team takes the time to make this transformation. My young son was always interested in sports particularly baseball and soccer. As a dad I was involved as one of the coaches. Although I played a lot of baseball as a kid I didn't play organized soccer. So with soccer I had to learn the basic skills as an assistant coach while trying to organize the kids to play well. For the boys under 10 years old there are significant differences in skill level. Most of the kids just chased after the ball, whereas more advanced kids were more in control. The few boys with skills did most of the work and the scoring. However, while they all seemed to be having fun, they really were not playing as a team. At that age, everyone appeared to be ok with the status quo. However, there was a remarkable difference in the style of play as I watched the older kids play, the 11 year-old plus boys including those in high school. They played as a team; they formed triangles, passed the ball to each other, played their position, controlled the ball, and for the most part stuck to their specific roles. These things were not happening with the younger players. So what happened between the years of nine and 11 that transformed these kids from a bunch of boys running around chasing after a ball to playing as a team, controlling the ball? The youth soccer league in Mandeville, Louisiana formed what they called the 10 year old soccer league. It was a developmental league, a separate league just for 10 year olds. It was a set aside time to focus on learning and practicing the basic skills that would transform the kids from individuals to team players. I thought this was a great idea, but it did have a downside. It was a stressful time for the parents, the star players, the kids with no skills, and the coaches. The parents became frustrated because the focus wasn't on winning games; it was on learning individual and team skills. Lots of patience was required. The star players now had to depend on the other kids who may not have the same level of skills or talents. For the coaches the stress came from having to deal with the parents and frustrated kids. To help mitigate these issues and frustrations, a parent meeting was held at the beginning of the season talk about what the real purpose of the 10-year-old league and to solicit their support. The purpose of the 10 year old league was developmental while having fun. It was not about winning games and it was not about soothing egos. It was all about developing the individual skills and then transferring those skills into highly effective team behaviors. The Mandeville youth soccer program recognize the need to set aside a specific time in the development of these children in order to help them make that transition into more advanced soccer players. As adult leaders, we assume that we all have the required skills necessary to meet together to make decisions that guide whatever organization we support. My experience suggests otherwise. Our behaviors sometimes model the under 10 year old soccer players. Like Mandeville did, we should take the time to form our team, learn the skills, and practice them every time we get together. To become a highly effective team, development must be intentional and continuous. Practice what Jesus did when he was with his disciples and the skills that support strategic planning.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning EPILOGUE Team Skills that support Strategic Planning

(from Breakthrough Teamwork, Outstanding Results Using Structured Teamwork, Dennis A. Romig, Performance Research Press, Austin, TX)

Team meetings – agendas plus Team meetings are the starting point for rapid, synchronized action. Team meetings have the potential to be energizing and to meet a variety of member needs. Individuals can leave a well-run team meeting motivated and recommitted to the team’s mission and goals. Successful team meeting use structure, the most importing being the meeting format or agenda. Desired outcomes are reaching goals, solving problems, making decisions, improving processes and improving teamwork Clarifying roles and responsibilities Team roles and responsibilities describe the tasks and decisions that are both unique and shared for each member of the team. The descriptions are developed through the involvement of the whole team. There are three kinds of tasks shared by team members: Structured Teamwork tasks, work responsibilities/tasks of the specific work area, and administrative self-management tasks. Communicating Team: As a team decide how together how and when to be approachable with each other. Listening is the foundation of all interpersonal skills. Listening shows respect for one another. Be specific and check for understanding by listening, recalling key words, Mentally summarizing what the speaker is saying and why, indicate you are checking for understanding and concisely state your summary of what and why of the speaker’s statement. Others: Develop a set of clear messages you want your audience to know. Understand who you audiences are, what they care about and how best to reach them using every media available. Make clear assignments to those who will be responsible for delivering the message including deadlines. Continuously evaluate the effectiveness of your communication plan and make adjustments. Brainstorming/ Creativity Creativity, the ability to develop both a large quantity of ideas and highly imaginative, is a skill. Practice structured brainstorming where you prepare, maximize participation, are positive, and follow through with an action plan. Problem solving Team problem solving is a structured process. Teams need a user-friendly model that can be applied anywhere. The six-step model is based on a synthesis of problem solving and teamwork research. Step 1: Specify the problem, Step 2: Analyze the causes, Step 3: Brainstorm solutions, Step 4: Select solutions, Step 5: Establish the goal, Step 6: Implement solutions. Decision Making Team decision making is a carefully designed process for developing and selecting the best alternatives among a variety of choices. Although not every decision requires a structured approach to decision making, the following steps are helpful for issues involving the whole team: 1. Set goal and measurement criteria, 2. Expand alternatives, 3. Narrow alternatives, 4. Do pro/con analysis, and 5. Reach consensus on best alternative.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning EPILOGUE Empowerment Empowerment is a structured and planned process that increases team member decision-making authority and accountably. Benefits include improved results, earlier and better communication, reduced need for direct supervision, increased intellectual and emotional commitment, and faster and better problem solving. It also enables individuals a voice in the decisions, increased job knowledge and skills, improved teamwork, more self-confidence and recognition. It is not a total democracy, equal say or having agreement on all matters. Conflict Management Conflict is a disagreement between two or more people accompanied by strong emotion. Conflicts evoke anger, hurt, outrage, disgust, hopelessness, and feelings of being trapped, threatened, or betrayed. Steps in managing conflicts include manage feelings, create a supportive climate, describe the conflict, understand the goals, and create solutions.

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NOTES: _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ Š 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning REFERENCES Breakthrough Teamwork, Outstanding Results Using Structured Teamwork, Dennis A. Romig, Performance Research Press, Austin, TX Built To Last, Successful Habits of Visionary Companies, Jim Collins, Jerry I. Porras, Harper Business Good to Great, Why some companies make the Leap… and others don’t, Jim Collins, Harper Business Leading Change, John P. Kotter, Harvard Business School Press, Boston MA Moving Off the Map, A Field Guide to Changing the Congregation, Thomas G. Bandy, Abingdon Press, Nashville, TN Reclaiming the Great Commission, A practical model for transforming denominations and congregations, Bishop Claude E. Payne, Hamilton Beazley, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA Side by Side Leadership, Achieving Outstanding Results Together, Dennis A. Romig, Bard Press, Austin, TX The Purpose Driven Church, Growth Without Compromising Your Message & Mission, Rick Warren, Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI Congregational Development Resources, Iona Center, The Episcopal Diocese of Texas, www.epicenter.org, Houston, TX Mary M. MacGregor, Director of Evangelism and Congregational Development, The Episcopal Diocese of Texas, Houston, TX The Rev. Canon Lance Ousley, Canon for Stewardship and Development, The Episcopal Diocese of Olympia, Seattle, WA

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Section II BACKGROUND MATERIAL


Congregational Development Strategic Planning CURRENT STATE SUMMARY 1. What are the ideals that you compare yourself to (things that can be observed)?

2. List major challenges?

3. What is working?

4. What is not working?

5. Unique observations?

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Ministry Map

Name of the Church, City, State Mission Statement

Canonical Responsibilities Purpose Statement of the legal entities

Rector Responsibilities Purpose Statement of the Leader

Ministry Area 1

Ministry Area 2

Ministry Area 3

Ministry Area 4

Propose Statement of Ministry Area 1

Propose Statement of Ministry Area 2

Propose Statement of Ministry Area 3

Propose Statement of Ministry Area 4

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning NEW 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior 1. Worships: Designs and carries out in a thoughtful and excellent fashion worship that is responsive to the individual nature of the congregation. The congregation understands the power of the Holy Eucharist to renew the spirit. Worship is vibrant and alive and touches the congregation. Liturgy is well planned and executed. Sermons are thoughtful, relevant and well delivered. 2. Knows Itself and Moves Forward: Defines itself by its sense of values, mission (purpose) and vision with resulting plans for the congregation. The culture is one of expectation of constant activity and growth, seeking God’s will for its future. This awareness is grounded in scripture and tradition. 3. Invites, Incorporates: Invites, displays hospitality and works toward inclusion of newcomers and members into active participation in congregational life with an emphasis on relationship formation. 4. Disciples: Takes seriously the formation of disciples, grounded in the Baptismal Covenant with emphasis on spiritual formation, biblical education and prayer. 5. Lives as Stewards: Promotes good stewardship of parishioner’s time, spiritual gifts and money. Thoughtful about environmental and facility stewardship. 6. Empowers: Fosters a culture of empowering ministry utilizing knowledge of persons’ spiritual gifts, passions and talents for service coupled with expectation and accountability for those who undertake ministry. 7. Cares: Responds with thoughtfulness and pastoral sensitivity to individuals in the congregation when illness, personal crisis, death and other challenging life circumstances arise. 8. Reaches Out: Focuses significant ministry outward to the community and beyond. 9. Fosters a Learning Culture for Leaders: Understands that leaders in Christian community have a distinctive call, that they seek God’s guidance, are willing to risk, lead change well and learn from experience. Leaders are trained and expected to mentor future leaders. Lay leaders foster a healthy relationship with their clergy. 10. Communicates: Generates effective communications inside the church and outside to the community. 11. Manages Conflict: Manages conflicted situations with practices/processes that foster reconciliation and healing. 12. Understands the Need to Be Connected to the Greater Church: Demonstrates connectedness and support for the wider church.

Authors: Mary MacGregor and Reb Scarborough, 2004, 2011 The Iona Center - Training the Baptized for Leadership, Episcopal Diocese of Texas References: Peter Steinke; The Evangelism, Church Growth, Worship and Mission Agency of the Presbyterian Church of Canada

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12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior Quick Assessment Church Name:_________________________ Date:____________ Circle one:

Rector

Vestry

Characteristic

Staff

Ministry Leader

Worships: Designs and carries out in a thoughtful and excellent fashion worship that is responsive to the individual nature of the congregation. The congregation understands the power of the Holy Eucharist to renew the spirit. Worship is vibrant and alive and touches the congregation. Liturgy is well planned and executed. Sermons are thoughtful, relevant and well delivered. Knows Itself and Moves Forward: Defines itself by its sense of values, mission (purpose) and vision with resulting plans for the congregation. The culture is one of expectation of constant activity and growth, seeking God’s will for its future. This awareness is grounded in scripture and tradition. Invites, Incorporates: Invites, displays hospitality and works toward inclusion of newcomers and members into active participation in congregational life with an emphasis on relationship formation. Disciples: Takes seriously the formation of disciples, grounded in the Baptismal Covenant with emphasis on spiritual formation, biblical education and prayer. Lives as Stewards: Promotes good stewardship of parishioner’s time, spiritual gifts and money. Thoughtful about environmental and facility stewardship. Empowers: Fosters a culture of empowering ministry utilizing knowledge of persons’ spiritual gifts, passions and talents for service coupled with expectation and accountability for those who undertake ministry. Cares: Responds with thoughtfulness and pastoral sensitivity to individuals in the congregation when illness, personal crisis, death and other challenging life circumstances arise. Reaches Out: Focuses significant ministry outward to the community and beyond. Fosters a Learning Culture for Leaders: Understands that leaders in Christian community have a distinctive call, that they seek God’s guidance, are willing to risk, lead change well and learn from experience. Leaders are trained and expected to mentor future leaders. Lay leaders foster a healthy relationship with their clergy. Communicates: Generates effective communications inside the church and outside to the community. Manages Conflict: Manages conflicted situations with practices/processes that foster reconciliation and healing. Understands the Need to Be Connected to the Greater Church: Demonstrates connectedness and support for the wider church.

Disagree

Member of Congregation

Agree

Score

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Total

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12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior Quick Assessment Church Name:_________________________ Date:____________ Circle one: Rector Vestry Staff List those things that are working (Strengths):

Ministry Leader

Member of Congregation

List those things that are not working (Opportunities for improvement):

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12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior Quick Assessment Church Name:_________________________ Date:____________ Circle one: Rector OTHER COMMENTS:

Vestry

Staff

Ministry Leader

Member of Congregation

Authors: Mary MacGregor and Reb Scarborough, 2004, 2011 The Iona Center - Training the Baptized for Leadership, Episcopal Diocese of Texas References: Peter Steinke; The Evangelism, Church Growth, Worship and Mission Agency of the Presbyterian Church of Canada

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior – Score Sheet

Church Name:___________________________________________ 10

Date: ______/_______/_______

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

LEGEND X Rector • Vestry  Ministry Team Ldr.  Staff o Member of Cong.

1 Worships

Knows Self

Invites

Lives as Stewards Disciples Empowers

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Cares

Learning Culture Manages Conflicts Reaches Out Communicates Connected

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning 12 Marks of Healthy Church Behavior – Score Sheet

Church Name:___________________________________________ Date: ______/_______/_______ Instructions for calculating and plotting scores: • Add the scores by Mark and participant group. Divide the total by the number in that group, calculating an average. • Plot the averages by group for each Mark. Connect the plotted points for each group for all the 12 Marks. • See PART 3.4 for instructions to help with interpretation. MARK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 GROUP Rector

12

Ave. Vestry

Ave. Ministry Team Ldr.

Ave. Staff

Ave. Member of Cong.

Ave. COMPOSITE AVE.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning THE PROCESS FOR VIEWING/ UNDERSTANDING/ USING THE 12 MARKS REPORT. 1. Look at the graph. Identify and label the peaks (+), the valleys (-), and where there is low agreement (high deltas ∆). 2. For each (+) 12 Mark, read the comments, validate as a (+). Add additional observations. 3. For each (-) 12 Mark, read the comments, validate as a (-). Add additional observations. 4. For each (high delta ∆) 12 Mark, read the comments, validate as a (high delta). Clarify any disagreements and decide if a resolution is a priority; if none, note and move on. 5. Study Strengths and validate. 6. Study Weaknesses, validate and prioritize. 7. Construct a set next year Goals based on overcoming the Weaknesses and High Deltas in priority order, building on the Strengths. 8. For each Goal, assign to appropriate Ministry Team Leader/ Board Liaison/ Staff with Expected Results and Timing.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning THE PROCESS FOR VIEWING/ UNDERSTANDING/ USING THE 12 MARKS REPORT.

NOTES: ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Š 2914 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Communication Planning Worksheet

Audiences

Who needs to hear the message

Messages

What are the messages

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Media

How will the message be communicated

Assignments

Who is responsible for message creation and sending

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Deadlines

When does the message need to be sent

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Communication Planning Procedure For use with the “Communication Planning Worksheet” 1. Identify and make a list of potential audiences, those who need to hear your messages. Record in the Audiences column. Label each a unique letter starting with “A”. Example: A. The public, B. Leadership team, C. Members of the organization. 2. Make a list of the various messages that you want to communicate. Record in the Messages column. Label each with a unique number starting with “1”. Example: 1. Upcoming activities, 2. Status on various projects, 3. Opportunities to get involved. 3. Map the message with the audience. Example: A (1), B (1,2,3), C (1,3). 4. Make a list of all the potential media that is available to you. Record in the Media column. Label each a unique letter starting with “a”. Example: a. Local newspaper, b. Website, c. Newsletter 5. Map the message with the audience. Example: A (a,b), B (b,c), C (a,b,c). 6. For each Media, assign a coordinator. For each Message identify who the message (content) creators are. Record each in the Assignments column. Example: Media Coordinators: a. Local newspaper (Jane), b. Website (Bill), c. Newsletter (Mary) Content Creators: Upcoming events (ministry leaders), Status of various projects (project leaders), opportunities to get involved (ministry leaders) 7. For each media type, record the deadline dates in the Deadlines column. Example: a. Local newspaper (Tuesday noon), b. Website (second Thursday), c. Newsletter (third Wednesday) 8. Once the brainstorming and mapping have been completed, record the Messages and Media by Audience and Assignments and Deadlines by Media on a new copy of the worksheet. © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Discovering Future Members Who is impacted by your Vision? "The Bible determines our message but our target determines when, where, and how we communicate it. It is imperative that you not even think about who your target may be until after you've clarified the purpose of your church as described in your Vision Document.” Know your Community and describe your future member 1. Find out all you can about your community: geographically, demographically, culturally, and spiritually. A. Geographically a. Identify where people live that you want to reach – post on a map - determine "reasonable driving distance” - match with relationship and program - first cut is a 5 mile radius b. Determine the size of the target pool. c. Gather trend information B. Demographically What type of people live in the target area? a. b. c. d. e.

Age by group Married status Income Education Occupation

Sources: US Census data at the library, city/county planning department, newspaper offices, local Chamber of Commerce, United Way, local contractors, realtors, utility companies, and MissionInsite. C. Culturally Document the lifestyle and mindset "psychographics", the people's values, interests, hurts and fears. The best way to gather this information is to talk to them, conduct interviews where the community gathers! Ask them what they feel are their greatest needs. Listen for their hurts, interests and fears. D. Spiritually Discover the spiritual background of the people in your community. a. Interview other pastors in your community. b. MissionInsite © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Discovering Future Members 2. Describe and personalize your target Know who you can best reach. You will attract who you are not who you want. You'll best reach those who you relate to. A. Who already attends your church? B. What kind of leaders do you have? Growing churches focus on reaching receptive people. Non-growing churches focus on reenlisting inactive people. 3. What are your specific plans to reach out and invite your community?

Reference: The Purpose Driven Church, Growth Without Compromising Your Message & Mission, Rick Warren, Zondervan, 1995, pgs. 157 – 177.

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Section III DEFINING YOUR CORE VALUES


Congregational Development Strategic Planning Identifying the Core Values of a Church “The most important single element of any corporate, congregational, or denominational culture is the value system.” -Lyle Schaller, America’s foremost church consultant The core values of a congregation answer the question, “Why do we do what we do around here. A ministry based on clearly articulated core values drives a fixed stake in the ground that says to all, ‘This is what we stand for; this is what we are all about; this is who we are; this is what we can do for you.’ ” No two churches are alike, even churches of the same denomination. Differences arise out of geographic location, demographics of the community, size of the active membership, its history (age), and particularly the people who have shaped the ministry of the church and helped to form its personality and values. Each church is a family system which affects the way it interacts and ministers. A good core value statement should articulate clearly what a congregation most highly values. New congregations being planted in America are establishing their core values from the onset. This lays the foundation for building ministry and accountability. An established congregation that takes a good internal look to discover and define its core values moves closer to discerning its unique mission. This definition can assist a congregation in shaping its vision and ministry for the future. It can also be helpful to persons looking to join the group who seek to understand the very nature of the church and its priorities. Core values and the mission of a congregation (its purpose) should be in close alignment. A core value statement provides a vehicle by which a church’s sense of mission can be defined in as much distinctive detail as the congregation desires. The greatest challenge in uncovering the core values of a congregation is the willingness of individuals to release their personal agendas and allow a sense of corporate values to emerge. This takes great objectivity and can be difficult to do. Once the values are discerned and articulated in a statement, it is imperative that the congregation allow the understood values to shape ministry, guide decision making, set goals and priorities, plan budgets and determine the best use of human and material resources. This focus can maximize a congregation’s potential for living into its God-given mission.

Values Driven Leadership, Discovering and Developing Your Core Values for Ministry. Aubrey Malphurs, Baker Books, 1996. ISBN 0801090156

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Identifying the Core Values of a Church The core values of congregational life are the preferences or choices that are consistently prioritized in the behavior of the participants. These choices may be deliberate and carefully considered, but they must also be spontaneous. They are apparent in the largest projects and in the smallest circumstances. They are often revealed most clearly in unplanned, unrehearsed experiences. Core values shape the normative behavior of congregational participants within, and beyond, the church. These core values make the behavior of congregational participants predictable, whether they are at home, at work, or at play. Core values are not just ideals toward which congregational participants strive, but real preferences that congregational participants actually make in daily life. Core values are not just goals that congregational participants seek to achieve, but real choices that shape the lifestyles of congregational participants individually and collectively The discernment of core values may not be easy. First, the congregation must move beyond their understanding of how Jesus wants them to be, to discover how they actually are. Second, the congregation must move beyond how they imagine that they to discover the truth about how they truly behave. And third congregation must move beyond how they market themselves to the public, to discover how the public truly perceives them to be. In other words, core values are not a matter of wishful thinking, imaginative self-interpretation, or projected self-image. Core values are a matter of consistent choices that shape the daily, monthly, and yearly behavior of the people in the congregation—both individually and collectively. Once the core values of congregational life become clear, the congregation can begin to address issues of morale, method, relationship, and cooperation. Low morale, poor planning, broken relationships, and inability to cooperate in congregational projects all result from ambiguity about values. Decision making on matters of real importance becomes timid, slow, or even impossible—and the congregation preoccupies itself with ever more trivial matters. Lack of clarity about core values is revealed when meetings never seem to address matters of substance, last far too long, and habitually defer decisions to ad hoc committees or subsequent meetings. Other corporate addictions are then allowed to block congregational action and may even pose as “traditions,” which in fact contradict congregational identity and frustrate potential congregational leadership.

Moving Off the Map – A Field Guide to Changing the Congregation. Thomas G. Bandy, 1998, Abingdon Press. ISBN 0-687-06800-2

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Write a Book about (NAME) Episcopal Church Small Group Activity – 40 minutes

Objective: Congregational values clarification Directions: Gather in groups as directed. Discuss as a group the questions for each chapter and come to a consensus about the answers. WRITE SHORT, BRIEF ANSWERS-SINGLE WORDS, PHRASES Work to answer the questions in the order of the numbered chapters. Using markers and the easel paper provided, one sheet per chapter, one for the cover 1. Write brief, bulleted answers to each chapter’s questions 2. Upon reflection of each chapter’s answers, creatively title and number the chapter 3. Title the book 4. If you have extra time design a cover for your book including the title

Remember, core values of a church say, “This is what we stand for, this is what we are all about, this is who we are, this is what we strive to offer as a church, this is why we do what we do.”

Chapter 1 - Why were we founded as a congregation? Your notes:

Chapter Title:________________________________________

Chapter 2 - What have we provided that was valuable to the many generations of our members in the past and in the present? Your notes:

Chapter Title:_________________________________________

Chapter 3 – What value have we been to our city, our surrounding community, State, the U.S. and the world? Your notes:

Chapter Title:________________________________________

Chapter 4 – Why do we do what we do, today, as a church? Your notes:

Chapter Title:________________________________________ Book Title:__________________________________________ © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning List 5 Core Values with Descriptions Based on the words and phrases most repeated from the “Writing a Book about your Congregation” exercise, In the space below, List up to 5 Core Values Headlines with Descriptions (See example in Section IV): 1._____________________________________________

2.______________________________________________

3.______________________________________________

4.______________________________________________

5.______________________________________________

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Section IV AFFIRMING YOUR MISSION STATEMENT


Congregational Development Strategic Planning MISSION Statement “What do you do here that is of eternal significance?” Congregational mission is the most important outcome of this process, and it will be the key to congregational growth, expansion of ministries, and successful stewardship in the future. Congregational mission is founded on the people’s consensus around core values, bedrock beliefs, and motivating vision. The mission of the congregation is a clear, concise declaration of purpose that is aimed directly at the hearts of the unchurched public. There are three common mistakes congregations make about mission statements. First, a mission to survive is not mission. The perpetuation of a heritage has no value in itself, and it is neither interesting nor helpful to the public. The survival of an institution—no matter how large, glorious, or expensive—is of no consequence for God. Biblical visions never lead people to survive. They lead people to grow. Second, a mission statement is not a summary of program. It is not an abbreviated version of a congregational constitution or structure, nor is it a summary of committee mandates. Mission statements are all about purpose, and they make no assumptions whatever about tactics, structures, or leadership. Third, a mission statement is not an essay. It does not interpret congregational identity or practice for public recognition. It does not offer a rationale or an explanation that justifies church membership. It is rarely longer than twenty words in length. Mission statements articulate in a nutshell where the congregation is going in the twenty-first century. Powerful mission statements emerge from the clarity you have gained about the core values and motivating vision of the congregation. They have the following characteristics: Powerful mission statements are clearly motivational. They are exciting to people in both church and community, and they are regularly celebrated by the congregation to be truly the leading of Jesus. The mission energizes people. It is a source of pride. They readily speak of it among work associates, neighbors, relatives, and friends. Their personal identity is tied to this mission. Powerful mission statements are clearly congregational. They involve and develop to totality of congregational life, not simply an aspect of that life. Everyone participating in the congregation is enthusiastic and wholehearted about that mission. It is their ultimate reason for participation in congregational life. Each person is on fire for that mission, and people participate in this congregation specifically because these people are working toward that purpose. Powerful mission statements are clearly distinctive. They do not repeat old phrases or duplicate current work. They do not seek to do everything worthwhile, but they do seek to do one worthwhile thing with excellence and energy to ultimate fulfillment. They do not cast judgment on other possible visions and purposes, but take ownership of a particular vision and purpose. It is the stamp of identity in the midst of diversity.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning MISSION Statement Powerful mission statements are deserving of sacrifice. No matter how large the vision or how great the challenge, a powerful mission statement is always reasonable and achievable. People recognize that it is more than a dream—it is a possibility. It deserves immense personal sacrifice not only because it is worthy but also because it can be done. Powerful mission statements are supported by perpetual prayer. Individuals, leaders, and the congregation as a whole continually pray for the success of the mission. Prayer is both planned and spontaneous. The mission is constantly lifted into consciousness, and it lies at the center of personal and corporate spirituality. Your ultimate goal will be to articulate your mission in such a way that it can be easily printed on the side of a bus, on a park bench, on a matchbook cover, or on a banner trailing behind an airplane above a crowded beach. In that brief space, you need to communicate everything the public needs to know about your church that will motivate their support or involvement. Of course, these are exactly the places that your mission statements will be proclaimed. Moving Off the Map – A Field Guide to Changing the Congregation. Thomas G. Bandy, 1998, Abingdon Press. ISBN 0-687-06800-2

On the purpose of the Church, by C.S. Lewis “He works on us in all sorts of ways. But above all, He works on us through each other. Men are mirrors, or “carriers” of Christ to other men. Usually it is those who know Him that bring Him to others. That is why the Church, the whole body of Christians showing Him to one another, is so important. It is easy to think that the Church has a lot of different objects – education, building, missions, holding services… The Church exists for no other purpose but to draw men into Christ, to make him little Christs. If they are not doing that, all the cathedrals, clergy, missions, sermons, even the Bible itself, are simply a waste of time. God became man for no other purpose. It is even doubtful, you know, whether the whole universe was created for any other reason.”

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Discerning Mission Statement Worksheets Mission Statement Review/Creation Meeting Worksheet #1

Laying the Scriptural Foundation For Discerning Mission

Part I: Directions: The facilitator will ask the following question after each appointed Bible passage is read.

Reflecting on this scripture, why do you think the Church exists? What is the purpose of the Church? Utilize the space below to write simple phrases and single words in response to the above questions.

Part 2 Independent Reflection (5 – 7 minutes) Directions: Thoughtfully, prayerfully, reflect on the scriptures just read, other studying you have done, and the core value statement of this church. Write in the space below simple phrases and single word answers to the following questions: Why does (church name) exist? What is its God given, unique purpose for this time and this place (location)?’

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Discerning Mission Statement Worksheets

Mission Statement Review/Creation Meeting Worksheet #2

Sharing Our Thoughts, Building Consensus

Small Group Work – 20 minutes total Part 1 – (12 minutes)

Directions: Allow each person in the group about 3 minutes to share their simple words and short phrases and some of the personal thoughts they wrote on the last worksheet.

Listen for words and phrases expressed more than once. Use the space below to make your own notes, particularly noting words and phrases that are repeated.

Part II – 8 minutes.

Directions: AS A GROUP build consensus on words or phrases that you all agree reflect why you think this Church exists-its God given, unique purpose for this time and place. Write each word or phrase on a sticky note provided. Make as many sticky notes as necessary, place them on the sheet of easel paper provided and bring them back to the whole group for posting when time is called.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Discerning Mission Statement Worksheets

YOUR WORD BANK

Directions: Write down words and phrases in the space below as you hear them read. Particularly note the words that strike you as meaningful and relevant to you in terms of the mission of (this church). Note the words that were repeated often. You will utilize this list in the small group you join that will draft a preliminary mission statement.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Discerning Mission Statement Worksheets Scripture References Exodus 18:13-26

Moses realizes he cannot lead by himself. He chooses leaders and empowers them to lead Proverbs 29:18 Where there is no vision the people perish Matthew 18: 19-20 Anything asked for in prayer...two or more Matthew 22:37-40 The Great Commandment to Love Matthew 25: 35-40 I was hungry and you gave me food Matthew 28: 16-20 The Great Commission Luke 6: 36-38 Be compassionate…do not judge…give full measure, pressed down John 13:34-35 By the love you have for one another...everyone will know you are my disciples Acts 2:42-47 The early Christian community… broke bread, shared everything… day by day the Lord added to their community Romans 12:9-13 Work together…have hope…don’t give up easily…be hospitable Romans 15:1-6 Tolerance, helping others to become stronger Christians learning from scripture 1Corinthians 12:12-21, 27-30 Many parts of the body make up one…spiritual gifts…need each other Galatians 5:22 Fruits of the Spirit Ephesians 1:22-23 Christ is the head of the Church which is his body Ephesians 2:19-22 You are citizens and part of God’s household. Christ Jesus is the Cornerstone Ephesians 4:1-6 Paul’s call to the church for unity Ephesians 4:1-7, 11-13 Lead a life worthy of your vocation…according to the gifts given you Ephesians 5: 19-20 Sing psalms and hymns when together Colossians 1:27-28 The mystery of Christ is among you...train and instruct everyone Colossians 3:12-15 You are God’s chosen race…bear with one another…forgive Hebrews 10:24-25 Don’t stay away from the meetings of the faithful Hebrews 13:1-2 Hospitality to strangers…may be entertaining angels 1Peter 2:9-10 You are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a people set apart Revelations 3:14-16, 20-22 Church that is neither hot or cold…will be spit out Some of the above references from the Gospels can be found duplicated in other Gospels.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Discerning Mission Statement Worksheets Based on the small group work and discussion record in the space below the agreed DRAFT Mission Statement:

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Discerning Mission Statement Worksheets NOTES

_________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ Š 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Section V DISCERNING YOUR VISION FOCUS


Congregational Development Strategic Planning Vision Discernment of the motivating vision that drives the congregation toward mission may be the most difficult step in clarifying the basics of congregational life. There are several reasons: First, vision is not constructed by the people, but it is revealed to the people by God. Therefore, the process requires the creation of a climate of waiting in which the core values of the congregation are brought into creative interaction with scripture and the transformative experiences of individuals. Second, vision is profoundly threatening. Core values help define who you are, but authentic vision will change who you are—and carry you and your values in unexpected and perhaps unsettling directions. Third, vision can never be fully expressed in words. Unlike our previous work in core values, this effort requires us so transcend mere words to and express the raw enthusiasm or emotional power that leads us to take real risks. A vision is a song in the heart. It is a metaphor or symbol, a rhythm or tune, a picture or experience, the mere presentation of which elicits spontaneous joy and excitement. Vision speaks to the heart, not the mind. It can never be fully contained in words, and one always feels rather breathless and frustrated trying to communicate it to another person. Yet at the same time, a vision is so compelling that one simply must share it with others—even with perfect strangers! A vision makes you feel like nobility! It uplifts the human spirit and fills the heart with immense purpose and meaning. It fills a person with impatience, with a burning desire to do something immediately The specific action required may be unclear. The support of others is helpful, but not essential. It is the vision itself that fills an individual with renewed self-esteem, and centers his or her life toward a single-minded destiny. It invests a small human life with universal significance and infinite worth. A vision is true north for the soul. It is a permanent, intuitive compass direction for a human being. Every person inevitably strays from the path. Life is an endless experiment and course correction. The vision brings one back to the true path. One only needs to pause, refocus, concentrate on the vision; and new clarity for action emerges. The vision is like a magnet that draws the people, individually and collectively, unto itself. A vision is the answer to the question “What is it about my experience with Jesus that this community cannot live without?” It is a clear grasp of that pivotal, heart-felt experience with Jesus that has so changed one’s direction in life and activity of living— and has so filled one’s life with joy and meaning— that unless one shares it with another, that other person’s life will be impoverished. A vision fills one’s life with generosity, which overflows in magnanimity toward the world. For Christians, authentic visions are always associated with the living Christ.

Moving Off the Map – A Field Guide to Changing the Congregation. Thomas G. Bandy, 1998, Abingdon Press. ISBN 0-687-06800-2

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Vision The Organization’s Vision is a compelling positive and idealistic statement (or set of statements) that describes how the organization wants to ultimately function in the future to meet its values and mission. Characteristics of a vision statement: 1. Vision statements are specific. It is not everything that could be. 2. A successful vision achieves at least one or two of the high priority values of each of the three areas: customers, members, and sponsor. 3. A vision is attainable sometime in the future. It is strategic. 4. A vision must get people motivated and excited about the future of the organization. It should be a compelling picture of what could be in the future. 5. Development of a vision requires a highly creative process. It may break a current paradigm of how things are today. from Performance Resources, Inc., 2004 – adopted by Reb Scarborough, 2005 Why Vision is essential: Vision refers to a picture of the future with some implicit or explicit commentary on why people should strive to create that future. In a change process, a good vision serves three important purposes. First, by clarifying the general direction for change, by saying the corporate equivalent of “we need to be south of here in a few years instead where we are today,” it simplifies hundreds or thousands of more detailed decisions. Second, it motivated people to take action in the right direction, even if the initial steps are personally painful. Third, it helps coordinate the actions of different people, even thousands and thousands of individuals, in a remarkably fast and efficient way. Clarifying the direction of change is important because, more often than not, people disagree on direction, or are confused, wonder whether significant change is really necessary. An effective vision and back-up strategies help resolve there issues. Vision serves to facilitate major changes by motivating action that is not necessarily in people’s shortterm self-interests. Vision helps align individuals, thus coordinating the actions of motivated people in a remarkably efficient way Characteristics of an Effective Vision: • Imaginable: Conveys a picture of what the future will look like • Desirable: Appeals to the long-term interests of employees, customers, stockholders, and others who have a stake in the enterprise • Feasible: Comprises realistic, attainable goals • Focused: Is clear enough to provide guidance in decision making • Flexible: Is general enough to allow individual initiative and alternative responses in light of changing conditions from Leading Change, by John P. Kotter, Harvard Business Press, 1996 © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Vision Event Worksheets Handout #1

Your Inspired Vision

Part I – Independent Reflection – 10 minutes

Directions: Reflect on the visioning exercise that you just experienced. Keeping in mind Your church’s mission statement and core values, what activities/ministries did you see happening that don’t exist now? What did you see that was a creative expansion of current ministries? What did you see that inspired and excited you? How do you envision (church name) three to five years from now? List up to 8 visions of ministries you saw that you would like to become reality. Write these visions as brief phrases and be ready to share them with your small group. 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Vision Event Worksheets

Handout #2

Use the back of this sheet if you need more space to write

Whole Group Notes Use this sheet to make notes about the visions you are hearing reported. Especially record those that bring you great joy, you feel are inspired by God and live into the mission and values of this church. Also note visions that are repeated often.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Vision Event Worksheets Handout #3

Any Common Vision?

Group Activity #1 – 30 minutes

Directions: Gather in your assigned group. Appoint a discussion leader in order to keep the group on task and on time. Appoint a recorder to write down the final decisions of the group on strips, and appoint a spokesperson for the group to report your decisions to the entire group. DISCUSSION LEADER-facilitate the following: (about 15 minutes-WATCH THE TIME!) Have each person in the group report visions that he/she envisioned during the exercise. Everyone should listen for common responses or common themes if possible.

Place for your notes as persons are reporting their visions

NEXT As a group, decide on a maximum of 8 visions that you all agree bring you great joy, you feel are inspired by God and live into the mission and values of this congregation. Record each vision, one vision per strip, as a few words or phrase. DON’T put numerous items on a strip! Pick a spokesperson from your group to be prepared to report your group’s vision strips when called upon to do so.

Place for your individual notes on your group’s maximum 8 visions

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Vision Event Worksheets Handout #4

Building Group Consensus Group Activity #2 – 30 minutes DISCUSSION LEADER - Allow the persons in your group to discuss what they heard in the large

group, particularly noting ideas that were repeated. Your group must agree on only 5 visions that you feel are inspired by God and live into the mission and values of this congregation. Write each vision on a strip and be prepared to post it immediately when you return to the whole group session. Place for your individual notes on your group’s maximum 5 decisions.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Results from Visioning Exercise Based on the words and phrases most repeated from the “Visioning” exercise, In the space below, List up to 5 Vision Area Headlines with Descriptions (See example in Section IV): 1._____________________________________________

2.______________________________________________

3.______________________________________________

4.______________________________________________

5.______________________________________________

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Results from Visioning Exercise NOTES

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Section VI REALIZING YOUR VISION THE PLAN


Congregational Development Strategic Planning Definition of Goals and Objectives Goals and Objectives Goals and objectives are statements that describe what your Vision Document will accomplish, or the results that will be achieve. Goals are high level statements that provide overall context for what the Vision Document is trying to achieve, and should align to its components. Objectives are lower level statements that describe the specific, tangible products, deliverables and fruits that will be delivered. The definition of goals and objectives is more of an art than a science, and it can be difficult to define them and align them correctly. Goals Because the goal is at a high-level, it may take more than one objective to achieve. It may take many objectives over a long period of time to achieve the goal. Generally, non-measurable: If you can measure the achievement of your goal, it is probably at too low a level and is probably more of an objective. If your goal is not achievable through any combination of objectives, it is probably written at too high a level. It may instead be a vision statement, which is a higher level statement showing direction and aspiration, but which may never actually be achieved. Objectives Objectives are concrete statements describing what the project is trying to achieve. The objective should be written at a lower level, so that it can be evaluated at the conclusion of a goal to see whether it was achieved or not. Goal statements are designed to be vague. Objectives should not be vague. A well-worded objective will be Specific, Measurable, Attainable/Achievable, Realistic and Time-bound (SMART). •

Note that the objective is much more concrete and specific than the goal statement.

The objective is measurable in terms cost, speed, quantity and / or quality.

We must assume that the objective is achievable and realistic.

The objective is time-bound, and should be completed by a specific date.

Objectives should refer to the deliverables of the goal. If you cannot determine what deliverables are being created to achieve the objective, then the objective may be written at too high a level. On the other hand, if an objective describes the characteristics of the deliverables, they are written at too low a level. If they describe the features and functions, they are requirements, not objectives.

© 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning Definition of Goals and Objectives NOTES

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Congregational Development Strategic Planning GOAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHEET (One page per Goal) 1. Write a Goal that when accomplished will help realize one or more of the stated visions. Record the Vision Area: __________________________________.

2. What are the basic things that must happen to achieve that Goal (objectives/ milestones)?

3. What are the specific expected results (observable) of achieving that Goals?

4. Who is the champion of that Goal and what ministry area is responsible?

5. Unique observations and comments

Š 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Calvary Episcopal Church Richmond, TX

Vision and DRAFT Strategic Plan 2011 - 2016

September 18, 2010 v.1.0

Reb Scarborough Scarborough Consulting Services

Š 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services Page 87 VI 5.1 Congregational Develoment Startegic Planning EXAMPLE - Goals & Objectives Project Management Summary 040814


Calvary Episcopal Church Richmond, TX Vision Document July 2010 Mission Statement As a welcoming Body of Christ, we seek to empower everyone to learn, live, and teach God’s Eternal Promise. Core Values Calvary Episcopal Church, empowered by the Holy Spirit and the love of Jesus, seeks to embrace all ages in our journey of faith through these values: Christian Fellowship and Family: We are a nurturing and prayerful Christian Community that provides a small town atmosphere for all members of our family. Worship: We enjoy spirit filled worship that celebrates the continuity of our catholic and apostolic traditions through the liturgy, common prayer, communion, and music. Christian Education: We seek to nurture spiritual formation to excite in all a passionate faith in Jesus Christ with a Biblically-based Christian Education. Outreach: We grow together in experience by continuing Christ’s ministry in meeting the community needs and making Christ known. Vision Statements Powerful Youth: Calvary’s youth ministry is powerful, vital, growing, and exciting, where our youth and young adults, with their families, are shepherded into opportunities to develop into disciples of Jesus. We enjoy Christian community, and worship in services that are youth and young adult friendly. Christian Formation: Christian Education and Shepherd Groups provide coordinated program offerings to enrich spiritual growth. We teach God’s Living Word to all ages, and encourage small group bible studies. Community Outreach: Every member of Calvary is actively supporting a variety of ‘hands-on’ ministries and other outreach opportunities. We treasure our strong and special relationship with Calvary Episcopal School as part of our mission. Welcoming and Fellowship: We welcome all visitors who grace our doors, and mentor new members into the Life at Calvary. We create opportunities for fellowship, retreats, and prayer which strengthen our relationships, offer encouragement, and maintain a sense of connection with each other. Leadership Formation and Communication: We nurture and develop servant leaders and faithful stewards in an ongoing process that is shaping, growing, and serving the church’s mission and ministries. As part of this process, we promote effective communication among our staff, leaders, parishioners, visitors, and our community using various communication channels. July 2010 v.1.0 Final approved by Vestry © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Calvary Episcopal Church, Richmond, TX Goals and Objectives September 2010 Christian Formation (CF) 2011 Goals & Objectives Goals 2011 Objectives Expected Results Christian Formation CF1- Grow Small Groups Increase Shepherd and Small Group participation. Christian Formation CF 2 - Spiritual Renewal To make stronger and more active Christians through spiritual renewal.

Christian Formation CF 3: Enhance Christian Formation Enhance Christian formation to increase participation among all members and ages

CF 1.1: Coordinator for Groups with training.

Assigned

Comments

 Growth in participation within Small Groups  More Small Groups

Formation and Spirituality Ministry

 Stronger and bigger church  Members are more connected to Christ and each other

Formation and Spirituality Ministry

 Members develop a deeper relationship with and knowledge of God  Greater Sunday school participation among adults  Greater Sunday school participation among youth

Formation and Spirituality Ministry

• Coordinate with Worship Ministry

CF 1.2: Maintain and publicize locations, times and focus. CF 1.3: New leader training CF 2.1: Hold Alpha Class CF 2 1.2 Hold Discovery Weekend CF 2.3: Develop the Cursillo community. Better communication: Before (info) During (Pallanca) After (4th Day) CF 2.4: Develop Young Adult and College Ministry. College reunions (Xmas and summer) CF 2.5: Guest Speakers (or series) CF 2.6: Develop ECW and ECM groups through fellowship, education, outreach and worship CF 3.1: Improve offerings for adult Sunday school to include a variety of themes and series CF 3.2: Formal training for all education leaders and teachers CF 3.3: Develop vibrant enthusiastic education ministry that is relevant with a Biblical foundation CF 3.4: Address the Sunday schedule to encourage attendance

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Calvary Episcopal Church, Richmond, TX Goals and Objectives September 2010

Summary: Goal Map to Ministry Responsibilities Canonical: BG 1 Office of the Rector: none assigned Worship: CF 3 (shared) Community Outreach: CO 1, CO 2 Formation and Spirituality: CF 1, CF 2, CF3 (shared), LFC 1 Calvary Life: PY 1, LCF 2, WF 1, WF 2

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Calvary Episcopal Church, Richmond, TX Strengths and Opportunities September 2010 Strengths (What’s Working) Build on these Community Outreach - 22 Garden (3) Community Gardens (2) Thanksgiving Feast (3) Thanksgiving (2) Community Outreach Projects Community Outreach Outreach (but room to improve) Heart of outreach Thanksgiving and other outreach Adopt a Christmas Christmas Adopt-A –Family Christmas gift for… Ministry of the Garden Blood drives Pancakes VBS as an outreach Worship and Music – 20 Beautiful worship tradition Worship Excellent worship Strong worship team Lively worship Spirit filled/ spirit led worship Meaningful worship Good contemporary music Good music POGS – great music Liturgy and Music Music (4) Great music Music team Youth-type Music Great organist (doesn’t make a “concert” out of a church service!) Staff and Volunteers – 19 Invested volunteers Opportunities to serve Lay Ministry Giving generously – time and talent; working on treasure Passion Energy Enthusiastic Youth leaders © 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Calvary Episcopal Church, Richmond, TX Strengths and Opportunities September 2010 Opportunities (What’s Not Working) Work on these Communication – 18 Communication (2) Awareness of Calvary events (everybody knowing what’s going on) Making Calvary Known (esp with new, e.g., Del Webb Community) Internal Communication Communication about Calvary Outside exposure making us know in the community More colorful website – Garden, DOK, etc. Early advertising of events More advertising of our church Sharing the works of Calvary – within/ outside the campus Lack of Communication No publicity of significance Advertising Community identity (they don’t know us, not in the way we want) Advertising to region Publicity Website still not kept up – vital to growth New Members – 12 Active Greeters Sometimes ignoring newcomers Open Doors to community Gaining new members (growth) Integrating visitors (it is getting better) Prospects and new members hospitality/ welcoming Welcoming new folks (on Sunday) Integrating new people (beyond Sunday) New members Follow up with new members Bring in new people More active Greeters Volunteers – 11 Too many ministries – spread too thin Not enough core volunteers Increasing volunteer base Volunteer base diminished capabilities (core volunteers) Depth of volunteerism (getting people involved who are not involved) Integrating all members into programs Outreach and Ministries Breakfast for a Buck Teaming More commitment to Community Gardens

© 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Calvary Episcopal Church, Richmond, TX

Canonical Ministries

September 2010 v.1.1 A welcoming Body of Christ, seeking to empower everyone to learn, live, and teach God’s Eternal Promise

Taking care of the business of the church.

• The Vestry Executive Finance Building/ Grounds Mission and Vision Stewardship

• Calvary Episcopal School Board Director Chaplin

Office of the Rector

Direct responsibilities of the Rector.

• Pastoral Care PC Committee • The Staff Rector Parish Administrator Youth Worship Leader Organist Christian Formation Treasurer • Volunteers Reception Secretary

Worship Ministry

Supporting the lay ministry in enhancing the Worship experience.

• Acolytes • Altar Guild • Children’s Chapel • Flowers • Lay Ministry • Liturgy • Music Choir POGS Sound Board • Ushers

Outreach Ministry

Feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, and soothing the suffering within our community.

• Boy Scouts • Christmas Adopt-AFamily • Community of Hope • Community Gardens

Formation and Spirituality Ministry Providing Christian education and spiritual formation to all ages.

Facilitating a loving personal relationships with God and our neighbors.

• Advent and Lenten Programs

• Communication and Marketing

• Alpha

• Fellowship Cooks Family retreat Picnic Women’s retreat Men’s retreat Supper Club

• Adult Education

• Helping Hands

• Children’s Ministries VBS Sunday School Nursery

• Mission Trips

• Confirmation

• Open Door

• Cursillo

• Thanksgiving Feast

• Discovery

• Easter Baskets/Hunt

Calvary Life Ministry

• EFM • Faith Alive • Shepherd Groups

• New Member Greeter Connection • Prayer DOTK, Jr. DOTK • Rally Day • Seniors

• Youth/EYC

• Track Rack

© 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Section VII BIOGRAPHY


Bio Reb Scarborough

October 2013

Robert L. (Reb) Scarborough is a lifelong Episcopalian retired from the oil industry after 29 years working as Mechanical & Petroleum Engineer and IT Manager, now working full-time as a consultant in Organizational Development & Growth. Reb Graduated from St. Christopher’s (Episcopal) School (1969), Richmond, Virginia and Clemson University, South Carolina (1973) with a BS in Mechanical Engineering with a focus on Ocean Engineering. That led him to work for Amoco Production Company in Louisiana and later BP in Houston, TX where he gained practical experience in all aspects of offshore oil field development, facilities construction and operations. He rose quickly to supervisor and management positions in engineering and later Information Technology. In those roles Reb gain a number of skills in strategic planning, project management, leadership development, team building and facilitation. Reb completed a 4-year Certificate in Advanced Studies in Congregational Development from Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, Evanston, IL in 2000. He is a 2004 graduate of the Diocese of Texas' Ministry Academy. Reb is a member of Calvary Episcopal Church, Richmond, TX, since 1990. He teaches adult confirmation and new member classes, and is a musician with the contemporary music team. He has served on several past Vestries as Sr. Warden, Jr. Warden, Chairman of Worship, Christian Education, Evangelism, and Stewardship committees and a past Chairman of a capital funds drive. His specific focus is in organizational development and growth where leadership development and training, team building, visioning and plan implementation are critical components. Reb has experience in these areas since 1994. He formed Scarborough Consulting Services in November 2002 with the following purpose: Our Mission: “Realizing Your Vision” Helping volunteer leadership teams and small business owners to: - Clarify who they are, what they care about and where they are going; - Convert their vision into an actionable plan; and - Develop the organizational capacity to realize their vision. Since 2003 he has worked with 3 Episcopal Dioceses (Michigan, Mississippi, and Texas), 30+ Episcopal congregations (parish and mission status), and various school, community centers, civic leadership boards and small businesses. The congregations range in size from 50 to 2000 ASA in rural, suburban and urban environments in Texas, Illinois, and South Carolina. Engagements have included assessment, discernment of mission, core values, and vision statements, developing strategic and tactical plans, organizing for ministry for staff, leadership teams, coaching in pre-search activities, special Diocesan projects, e.g., Crosspointes Leadership Development course and with the Diocesan Interfaith Ministry Board, and currently TEC Transition Ministry Board. Reb is married to Anne for 39 years and has two married adult children and three grandchildren.

© 2014 Scarborough Consulting Services

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Section VIII NOTES


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"The Practice of Developing and Maintaining a Strategic Plan"  

"The Practice of Developing and Maintaining a Strategic Plan" is a Congregational Development Resource DISCOVERY WORKBOOK by Robert L. (Re...

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