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REBECCA TWOMBLY


Rebecca Twombly EDUCATION 2021

Fall 2019

CONTACT rtwombly@ku.edu 636-226-7243 issuu.com/rebeccatwombly

Lawrence, KS GPA 3.79

University of New South Wales Sydney, Australia

EXPERIENCE 2015 - 2019

Ride Operations Lead, Six Flags St. Louis

-Supervise ride operation crew -Train and coach team members -Operate rides in a safe and efficient manner -Maintain a clean work environment -Greet and assist guests with questions and concerns -Communicate with supervisors and team members

linkedin.com/in/rebeccatwombly

May - Aug 2019

PROFICIENCIES Revit SketchUp Layout Lumion Photoshop Illustrator Indesign AutoCAD Bluebeam Revu Microsoft Office

Master of Architecture, University of Kansas

CAD Intern, Duke Manufacturing Co.

-Utilize AutoCAD in a 3D environment -Draft drawings of commerical foodservice equipment -Revise drawings based on customer feedback -Communicate with CAD team and project managers

AWARDS & ACTIVITIES 2016-present 2016-present

University Honors Program KU Chancellor Scholarship

SKILLS organization, team work, communication, leadership, problem solver, self-motivated


CONTENTSS 01

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CROSSROADS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

OLATHE PUBLIC LIBRARY

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MARVIN ANNEX

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URBAN STATION


CROSSROADS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL This elementary school lies in the heart of the Crossroads District of Kansas City. This lively arts-centered area of downtown prides itself in its creativity and was in need of a learning community to carry on the traditions of the area. This school satisfies the need for an interactive, hands-on learning environment that serves the neighborhood with opportunities for several indoor and outdoor community areas while still respecting the context of the area.

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WELCOME This elementary school fits right into the Crossroads District. Its undulating brick and glass facade suggests a continuation of the urban wall while reflecting the playful nature of the art of the neighborhood. The form also creates a courtyard as an oasis from the city, allowing safe learning and play outdoors. Within the building, there is one classroom pod per grade, dividing into two smaller classrooms to allow a 1-16 teacher-student ratio.

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entry parent’s office counselor’s office administrative office nurse’s office classroom collaborative hallway storage bathroom learning garden library music room art room playground gym stage cafeteria commercial kitchen loading zone mechanical room teacher supply storage teacher training teacher’s lounge

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small group

individual

large group

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LEARN

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The classroom is the building block of the school. These

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classroom blocks allow for interactive learning of all types. Upon entering the space from the hallway, there is a reading nook where students can discover

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knowledge on their own. The center third of the classroom is equipped with individual desks that form together for small group projects. The last segment is a place for large group presentations, which has the potential to spill out into the hallway. Here, multiple learned. With multiple teaching options, every student

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is sure to find a solution for their personal learning style. 1 2 3 4 5

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classes can come together and share what they have

main hallway reading nook group work zone presentation area collaboration hallway


multiple learning styles

collaborative learning hallway

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main hallway

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gallery wall

collaborative hallway

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PROCESS On the eastern elevation, a few changes were made throughout the process of determining materiality. The original sketch shows transparency only into the hallway from the interior courtyard. This was a key place to allow visibility and natural light from one end of the school to another. Once it was decided to blend with the context by using dark red brick, this language was used exclusively for the classrooms, while the wood paneling emphasized the verticality of the large public spaces: the gym, library, and lobby.

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north lawn

COMMUNITY In a concrete landscape with little greenspace, this school adds to the urban community. The entrance of the building is centered on 20th and Grand, where the bus stop and parent drop off lie. This takes advantage of the recently added bulb-out on this corner, along with the already active intersection. The lawn to the north is perfect for indoor/outdoor community functions featuring garage doors that can double as an awning for such events. Finally, the courtyard features learning gardens in the south and the playground in the center. All of these amenities will allow the neighborhood to thrive even when school is not in session.

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playground


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Olathe Public Library y In the heart of Olathe’s civic center, this library provides a community space for all to gather. It not only functions as the downtown branch of the Olathe Public Library system, but also as a place for the public to engage and gather to utilize the meeting rooms and auditorium.

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FORM The form of this facility was insipired by the Santa Fe Trail, where Olathe was once an important stop for travelers. The way the trail divides into two then reconverges is emulated through the program wrapping around a central void. The organic shape of the trail is seen in the auditorium while contrasted with the geometric program. The new Apple Headquarters served as a precedent for this form. It proves the form combines enormous amounts of natural light and easy access to nature.

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interior view of wall system

FACADE The brick exterior serves as a shell, respecting the red brick context of downtown Olathe. However, this hard exterior is a part of a wall system made up of a curtain wall with a perforated brick outer layer to allow light in and views out. The walls surrounding the interior courtyard are also made of curtain walls, but instead, feature terracotta louvers. Their color reflects the feel of the red brick context, while functioning as a barrier to the summer sun. Finally, as the auditorium rises up

north elevation

out of the floor of the courtyard, it becomes the focal point of the space, deserving its own special copper pannel material.

north-south section

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perforated brick curtain wall

copper panels

terracotta louvers

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PROGRAM From the street, visitors climb the stairs to be greeted by a lush courtyard featuring a grand oak tree juxtaposed by the sweeping metal auditorium form. There are places to gather and sit, or the visitor can continue into the library. Inside, a cafe and exhibition space sit to the left while circulation to other floors is straight ahead. To access the auditorium, one descends the stairs, coming to a large area to gather before events as well as entry to meeting rooms. Library staff have multiple areas throughout the building to call home. Facility workers have access to a loading dock on the first floor, while intake and processing librarians work on the first and second floors. Finally, the library administration is located on the second floor in an area with its own entrance. From here, they can conduct business concerning all branches of the Olathe Public Library system.

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entry vestibule cafe exhibition intake & processing courtyard library administration storage reference desk young adults study room children service desk meeting room stage auditorium AV control panel MEP areas catering facilities loading dock pre-function drive-by book drop computer lab general stacks AV materials

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xMarvin Annex As the architecture building on campus, Marvin Hall tends to fill up with models and projects throughout the semester. That is why the Marvin Annex to the west of the building is the perfect place to hold reviews and display the work that the students are doing throughout the semester. With a sustainable basis for the form of the building, this space is a great setting to showcase student work.

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LINDLEY HALL

SPATIAL PLAN The diagram above shows the spatial planning of the site. Jayhawk Boulevard diverts from the regular grid, so the diagonal orientation of the building reflects the nature of the most important street on the KU campus. The remainder of the site is based off of the grid, creating nooks for benches and landscaping.

map of Lawrence

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natural ventilation

SUSTAINABLE The premise of the project was to start with a rectangular floor plan and explore ways to manipulate the 3D extrusion into a sustainable, beautiful pavilion to support studio reviews. To control the excess water runoff, the roof is slanted towards a small reflecting pool on the south side. This also serves to cool the wind coming through the lower windows. This cooler air comes into the space, heats up, then rises to the top of the room where it is released through the windows on the north side.To control the temperature of the space, the slanted roof system is made out of glass and supplemented by louvers between the roof joists. This ensures that the summer sun is blocked from heating up the space while the winter sun is allowed to penetrate the roof and warm the space while providing soft light.

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interior review space


winter daylighting

summer daylighting

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Urban station As a part of this design-build studio led by Nils Gore, our team of eighteen students produced a new entrance for a gas station-turned-community center in Kansas City, Kansas. By evaluating the client’s needs for identity, security, and style, we designed, built, and installed the new entrance to the space. Aditionally, I worked with a team of two other students to design and make unique chairs for the space to compliment the large conference table created by students in a previous design-build studio.

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concept URBAN STATION

Urban Works

URBAN STATION

Urban Works

DESIGNING We dedicated the first weeks of the semester to observing, brainstorming, and learning from each other. First, we investigated the needs of the client. The most important needs that we identified were the inclusion of natural lighting, protection from solar heat gain, vandalism deterrence, and an inviting feel to the space. Then, we collaborated as a team to design an entrance that is defined by a metal surround that provides shade, branding and a sense of transition.

demolition + temp. enclosure

401 N 14th St, Kansas City, KS 66102401 N 14th St, Kansas City, KS 66102

The solution also includes plenty of glazing to bring in light, an interior light shelf to bounce the light further into the space, and metal louvers to control solar heat gain in summer. Over the last weeks of the semester, we split into teams to accomplish each part of the project. We installed the finished product on site and it was

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installation

ready for the community.


Wyandotte, KC

Spring 19' • KU Arc/D

Compiled by Kate Kemper

URBAN STATION

ARCH 509 - Nils Gore

created

April 22, 2019 revised

May 15, 2019

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GATHERING The best part about completing this project is seeing the final product being used and loved by a community. It serves as a place to gather for kids after school, on a Friday morning for coffee, and everything in between.

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comfort testing

MAKING My main focus was designing and manufacturing a set of sixteen chairs. After analyzing the seating around us, we were inspired by wooden slatted chairs at a local coffee shop. The ease of creating a relatively comfortable seat with three angled slats was a simple way to coordinate with the conference table. With that, we went to the wood shop where we built and tested a series of prototypes to get the optimal balance of comfort and style. We switched up the height of the back, the angles of the slats, and the width of the seat from iteration to iteration. Once the final design was approved by our classmates, we used SketchUp to model the chair and make shop drawings to cut the plywood back and sidepieces using a CNC router. The next step was processing the reclaimed lumber to be used for the slats. The was a long process that included removing old nails, leveling, cutting to size, sanding, filling holes with epoxy, sanding, and applying several coats of gloss. Finally, the pieces were simply assembled due to the built-in notches that controlled the angles of the slats and reclining angle of the back. This was a learning process but we got better as we went alongand the result was sixteen unique chairs that will comfort the community for years to come.

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prototypes

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lumber

staining

assembly

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Profile for Rebecca Twombly

Portfolio 2020  

University of Kansas fourth year portfolio

Portfolio 2020  

University of Kansas fourth year portfolio

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