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REBECCA FRYE

portfolio of ADVANCED DESIGN

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA

- SUMMER 2012 SCHOOL

OF ARCHITECTURE + COMMUNITY DESIGN 1


TABLE OF CONTENTS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA

2

- SUMMER 2012 SCHOOL

OF ARCHITECTURE + COMMUNITY DESIGN


04-11

12-25

26-37

38-63

64-69

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A

B

C

D

ADVANCED DESIGN

ADVANCED DESIGN

ADVANCED DESIGN

ADVANCED DESIGN

DIGITAL FABRICATION

Professor Dan Powers 6 week project

Professor Dan Powers 10 week project

Professor Trent Green 16 week project

Professor Jan Wampler 16 week project

Professor Mark Weston 16 week project

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Frenzie Community Theater consists of a 300 person auditorium with proscenium stage, orchestra pit, back of house and front of house programmatic elements. The site is a treeless, flat parcel of land located at the intersection of highway 301 and Crescent Park Drive. Its expansive location measures 360’ x 430’ and expresses an open relationship to nature. The concept behind the Frenzie Community Theater is an extension to the site in form of land mass that leads up to the raised volume of the main performance auditorium. Design of the building form creates occupiable green spaces on the roof and is accessible from inside the theater. Traditional elements of a proscenium theater space, where the audience directly faces the stage with no audience on either side, are translated to the design informally.

FRENZIE THEATER

in the TAMPA COMMUNITY

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ADVANCED DESIGN

A “In the theater the audience wants to be surprised, but by things that they expect.” -Tristian Bernard (French Playwright)

Professor Dan Powers 6 week project


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FRONT OF HOUSE THEATER

BACK OF HOUSE

THREE ZONES

The theater is divided up into three separate zones: Front of House, Theater, and Back of House. Each zone has its own function related to the traditions and rituals of a theater. Being able to translate the formal characteristics of a traditional theater comes from the routine that takes place by the people who occupy the space. The sense of place is about being seen and begins with the approach onto the site.

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LOBBY REHEARSAL HALL STAGE ORCHESTRA PIT LOADING AREA/STORAGE SOUND ROOM DRESSING ROOMS BREAK ROOM AUDITORIUM SEATING COCKTAIL BAR OUTDOOR GREEN SPACE

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4 3

2 6

7 7 5 8

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AMPHITHEATER SEATING FOR OUTDOOR PERFORMANCES

EXTERIOR ART WALL TO SERVE AS BACK DROP FOR OUTDOOR PERFORMANCES AND SIGNAGE FOR UPCOMING SHOWS

REHEARSAL SPACE OPENS TO OUTDOOR GATHERING SPACE

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LONGITUDINAL SECTIONS

ENTRANCE LOBBY AND TICKETING

RECEPTION/BAR

BACK OF HOUSE

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BACK OF HOUSE

MAIN ENTRANCE LOBBY

SEATING AND SHOW

OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE SPACE

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elevations

west

EXTERIOR RELATIONSHIP

The overall concept delineates with a single gesture on the site. A large wall extends up to the highest point of the theater space creating a sloping green roof and grand entry space. Layering the wall as it extends to the south, moments of light enter inside the entry lobby to allow for recognition of the arrival into the space. The rooftop of the supporting program doubles as extra green space layering on the site providing an outdoor area to break during intermissions. An additional outdoor area is designed for performance space with a sunken amphitheater/stage with backdrop meant to transform the space with each show.

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east

south

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ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME

at the ST PETERSBURG PIER

ADVANCED DESIGN

A

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Professor Dan Powers 10 week project


The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame started by choosing a Florida musician to feature in the museum. The choice: Lynyrd Skynyrd. The group started with five members and since has gone through some difficult situations, losing members, hardships and tragedies throughout their careers, but never gave up on their music. Lynyrd Skynyrd is about tradition and to them “music is a great healer�. Using these concepts as a starting point, the design took a continuous direction striving for rhythmic flow. Rhythm is defined by a movement marked by regulated succession of strong and week elements or a timing of sounds and silences. This inspiration is designed both in plan and section while taking to account the design of the skin and form of the building.

TAMPA BAY

TAMPA BAY

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FRAME THE HORIZON

Realizing that this is a museum about musical artifacts and legendary people, the program contributes an interaction between the building, site, people and water. The form of the building begins with floating volumes that create a large void in the building and open up the view straight toward the water. Within the building, the gallery spaces are designed around a central core connecting exhibits and allowing one to move around and encounter many views. Volumes pierce through the exterior to allow glimpses of the water. Circulation functions as exhibit space guiding visitors in and out of the building envelope, repeatedly passing from inside to outside from enclosed volumes to open air.

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8 11

1 2 3 4

LOBBY/GIFT SHOP OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE CAFE LOADING DOCK

5 6 7 8

STORAGE THEATER SCULPTURE GARDEN GALLERY

9 LIBRARY 10 ADMIN OFFICES 11 LOOKOUT BALCONY

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INTERACTIVE SKIN SYSTEM THAT FILTERS SOUTHERN LIGHT INTO GALLERY SPACE

south elevation

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MULTI LEVEL COVERED ENTRY AND PROCESSION TO WATER

west elevation


WIDE WINDOW OPENING TO ALLOW NORTHERN LIGHT INTO LIBRARY THREE STORY FEATURED GALLERY SPACE

north elevation

COVERED OUTSIDE SPACE WITH SEATING LOOKING OUT TO WATER AND MARINA

east elevation

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PROTRUSION THROUGH THE SKIN FOR OFFICE SPACE AND LOOKOUT BALCONY

OPERABLE SKIN SYSTEM CONTROLS THE AMOUNT OF LIGHT IN GALLERY SPACES

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LARGE OVERHANG PROVIDES OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE ON THE WATER


LAYERED LIGHT

Responding to the thriving area of St. Petersburg, the waterfront faรงade establishes a distinctive identity for the museum. As part of the rhythm of sounds and silences, light is translated in the same way. The building resonates with light and transparency via a double skin on the west and south facing facades. The facades are composed of an operable building skin made of perforated stainless steel panels offset from a glass wall. The panels reduce the impact of heat radiation during the summer and diffuse the amount of light entering the gallery spaces. Inside, the light can be controlled by the operable panels opening in varying directions.

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The museum’s entry draws people into the building in a open gesture down to the water

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APPROACH NORTH TO SOUTH OF SITE STEPS DOWN TO WATER’S EDGE ON GROUND LEVEL

GALLERY SPACE, LIBRARY AND THEATER PROGRAM THE SPACES

LARGE DOUBLE HEIGHT GALLERY SPACE ON FOURTH LEVEL

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT: ceiling to ground detail Another strategy used to filter light into gallery spaces is displayed in this ceiling to ground detail. A designed light reveal in the roof combined with setting back the ground floor structural glass wall creates diffused light on multi-levels. As shown in these details, the second floor protrudes over the first floor glass wall allowing for a light reveal and the similar on the third floor roof.

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1 LIGHT-GAUGE STEEL FRAME STUDWALL 24” O.C 2 HORIZONTAL CHANNEL BRACING SPACED 5’0” O.C 3 CEMENT FIBER BOARD PANELS 4 VAPOR BARRIER 5 3/4” PLYWOOD

6 GYPSON BOARD 7 GLASS LIGHT REVEAL 8 STEEL BEAM CONNECTION TO FLOOR SYSTEM 9 TEMPERED GLASS STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

1 3” STEEL COMPOSITE DECKING W/ LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE AND BITUMEN ROOFING SYSTEM 2 CANT STRIP 3 FLASHING 4 GLASS ROOF W/MULLIONS 5 RAFTER W/ CONDENSATION GUTTER 6 3/4” PLYWOOD

7 VAPOR BARRIER 8 CEMENT FIBER BOARD PANELS 9 GLASS CURTAIN WALL 10 8“ CONCRETE SLAB ON GRADE 11 4’ CONCRETE PILING 12 4” CONCRETE SLAB ON GRADE 13 EXPANSION JOINT

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CUSTOM SKIN WITH OPERABLE PANELS RACEWAYS- ATTACHED TO THE BACK OF EACH INDIVIDUAL PANEL PERFORATED METAL SCREEN STEEL STRUCTURE FOR SCREEN GLASS CURTAIN WALL DROP CEILING POURED IN PLACE CONCRETE SLAB STEEL TRUSS

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This project was to propose a single residential tower and public park space at the highline in New York City. Essentially a master plan would include two residential towers and shared park space on a single waterfront block with entrance to the highline. This proposal establishes a correspondence between aspects of the site and its relationship both to the geographic context and to architecture. In responding to the master plan, three primary urban conditions are addressed: that the proposed tower tribute the highline, create a unified composition while reinforcing the public space, and utilize the water’s edge and views of the city. Generally, a residential tower is about the views, maximizing natural light, and units generating their own identity. In addition to these up-front concepts, the design responds to the collective urban functions of Chelsea Square by incorporating ground level and highline level public uses.

CHELSEA SQUARE

at the NEW YORK HIGHLINE

ADVANCED DESIGN

B

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Professor Trent Green 16 week project


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SO D U H

IVER R N


COMPOSITION STUDY

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north elevation

east elevation

This elevation study primarily focuses on the composition and transparencies of the facade to function with the spaces of the tower. Three separate masses of the tower integrate to form a unified composition. The form sculpts space around the highline to keep its open air qualities while still interacting with it.


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south elevation

west elevation


STRUCTURE AMPLIFIES TOWER AT NIGHT

Structure amplifies the tower at night. It’s lightweight high strength structure allows visibility of a glass façade and opens up visibility of the activities happening inside. The tower is composed of thirty-three floors, six of which are programed with commercial/public and shared residential uses.

a

b

c

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a

WRAPPING ELEMENT HOLDS PENTHOUSE SUITES

b TOWNHOMES OPEN OUT TO PARK SPACE

c

STREET EDGE AND HIGHLINE ENTRANCE

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GROUND FLOOR

2ND FLOOR

TWO-STORY TOWNHOME UNITS FACING PARK.

TOWNHOME COURTYARD ENTRANCE AND RETAIL SHOPPING ON GROUND FLOOR

COMMUNITY PARK SPACE WITH FLEXIBLE USES. WALLS TO DISPLAY EXHIBITIONS FROM LOCAL CHELSEA ARTISTS 32


3TH

FLOOR

4TH FLOOR

TYPICAL FLOOR

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THREE BEDROOM APT LAYOUT

TWO BEDROOM APT LAYOUT

level one

UNIT CONFIGURATIONS

level two

The tower design offers expansive views and up to six corner units on each floor. A combination of loft style, one, two and three bedroom units as well as townhomes and two story luxury apartments are configured into the floor plan. The tower portion is designed with an angle so that the west facade looks across to the Hudson River. Opposite, the view on the east looks out to New York City. Within the spacial layout of the tower, one central bank of elevators service all residential floors in the tower and a double loaded corridor access each unit. In the townhome configuration, a shared ground level courtyard and two elevators service the two-story units.

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6 1 2 3 4 5 6

PUBLIC SPACE

The shared pubic park space in the middle of the block serves as a flexible space for markets, local art shows, and green space to serve the colorful Chelsea surroundings. Chelsea is known for local artisans, so the main focus for this space is to have display areas for art shows and large lawn to set up a weekend festival or music venue. The covered space flows from the sidewalk into the block as hardscape place to showcase art.Townhomes directly face the park and Chelsea Square is just one destination on the New York Highline that people will want to stop. 36

PARK SPACE TOWN HOMES HIGHLINE APARTMENT TOWER PENTHOUSE FLOORS TWO-STORY LUXURY APARTMENTS


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TEAM: REBECCA FRYE LAUREN SAJEK STELLA KELMANN MARY ALVAREZ

Quito is a city where the past is layered with the present. From the old city to the contemporary surrounding, it is easy to see the development of a rich cultural valley. Our intent is to create a village within the city that regenerates and protects the essence of Quito’s cultural aspects. By providing more opportunities for their citizens to sustain themselves as a community, they will be able to focus more on the growth of what really makes Quito; for it is the people, the children of the future that will be in charge of maintaining the original vision of a future that has not lost its past. Architecture and urban planning are very powerful tools for the future of cultures; for it could take them to the path of degrading the people or enhancing their lives. Our project strives to construct a modern day village that maintains the values of the citizens of Quito. We created a system that structures the village around a series of interconnected pathways that lead to nodes within the site, but, also connects the site to the existing context. We communicate this idea through the concept of ‘stitching’; a network that integrates the citizens and the various functions offered within the site. Agriculture, city markets, art studios, museums, education centers, public theaters, house of hope, nature trails, public parks, and open space plazas are some of the proposed programmatic components that will allow for a cultural growth of Quito’s communities.

STITCHING the old and new in QUITO, ECUADOR

ADVANCED DESIGN

C

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Professor Jan Wampler 16 week project


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Space between model Gammeltorv, Copenhagen

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Gammeltorv, Copenhagen context map

Plaza San Marco, Venice context map


REFERENCES OF PUBLIC SPACE

The process initiated through a series of precedent studies on existing public plazas throughout the world. Referenced below are Plaza San Marco in Venice, Italy and Gammeltorv in Copenhagen, Denmark. Elements of the plaza referenced in these studies are scale, public open space, pedestrian precession, vehicular precession, intensity of use, layering and hierarchy. Plexi glass space between models were constructed to interpret the elements studied and discovered within the plaza to bring a new language of thinking and building to the investigation.

Space between model Gammeltorv (left) Space between model Plaza San Marco, Venice (right)

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NORTH ACTIVATION ZONE

BOARDWALK SYSTEM ACROSS WATER EDGE

MAIN CENTER SQUARE ACTIVATION ZONE

CULTIVATING HOPE:

Is it possible to bring agriculture into the site, cultivate crops for the benefit of the community?

HOUSE OF HOPE:

How we can enhance the existing idea of the house of hope and foster its expansion.

SOFTENED THRESHOLD:

How do we address the existing street wall? To Soften the separation edge.

SOUTH ACTIVATION ZONE

COMMUNITY ART WALL:

Opportunity to express through street art to eliminate the notion of a democracy’s oppressed feelings.

EXISTING MAIN TRANSPORT HUB 42


12 VISIONS 12 12VISIONS VISIONS

DYNAMIC LAYERING:

PUBLIC TRANSPORT:

TERRACING SECTIONS:

NURTURING FUTURE:

CELEBRATION SPACE:

ACTIVATE PUBLIC:

SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY:

CULTURE OF TRUST:

Implementation through different evolutionary phases.

“Rooftops sprawl the length and breadth of the valley in the sky.” To maintain the terracing and sectional qualities of Quito.

“Public spaces allow us to reflect on all aspects of our embodied consciousness.” To have a flexible gathering space.

“To protect our planet, we need to protect our net.” How can we allow sustainability to impact the site and the culture?

Public transportation in relation to the boundary of the site. How do we influence pedestrian traffic through the extent of the site?

“To revive humans as a seeker of creativity.” To carry history over to future generations through learning art, specialties, and traditions.

How can the public actively interact through out the site?

“It is space where people can learn about something held in common and start to develop a sense of responsibility for it.”

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FOUND OBJECTS

The found object model initiates the design process after being introduced to the site in Quito. Found within are objects from an antique accordion as well as an electric keyboard. One of the key concepts of this design which carries throughout the process is the juxtaposition between the old and new, capturing the essence of the culture while designing a modern day intervention for the site. This model study first introduces the idea of ‘stitching’, a series of elevated walkways that connect the pedestrian within the site that also allows numerous access points from the surrounding context. Through the process of investigation and discovery of our found objects, a vertical datum emerges in the site, helping to formally structure and organize the plan. Succeeding the found object model we developed a sketch design diagram for the total site representing our attitude, design ideas, and future intentions.

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INITIAL SITE DESIGN MODEL

SKETCH DESIGN DIAGRAM

CONCEPTUAL JUNK MODEL


TESTING ORGANIZATION The next step in the process tested a portion of the preliminary plan to further detail the design focusing on the most dense area at a larger scale. In this physical model, the urban center is shown which houses a public market, open space plaza, public theater, learning center, amphitheater and park space. From the junk model, concepts such as the gesture of ‘stitching’ and softening the edge are used to organize and develop the overall scheme. It was also important to incorporate the twelve visions and focus on what aspects would enhance the existing context.

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RESIDENTIAL AREA AND SUPPORTING COMMUNITY AGRICULTURE

WATER SOFTENS THE EDGE BETWEEN THE OLD AND NEW PARTS OF THE CITY WITH BOARDWALK AND WALKWAYS CONNECTING BOTH MAIN PLAZA WITH SURROUNDING COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL USES

DENSE MIXED USE AREA WITH PATHS TO WATER PUBLIC MARKET AND MAIN SUBWAY STOP FOR THE SITE

CONSERVATION SPACE WITH AMPHITHEATER AND TRADE SCHOOL 47


ZOOMING ZOOMING ZOOMING INTO INTO INTO THE THETHE CENTER CENTER CENTER

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DETAIL IMAGES OF BLOCK MODEL FOCUS AREAS AT 1/64”=1’ SCALE


To further investigate the village center, focus areas were determined and divided up between group members. The main goal was to better understand the human scale to the city as it relates to space between buildings, path, programmatic use, vernacular architecture and place. Diversity and language between building blocks along with dynamic layering and multi-use areas are shown within the design. Another factor considered is development and the notion that these areas would be built in phases to accommodate economic issues. These focus areas are further developed later in design.

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CLIMATE STUDY IN QUITO, ECUADOR

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ELEVATION/COLLAGE/MONTAGE This study begins to help understand and interpret the materials used in Quito to create a vocabulary for the rest of the project. Three different zones were considered while designing the elevation; ground zone, middle zone, and sky zone. The elevation montages below capture the character that exists within the streets of Ecuador through materials, shading devices, climate, and scale. When looking at the facades of existing Quito, one realizes that the horizontal layers begin to blend with the terracing qualities of not only the architecture but the mountainous landscape. Some of the elements took into consideration while designing the facades are terraces, balconies, layered materials, windows, columns, doors, stairs, and public hallways.

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FOCUS AREAS

Of the four previous focus areas studied in the block models, the group then detailed each block to further define the architecture of the new village. Examples of Large plazas in the central part of the site define multi level hardscape areas lined with commercial uses on the ground floor, office and residential uses above. Buildings in this area range from four to seven stories. The Main Market with plaza details the large public entrance for the site. Steps lead up to the local folk art museum with theater and other supporting commercial uses. This site is water front and serves as a large venue for many uses. These studies helped to further define the scale and character set forth in the design.

DETAIL MODEL OF LARGE PLAZA SCALE 1’=1/16”

DETAIL MODEL OF LARGE PLAZA SCALE 1’=1/16”

MAIN MARKET PLAZA DETAIL MODEL SCALE 1’=1/16”

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TYPICAL BUSINESS DISTRICT PLAZA DETAIL MODEL SCALE 1’=1/16”


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BLOCK DESIGN

In this individual model study of a small commercial and residential plaza, public space, character and scale are important factors considered. It is assumed that the east and west are surrounded by busy walkways with a large commercial program. This smaller, more intimate plaza flows within the building landscape as many levels and courtyards open up into the public plaza. Roof top terraces, green roofs, and balconies spill out and make connections down to a mixture of hardscape and planted landscape. Shading is essential in Quito and ways to self support in terms of energy as part of the design composition were incorporated. Vertical uses occur in each building as a building might have commercial on the ground floor, offices on floors above and housing on the upper floors.

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DETAIL IMAGES OF INDIVIDUAL FOCUS AREA MODELS SCALE 1’=1/16�


GREEN ROOFS AND BALCONIES OVERLOOK COURTYARD ENTRANCES

SPACES SPILL OUT TO MULTI STORY COURTYARDS BETWEEN BUILDINGS LARGE OVERHANGS PROVIDE SHADE

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boardwalk

pedestrian walkway

vehicular pathway

In the overall scheme, space between buildings is the focus of our ‘stitching’ concept. The connections between what is already existing in Quito to the new village in the city makes way for interesting movement throughout the site. A network of transportation systems such as pedestrian walkways, vehicular roadway, parks and plazas intersect within open space. The space between also encourages smooth transitions such as boardwalks elevated pathways, waterways and vehicular roadways to connect within the site and to the existing context.

residential park

vehicular pathway

pedestrian walkway

elevated path

SPACE BETWEEN BUILDINGS


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elevated parkway

central plaza

outdoor performance park

bus station

main subway stop

community outdoor park

vehicular pathway

south end plaza

subway stop


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FINAL MODEL As the project moves toward a resolved overall design on the site, we still strive to investigate and challenge our initial twelve visions for Quito. Our plan continues to be structured around ‘stitching’, a series of interconnected pathways that lead to nodes within the site. This system also connects to the roads, transit hubs, and the existing context. The main objective of ‘stitching’ is to integrate the citizens and the various functions; agriculture, city markets, art studios, museums, education centers, public theaters, house of hope, nature trails, public parks, and open space plazas.

OVERALL MASSING DIAGRAMS 59


NORTH RESIDENTIAL AREA, SUBWAY STOP AND INTEGRATION OF BOARDWALK AND PEDESTRIAN WALKWAYS

EXAMPLE OF PEDESTRIAN WALK WITH COMMERCIAL USE ON GROUND LEVEL AND MARKETPLACE

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a b c d

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LAND USE PLAN OPEN SPACE PLAN CIRCULATION PLAN OVERALL PLAN 61


DETAIL IMAGE OF RESIDENTIAL AREA AND AGRICULTURE LOOKING TOWARD CENTRAL PLAZA

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DETAIL IMAGE OF BOARDWALK CONNECTION TO EXISTING CONTEXT

DETAIL IMAGE OF LARGE CENTRAL PLAZA AND DENSE COMMERCIAL DISTRICT


THE ECHO The echo of this project expresses our idea of preserving Quito’s rich culture and allowing it to create a new culture within it for the new generations to grow as one whole community that works towards the benefit of their own; one that can learn about something held in common and start to enroot a notion of responsibility for its own surroundings. “The unique relationship between the open area, the surrounding buildings, and the sky above creates a genuine emotional experience comparable to the impact of any other work of art.” - Paul Zucker

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DIGITAL FABRICATION

paper, plastic or elastic? “Modern Architecture does not mean the use of immature new materials; the main thing is to refine materials in a more human direction.” -Alvar Aalto

DIGITAL FABRICATION

D

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Professor Mark Weston 16 week project


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POLYGON PAJAMAS The intent of this project is to contemplate garments fabricated from paper using the laser cutter. in this design, a single unit was used and fastened together repetitively in a balloon type design. Combining earlier techniques of bend, fold and mutilate, experimentation with shape and proportion developed a human scale form suited for the Digital Fab Runway.

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MODELED DRESS DESIGN


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REITERATE

After exploration of several materials and using the laser cutter, this 5’ x 8’ installation of cork mimics a weaving gesture. It was designed in a three dimensional software as a single unit repeated along a developable surface. Each unit of cork is different and fastened to the next angled to push the material to its limit.

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reVISION

University of South Florida Charrette Team: Rebecca Frye, Andres Moguel, Dustin Merritt and others

The objective of this project is to create a renewed identity for the University of South Florida Eye Institute and to create an atmosphere that is easy to navigate and is comfortable for all users of the building, while considering the needs of not only the patients but also the staff, doctors and families of the patients. The reVISION of the faรงade directs an individual to the building as it is welcoming and identifiable. It connects the entrance foyer to the rest of the building that seemed separate and disproportioned. The expanded waiting area creates a boundary that links the outdoor patio and main entrance and guides persons towards the building regardless of their point of origin. The expanded waiting area eases operation of the USF Eye Institute as it provides a new space for movement and is easier to be spatially understood by new occupants or patients. It allows for greater circulation from the exterior into the interior of the building and allows the existing waiting areas to become space for circulation rather than rest and restricted movement. The threshold of the USF Eye Institute becomes anchored by the reVISIONed main entrance way and the protruding overhang. The overall design works with the existing and unedited features of the building to improve wayfinding, operations and the identification of the USF Eye Institute.

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Advanced Design Portfolio