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REBECCA LEWIS BA ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES STAGE 3

SESSION 2013/2014


INTRODUCTION The portfolio consists of work completed for the design module (ARC3013) with two additional chapters detailing short projects completed alongside this module and an overview of the dissertation submitted for ARC3060. All non-design coursework submitted through the course of the year can be found in the separate Year Design Report booklet.


BA ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES PORTFOLIO: CONTENTS

6 - 33

36 - 49

52 - 53

1.

SHOW/STORE: FINAL DESIGN HOUSING THE LAURENCE HUTTON COLLECTION IN NEWCASTLE

2.

SHOW/STORE: DEVELOPMENT THE PROTOTYPE AND SUBSEQUENT DEVELOPMENT OF IDEAS

3.

RIBA CHARETTE THE RIBA HOLD A CHARETTE IN NEWCASTLE


REBECCA LEWIS . STAGE 3 . SESSION 2013/2014

4.

STUDIO NCL

ARCHITECTURE DEPARTMENT STUDENT MAGAZINE

5.

CAN RICART

A NEW BASE IN BARCELONA FOR ‘‘LA MACHINE’’

6. DISSERTATION (ARC3060): GLAZING WITHIN THE LLOYD’S BUILDING

56 - 57

60 - 85

88 - 89


1. A NEW MUSEUM FOR NEWCASTLE The initial brief asks to chose a collection and design a building to show/store the objects of this collection and any related activities. The building will be located in one of the selected sites around Newcastle.

1.1 THE BRIEF 1.2 THE SITE 1.3 SITE STRATEGY 1.4 CONCEPT 1.5 IN CONTEXT 1.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING 1.7 TECTONIC INTENT


SHOW STORE: FINAL DESIGN


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1. 1 THE BRIEF

My chosen collection is that of Laurence Hutton, an American essayist born in 1843, which contains over one hundred death masks and around twenty life masks of important historical figures such as Oliver Cromwell (below), Sir Isaac Newton and Sir Marc Isambard Brunel.The building will house the collection itself in addition to a literary exhibition for the works of Laurence Hutton, his influences and interests; casting and drying rooms for the creation of new masks; film rooms to educate visitors about the lives of those who have been cast; a small theatre for lectures or performances and an activity space above this to accommodate functions and temporary exhibitions. The decision to choose this collection happened after first exploring the idea of a collection of facial expressions following the concept that communication is becoming more and more digital as opposed to physical. I did research into the various possibilities of expression and the ways of representing these (see separate Research Journal) and finally decided to use an existing collection of expressions: The Laurence Hutton Collection. The timeline (bottom right) depicts key points of research: Richard Weston’s scanned nature; Darwin’s book ‘‘The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals’’ and the film ‘‘Mary & Max’’ in which Max, who is autistic, has a collection of expressions drawn in a book for reference.

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1. A scanned expression, following the influence of Richard Weston. 2. Social media masking expression. 3. The muscles behind the expression. 4. Expressions deformed by the media.

1.1: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


1.

1. Map to show the site location which lies to the right of Northumberland Street and is surrounded by key buildings in the city. 2. Site model at 1:500 showing the surrounding area, with its shape taking influence from the facial form. 3.View to the site from Northumberland street.

1.2: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


1. 2 THE SITE

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The chosen site is in the centre of the city on John Dobson Street which runs parallel to the main shopping area: Northumberland Street. It is surrounded by three major buildings: The City Library, Bewick Court (the tallest building in Newcastle at 77m which houses many small flats) and The Laing Art Gallery which borders the site.

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1.3 SITE STRATEGY

CONNECTING THE CITY

The site is incredibly thin as it sits between the Laing and the road which is significant but not overly busy. A coach stop imposes on the site but will be maintained as it is used frequently by those visiting the gallery. To the left of the site is a car-park with difficult access and opposite this is a thoroughfare to Northumberland Street. To the right is a large courtyard outside the gallery which is used mainly as access to another car park. By levelling the car park and adding a new ramp the car park now becomes much more accessible and these three spaces are linked whilst drawing people past the building. The main entrance will be to the right of the site so as to be visible from the bottom of Northumberland Street, and so the main area of town.

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1.View South down John Dobson Street 2.View North to Bewick Court 3. Site map indicating views (4, 5, 6) and the location of the main entrance. 4.View from Northumberland Street to car park. 5.View from car park to site. 6.View across courtyard.

1.3: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1.4 CONCEPT

THE BUILDING AS A FACADE

The building will become a new face for the Laing Art Gallery. From the street the building will appear as a thick solid wall, this wall will house within it all of the secondary spaces and also provide exhibition and storage spaces for death masks only. Behind the wall is a layer of pathways which transport staff, visitors and services through the building; the pathways provide access to the next layer where the main rooms of the museum are.

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In this way the building can be seen as the skin, capillaries and muscle which together form the new face of the Laing. The timeline (bottom right) shows where these ideas came from: microscopic images of skin and facial muscles following the detail that was uncovered in Richard Weston’s scans (p.9); anatomical drawings of the face similar to those in Darwin’s book.

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1. Diagram to show the layers of the building against the Laing. 2. Diagram to show internal structure of the wall. 3. Diagram to show spaces inside the wall. 4. The wall against the Laing (plan). 5. The wall against the Laing section). 6. Looking onto the building from Bewick Court entrance.

1.4: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1. Elevation from the City Library 2. New access to car-park as seen from street. 3. Ramp and stairs in elevation. 4. Ramp and stairs in plan. 5. Isometric view of the exhibition spaces and walkways that are located behind the wall.

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1.4: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14

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1.4 CONCEPT

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THE FACE AND THE MUSCLE

The outer layer of the wall will be constructed from concrete, behind this the exhibition spaces will be clad in timber panelling so as the mimic the fibres of the muscles. In cases where it is possible for those on the outside to see into the building, the view will extend to the back wall, a ‘window to the soul’ approach. In cases where it is possible to penetrate the layers, materials protrude outwards towards the street; the decision for the building to take these forms was made after studying features of the human face.

The new stairs creating access to the car park form a narrow staircase, a reference to the numerous existing ‘Chares’ in Newcastle. The addition of this new access should encourage people to walk past along the length of the building.

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1. 1. Section B-B (looking South) to show how the building might be inhabited at night. 2. Perspective elevation looking North, showing day time use.

1.5: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


1.5 IN CONTEXT

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BY DAY AND BY NIGHT

During the day the building will be an attraction for those wishing to view the collection and take part in activities. By night the exhibition areas can be shut off to leave only the restaurant, activity space and theatre which could be used for small performances and functions. The form does not impose on the site but rather becomes an extension of what is already there. The existing coach stop is maintained so that visitors still have easy access to the new building, Laing Art Gallery, City Library and the town.

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1.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING

A JOURNEY THROUGH The building houses the collection itself, but also provides spaces for activities relating to the collection.There is one main entrance for visitors which is located directly in front of the reception desk; from here they can either go right to the cafe/ restaurant or left which begins the museum route. The walkways guide visitors in and out of the concrete wall, through exhibits and past designated activity spaces, clad in timber; the variation in materiality and atmosphere was inspired by the Sensing Spaces exhibition at the RA. In certain areas it is possible to view the entire length of the building, inspired by the plan of the John Soane Museum. The route as a whole is located around the central activity space, providing an orientation point and a variation in scale, enhancing the experience of being within the building. The form of the plan was inspired by the cellular images (p.15) found during the early research stages of the project. The final destination is the secret roof terrace which faces South-West and sits between the roofs of the Laing and the heightened concrete facade. From here it is possible to get directly back to the ground floor via the lift or fire protected stairs. The existing fire door from the Laing is maintained and both escape routes lead directly to the pavement.

SHOP

STORAGE

READING AREA

ROOF TERRACE

ACTIVITY SPACE

LIFE MASK DISPLAY

DRYING ROOM CASTING ROOM

FILM PROJECTION

REPAIRS

CLEANING

CAFE LIFE MASK DISPLAY

RECEPTION KITCHEN

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5. 1. Section through the walkways showing spaces as seen by visitors. 2. Section through entrance to show internal atmosphere. 3. Exposed walkway crosses a viewing area. 4. Sensing Spaces: timber 5. John Soane’s house: long views 6. Sensing Spaces: concrete

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1.6: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING

LIFE AND DEATH MASKS

Life masks will be displayed in down-lit cases that are suspended in designated areas within the timber sections of the museum, these will all face out towards the city.There is room for almost half of the life masks to be displayed at any one time. Death masks will be housed in up-lit recesses in the concrete walls and they will all face in towards the building. There is room for around a quarter of death masks to be on display. The entire collection cannot be on display at once, masks exhibited will be changed on a semi regular basis to provide a more interesting archive, generating more interest.

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1. Contrast between life and death mask display. 2. Life masks are suspended in the timber spaces and death masks are set into recesses in the concrete. 3. Section looking towards the town showing death mask exhibitions (red) and storage (purple). 4. Section looking in showing life mask locations. 1.6: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING


1.

(left): ground floor plan showing the main route in grey and section cuts for sections on p.18, 20, 23. (above): view at the bottom of the activity space looking back towards the main entrance and into the small theatre.

1.6 SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING


1.

(left): plan showing the mezzanine level with access to the activity space and the beginning of the exhibition route. (above): the film projection area is the first room, educating visitors on the history of the collection.

1.6: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


(above): plan showing the main route in grey, exhibition spaces are marked in a darker grey and external terrace in green. 1.View showing the right hand side of the casting room with sink, access to external terrace and route leading to drying room. 2.View showing left hand side of the casting room with chairs for casting faces, shelving and table with storage areas underneath.

1.6: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


1.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING

29

THE CASTING WORKSHOP

After the films the route takes visitors past the casting room, here there are seats built into the wall enabling two people to have their faces cast at the same time. The room has extensive shelving which protrudes from the wall to enhance the feeling of different areas within the casting room: the entrance, the mixing area to the right where there is also a large sink and the application area to the left. Here vents in the wall allow those within to look over the activity space from above and aid internal air circulation. The room is separated from the main walkway so that visitors are not constantly imposing on the area, this is achieved by glass panels enabling the activities within to still be visible and those working inside to maintain a connection with the outside world. The walkway is set back slightly from the room to further enhance the idea of separation and to allow further visual connections with other parts of the building.

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The window directly opposite the casting room extends upwards another floor allowing those on the walkway above (p.30) to look down onto the viewing space below and the external terrace which is accessible from this floor. The route then leads on to the drying room where masks, once taken off, will be left to dry and decorated if necessary.

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1.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING


1.

(left): plan showing main route in grey and exhibition spaces in darker grey. (above): view looking up from the activity space; walkways circulate around the central void, inspired by the microscopic images from earlier research (immediate left).

1.6: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING


1.

(left): plan showing main route in grey, exhibition areas in darker grey and external terrace in green. (above): view looking towards the bar on the roof terrace. Skylights in the rooms below allow a visual connection with the drying room and let light reach the office space on the ground floor.

1.6: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1. Diagram to show structural and constructional elements of the wall. 2. Section at 1:20 through the wall. 3. Diagram to show natural lighting and rainwater collection. 4. Diagram to show mixed mode ventilation strategy (timeline): ideas for timber panelling system, syphonic drainage system, structural steel frame attaching to concrete base, cast concrete walls (alternative to panels). 1.7: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14

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1.7 TECTONIC INTENT

35

The wall contains a plant core and water core. The plant core contains a heat recovery system which extracts stale air from the wall and distributes fresh air along the walkways; internal circulation of air is then aided by the solar chimneys and wall vents. Gutters are merged with the Laing, rainwater is collected and stored in a tank underneath the ramp where it is treated to be used as grey-water. From here it is pumped to the toilets which are in a separate core.

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2. EARLY IDEAS The decisions that lead to the final design were made after a lot of initial research and experimentation. This section gives an overview of the development within the project, more information on the research that was done can be found in the separate Research Journal.

2.1 THE PROTOTYPE 2.2 THE ‘‘SKIN’’ 2.3 THE ‘‘CAPILLARIES’’ 2.4 THE ‘‘MUSCLE’’


SHOW STORE: DEVELOPMENT


38

2.1 PROTOTYPE

HOUSING ONE ITEM OF THE COLLECTION

The first stage of the project was to choose one item from the collection and house it on a different site in Newcastle. At this stage I was looking into the emotion side of expression and chose to house a cast mask of ‘depression’ based on the picture below. The emotion led me to a site in Newcastle between a road of high activity and a back alley of low activity; the site is located on an unfinished and forgotten bridge between these two levels which I chose to represent as black and white symbolising the level of activity and accessibility. This decision came from studying the picture of the depressed face and marking the higher levels in white and the deeper levels in black. The theme of this site analysis is something that I kept and used throughout the entire project as a way of quickly distinguishing between different areas of external space.

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1. Map showing the site in context with other areas of Newcastle: The beginning of the main area of town; the church; the quayside. 2. Conceptual model of the site showing the ‘white’ and ‘black’ areas and surrounding buildings.

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2.1: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1. Low level entrance to the site showing the abandoned walkway. 2. High level entrance to the site showing the beginning of the staircase network. 3. Site plan highlighting the pathways. 4. Winding and jagged staircases on the route.

2.1: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14

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2.1 PROTOTYPE

41 WALKWAYS

Entrance to the site is via a convoluted series of pathways and staircases which seemed appropriate for the expression that was being housed; the network of paths is what drew me to the site for the final building as it too makes use of these. They also heavily influenced the format of the final building with the walkways that weave around the central void.

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2.1 PROTOTYPE

42 FIRST MODEL

I spent a lot of time trying to find an appropriate site and doing site analysis for this part of the project. The first model was a quick representation of the idea that the form of the building should have a direct impact on the user. Those who enter will journey along a space that gradually decreases in size until they become face to face with the mask. I have kept the basic principles behind this design but have made them a lot less literal for the final design.

1. Model showing the entrance to the exhibition space and lighting. 2.View from the low level entrance to the site showing how the space would sit in the site and how people would be forced to move within it. (timeline): sketches showing brief development of ideas for the design.

2.1: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14

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2.1 PROTOTYPE

THE PROTOTYPE II

This is a model that was made after the prototype stage of the project to demonstrate the qualities that I wanted to have within the building. It more appropriately became ‘‘the prototype’’ for the final design. I tried to demonstrate: variation in scale; contrast between the hard, smooth exterior and the more intricate interior; change in materiality and an internal single entity.These are the themes that were kept and developed for the final design, combined with the site analysis from the earlier part of the project.

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1. Prototype II from various angles showing key themes. 2. Prototype II in development to show the creation of a single internal entity; stairs are made from walls which are made from ceilings. (timeline): Sensing Spaces, concrete and timber exhibitions, the networks of pathways in the John Soane museum. 2.1: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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1. Model to show a walkway going through the wall with the muscle space behind. 2. Development of the wall through models; initial panels, a walkway, profiles, floor-plates, a new face. 3. Developing the vertical components of the wall structure in order to create a profiled face.

2.2: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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2.2 THE “SKIN�

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INHABITING THE WALL

The site is incredibly thin and so it was decided that a hard outer shell would have to become a single hard layer The idea to inhabit the wall developed after realising that the hard external wall would have to be penetrated in places and working out how to do this. Initial ideas were based on a walkway that would run through the wall. This developed into having a whole structure within the wall itself and the walkways were moved to the next layer, having being influenced by the anatomy of the human face (p.14).


48

2.3 THE “CAPILLARIES�

MOVING AROUND THE BUILDING

Initial arrangement of spaces was based around the wheel of emotions by Robert Plutchik (see Research Journal) and it seemed that the most appropriate way to access these spaces would be via a continuous walkway; a stream of consciousness. The thin nature of the site meant that many ideas did not work as there was not enough room, the final idea developed from wanting a continuous pathway that went in and out of the wall whilst slowly ascending.

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1. Model showing pathways within a muscle like structure: front and back. 2. Early model to show a slowly ascending pathway through the building. (sketches): desired atmosphere and category of emotion dictated the arrangement of spaces

2.3: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


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2.4 THE “MUSCLE”

THE MAIN AREA OF THE BUILDING

This element of the design changed a lot throughout the course of the project due to the fact that I was uncertain about the form of the exhibited ‘expressions’. At this stage I wanted them to be plastic masks and so the building was going to take a more plastic form, with internal walls perhaps being made out of the masks themselves, influenced by exhibitions seen below. However I decided the building should house the Laurence Hutton collection of casts and so the building ended up taking a different form that was more appropriate to that collection; much more organic.

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1. Model highlighting the desired qualities of the plastic muscle space in earlier designs. 2. Plastic mask made by vacuum forming a face made out of clay. This was the initial collection idea, masks could form the inner layer of skin. (timeline): Marcos Cruz gives a lecture and talked about plastics, plastic panels on Chanel pavilion. 2.4: SHOW/STORE: 27.01.14 - 06.05.14


3. A NORTHERN SOUL Northumbria hosted the RIBA charette‘‘A Northern Soul’’for ten architecture schools in the North of England. There were ten teams comprising of six students from different Universities; a brief was given in the morning and during the day teams had to develop a proposal to present in the afternoon.


RIBA CHARETTE


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5. 1. Drawing showing the intended feeling of the community. 2. Stills from a film made on the day. 3. Master plan of the Stephenson Quarter with green spaces, cycle routes and public squares. 4. Initial sketches showing the steel ring, existing entrances and desired elements of the community. 5. My team.

5: RIBA CHARETTE: 25.04.14


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A NORTHERN SOUL

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STEPHENSON RE_WORKED

The event was held at the Stephenson Works, the newly redeveloped ex-workshop of George Stephenson.The brief was to come up with a proposal for the development of the surrounding area which, sited behind the train station, is trapped in a ring of steel and cut off by the Tyne and so has been partly forgotten. Our proposal was not to try and link the area back to the city, but rather create a new district in itself. A community of self-sufficient ‘makers’ would inhabit the area, taking it back to the 1800s when it would have prospered. Inhabitants would use the river and the land for power and food, workshops would produce bespoke items to sell to the outsiders through markets that would be located on the quayside as an extension of the existing market spaces further down. The area would prosper again and promote a greener more sustainable attitude to living, in an age where technology is rapidly taking over.

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4. ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE Newcastle University Architecture department recently started a new student magazine. Images were requested along the theme of ‘the studio’; both of my submissions were used as the back cover and first page.


STUDIO NCL


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4. 1. My image as the back cover. 2. Susan used on the first page. 3. Susan in the studios. 4. Individual contributions to the floor piece.

4: STUDIO NCL: ISSUE 1. MARCH 2014


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4. STUDIO NCL

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Following the request for images along the theme of ‘the studios’, I submitted two photographs; one of the area outside the studios which has been used for spray painting and another of my mannequin ‘Susan’ who lives in the studios and has featured in numerous student projects since I acquired her from Fenwicks for a charette at the beginning of the year. I have been photographing the spray painting area for the last few months as it has grown over the course of projects. People from different studios come to spray pieces of their models there and the result is a canvas of marks made by individuals which represents the department as a whole. I think is a really beautiful idea I chose to submit a photo of Susan too, she’s the first thing people see when they come in in the morning and so has become something of a minor celebrity.

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5. LA MACHINE IN BARCELONA The first project of the year was set in Barcelona, following a short field trip. A series of old factory buildings were to be renovated to form a new base for French production company ‘La Machine’.

5.1 THE BRIEF 5.2 THE SITE 5.3 SITE STRATEGY 5.4 CONCEPT 5.5 IN CONTEXT 5.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING 5.7 TECTONIC INTENT 5.8 DEVELOPMENT


CAN RICART


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5. 1 THE BRIEF

THE OLD AND THE NEW

The aim of the project is to work with the existing structure of the old textile factory building complex known as ‘Can Ricart’, situated in the Poblenou district of Barcelona. There are a number of factory buildings still standing, but they are abandoned and empty; many have already been torn down. The brief asks to focus on the ideas of public space. This is already an important element of the city and must be maintained and developed further. La Machine are known for their public performances involving huge scale mechanical animals that parade through the streets of France. They will need a building to house and build their Machines which providing an interesting exhibition for visitors bringing new life and interest to the up and coming area.

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1. La Machine: existing machines at their headquarters in Nantes. (Technical sketches of machines below). 2. Map to show public space in Barcelona and the Can Ricart site. 3. Photos taken of the public space in Barcelona (4th-11th October) external corridors, tree lined routes of movement and semi external sheltered pathways.

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5.1: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


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5.2 THE SITE

CAN RICART

The buildings on the site are incredibly run down. Almost all of the interiors have been gutted, if this is not the case then only small fragments remain and most are not salvageable. The external walls form a bold facade which can be maintained. At the centre of the group of buildings is a large tower which acts as a good point of reference and can be seen from many places in the surrounding area. There is a lot of interesting graffiti around the site marking the area as a hive of creativity and potential; interestingly the buildings are not in line with the grid, further highlighting the character and individuality of the site. The site model (below) shows the planned buildings that have been proposed for the surrounding area alongside existing buildings in white, with factory buildings left unpainted. Pedestrian routes are marked in red, vehicle routes in blue and a potential machine parade route in purple.

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1. Site model with routes 2. Existing facade 3. The back wall 4. Photographs taken on site highlighting the creativity in the area and run down nature of the existing buildings.

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5.2: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


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5.3 SITE STRATEGY

The aim is to maintain the character of the site as an old textile factory by two main methods:

RETAINING THE FEATURES

The site contains a number of interesting features (sketches below). Inside one of the buildings are five large masonry columns, in the same building are some steel columns (image below); both of these provide interesting features which can be retained to provide focal points in the new building while maintaining the history of the old.

WEAVING NEW ROUTES

By removing some of the more run down factory buildings, a new road can be created through the four blocks of the grid. New pedestrian routes can also be woven through the larger site, making the new building much more accessible to the public whilst creating interesting external spaces.

5.: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13

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Existing factory buildings

Previous factory buildings

Site for my building

Five masonry columns

Existing modern buildings

Proposed modern buildings

The park

Vehicle routes Pedestrian routes Machine parade route

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1. The central columns to be kept as a main feature in the new building. 2. Map to show the site as it is now and how it had been before. 3. Map to show the proposed site plan. 4. Maintaining the features, weaving new routes and enhancing the city grid refers back to the site as a textile factory. 5.3: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


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5.4 CONCEPT

THE BUILDING AS A MACHINE

After weaving new routes through the site, the focus is now on the centre of the longest building with the tower and the five columns; here a new machine will be situated. Its shape is taken from bits of the old factory buildings, while the ins and outs of the machine take their form from the new pedestrian pathways that have been created by modifying the site. This machine will perform the basic but necessary functions to maintain the building, with the exhibition route circulating around it. People will flow in and out generating new life in the area.

PUBLIC SPACE

The machine looks onto a large area surrounded by the existing buildings; the courtyard. Here the machine form will be used to shape several external spaces, extending the activity outside and providing an area to watch the final point of the parades. The five columns and the cafe sit as a backdrop to a new square enclosed by steps which could be used as a small performance space in the evening, or an area to sit during the day. The three sides of the existing buildings to the left of this form an enclosed area accessible through the arches, providing a sheltered space for market stalls. The areas of movement through the site will be planted with trees to make new tree lined walkways adding life and shading to the site which is at the moment harsh and exposed. Where the green walkways meet the external machine, a protected semi-circular space is formed to be used as a busking/ performance site. All areas have been influenced by the public space experienced in Barcelona on the field trip (p.63).

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1. The external machine forms new outdoor spaces. 2. the tree lined walkways to the site (left) and the new square with stepped seating (right). 3. Site plan indicating the construction of the# machine from the old forms and new routes. 4. Parti model. 5. Early modelling of the idea. 6. The Engine, a heavy influence on the form of the building.

5.4: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13

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1.View from above showing the building in relation to the others on the site. 2. Series of views indicating how the machine will be seen from different points of access and from the higher accommodation that is to be built around the site. 3. Image to show the back street when the machine is engaged for the parade.

5.5: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


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5.5 IN CONTEXT

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The machine can be thought of as having two modes: engaged (high activity) when the parade route is activated, and idling (low activity) when the machine is running but not to full capacity:

MACHINE ENGAGED

When the machines come out of the workshop and proceed around the parade route, the back street is activated to accommodate the higher number of visitors. From here the form of the machine can be fully recognised against the scale of the machines as it protrudes from the existing walls.The doors of the workshop will be opened on both sides to allow more people to flow through the building.

MACHINE IDLING

When there is not a parade on the machine will quietly maintain the site; visitors can pass in and out as they please, with the building feeling like an extension of the public space. The back wall provides an interesting facade for the new street that has been created through the four grid blocks and the tower has been maintained as a point of reference for those outside of the complex. One of the other buildings (marked in red) is currently completely bare except for external walls; this will be used as an extension of the workshop, where finished machines can be housed before and after the parade.

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5.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING

At the main entrance from the new street visitors will be greeted by a film with information about the production company, from here they pass the information desk and can either carry on through to the external courtyard and cafe, or purchase tickets to view the exhibitions which are located in the enclosed workshops or on the higher level walkway.

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1.View to show the entrance from the back street, with educational film projected onto the wall of the modelling workshop, reception window visible in the background and higher level exhibitions visible above. 2. Modelled elevation of building with external walls removed. 3. Model in plan view with glass removed to show interior.

5.6: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


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5.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING

(above): plan to show the ground floor with ins marked in red and outs marked in black. The machine sits behind a new public road through the length of the building. 1. Section made by layering sheets of acetate with different elements of the building drawn on to create a 3D image inspired by the previous usage of the building as a textile factory. 2. Short section to show modelling workshop and access to the exhibition space above. 5.6: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13

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1.View from section showing the modelling workshop behind the reception room and plinths for machines next to the exhibition space. 2.View from section showing the reception window, exhibition space with suspended machine, the entrance to the shop and the cafe area with atelier above. 3. Short section to show the services area with the kitchen for the cafe below and drawing atelier above. 5.6: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


5.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING

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THE BUILDING AS A MACHINE

This theme is further enhanced by the exposed services; at this level there is an extensive plant area that is visible from the ground and also the cafe and workers canteen.

MACHINES IN THE BUILDING

The machines themselves will be located on plinths of different heights and scales, formed by the roofs of the workshops and other rooms below. In some cases they will be suspended from the steel frame which supports the roof. This level shows the painting workshop which sits above the wood and metal workshops. The roofs of the rooms below provide a platform for machine parts to be lifted on to, out of the dust and dirt, where they can be cleaned, painted and left to dry, before being put down again and moved in to the finishing workshop. Windows in the painting workshop correspond with those on the existing facade allowing more light in to the space. Windows on the opposite side allow a view across the entire open workshop area.

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(above): plan showing the worker level with access to the drawing atelier, meeting room and balconies. 1.View from section showing the cafe space with drawing atelier above. 2.View from section showing the meeting room balcony, private workers canteen and visitors viewing platform above. 3. Short section to show the cafe space and drawing atelier with glass cases to display items to be seen from below. 5.6: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


5.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING

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THE WORKERS AND THE VISITORS

The workings behind ‘‘La Machine’’ are visible to those who are visiting, but the workers themselves are kept separate. A staircase keeps people at a distance from the main open workshop space. from here workers only can access the mid level where the drawing atelier and the meeting room are located. The exhibition walkway circulates these spaces but they never meet. From the drawing atelier, workers have views across the external courtyard and the exhibition spaces. The meeting room looks out over the workshop and has access to the balcony for communication.

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(above): plan to show the route of the exhibition in grey. 1.View from section into the workshop, what might be seen from the viewing platform. 2.View from section showing suspended machine by the exhibition walkway.

5.6: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


5.6 INSIDE THE BUILDING

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THE EXHIBITION WALKWAY

The exhibition takes the form of a walkway which circles the main section of the machine. The walkway swells in areas of interest, in places where there are good external views or where the machines can be seen. The walkway guides visitors to a viewing platform which looks over the workshop so that the activities below can be seen from a safe distance. there is a window allowing a visual connection with the meeting room below and adequate space to give talks to a large group of people.

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3. 5.: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13

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5.7 TECTONIC INTENT

THE BUILDING AS A MACHINE

The machine will provide water and electricity for itself where it can. This will be done via rainwater harvesting and solar panels which will be visible on the roof and service area. A gap between the roof and the external walls allows the main spaces to be naturally ventilated while the concrete walls of the machine provide thermal mass to insulate. ‘‘Countries with severe water shortages have identified the best technical approach for them and encouraged uptake through incentive programmes. Several municipalities of Spain, including Sant Cugat Del Vallès near Barcelona and several other municipalities in Catalonia, have passed regulations to promote grey-water reuse in multistorey buildings.’’ Domenech, L. and D. Sauri. (2010). Socio-technical transitions in water scarcity contexts: Public acceptance of grey-water reuse technologies in the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona. Resources, Conservation and Recycling Volume 55, Issue 1, November 2010, Pages 53-62. http://www.sciencedirect.com/

The roof will be supported by a steel structure with trussed rafters (below), which sits inside the existing masonry walls. Glazing will be fitted on top of this in panels that allow for solar control glass.

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1. Diagram to show rainwater harvesting strategy and solar panels. 2. Diagram to show ventilation and thermal mass with exposed service area providing for the building. 3. Detail of the roof showing how rainwater will be harvested with syphonic drainage system. (left): influences on intent. 5.7: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


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5.8 DEVELOPMENT

THE BUILDING AS A MACHINE

This concept came fairly early on after studying the drawings of La Machine and doing research into the character behind the production company (p.62). This is something I think could be developed much further into a more conceptual building, but the required coursework for the technology module meant that it was sensible to keep the building relatively ‘safe’. Maintaining the original facade was important to retain the character of the factory complex, however I felt that it was also necessary to get more people through the centre of the site and so the middle section was removed in order to do this while also exposing the concrete columns in the middle of this section.

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1. Model to show the machine sitting in the steel structure. 2. Model to show contrast between machine and facade. 3. Drawings by Jules Verne which influenced the design. (this page): sketches showing the development of the building as a machine concept.

5.8: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


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5.8 DEVELOPMENT

THE WALKWAYS

The walkways changed a lot over the course of the project before finally settling on a form that swelled to accommodate more people in areas of interest, separated workers from visitors and resembled the pipes of the machine which transport the fuel around the structure. THE SECTIONS The short sections were not fully resolved in the final presentation, I had concentrated mainly on getting the plans to a standard that I was happy with, which meant that the sections were partially forgotten and I was not happy with them at the time of the deadline and so did not present them fully but rather showed diagrams that indicated where the main rooms were in section. The model section at 1:50 (right) was far too boxy and did not convey any of the atmosphere that I had intended, shown through the long section (p.75) and earlier development models (right). I revisited the sections, making the walls take on a less rigid form, as though they were the cast elements of the engine (p.69). I think this did not happen initially as I was unsure of how the structure would work, especially given that the technology module coursework was based on this project. Since then I have done more research on concrete for the second project Show/Store and found precedents indicating that my ideas would work (below).

5.8: CAN RICART: 07.10.13 - 09.12.13


GLAZING WITHIN THE LLOYD’S BUILDING After visiting the Lloyd’s building a few years ago I was interested by the ‘Sparkle Glass’ used to let natural light in to the market place while retaining the privacy required by the institution. I chose to research this further for the dissertation, focussing on the psychological impacts of light on people and thus the heightened importance of the role of the architect.


DISSERTATION


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6. DISSERTATION

These pages give an overview of the dissertation which comprises of several chapters detailing the concepts behind the building, the glazing systems, the light within, the impact of light on people and the consequences of these factors on those who work here. I managed to visit the building four times to take photographs and measure light levels, the whole experience was really interesting and I learnt a lot about the building, methods of research and layout design which I think helped me for the final project especially.

6: DISSERTATION: 16.04.13 - 24.01.14


[Fig.15]- Diagram showing alterations in cladding.

[Fig.16]- Diagram showing panel location corresponding to availability of a view at either seated or standing level.

[Fig.17]- Air distribution with the use of glazing.

This is a little key to say what’s on the page. Might be useful, I don’t know 1. something 2. something else 3. the best thing ever 4. something really good 5. the last point it should get to

[Fig.18]- Sparkle Glass.


Stage 3 Portfolio- Architecture