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What is the Relationship Between Celebrity Chefs in Contemporary Food Culture and Food Branding?

Rebecca Catley Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


Arts University Bournemouth Rebecca Catley Extended Investigative Study BA (Hons) Graphic Design Level: 6 What is the Relationship Between Celebrity Chefs in Contemporary Food Culture and Food Branding? An Investigation into Celebrity Chef Packaging Design. Wednesday 13 February 2013 Academic Year: 2012-2013 Tutors: Kirsten Hardie Annie Grove-White Charlotte Wilmot

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


Abstract The aim of this study is to find out the relationship between celebrity chefs, which are popular in contemporary food culture and food branding and to

I have found, through carrying out a questionnaire, that people associate celebrity chefs to be male in gender and buy a celebrity chef food brand based on

assess their validity. Our food culture is surrounded by celebrity chef food branding, which is a central aspect of our culture as it aims to create a place in the market, which attracts consumer awareness to celebrity chef food brands and therefore increases brand loyalty and promotion. I have identified the reasons as to why celebrity chefs have importance in Britain and their rationale for success. I have closely analysed the strong food branding and marketing techniques used to promote celebrity chefs, which attribute to the ways in which celebrity chefs achieve consumer recognition and success. The advance of the media and technology has enabled celebrity chefs to become known to the public and increase awareness.

the personality of the celebrity chef. I have analysed consumer behaviour and most people feel more inclined to buy a non-celebrity chef food product compared to a celebrity chef food product. Through email correspondence to design companies, who have designed the packaging and branding processes involved for celebrity chef food brands, I have established that designers try to portray the brand values to the consumer through packaging design.

Celebrity endorsement is a common marketing

Celebrity chefs are used on the design for a food product to create a brand name for that particular celebrity and echo their brand through its packaging and acclaim consumer attention alongside product protection. Designers need to consider the most effective way to get the product and brand noticed by consumers.

advertising strategy to create a brand and has a strong effect on consumer purchasing and perception of the celebrity chef. Consumers purchase brands they know and like so celebrity endorsement will support a food brand. I have investigated into case studies to inform and assess my results. Researchers have found that way in which a product is designed and packaged can affect consumer-purchasing decisions. I have discussed the notion of celebrity, which has enabled me to distinguish the role of a chef, and a celebrity.

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List of Contents Abstract.............................................................................................................................................................................................. List of contents.................................................................................................................................................................................. Acknowledgements.......................................................................................................................................................................... List of Figures..................................................................................................................................................................................... List of Tables...................................................................................................................................................................................... Chapter 1 - Introduction...............................................................................................................................................................1 Chapter 2 - Celebrity and Culture.............................................................................................................................................2 Chapter 3 – Celebrity and Food.................................................................................................................................................8 Chapter 4 – Celebrity Chef Brands..........................................................................................................................................12 Chapter 5 – Case Studies...........................................................................................................................................................22 Chapter 6 - Conclusion...............................................................................................................................................................25 Bibliography...................................................................................................................................................................................28 Appendices: A: Questionnaire Template........................................................................................................................................................42 B: Questionnaire Results.............................................................................................................................................................45 C: Stewart Collins: Tesco Superstore Manager......................................................................................................................50 D: Kim Aldous: Marketer at Tesco Superstore......................................................................................................................51 E: Filip Wiekowski: Pearlfisher Design.....................................................................................................................................55 F: Malcolm Proudlove: Partnership Design..............................................................................................................................58 G: Vivienne Taylor Personal Assistant: Rick Stein..................................................................................................................63 H: Noreen Collins Website Manager Delia Online: Delia Smith........................................................................................66 I: Anthony Worral-Thompson...................................................................................................................................................68 J: Presentation...............................................................................................................................................................................70 K: Poster Design...........................................................................................................................................................................72 L: Action Plan: Gant chart..........................................................................................................................................................73

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Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


Acknowledgements to: All of these contacts have been a great help in order to find out the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. Malcolm Proudlove 23/09/12 Managing Director and Designer Partnership Design Fidelity House. Stocks Lane. Boughton. Chester. CH3 5TF. T: 01244 342600 F: 01244 318828 E: talk@partnershipdesign.co.uk W: www.partnershipdesign.co.uk Vivienne Taylor 15/11/12 Personal Assistant T: 01841 550 280 M: 07966 626 113 E: viviennetaylor@rickstein.com W: www.rickstein.com Noreen Collins 20/11/12 Website Manager Delia Online E: enquiries@deliaonline.com W: http://www.deliaonline.com/home

Filip Wieckowski 22//11/12 Studio Coordinator T: +44 (0) 20 7603 8666 F: +44 (0) 20 7605 1888 E: fillip@pearlfisher.com W: www.pearlfisher.com Stewart Collins 28/12/12 Store Manager Tesco T: 07441607536 (direct line) E: stewart.collins@uk.tesco.com W: www.tesco.com Kim Aldous 10/1/13 Local Marketing Manager T: 01992 644 792 (direct line) E: kim.aldous@uk.tesco.com W: www.tesco.com Anthony Worral-Thompson 5/2/13 Celebrity Chef T: +44 (0) 20 7384 9950 F: +44 (0) 20 7384 9955 E: antony@awtonline.co.uk W: www.awtonline.co.uk

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


List of Figures 1. Waitrose and its Non-Promotional (yet slightly Self-Promotional) Content. Red Rocket Media. Content Marketing Blog. (2012). [online image]. Available from: http://www.redrocketmedia. co.uk/blog/waitrose-and-its-non-promotional-yet-slightly-self-promotional-content/ [Accessed on 10 January 2013] 2. Rankin Selection Potato Farls. Irwin’s Bakery. (n.d.). Rankin Selection Potato Farls. [online image]. Available from: http://www.irwinsbakery.com/fs/ img/product/rs-450x/rankin4potatofarls.jpg [Accessed on 14 January 2013] 3. Rick Stein Savoury Oat Biscuits with Cheddar. Hamptons Fine Foods. (2012). Rick Stein Savoury Oat Biscuits with Cheddar. [online image]. Available from: http:// www.hamptonsfinefoods.co.uk/fine-foods/savoury-biscuits/savoury-biscuits/rick-stein-savoury-oat-biscuits-withcheddar.php [Accessed on 14 January 2013]. 4. Nigella Lawson Living Kitchen, Cream. John Lewis. (2013). Kitchen Collections. [online image]. Available from: http://www.johnlewis.com/14029/Product. aspx [Accessed on 10 January 2013]. 5. Feeding Our Kids Better. Jamie Oliver. (2013). Feed Me Even Better. Jamie’s Manifesto: Part II. [online image]. Available from: http://www. jamieoliver.com/media/jamiesmanifesto.pdf [Accessed on 11 January] 6. Ainsley Harriott (product range). Path. (2013). Ainsley Harriott. [online image]. Available from: http://www.path-designs.com/portfolio-item/ainsleyharriott/#sthash.cAmUtj2Y.dpbs [Accessed on 10 January 2013] 7. Brand “Personality:” Jamie Oliver’s New Packaging. The Kitchen Collaborative. (n.d.). Brand “Personality:” Jamie Oliver’s New Packaging. [online image]. Available from: http://kitchencollaborative.com/2010/04/brand-personality-jamie-olivers-new-packaging/ [Accessed on 25 January 2013]

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


8. Brand “Personality:” Jamie Oliver’s New Packaging. The Kitchen Collaborative. (n.d.). Brand “Personality:” Jamie Oliver’s New Packaging. [online image]. Available from: http://kitchencollaborative.com/2010/04/brand-personality-jamie-olivers-new-packaging/ [Accessed on 25 January 2013] 9. Jamie Oliver By Pearlfisher. Inspiration Lab. (2010). Jamie Oliver By Pearlfisher. [online image]. Available from: http://inspirationlab.wordpress. com/2010/10/04/jamie-oliver-by-pearlfisher/ [Accessed on 15 January 2013] 10. James Martin Packaging Design and Brand. Totality GCS. (N.d). James Martin Pacakaging Design. [online image]. Available from: http://www.totalitygcs. co.uk/work/project/james-martin.html [Accessed on 26 January 2013] 11. Retail Packaging Origin Coffee. A-Side. (2010). Packaging Origin Coffee. [online image]. Available from: http://www.a-sidestudio.co.uk/projects/ packaging/origin-coffee-origin-coffee.php [Accessed on 26 January 2013] 12. Jamie Oliver Leaves Sainsbury’s. Source. Essential Marketing Inspiration. (2011). Jamie Oliver Leaves Sainsbury’s. [online image]. Avaible from: http://www.added-value.com/source/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Picture21.jpg [Accessed on 16 January 2013] 13. Marketing for Gordon Ramsay. Cookware Range by Collective Creative Consultancy. Collective Creative Consultancy. (2010). Gordon Ramsay Packaging. [online image]. Available from: http://www.collectivecreative.com/pages/packramsay.html [Accessed on 26 January 2013] 14. Marketing for Gordon Ramsay. Cookware Range by Collective Creative Consultancy. Collective Creative Consultancy. (2010). Gordon Ramsay Packaging. [online image]. Available from: http://www. collectivecreative.com/pages/packramsay.html [Accessed on 26 January 2013]

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


List of Tables 1.

Catley, R. (2013). Celebrity Chef Personality Table. 31 October 2013.

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Catley, R. (2013). Celebrity Chef Personality Table. 31 October 2013.

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


Introduction The aim of this Study is to find out what is the relationship between contemporary celebrity chefs in food branding and packaging design. The key issues

Newman became well known to the public through his acting career (Bio True Story, 2013). On the other hand, there are celebrity chefs in the food market

addressed are when celebrity’s talk, people are more inclined to listen and what celebrities promote can influence consumer spending. My specific approach and line of critical enquiry is to explore the relationship between celebrity chefs in Britain and how they are used in our culture to promote, package and brand food. I have contacted design companies who have carried out the packaging design for celebrity chefs and have attained the main factors considered in the design, branding and marketing for a celebrity chef food product. I have researched how celebrity chefs are used within the design in food branding and on food packaging to appeal to consumers. Through email correspondence with celebrity chefs, I have attempted to find out how celebrity chefs see their role as a celebrity chef and as a celebrity.

who do not endorse their own brand and has carried out work for Comic Relief, such as Gordon Ramsay (The Food and Drink Innovation Network, 2011).

Within our contemporary food culture, ‘it seems as if a renowned chef has not achieved his or her fullest potential without a branded product line’ (Silverstein, 2008). Our culture is surrounded by celebrity chef food brands and packaging design which is endorsed by celebrity chefs (Gregory, 2012). For example, there is Paul Newman and Loyd Grossman who have their own food brand, use their names as a main selling point, who are not chefs but are still considered as celebrities in the public eye (Geoghegan, 2008).

As graphic designers, we have to consider the most effective method of portraying a brand, service or product to be noticed by consumers (Design Council, n.d.). I have contacted design companies to collate their design decisions and reasoning made when designing for celebrity chef food brands in the market today. I have analysed the packaging design strategies and branding decisions made by contacting design companies who have designed for celebrity chefs and have considered the effectiveness on consumers. I have discussed and found out how celebrity chefs communicate to consumers through design and brand strategies. For example, I have looked at how celebrity chefs are portrayed in the media and the advertising approaches used. A main aim of this study is to find out the importance of celebrity chefs in our food culture, their authority and how they operate in food branding. As a designer, I believe a product is meaningless without its packaging, as I consider the design and how a brand is portrayed to a consumer and packaged, plays an important role on attracting consumer attention. Thi essentially promotes brand

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recognition. A main aim is to look at the ways in which a food product is packaged and what attracts a consumer1 to buy a brand.

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I have investigated into food marketing and the marketing decisions behind celebrity chef food products and how they operate in society to consumers in order to find out the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. I have investigated through carrying out a public survey to find out data on whether the personality of a celebrity chef influences the product purchasing decisions made by consumers in contemporary culture. I have examined the notion of celebrity and have researched into celebrity culture in order to find out the relationship between celebrity chefs in our culture. Rojek (2001, p.10) defines celebrity as, ‘the attribution of glamorous or notorious status to an individual within the public sphere.’ As graphic designers, we have to develop, create our own cultural background and self promote ourselves (Bierut, 2006). The notion of the celebrity is perceived in the design industry in addition to the food industry, such as Johnathan Barnbrook who ‘is one of the UK’s most active graphic designers’ (Design Museum, 2007). As a designer, I look up to well known designers within the design industry and use their work as inspiration. In my opinion, this is similar to the ways in which consumers watch cooking programmes on television. They are inspired by celebrity chefs and how they are portrayed. hat

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Jamie Oliver is a celebrity chef well known for carrying out cookbooks such as ‘The Naked Chef’ and uses this term to represent his simple cooking style in our culture and is perceived as the ‘family man’ by the nation to target a large number of family consumers in our culture and attracts consumers to purchase his brand (Wynne-Jones, 2010). Jamie Oliver is ‘one of the world’s best-loved television personalities and one of Britain’s most famous exports’ (One Young World, n.d.). The rationale behind my theme selection is branding and packaging design are topics I would like to be involved with for my own design purposes when I leave University as I would like to design the packaging for a product and brand promotion. This study will enhance my design practice and knowledge accordingly.

Celebrity and Culture There are different types of celebrity within our contemporary culture, which Kriekan (2012, p.1) explains, ‘celebrities have strong emotional resonance, negative as well as positive, both in life and death – John Lennon, Princess Dianna and Michael Jackson are just among the more obvious and recent examples.’ The list is endless. Rolph (2008, p.172) mentions, ‘The Oxford Dictionary defines the term, ‘celebrity’ as ‘a person of celebrity; a celebrated person; a public character.’


Blake (2006, p.27) explains how we use celebrities in our culture and states, ‘determining the beginnings of celebrity culture is a difficult if not futile exercise, particularly since most of the subject view it as roughly corresponding to the lives of the specific men and women they are studying.’ Turner (2004, p.3) distinguishes between the contemporary celebrity and the modern celebrity and states that:

The notion of expertise can be associated with the celebrity which, (Collins and Evans, 2007, p.2) explains on the importance of expertise in our culture as ‘we ought to prefer the judgments of those who know what they are talking about.’

The contemporary celebrity will usually have emerged from the sports or entertainment industries; they will be highly visible through the media; and their private lives will attract greater public interest than their professional lives…the modern celebrity may claim no special achievements other than public attention.

The specifically modern quality of the celebrity can be identified from a variety of ways of looking at contemporary culture…the use of the term celebrity in its contemporary form developed in the nineteenth century.

Celebrities surround our culture and an example of a previous celebrity who uses public attention and uses his personality to attract consumer awareness is current X Factor and Celebrity Big Brother contestant Rylan Clarke, who has recently posed naked on his knees in a large cocktail glass for charity (Wood, 2013). Boorstin (1962, cited Newbury, 2000, p.1) states, ‘The celebrity is a person who is well known for his wellknownness.’ The notion of expertise is associated with the celebrity and they uphold an expert status within the industry that they specialise in to consumers (Prime Performers, 2012).

Marshall (1997, p.4) discusses the notion of celebrity in our culture and states:

Delia Smith, Nigella Lawson, and Rick Stein, are just a few of the celebrity chefs, which inspire my own cooking practice. A chef is defined by Psaltis and Psaltis (2005, p. 289) as a person, ‘responsible for all aspects of the kitchen’s operation, and often for the entire restaurant.’ I believe celebrity chefs contain the natural talent and are born with an innate ability within their specialism and consider the media to play a big role in promoting the celebrity chef, their talent and recognisability to the viewer. Celebrity chefs are represented to consumers to provide expert advice and recipes for consumers to follow in the culinary industry (Daily Record, 2012).

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Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


Celebrity chefs provide consumers with expert advice through their cooking programmes and provide consumers with opportunities in our culture, such as, Gordon Ramsay and his television programme, ‘Hell’s Kitchen,’ in which, consumers watch the programme and through promotion and advertising they apply to be on the show and compete against each other in culinary challenges in order for the winner to take the head position at one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants in Las Vegas (Fox, 2013). 4 As well as the notion of expertise celebrity chefs incorporate in our culture and endorse to consumers, celebrity chefs establish the concept of a ‘hero,’ as Boorstin, (1962, cited Newbury, 2000, p.1) states: The celebrity reeks of in authenticity, of cultural declension from a prior age in which “heroes” were admired for “greatness in some achievement. [The hero] is a man or woman of great deeds….The hero created himself; the celebrity is created by the media. Delia Smith and Heston Blumenthal are two celebrity chefs who have distinct styles in the culinary industry and from visiting the local supermarket; Waitrose, Delia Smith and Heston Blumenthal have created a green token system, ‘Community Matters’ for charity (Waitrose Media Centre, 2013).

Fig.1. Waitrose and its Non-Promotional (yet slightly Self-Promotional) Content. Delia Smith and Heston Blumenthal explain, ‘that instead of making a “fancy TV advert”, Waitrose has decided to donate the money saved as an additional £1m to good causes through its Community Matters ‘green token’ scheme. This is on top of the £600,000 it would normally donate to local good causes through the initiative during November and December’ (ibid, 2013). This is a great cause and as a result, positively increases celebrity awareness on consumers and effects their purchasing decisions by choosing which charity to give a green token to (OCD-UK, 2013).


The money is divided up monthly to the number of tokens that charity has been decided by consumers and then given to the charity (ibid, 2013). Celebrity endorsement is crucial to representing a celebrity chef food brand to consumers and is essential for maintaining brand success (Chilli Breeze, 2011). Celebrity endorsement is defined by McCracken in 1989, (cited Byrne, Whitehead and Breen, 2003, p.290) as, ‘any individual who enjoys the public recognition and who uses this recognition on behalf of a consumer good by appearing with it in an advertisement.’ Celebrity endorsement is a popular strategy used in advertising for the celebrity chef, as (Atkin & Block, 1983, cited Ali, Farhan and Farooq, 2012, p. 584), state, ‘advertisers try to leverage the image and identification of the celebrity to promote a product or company.’ Celebrity endorsement is an effective advertising strategy for celebrity chef food brands, financially, as, (Elberse and Verleun, 2012, p.184) state, ‘even simply being aware of the differential impact of endorsements on stock returns and sales might help managers more effectively inform investigators and other constituents.’ Rojek (2001, p.1) explains the notion of celebrity in our culture further and states:

Celebrity is inescapable today; it is part of everyday life. But how did people like Elvis Presley and John Lennon impress themselves so powerfully on the public mind? Or were their images constructed by the media? The media plays a large role in promoting the celebrity chef to consumers and attract consumer attention towards their food brand through their endorsements and the media (Tuttle, 2012). However, according to a recent Study from the University of Colorado on June 2012, suggests that ‘companies paying celebrities big money to endorse their products may not realise the negative perceptions about a celebrity are more likely to transfer an endorsed brand than are positive ones’ (University of Colorado Boulder, 2012). As a designer, I consider the packaging design for a food brand to attract my attention. Consumers want to trust the celebrity to produce high quality food and to provide us with positive results so we purchase that product again (Andruss, 2012). Celebrities have a powerful impact in our culture and food branding as, ‘a brand looks real when a celebrity endorses it. It shows it exists’ (Pe, 2012). ‘NMP Live’ is one of many celebrity endorsement companies in our culture, which help advise celebrity endorsement and sponsorship and have worked with a variety of different celebrities (NMP Live, 2013). 5

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


NMP Live state, ‘the association between a celebrity and brand can significantly increase consumer awareness of a product, add credibility to a service and help to establish a trust and affinity that would otherwise take years to build’ (ibid, 2013).

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Paul Rankin is a celebrity chef who I admire as he achieves this and has a ‘real passion about great local food’ (Rankin Selection, 2010). Paul Rankin has been very successful through his culinary career and as a result has, ‘sold over £30 million in sales due to the success of his bakery and meat products’ (Lemm, 2013). The ways in which celebrity chefs portray their own persona through their cooking style to consumers and the way they act through their personalities, from smiling to being visibly coded on the packaging design for a food brand is instantly recognisable to consumers and attracts consumer awareness to their brand image and personality (Interbrand, 2010). From analysing celebrity chef food packaging design below (Fig. 2), Paul Rankin is an example of a celebrity chef who uses his signature on the packaging of a food product. Rick Stein uses a similar signature style and brand logo on their food packaging (Fig. 3). In my opinion, the signature style used by the two celebrity chefs attracts consumers to a professional and expertise approach to their cooking which represents a high quality food appeal to the consumer through the representation of their food packaging design. Nigella Lawson is another well-known celebrity chef who has created a variety of kitchenware products.

Alongside her food writing, own cookbooks, television programmes and recipes, Nigella has been achieved great culinary sucess (Nigella Lawson, 2011). In relation to their food products, which are available on the market for consumer purchase, it increases the brand recognition for the celebrity chef (ibid, 2011). Nigella Lawson can be perceived as an inspiration to consumers through her culinary success and food brand (Lifestyle Food, 2012). On the opposite page, is a selection of kitchenware products Nigella Lawson has produced for her food brand in her culinary career.

Fig. 2. Rankin Selection Potato Farls.


Fig. 3. Rick Stein Savoury Oat Biscuits with Cheddar.

Fig. 4. Nigella Lawson. Living Kitchen, Cream.

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The power celebrities have in our culture plays an important role of the celebrity and Delia Smith is an influential example as in 2001, established the “Delia Effect” (Wallop, 2008). The Delia Effect is ‘when sales of products featured on her shows

Montanari (2006, p.29), talks about the notion of cooking in our culture and suggests, ‘Cooking is the human activity par excellence: it is the act that transforms a product “from nature” into something profoundly different.’ Celebrity chefs educate us on

soar and even sell out’ (Roche, 2013). As a result of Delia’s Effect, ‘supermarket shelves were suddenly emptied of particular items featured on Delia Smith’s TV programmes…the phenomenon suggested that celebrity chefs could have a powerful influence on our eating habits’ (Rohrer, 2009).

how important food is to us, the right food to choose and of best quality; therefore celebrity chefs are an important attribution to our culture and lifestyle and lead the notion of healthy eating on consumers (Natural Food Finder, n.d.).

Howell (2007, p.9) discusses the creation of celebrity chefs in our culture and states: Celebrity, as we know it today, was created by the modern mass media. It began with photography in the early nineteenth century, when for the first time in history, masses of people could regard images of themselves in something other than a mirror. Therefore, this allowed for celebrities to be more known to the public and as a subsequence created the emergence of celebrity chefs in our culture.

Celebrity and Food Food is an essential part of our diet and culture; for example, eating your ‘5 a day’ helps us stay healthy (NHS Choices, n.d.).

Celebrity chefs can inform our attitudes, decisions and influence consumer perceptions towards food, which is evident as, Jamie Oliver, in his manifesto (McDonald, 2011) states: It’s been proven time and time again during the last five years that a healthy school meal improves a child’s ability to learn and do well at school. We can’t ignore that; we must continue to feed our children better, even better. We must invest in our kids; they are the future and they deserve it. Jamie Oliver’s campaign to promote healthy school dinners for children has had a lot of support from the Government, which have helped regulate and politically control the campaigns that celebrity chefs promote in our culture, through organisations, findings and reports (Jamie Oliver, 2013). For example, ‘when Tony Blair was Prime Minister for the UK ‘he committed £280 million to improving school food’ (ibid, 2013).


School Meal 2005

School Meal 2010

Fig. 5. Jamie Oliver, Feeding Our Kids Better. In another project to support Comic Relief, Gordon Ramsay visited South Africa, which uses football to make children know about HIV, its consequences and promotes his range of sauces ‘Seriously Good,’ providing children with a well balanced diet (Cloud Nine Media, 2010). As a result, Celebrity chefs carry out projects to help others and as a result, travel to other cultures to promote their brand to consumers and raise awareness of their food brand globally to expand consumer awareness and brand promotion in different cultures (ibid, 2010). According to an article for ‘The Grocer,’ Gordon Ramsay’s ‘Seriously Good Sauce’ brand is now only available in Tesco due to the listings made by retailers (Bamford, 2012).

Jamie Oliver portrays a middle class family man approach through television adverts to consumers (Zacharia, 2012). Through his attitude and passion towards food are visibly shown through his personality and is reflected in the media (ibid, 2012). On the following pages are tables I have created displaying the different personality traits from a selection of ten famous celebrity chefs in Britain and my own interpretation from analysing information from visiting the ‘Good Food Channel’ website (Good Food Channel, 2012).

Celebrity chefs use their persona to sell their food brand, such as Jamie Oliver.

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Table 1. Catley, R. (2013). Celebrity Chef Personality Table. 31 October.


Table 2. Catley, R. (2013). Celebrity Chef Personality Table. 31 October.

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Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


I have produced and added my own opinions of each celebrity chef personality visually. For example, James Martin is a television sweetheart, devoted to food, eager to learn more and is driven in his culinary career (Good Food Channel, 2012). Through analysing my data visually, there is a clear contrast between the celebrity chef personalities and character, such as Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsay.

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From reading an article for the ‘The Globe and Mail’ by reporter, John Doyle, on the 5th September 2012, Gordon Ramsay, is perceived as a ‘fierce celebrity chef’ ‘and ‘the BBC TV guide, Radio Times, polled thousands of readers to determine “television’s most terrifying celebrity” and Ramsay came at No.1’ (Doyle, 2012).

‘Gordon Ramsay has had a sly dig at Jamie Oliver’s weight, claiming that the popular TV chef is not presentable and he needs to think about his own ‘healthy eating’ before dictating to the US’ (Rutter, 2012). Celebrity chefs have their own signature dish and style, which is provided at their restaurants to promote their food brand, which reinforces the status of the celebrity and consumers produce on their television programmes (O’Shea, 2007). For example, Gordon Ramsay and his beef wellington is his signature dish, which is sold essentially to consumers (Krummert, 2013).

Celebrity Chef Brands

In conjunction with their television cooking programmes, the two celebrity chefs have both achieved their culinary careers in diverse ways, for example, Jamie Oliver was seen as the new face around the culinary globe and began work at the River

A brand can be defined as, ‘a mixture of attributes, tangible and intangible, symbolised in a trademark, which, if managed properly, creates value and influence’ (Brandchannel, 2013). There are various definitions for a brand by theorists, such as, (Kaptan

Café in London, which launched his profession (Jamie Oliver, 2013). However, ‘Gordon Ramsay completed a course in hotel management and his dedication and natural talent led him to train with some of the world’s leading celebrity chefs’ (Gordon Ramsay, n.d.). There is a rivalry and competition between the two celebrity chefs in our contemporary food culture.

and Pandev, 2010, p.3) defines a brand as, ‘a term meaning that it can be a word used to express a definite concept.’ Murray (2004, p.1) discusses the impact brands have in our culture and states:


Technical advances have created fantastic opportunities; they have also facilitated new, unscrupulous business tactics and provided a haven for criminals who thrive on the victimization of corporations and consumers alike.

Brand credibility and loyalty are key principles to a brand for the consumer and Allen explains this (2007, p.1) as, ‘corporate events can be used by businesses of all sizes to solicit new business, create a corporate or brand image, and retain and build loyalty, with existing suppliers and customers.’

Celebrity chef food brands can have a considerable effect on consumer perceptions as, ‘if a brand delivers what it promises, behaves in a responsible fashion, and continues to innovate and add value, people will continue to vote for it with their wallets, their respect and even their affection’ (Clifton et al, 2003, p.3). A business needs a brand to create difference, add value and to connect with people (Design Council, n.d.). There are various elements, which need to be considered and maintained within the branding process for celebrity chefs, such as, brand equity, which is the value of the brand and enables companies to connect with consumers that forces brand loyalty (Cullather, 2012). Market research supports branding to collect consumer perceptions and gain consumer perceptions to help develop their brand and create there brand strategy (Windsor, 2004, p. 22). Joseph (2010, p.2) states, ‘the essence of good marketing is creating a consistent brand experience with each specific consumer interaction.’

I have constructed a variety of key questions to collate key findings in order to discover the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding by carrying out a public survey to a sample size of 58 people to attain substantial consumer data. This public survey was created on the 24th October 2012, online, using Survey Monkey (Catley, R, 2012, See Appendix A and B). Through carrying out a result analysis I have found out what gender consumers associate more with celebrity chefs. As a result of my findings, 93% of people associate celebrity chefs to be men and 8.8% of people associate celebrity chefs to be women in our culture (See Appendix B). I have attempted to find out the rationale behind consumer perception and celebrity chef gender. According to an article on ‘The National’ on the 13th April, 2011, Emily Shardlow worked with Clare Smyth, who was made head chef at restaurant Gordon Ramsay and states, ‘Smyth admits that historically, kitchens have not attracted as many women as men due to the long working hours and manual labour involved but adds that she thinks things are changing’ (Shardlow, 2011).

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Therefore the profession persists to be male dominated in our culture from public perceptions of the celebrity chef (Pelletier, 2013). I also asked the public whether the personality of

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a celebrity chef affects whether you purchase a celebrity chef food product (See Appendix B). My results show that 69% of people said yes, it does affect their consumer purchasing decisions towards a celebrity chef food brand and 31% of people said the personality of a celebrity chef does not affect their consumer purchasing decision towards a celebrity chef food brand (ibid, 2012). Extending my research by analysing my data on brand and personality, I have found that ‘every brand should choose an intended personality based upon the brand’s aspiration and it’s customers current perceptions of the brand’ (Auken, 2008). Consumer behaviour can be applied which is the theory to understand the consumer and their purchasing decisions, which can be closely linked along with customer satisfaction of a food product (Pant, 2007, p.56). Further questions I asked the public involved, whether consumers feel more inclined to buy a celebrity chef food product compared to a non celebrity chef food product (See Appendix B). My results explain that 67.2% of people do not feel more inclined to buy a celebrity chef’s food product and 32.8% do feel more inclined to purchase a celebrity chef’s food product (ibid, 2012).

According to an article on ‘The Globe,’ on the 21st December 2009, the newspaper suggests that celerity endorsements work well for young people as they are inspired by them but price can be seen as a limiting factor and want quality for a celebrity chef food brand (Stromberg, 2009). I asked the public to collate variable data whether they could provide some examples of successful and unsuccessful food brands that have used celebrity chefs (See Appendix B). By analysing my responses, I have found out that a lot of consumers thought Jamie Oliver were a main success with his endorsement with Sainsbury’s (ibid, 2012). The public also mentioned that Heston Blumenthal, celebrity endorser for Waitrose, and his food line is a great success, conceivably due to his personality and celebrity status (ibid, 2012). Another response on Heston Blumenthal was that he demonstrates innovative and technical cooking knowledge on a regular basis, which creates a trust in the brand (ibid, 2012). Therefore personalities can aid celebrity chef success as, ‘some supplementary culinary school or formal culinary education with natural talent and magnetic personalities to earn public success’ (Food Editorials, 2013). The public mentioned the television adverts the two celebrity chefs, Jamie Oliver endorsing for Sainsbury’s and Heston Blumenthal endorsing for Waitrose was a good branding strategy and promotion for their food brands (See Appendix B).


The public suggested that seasonal brand promotion, such as Heston Blumenthal and Delia Smith’s Christmas advert was great promotional advertising for Waitrose (ibid, 2012). As a result of their Christmas advert, I have found out they have made

The restaurants celebrity chefs have established in our culture have reinforced the status of the celebrity chef, which the public believe to be a large success (ibid, 2012). Further research into celebrity chefs, I have found out that celebrity chefs have established

a large amount of money in our society through their advertising and celebrity effectiveness as, ‘the supermarket is seeking to stand out from other brands lavish Christmas ads and claims the cheap ad will make it possible to donate £1m to charity’ (Chapman, 2012).

their own restaurants available to the public, such as,‘The Fat Duck Restaurant’ by Heston Blumenthal, situated in Bray, alongside their television shows to promote themselves and their food brand (Visit Britain, 2010).

My survey targeted those who were vegetarian and suggested that a successful celebrity chef food brand they particularly liked was Linda McCartney (See Appendix B). Gordon Ramsay, Jamie Oliver and Heston Blumenthal were the most responses I received through the results of my survey for successful celebrity chefs in the culinary industry (ibid, 2012). Gordon Ramsay’s cookbooks were deemed a large success by one response and other results showed that people thought Levi Roots was a successful celebrity chef (ibid, 2012). Levi Roots deals with Caribbean food and was born in Jamaica, which brings different cultural foods on the market, which are accessible for consumers to purchase In Britain (Levi Roots, 2012). Antony Worral-Thompson was also perceived by the public as a successful celebrity chef food brand and The ‘Knorr’ recipes by Marco-Pierre White were also deemed a large success (See Appendix B).

The public perception of Ainsley Harriott’s food brand was perceived as unsuccessful as his product range of rice was ineffective and was seen to be a celebrity chef that declines publicity (See Appendix B). Other responses I collated which the public deemed as unsuccessful food brands in the culinary industry were Gary Rhodes and Loyd Grossman (ibid, 2012). Loyd Grossmans brand of sauces were viewed as unsuccessful (ibid, 2012). From reading an article for the ‘Mail Online,’ by Sean Poulter in 2011, children became ill from eating Lloyd Grossman sauces, which can be detrimental to the brand and affected Loyd Grossman’s brand as the korma sauces as they had to be removed from the supermarkets (Poulter, 2011). The final question I asked the public was in what ways do celebrity chefs promote a certain lifestyle to consumers and I have found out that most people thought celebrity chefs promote a certain lifestyle to consumers through using their persona and personality (See Appendix B).

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Other responses included, promoting healthy living by encouraging consumers to cook healthy balanced meals which are easy to make and affordable (ibid, 2012). The public considers that celebrity chefs try to promote that it is not hard as you think to create a delicious meal and encourage the pleasure you gain through creating your meal from scratch, which is creative and enjoyable (ibid, 2012). Other responses I collated from the public were that celebrity chefs represent that the food they create has a certain level of expectation in relation to how well known the celebrity chef is (ibid, 2012). This consumer perception could be related to the notion of celebrity chef ‘expertise’ explained earlier within this study. To summarise my results from my public survey in order to assess the validity of the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding are that most people think celebrity chefs are male dominated in our culture and would choose a celebrity chef food brand based on the celebrity chefs personality and persona (ibid, 2012). However, the public would not feel more inclined to buy a celebrity chef’s food product compared to a non-celebrity food product, although, it is clear that the public feel that celebrity chefs promote a healthy and creative lifestyle to consumers (ibid, 2012). Davis, (2009, p.12) explains ‘a brand represents the full ‘personality’ of the company and is the interface between a company and its audience.’

It is difficult creating a celebrity chef food brand and takes a lot of people to create a chef into a celebrity food brand (Foley, 2013). The development process of the brand needs to be considered and involves conducting research and attaining consumer behaviour, which is the thinking process the consumer acts upon before purchasing a celebrity chef food brand based on there needs, such as seasonal occasions (Management Study Guide, 2012). Harris and Ambrose, (2011, p.13) explain the importance of packaging design within our culture and state: Packaging design is part of the overall graphic communications mix many brands; and that the brand manifests through advertising, marketing, public relations and online viral communications… packaging becomes merely another way of usefully communicating a brand’s values to consumers. As well as the packaging of the celebrity chef food brand to be established effectively, the celebrity chef brand needs a strategy in order to stand out and differentiate from their competitors on the market, such as a logo, a typeface, and promotional material sending communication to consumers in an innovative way and represent the brand values (Schmitt, Simonson and Peters, 1997, p. 24).


Celebrity chefs have their own television shows and by being in adverts resembles the celebrity chef endorsements of a food product, which lead to making a lot of money and as a result social media and televisions shows are strong methods of promoting a celebrity chef food brand and identity (Celebrity Group, 2013). In my opinion, the more celebrity chefs are shown on television the more recognisable that celebrity chef is to me, therefore, the notion of persuasion in advertising on consumers can be mentioned as (O’Shaughnessy and O’Shauhgnessy, 2004, p.27) state, ‘advertising gives new meaning to a product if it can induce self-persuasion by getting the target audience to imagine using or consuming it.’ The advance in technology increases the status of the celebrity chef awareness in our culture and is ever expanding to promote celebrity chef food brands (Emerson, 2009).

Fig. 6. Ainsley Harriott (product range). By critically analysing the packaging design for Ainsley Harriott’s food brand, I do not perceive the style of packaging to attract my attention and food appeal.

From visiting local supermarkets, celebrity chefs also have a variety of product ranges for their food brand. Ainsley Harriott is a clear example and his

Extending my research on Jamie Oliver, I have found out that Jamie Oliver’s success in the number of books sold in Britain has led him to be popular in Britain and places him as a high competitor in the culinary industry as he:

product range is a collection of high quality food products, which are globally available and recognisable (Ainsley Harriott, n.d.). Situated to the right, (Fig. 7) is an image representing the product range Ainsley Harriott produces in the food industry.

Has become the biggest-selling author in Britain after JK Rowling. UK sales of the celebrity chef’s cookbooks including his most recent, Jamie’s 30-Minute Meals, have raised an astonishing £101.55m (This is Money, 2010). I have held an interview on the 28th December 2012 and further email correspondence on the 15th January 2013, with the Manager at Tesco Superstore, Stewart Collins, which has enabled me to find out the relationship between celebrity chefs.

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This has aslo enabled me to analyse their position and competition in the food market (See Appendix C). Carrying out the interview, I have found out that within Tesco Superstore there are 9 sample celebrity chef food lines and there are 13 cases of celebrity chef

According to an article on Marketing Week, ‘Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Tesco and travel firm TUI are among the brands likely to lose sales as households trade down to cheaper brands to offset income lost from changes to child benefit for households earning

food products each week, which sell at £2.00 (Collins, 2012).

more than £50,000, according to data firm Acxiom’ (Baker, 2013). Aldous suggested that ‘packaging will play a big role in people’s shelf edge decisions, once the price has been considered and this is where the perception and value for money will come into the decision process’ (Aldous 2013). I have found an article on ‘The Telegraph,’ which supports this viewpoint and states,’ supermarkets need to strike a balance between quality and value for money, and reflect that in their branding’ (Davidson, 2012). Kim Aldous also explained that ‘consumers like to stick to brands that they know and like, so endorsement from someone like Jamie Oliver will be seen as supporting a brand and making it stronger in people’s minds’ (Aldous, 2013).

Therefore in a week Tesco superstore makes £156.00 a week of celebrity chef food products. However, a local product, such as Thatcher’s cider with 4 options will generate £1,200 a week at peak (ibid, 2012). I have also found out that, there are 45 pages of lines at the Tesco online screen and website, which allows consumers to view a variety of celebrity chef food brands and products (ibid, 2012). The “Hero” lines generate large, constant, volumes. Niche, brandenhancing products are key to broaden the celebrity chef appeal (ibid, 2012). To extend my research in order to assess the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding, I have spoken to Marketer, Kim Aldous, on the 10th of January 2013, for Tesco Superstore to attempt to find out the marketing process behind celebrity chef food brands (See Appendix D). I have found out that Tesco are contacted regularly to work with a range of different food brands and do not have any overall celebrity involvement, but supply celebrity chef food products which are developed by an in-house team (Aldous, 2013).

A celebrity chef brand image can be represented through the use of the celebrity chef on the packaging design for a food product (Fig. 8). Through email correspondence with Filip Wieckowski, Studio Coordinator at ‘Pearlfisher Design’ who has created the packaging design for Jamie Oliver on the 22nd of November 2012, I have found out the main factors involved within the design and branding for a celebrity chef food brand (See Appendix E).


Fig. 7. Brand “Personality:” Jamie Oliver’s New Packaging.

Fig. 8. Pearlfisher Design: Jamie Olver Brand Identity.

Fig. 9. Jamie Oliver By Pearlfisher.

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When designing for celebrity chef food brands, Filip Wieckowski proposed the main elements considered in the packaging design are ‘to create an image that feels like the style and brand image for the celebrity chef’ (Wieckowski, 2012). To collate a designers

The linking of word and image is a semiotic approach and can be associated with Roland Barthes and his theory in 1997 (cited Leeuwen, 2005, p. 229) which explains, ‘the text directs the reader through the signifieds of the image, causing him to avoid some

perspective, I asked how he thought celebrity chefs have come to be so important in our culture and why they are a useful way of promoting food in our culture and he suggested ‘that it is a trend and a way to add value and trust to celebrity chef brands’ (Wieckowski, 2012). Pearlfisher Design ‘select a particular celebrity chef personality for the food products by thinking which type of celebrity they could be associated with, would fit and benefit their own brand image’ (Wieckowski, 2012).

and receive others and remote-controls him towards a meaning chosen in advance.’ Type is an important aspect within the design for a product and the text has a different association and meaning to the image (Meggs, 1992, p.43).

I spoke to Designer and Managing Director at Partnership Design, Malcolm Proudlove on the 8th of October, which allowed me to collate early responses and direction for this study (See Appendix F). Partnership Design carried out the packaging design for Gordon Ramsay and the main factors Malcolm Proudlove considers in the branding for a celebrity chef food product is to ‘portray the brands values to the consumer and to highlight the products benefits’ (Proudlove 2012). Proudlove also stated that ‘the semiotics of type and image are main aspects when dealing with the brand identity for a celebrity chef food brand, the visual recognition of colour and typography are aspects of the basic structure of brand communication’ (Proudlove, 2012).

As a designer, Proudlove explains that ‘packaging almost becomes the ‘hero’ in attracting the consumer’ (Proudlove, 2012). I have also found out that the packaging design they established for Gordon Ramsay, Partnership Design had to create a brand name for the celebrity and echo that across a range of packaging and it was Gordon Ramsay’s choice to use Partnership Design as a design company (Proudlove 2012). Edwards (et al, 2009, p.17) ascertains that: Packaging design is a focused discipline that takes education, experience and a lot of hard work. It takes an extensive breadth of qualities beyond the ability to graphically layout a pdp or creates a threedimensional structure. As a designer, I have found some examples of packaging design to analyse from my own perspective. ‘Totality GCS’ is a Leeds based design company who have dealt with brands in the food industry.


They created the designs for a new home baking range for pastry chef, James Martin (Totality GCS, n.d.). Through my own critical analysis of the packaging and brand (Fig. 10), the type and image work as a cohesive whole and the colour scheme

I am passionate about packaging design and as well as celebrity chef packaging design for food brands that is created in the culinary world, there are other food brands established which achieve great consumer recognition through their design such as

has great visual impact on the consumer. The use of the colour palette attracts consumer awareness and brand recognition. In my opinion, the use of James Martin on the packaging promotes the image of the celebrity chef effectively and provides a positive persona of the celebrity chef to the target audience by visually smiling on the food packaging. I also think that using feminine colours on the packaging represents a ‘home based feel’ and approach to cooking. The typographic styling for the packaging and layout is effective on the audience and I believe the brand communicates with the viewer on a high level.

‘A-Studio,’ which is a design company I have found based in Falmouth who create the design work and establish successful brands (A-Side Studio, 2010). Food branding and packaging design produced by A-Studio is represented to a high standard, which portrays the value of the product (ibid, 2010). The graphic illustration is beautifully crafted along side the typographic layout and fits in seamlessly with the overall design as a cohesive whole. I also feel the use of the colour black, white and gold has large visual impact on the consumer attracting the viewer to the brand and promotes brand recognition.

Fig. 10. James Martin Packaging Design and Brand.

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In my opinion, this is a pure example of how packaging design can attract strong consumer attention to a food brand.

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Fig. 11. Retail Packaging Origin Coffee. Packaging design created by other designers inspires my own design practice. By critically analysing other competitors and food brands in the food market that celebrity chef food brands compete with has enabled to see a contrast within the design of their food branding and packaging design in the culinary and design industry. It has also allowed me to see the standard of design work on the market today in relation for my own design practice.

Case Studies I have critically analysed two case studies in order to find out and assess the validity of the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding.

The Naked Truth of Celebrity Endorsement This case study examines the use of celebrity, Jamie Oliver, endorsing for Sainsbury and research on consumer perceptions (cited Byrne, Whitehead and Breen, 2003, p.288). By critically analysing this case study, the price and quality of a product faced problems with consumers and therefore (ibid, p.288) suggest that, ‘Sainsbury chose to spend £25 million on a brand building exercise through the use of celebrity endorsement.’ The campaign symbolises the image Jamie Oliver portrays in ‘The Naked Chef’ such as shopping with his family in Sainsbury’s and Christmas campaigns have been established endorsing Sainsbury’s (ibid, p.289). The rationale behind this strategy was because (Abbot 2001 et al cited Byrne, Whitehead and Breen, 2001, p.289) states: Celebrities can build, refresh and add new dimensions. What celebrities stand for enhances brands and they save valuable time in terms of creating the credibility of a company has to create in order to build its brands by transferring their values to the brand. When consumers see a credible celebrity endorsing a product they think the company must be ok. The use of good quality in food is why Jamie Oliver represents the image for Sainsbury and wants the food in Sainsbury’s to represent this and his personality through their brand, which attracts consumer attention and promotes brand recognition (ibid, p.290).


Advertising is crucial in the branding process, as Misra, 1990 (ibid, p. 292) states:

This increases brand awareness, recognition, and popularity (Bowers, 2011).

Advertisers must match the product or company’s image, the characteristics of the target market, and the personality of the celebrity, in order to establish effective messages and the determinant of the match between celebrity and brand depends on the degree of perceived “fit” between brand name and celebrity image. Consumer research and focus groups is key in the brand development process, for example, with the Jamie Oliver campaign, consumers liked the advert as it relates to the age of Jamie Oliver and through the use of his personality therefore Jamie Oliver can appeal to a large target market through his persona and connect with consumers (ibid, p.294). To conclude, (ibid, p.294-295) states, ‘this case study highlights the need for retailers attention to reinforce their in-store attributes to support their use of celebrity endorsers within a campaign.’ Celebrity endorsement is difficult from a retailer’s perspective as any lack of communication for the brand within the store will affect the campaign and staff must be told in order for the campaign to succeed (ibid, p.295).

Fig. 12. Jamie Oliver Leaves Sainsbury’s.

To the right is an image of Jamie Oliver that represents one of the most successful celebrity chef relationships and celebrity endorsement with retailer store, Sainsbury’s, which he worked for the food brand for 11 years and has carried out 100 television adverts with Sainsbury’s.

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This case study examines packaging, consumer behaviour and the brand selection when purchasing food products, which is a considerable decision for consumers when carrying out their food shop (Sheffield Hallam University, n.d.). By critically analysing this case study it particularly focuses on the way in which a food brand is packaged and designed which can create, reduce waste or be, used again can influence consumer purchasing decisions (ibid, n.d.). As a result consumers chose the most sustainable route for their food choice and packaging decisions (ibid, n.d.). The food brands consumers purchase are influenced by their environmental issues (ibid, n.d.). By significantly analysing this case study on packaging design and consumer perceptions are that, ‘physical attributes which affect this choice include strength, durability and size of the pack whilst nonphysical attributes include the colour and graphics applied to the packaging’ (ibid, n.d.). I have analysed another celebrity chef packaging example to extend my research on packaging design produced by Collective Creative Consultancy, (Fig.13 and 14), who has carried out a variety of packaging work for Anthony Worrall Thompson and Gordon Ramsay and produced the finished outcome for Gordon Ramsay’s cookware range (Collective Creative Consultancy, n.d.).

Fig. 13. Marketing for Gordon Ramsay. Cookware Range by Collective Creative Consultancy.

Fig. 14. Marketing for Gordon Ramsay. Cookware Range by Collective Creative Consultancy.


Through my critical analysis, the packaging design is designed to an elevated quality, which I believe attracts and influences consumer purchasing decisions and can enhance consumer perceptions of the celebrity chef due to using their face on the packaging which consumers can connect with. In my opinion, I feel packaging portrays the celebrity chef brand values and personality of the celebrity chef. Using their image on the packaging for a food brand and signature represents a friendly persona of the celebrity chef, a sophisticated style and high food quality for the consumer to relate to visually. The colour scheme and typographic layout work well to attract consumer awareness and promotes Gordon Ramsay’s cookware range and food brand.

Conclusion To conclude, the viability of my theme has been sustainable to work with. I have collated variable research ranging from old publications to new which have been key findings in order to assess the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. I have accessed a variety of websites, which have informed my opinions and results. I have carried out extensive research by carrying out a public survey to collate my key findings in order to find out the relationship between celebrity chefs and to find out consumer perceptions (See Appendix A and B).

I have had email correspondence with design companies who have designed the packaging for celebrity chefs, which has enabled me to see how design companies work with celebrities and the design process involved for celebrity chef and non-celebrity chef food packaging to see a contrast in the market and design (See Appendix E and F). I have learnt the design decisions, which need to be established within the branding for a food product (ibid). I have extended my research by contacting the manager at Tesco Superstore to assess the position of celebrity chefs within the market today (See Appendix C). I have developed my research, gaining information on food marketing by speaking to a marketer who works with Tesco to attain a marketers perspective on celebrity chef food branding (See Appendix D). I have discovered the reasoning behind the design for celebrity chefs and the branding and marketing techniques used by speaking with professionals in industry (See Appendix E and F). I have concluded, through wide-ranging research by companies and theorists that strong marketing and branding decisions made by celebrity chefs and their support through their brand enhances the status of the celebrity in the culinary industry and brands are common, strong marketing tools, in which can create a successful celebrity chef food brand in our culture and remains their position in the food market for consumer purchase (Marketing & Branding, 2013).

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By assessing the results of my research to the public, I have found out that the personality and persona of the celebrity chef informs consumer-purchasing decisions, for example, Jamie Oliver is very likeable to a large variety of consumers through his persona he represents through his brand and attracts consumers to purchase his brand and consumer attention through my result analysis (See Appendix B). Therefore, the ways in which the consumer perceives a particular celebrity chef will inform their food product purchasing decisions and attitudes towards their brand (ibid). I have analysed consumer behaviour through critically analysing my case studies and understanding consumer perceptions on packaging design. I have found out that consumers would purchase a food product due to its sustainability and waste reduction rather than the design of the product engaging and attracting them to buy a celebrity chef food brand (Sheffield Hallam University, n.d.). I attempted to contact a number of celebrity chefs to see their role as a chef and a celebrity in our contemporary culture. I tried to contact Rick Stein, Antony Worral-Thompson, Ken Hom, Delia Smith, Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsay. I was unsuccessful to achieve a response from one of the celebrity chefs, however, Rick Stein’s Personal Assistant,Vivienne Taylor, replied on the 15th November 2012, and Delia Smith’s Website Manager, Noreen Collins, replied on the 20th of November 2012 and said they are very busy due to being in the public eye and receive hundreds of replies similar to my request (See Appendix G and H).

Anthony Worral-Thompson replied and said he would try and respond to my email as soon as possible and was the most promising response out of the celebrity chefs whom I contacted (See Appendix I). The media has a large impact on the promotion of the celebrity chef food brand to consumers, in which, Williamson, 2009, (cited, Al-Deen and Hendricks, 2012, p.162) states: Particularly, social media have been increasingly recognized as compelling tools in marketing and branding for several reasons: As an industry report stated, companies can reinvigorate their marketing and create new bonds with consumers by looking at social media as a way to listen to consumers, respond to their needs, and create ongoing dialogue instead of as another way of advertise to them. Celebrity endorsement is a common and popular strategy used within our culture to endorse the celebrity chef and promote brand recognition to consumers, which consumers can associate their feelings to a celebrity chef food brand (BBC News, 2010). I have explained the emergence of celebrity chefs in our culture, why they have established and are a useful source of promoting food in our culture, which is mainly due to portraying healthy lifestyles to consumers, aiding others in society and carrying out charity projects to enhance and support our culture we live in, such as Jamie Oliver and his healthy school dinners campaign.


This was an inspiration to our culture and remain an important aspect of our culture (Jamie Oliver, 2013). As a result, celebrity chefs and celebrities are influential to others by the projects they carry out and the money they raise for our community, for example Delia Smith and Heston Blumenthal endorsing for Waitrose (Waitrose Media Centre, 2013). However, celebrity chefs take part in adverts and charity work to make them selves become influential to others, give money to the community but also to gain for self-benefit and promotion (Doherty and Poole, 2012). By analysing the branding, design and marketing theories used within companies on consumers has enhanced my design practice and knowledge. The way in which a product is designed and packaged can also inform consumer purchases through speaking to marketers and design professionals in the industry (See Appendix D, E and F). I have enhanced my design knowledge on the packaging design of a food product and the branding process.

Celebrity chefs provide us with a variety of different foods to choose from in our culture and provide cultural change through the foods they offer and promote such as Levi Roots, which is available for purchase in the British food market (Levi Roots, 2012). Celebrity chefs change the way we eat, for example ‘The Delia Effect’ was a popular brand strategy and without celebrity chefs I believe we would have no one to look up to and use as inspiration in the culinary industry (Rohrer, 2009). Therefore, in my perception of the celebrity chef, consumers listen to celebrity chefs and essentially buy the food brands they promote in our culture, depending upon the nature of the brand and consumer perceptions of that brand and remain a significant and important part of our culture today.

I have established the notion of the celebrity in our contemporary food culture, as an individual becomes a celebrity due to their nature and talent they have in the culinary industry, which the media then plays a big role on promoting that celebrity and turning them into a brand (Boorstin, 1962, cited Newbury, 2000, p.1). 27

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Catley, R. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk). 23 September 2012. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to M. Proudlove. (talk@partnershipdesign.co.uk) Catley, R. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk). 21 November 2012. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to F. Wieckowski. (Filip@pearlfisher.com) Catley, R. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk). 15 January 2013. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to S. Collins. (Stewart.Collins@uk.tesco.com)

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Catley, R. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk). 14 November 2012. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to R. Stein. (feedback@rickstein.com) Catley, R. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk). 14 November 2012. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to D. Smith. (enquiries@deliaonline.com) Catley, R. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk). 8 January 2013. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to A-W. Thompson. (antony@awtonline.co.uk) Catley, R. (2013). Celebrity Chef Personality Table 1. 31 October 2013. Catley, R. (2013). Celebrity Chef Personality Table 2. 31 October 2013. Celebrity Group. (2013). Home. [online]. Available from: http://www.celebrity.co.uk/celebritychefs/ [Accessed on 16 January 2013] Chapman, M. (2012). Waitrose’s ‘Unglamourous’ And Unpaid Christmas Ad to Free up £1m For Charity. Marketing. [online]. November 2012. Available from: http://www.marketingmagazine.co.uk/news/1157923/ Waitroses-unglamorous-unpaid-Christmas-ad-free-1m-charity/ [Accessed on 19 January 2013] Chilli Breeze. (2011). Impact of Celebrity Endorsement on a Brand. [online]. Available from: http://www. chillibreeze.com/articles/Celebrity-endorsement.asp [Accessed on 14 January 2013]


Clifton, R. et al. (2003). Brands and Branding. [e-book]. London: Profile Books. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10210687 [Accessed on 25 January 2013] Cloud Nine Media. (2011). Comic Relief: Gordon Ramsay Visits South Africa. [online]. Available from: http:// cloudninemedia.co.uk/film/gordon-ramsay-visits-south-africa/ [Accessed 2 January 2013] Collective Creative Consultancy. (2010). Marketing for Gordon Ramsay. Cookware Range. [online images]. Available from: http://www.collectivecreative.com/pages/packramsay.html [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Collective Creative Consultancy. (2010). Gordon Ramsay Packaging. [online]. Available from: http://www. collectivecreative.com/pages/packramsay.html [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Collins, H. and Evans, R. (2007). Rethinking Expertise. [e-book]. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10266032 [Accessed on 29 January 2013] Collins, N. (enquiries@deliaonline.com). 20 November 2012. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to R. Catley. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk) Collins, S. (2012). Tesco Superstore Manager. Interview with Manager. 28 December Collins, S. (Stewart.Collins@uk.tesco.com). 16 January 2013. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to R. Catley. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk) Cullather, S. (2012). The Importance of Brand Equity and How to Maintain It. The Guardian. [online]. August 2012. Available from: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media-network/media-network-blog/2012/aug/10/brand-equitystart-ups-advantage [Accessed on 14 January 2013] Daily Record. (2012). Celebrity chefs provide the perfect shortcuts to ensure your Christmas dinner is a cracker. [online]. December 2012. Available from: http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/lifestyle/food-drink/celebrity-chefsprovide-the-perfect-shortcuts-1497782 [Accessed on 20 January 2013] 31

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


Davis, M. (2009). The Fundamentals of Branding. Lausanne: AVA Academia. Davidson, M. (2012). Every little hurts – Tesco’s new budget brand lacks snob value. The Telegraph. [online]. 5 April 2012. Available from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/9188573/Everylittle-hurts-Tescos-new-budget-brand-lacks-snob-value.html [Accessed on 15 January 2013] Design Council. (n.d.). The Power of Branding: A Practical Guide. [pdf]. Available from: http://www.designcouncil. org.uk/Documents/Documents/Publications/Power_of_branding.pdf [Accessed on 4 February 2013]

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Design Museum. (2007). Johnathan Barnbrook. [online]. Available from: http://designmuseum.org/design/ jonathan-barnbrook [Accessed on 1 February 2013] Doherty, R. and Poole, H. (2012). Do Celebs Only Support Charities To Promote Themselves? [online]. The Voice. April 2012. Available from: http://www.voice-online.co.uk/article/do-celebs-only-support-charitiespromote-themselves [Accessed on 27 January 2013] Doyle, J. (2012). The Fatal Attraction of Gordon Ramsay. The Globe and Mail. [online]. September 2012. Available from: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/television/the-fatal-attraction-of-gordon-ramsay/ article4518753/ [Accessed on 12 January 2013] Edwards, B. et al. (2009). Really Good Packaging Explained: Top Design Professionals critique 250 Package Designs and Explain What Makes Them Work. Gloucester, MA: Rockport. Elberse, A. and Verleun, J. (2012). The Economic Value of Celebrity Endorsements. Journal of Advertising Research. [online]. June 2012, Vol. 52 Issue 2, p-149-165. Available from: http://ehis.ebscohost.com/eds/pdfviewer/ pdfviewer?sid=5847b5a8-c2ff-4bea-b0cf-5f31e929505a%40sessionmgr112&vid=4&hid=116 [Accessed on 2 February 2013] Emerson, A. (2009). How Technology Has Effected The Food Industry. [online]. August 2009. Available from: http://www.helium.com/items/1571015-how-technology-has-affected-the-food-industry [Accessed on 12 January 2013]


Food Editorials. (2013). Celebrity Chefs Lead Stellar Culinary Careers. [online]. Available from: http://www. streetdirectory.com/food_editorials/cooking/cooking_tips/celebrity_chefs_lead_stellar_culinary_careers.html [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Foley, J. (2013). Building a Celebrity Chef Brand: Wake Up and Smell the Pot Roast. All Business. [online]. Available from: http://www.allbusiness.com/company-activities-management/product-managementbranding/15630655-1.html#axzz2I4jESvxP [Accessed on 15 January 2013] Fox. (2013). About The Show. [online]. Available from: http://www.fox.com/hellskitchen/about/. [Accessed on 9 January 2013] Geoghegan, T. (2008). Eat Me. BBC News Magazine [online]. September 2008. Available from: http://news.bbc. co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7643510.stm [Accessed on 21 January 2013] Good Food Channel. (2012). Celebrity Chefs. [online]. Available from: http://uktv.co.uk/food/homepage/sid/5152 [Accessed on 12 January 2013] Good Food Channel. (2012). James Martin. [online]. Available from: http://uktv.co.uk/food/chef/aid/530479 [Accessed on 25 January 2013] Gordon Ramsay. (N.d.). Chef Gordon. [online]. Available from: http://www.gordonramsay.com/chef-gordon/ [Accessed on 12 January 2013] Gregory, A. (2012). Why Are We Obsessed With Celebrity Chefs? Ones To Watch. [online]. October 2012. Available from: http://onestowatchmedia.com/2012/10/25/why-are-we-obsessed-with-celebrity-chefs/ [Accessed on 20 January 2013] Hamptons Fine Foods. (2012). Rick Stein Savoury Oat Biscuits with Cheddar. [online image]. Available from: http://www.hamptonsfinefoods.co.uk/fine-foods/savoury-biscuits/savoury-biscuits/rick-stein-savoury-oat-biscuitswith-cheddar.php [Accessed on 14 January 2013] 33

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Harris, P. and Ambrose, G. (2011). Packaging the Brand: Exploring the Relationship Between Packaging Design and Brand Identity. Lausanne: AVA Academia. Howell, B. (2007). Fame Us; Celebrity Impersonators and the Cult(ure) of Fame. [e-book]. Canada. Arsenal Pulp Press. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10298296 [Accessed on 23 January 2013] Inspiration Lab. (2010). Jamie Oliver By Pearlfisher. [online image]. Available from: http://inspirationlab.wordpress. com/2010/10/04/jamie-oliver-by-pearlfisher/ [Accessed on 15 January 2013]. 34

Interbrand. (2010). The Magnetic Celebrity Chef: Part 2. [online]. Available from: http://www.interbrand.com/en/ knowledge/blog.aspx?Tag=pbs [Accessed on 26 Jan 2013] Irwin’s Bakery. (n.d.). Rankin Selection Potato Farls. [online image]. Available from: http://www.irwinsbakery.com/ fs/img/product/rs-450x/rankin4potatofarls.jpg [Accessed on 14 January 2013] Jamie Oliver. (2013). Biography. Available from: http://www.jamieoliver.com/about/jamie-oliver-biog [Accessed on 20 January 2013] Jamie Oliver. (2013). Feed Me Even Better. Jamie’s Manifesto: Part II. [pdf]. Available from: http://www. jamieoliver.com/media/jamiesmanifesto.pdf [Accessed on 11 January 2013] Jamie Oliver. (2013). Feed Me Even Better. Jamie’s Manifesto: Part II. [online image]. Available from: http://www. jamieoliver.com/media/jamiesmanifesto.pdf [Accessed on 11 January] John Lewis. (2013), Nigella Lawson Living Kitchen, Cream. [online image]. Available from: http://www.johnlewis. com/14029/Product.aspx [Accessed on 10 January 2013] Joseph, J. (2010). The Experience Effect Engage Your Customers With a Consistent and Memorable Brand Experience. [e-book]. New York: AMACOM. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/ docDetail.action?docID=10387200 [Accessed on 25 January 2013]


Kaptan, S., S. and Pandey, S. (2010). Brand Imitation. [e-book]. Mumbai [India]: Himalaya Pub. House. Available through AUCB Library: http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10415674 [Accessed on 24 January 2013] Kriekan, R. V. (2012). Celebrity and Society. [e-book]. London: Routledge. Available through: AUCB Library http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368677 [Accessed 20 January 2013] Krummert, B. (2012). How To Make Gordon Ramsay’s Best-Selling Dish. Restaurant Hospitality. [online]. June 2012. Available from: http://restaurant-hospitality.com/food-trends/how-make-gordon-ramsay-s-best-selling-dish [Accessed on 20 Jan 2013] Leewen, T. V. (2005). Introducing Social Semiotics. London. Routledge. Lemm, E. (2013). Celebrity Chefs: Should We Trust Their Endorsements? [online]. Available from: http://www. high50.com/food-and-drink/celebrity-chefs-should-we-trust-their-endorsements [Accessed on 20 January 2013] Levi Roots. (2012). Humble Beginnings. [online]. Available from: http://www.reggae-reggae.co.uk/about-levi-roots/ [Accessed on 13 January 2013] Lifestyle Food. (2012). Nigella Lawson. [online]. Available from: http://www.lifestylefood.com.au/chefs/ nigellalawson/ [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Management Study Guide. (2012). What is Consumer Behaviour - Meaning and Important Concepts. [online]. Available from: http://www.managementstudyguide.com/what-is-consumer-behaviour.htm [Accessed on 15 January 2013] Marketing & Branding. (2013). Stand Out From The Pack. [online]. Available from: http://www.mbaonline.com/ courses/marketing-branding/ [Accessed on 20 January 2013] Marshall, P. D. (1997). Celebrity and Power: Fame in Contemporary Culture. USA: University of Minnesota Press. 35

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McDonald, G. (2011). Manifesto Project. Jamie Oliver: Feed Me Even Better. [online]. November 2011. Available from: http://www.1000manifestos.com/jamie-oliver-feed-me-even-better/ [Accessed on 28 January 2013] McMullen, M. (2010). Delia Smith And Heston Blumenthal Front New Waitrose Advert Campaign. Coventry Telegraph. [online]. Available from: http://blogs.coventrytelegraph.net/passtheremote/2010/03/delia-smith-andheston-blument.html [Accessed on 26 January] Meggs. P. B. (1992). Type and Image: The Language of Graphic Design. Canada. John Wiley and Sons.

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Montanari, M. (2006). Food is Culture. [e-book]. New York: Colombia University Press. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10183599 [Accessed on 18 January 203] Murray, B. H. (2004). Defending the Brand Agressive Strategies for Protecting Your Brand in the Online Arena. [e-book]. New York: American Management Association. Available through: AUCB Library: http://site.ebrary. com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10044971 [Accessed on 25 January 2013] Natural Food Finder. (N.d.). Are Celebrity Chefs Selling Out? [online]. Available from: http://www. naturalfoodfinder.co.uk/Celebrity-Chefs-selling-out [Accessed on 11 January 2013] Newbury, M. (2000). Celebrity Watching. American Literary History. (Spring – Summer, 2000). Vol. 12, No. ½. pp. 272-283. [pdf]. Available from: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/490251.pdf [Accessed on 21 January 2013] NHS Choices. (n.d.). Why 5 a Day? [online]. Available from: http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/5ADAY/Pages/ Why5ADAY.aspx [Accessed on 14 January 2013] Nigella Lawson. (2011). About Nigella. [online]. Available from: http://www.nigella.com/about-nigella [Accessed on 10 January 2013] NMP Live. (2013). Celebrity Endorsements, PR and Advertising Campaigns. [online]. Available from: http://www. nmplive.co.uk/Endorsement-PR [Accessed on 10 January 2013] OCD-UK. (2013). Waitrose Community Matters. [online]. Available from: http://www.ocduk.org/waitrose [Accessed on 13 January 2013]


One Young World. (n.d.). Jamie Oliver: Chef – TV Personality. [online]. Available from: http://www. oneyoungworld.com/our-network/counsellors/jamie-oliver [Accessed on 29 January 2013] O’Shaughnessy, N. J., O’Shaughnessy, J. (2004). Persuasion in Advertising. London. Routledge. O’Shea, G. (2007). Jen’s Real Hell Kitchen Job. The Sun. [online]. July 2007. Available from: http://www.thesun. co.uk/sol/homepage/news/89468/Jens-real-Hell-Kitchen-job.html [Accessed on 29 January 2013] Path. (2013). Ainsley Harriott. [online image]. Available from: http://www.path-designs.com/portfolio-item/ ainsley-harriott/#sthash.cAmUtj2Y.dpbs [Accessed on 10 January 2013] Pant, H. (2007). Advertising and Consumer Behaviour. [e-book]. India: ABD Publishers. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10415134 [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Pearlfisher. (2013). Jamie Oliver. [online image]. Available from: http://www.pearlfisher.com/our-work/identity/ jamie-oliver [Accessed on 15 January 2013] Pe, R. (2012). Celebrities: Their Fees, Pluses and Minuses of Using Them. Inquirer Business. [online]. September 2012. Available from: http://business.inquirer.net/80686/celebrities-their-fees-pluses-and-minuses-of-using-them [Accessed on 21 January 2013] Pelletier, J. (2013). Food Blog. 23 January 2013. Where Are The Women Chefs? [online]. Available from: http:// blogs.providencejournal.com/arts-entertainment/lifestyles/food-dining/2013/01/where-are-the-women-chefs.html [Accessed on 2 January 2013] Poulter, S. (2011). Two children with botulism poisoning after eating Loyd Grossman sauce ‘are brother and sister aged under 10. Mail Online [online]. November 2011. Available from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ article-2061731/Loyd-Grossman-curry-sauce-Victims-botulism-case-brother-sister-10.html [Accessed on 13 Jan 2013] Prime Performers. (2012). Celebrity Chefs Food & Wine Experts. [online]. Available from: http://www. primeperformers.co.uk/category/celebrity-chefs-food-wine-experts/ [Accessed on 21 January 2013]

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Proudlove, M. (talk@partnershipdesign.co.uk). 8 October. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to R. Catley. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk) Psaltis, D and Psaltis, M. (2005). The Seasoning of a Chef My Journey from Diner to Ducasse and Beyond. [e-book]. Available through: AUCB Library: http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10101512 [Accessed on 2 February 2013] Rankin Selection. (2010). Where It All Began. [online]. Available from: http://www.rankinselection.com/history. aspx [Accessed on 13 January 2013] 38

Red Rocket Media. Content Marketing Blog. (2012). Waitrose and its non-promotional (yet slightly selfpromotional) content. [online image]. Available from: http://www.redrocketmedia.co.uk/blog/waitrose-and-itsnon-promotional-yet-slightly-self-promotional-content/ [Accessed on 10 January 2013] Roche, E. (2013). Delia Smith: Why I’m Quitting TV For Good. Express. [online]. February 2013. Available from: http://www.express.co.uk/news/showbiz/375859/Delia-Smith-Why-I-m-quitting-TV-for-good [Accessed on 2 February 2013] Rohrer, F. (2009). How Celebrity Chefs Change The Way We Eat. BBC News Magazine. [online]. April 2009. Available from: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8009970.stm [Accessed on 9 January 2013] Rojek, C. (2001). Celebrity. London: Reaktion Books. Rolph, D. (2008). Reputation, Celebrity and Defamation Law. [e-book]. England: Ashgate. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10254953 [Accessed 24 January 2013] Rutter, C. (2012). Gordon Ramsay Can’t Resist Having A Pop At Jamie Oliver’s Weight. Entertainmentwise. [online]. December 2012. Available from: http://www.entertainmentwise.com/news/99179/Gordon-Ramsay-CantResist-Having-A-Pop-At-Jamie-Olivers-Weight [Accessed on 21 January 2013] Schmitt, B., Simonson, A. and Peters, T. (1997). Marketing Aesthetics – the Strategic Management of Brands, Identity and Image. London: Free Press.


Shardlow, E. (2011). The Evolving Role of the Female Chef in the Professional Kitchen. The National. [online]. April 2011. Available from: http://www.thenational.ae/lifestyle/food/the-evolving-role-of-the-female-chef-in-theprofessional-kitchen [Accessed on 15 January 2013] Sheffield Hallam University. (n.d.). Packaging, Design and Innovation. [online]. Available from: http://www.shu. ac.uk/sbs/research/food-innovation/case-studies/why-buy.html [Accessed on 16 January 2013] Silverstein, B. (2008). Celebrity Chef Brands That Cook In The Kitchen. Brandchannel. [online]. May 2008. Available from: http://www.brandchannel.com/features_effect.asp?pf_id=420 [Accessed on 20 January 2013] Source. Essential Marketing Inspiration. (2011). Jamie Oliver Leaves Sainsbury’s. [online image]. Available from: http://www.added-value.com/source/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Picture21.jpg [Accessed on 16 January 2013] Stromberg, D. (2009). Do Celebrity Endorsements Really Persuade Consumer Buys? The Globe. [online]. December 2009. Available from: http://www.pointparkglobe.com/2.7413/do-celebrity-endorsements-reallypersuade-consumer-buys-1.1039650#.UQPdcI4n9vA [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Taylor, V. (viviennetaylor@rickstein.com).15 November 2012. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to R. Catley. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk) The Food and Drink Innovation Network. (2011). Gordon Ramsay Promotes New Red nose Day Sauces. [online]. February 2011. Available from: http://www.fdin.org.uk/2011/02/gordon-ramsay-promotes-new-red-nose-daysauces/ [Accessed on 21 January 2013] The Kitchen Collaborative. (n.d.). Brand “Personality:” Jamie Oliver’s New Packaging. [online image]. Available from: http://kitchencollaborative.com/2010/04/brand-personality-jamie-olivers-new-packaging/ [Accessed on 25 January 2013] This is Money. (2010). Jamie Oliver Biggest Book Seller After JK Rowling. [online]. 29 November 2010. Available from: http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/article-1708713/Jamie-Oliver-biggest-book-seller-after-JK-Rowling. html [Accessed on 15 January 2013] 39

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Totality GCS. (n.d). James Martin Packaging Design. [online image]. Available from: http://www.totalitygcs.co.uk/ work/project/james-martin.html [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Totality GCS. (n.d). Contact Us. [online]. Available from: http://www.totalitygcs.co.uk/contact/ [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Tuttle, B. (2012). How Celebrity Endorsements Can Backfire. Time, Business & Money. [online]. June 2012. Available from: http://business.time.com/2012/06/22/how-celebrity-endorsements-can-backfire/ [Accessed on 25 January 2013] 40

Turner, G. (2004). Understanding Celebrity. [e-book]. London: Sage Publications. [online]. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/docDetail.action?docID=10080904 [Accessed on 24 January 2013] University of Colorado Boulder. (2012). Celebrity Endorsements Not Always a Good Bet, CU-Boulder Study Shows. [online]. Available from: http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2012/06/20/celebrityendorsements-not-always-good-bet-cu-boulder-study-shows [Accessed on 25 January 2013] Visit Britain. (2010). Celebrity Chef Restaurants. [online]. Available from: http://www.visitbritain.com/en/ Celebrity-chef-restaurants/ [Accessed on 18 January 2013] Waitrose Media Centre. (2013). Waitrose keeps Christmas TV ad plain and simple to give more to charity. [online]. Available from: http://www.waitrose.presscentre.com/Press-Releases/Waitrose-keeps-Christmas-TV-adplain-and-simple-to-give-more-to-charity-aa2.aspx [Accessed on 10 January 2013] Wallop, H. (2008). Delia Effect Strikes Again as Sales of Convenience Food Soar. The Telegraph. [online]. April 2008. Available from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/1904651/Delia-Effect-strikes-again-as-sales-ofconvenience-food-soar.html [Accessed on 26 January 2013] Wieckowski, F. (filip@pearlfisher.com). 22 November 2012. Rebecca Catley – Dissertation. Email to R. Catley. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk)


Windsor, J. (2004). Beyond the Brand Why Engaging the Right Customers is Essential to Winning the Business. [e-book]. Chicago: Dearborn Trade Pub. Available through: AUCB Library http://site.ebrary.com/lib/aib/ docDetail.action?docID=10064617 [Accessed on 25 January 2013] Wood, S. (2013). Be Careful You Don’t Drop THAT Out! Rylan Clark Poses Naked For Magazine Centerfold. The Mirror. [online]. January 2013. Available from: http://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/be-careful-youdont-drop-that-out-1567842 [Accessed on 21 January 2013] Worral-Thompson, A. (antony@awtonline.co.uk). 5 February 2013. Rebecca Catley - Dissertation. Email to R. Catley. (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk) Wynne-Jones, J. (2010). Jamie Oliver, the Naked Chef, Opens Up About Family Life. The Telegraph [online]. Dec 2010. Available from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/8224966/Jamie-Oliver-the-naked-chefopens-up-about-family-life.html [Accessed on 14 January 2013] Zacharia, C. (2012). Who’s Afriad of Jamie Oliver? Urban Times. [online]. October 2012. Available from: http:// urbantimes.co/2012/10/whos-afraid-of-jamie-oliver/ [Accessed on 26 January 2013]

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Appendices Appendix A: Questionnaire Template I have constructed a questionnaire to the public, (sample size: 58) in order to find out consumer perceptions on the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding.

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What is the Relationship Between Celebrity Chefs in Contemporary Food Culture and Food Branding?

Q. 1 1. What gender do you associate more with celebrity chefs?

Male

Female

Q. 2 2. Does the personality of the celebrity chef affect whether you purchase their food product?

Q. 3

Yes

No

3. Do you feel more inclined to buy a celebrity chef food product compared to one which is not?

Yes

No 43

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Q.4 4. Can you give some examples of successful and unsuccessful brands that have used celebrity chefs?

Q.5 5. In what ways do celebrity chefs promote a certain lifestyle to consumers? 44


Appendix B: Questionnaire Results Using Survey Monkey, I created my survey online, on the 24th October 2012 and carried out a result analysis from the consumer perceptions I collated. I have taken screen shots of my public results.

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Appendix C: Stewart Collins Manager at Tesco Superstore From: Bex Catley [bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk] To: Stewart.Collins@uk.tesco.com Sent: 15 January 2013 12:14 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation 50

Hi Stewart, Just looking through the notes you gave me and was just wondering as you mentioned that summer was a good season for celebrity chefs. I was just wondering why this is so I can analyse it in my writing. Many thanks, Rebecca From: Stewart.Collins@uk.tesco.com To: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk Sent: 16 January 2013 14:45:28 Subject: RE: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Hi Rebecca. Hope all’s good! It’s mainly because of diff opportunities of product with the good weather. There are “rubs” for BBQ, BBQ sauces, marinades also. All launched in spring so our customers are aware of them but ready to purchase when the weather changes - if it does at all!!! These are v strong for our friend Jamie as he has a fairly comprehensive range to pick from. They also complement their branded leisure ranges like Outdoor Furniture/BBQs as these may sit well as a grouped offer. Hope that’s a help. Stewart


Appendix D: Kim Aldous Marketer: Tesco Superstore From: Bex Catley (bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk) Sent: 09 January 2013 19:04
 To: Aldous, Kim
(Kim.Aldous@uk.tesco.com) Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Dear Kim Aldous, Stewart has told me that you could provide information regarding my dissertation, which I am very grateful for yours and Stewart’s time. I am writing my dissertation on the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. I contact you to ask if you could please help me with my research within areas on food branding and marketing. I am researching into lifestyle, food consumption, celebrity chefs and their unique selling points. I am interested in how celebrity chefs are created and communicated to audiences to attract consumer awareness. I have tried to refine it down and I would be very grateful if you could answer the following questions: 1. How is a celebrity chef food brand developed and marketed? 2. How does a brand select a particular celebrity chef and personality for the food products? Do food brands contact you to work with them? 3. What factors do you think attracts a consumer to purchase a particular brand? For example, characteristics/ personality differences of a celebrity chef, price, design of a food product, packaging etc. 4. Do you believe the way in which a food product is packaged can make a consumer think differently about purchasing a brand? 51

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5. Can you give some examples of successful and unsuccessful brands that have used celebrity chefs from being in the food industry? Any help that you can offer will be very much appreciated and will be acknowledged accordingly. Yours sincerely, Rebecca Catley

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118 Ensbury Park Road, Bournemouth. BH9 2SL. Bournemouth. bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk 07800734630 From: Kim.Aldous@uk.tesco.com To: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk Sent: 10 January 2013 Subject: Rebecca Catley – Dissertation Hi Rebecca, Happy New Year to you! Thanks for the email – I will do my best to help out, but not all of this is my area of expertise. When do you need all of the information by? I can definitely give some initial comments on some of your questions, which will hopefully give you some more food for thought (pardon the pun!) but most of this will be ideas to get you thinking, rather than info you can actually quote in your dissertation. Let me know if what I’m providing isn’t what you are after though, as I remember doing my dissertation and having so much info to look through. All I wanted was someone to write it in plain English for me! Here goes…


1. How is a celebrity chef food brand developed and marketed? I’ll have to look into this one for you, as whilst I have some idea, I’m really not sure the exact detail. I can provide some kind of an overview though if that would help. Let me know. 2. How does a brand select a particular celebrity chef and personality for the food products? Do food brands contact you to work with them? We will be contacted regularly to work with a range of different brands. We don’t have any overall celebrity involvement, but as you will know we stock a lot of celebrity chef products. I’m not sure on the exact detail of this as this will be dealt with by the commercial teams, but I can try and see what I can find out. I’ve done some googling this morning and there appears to be quite a bit that you can find out about some of the industry thoughts on celebrity chef endorsements. It might also be worth mentioning that we sell an uncle ben’s rice that has been used by Jamie Oliver in one of his 15 minute meal recipes – this might be the next level of celebrity chef endorsement! 3. What factors do you think attracts a consumer to purchase a particular brand? For example, characteristics/ personality differences of a celebrity chef, price, design of a food product, packaging etc. I can look into finding some research detail out for you on this, but you are probably just as likely to find detail on sites like Marketing Week and the Grocer. 
The biggest driver (generally speaking) is likely to be price at the moment due to the current economic climate. There has been a big rise in the number of people that shop at discounters (Aldi and Lidl etc) and then use the bigger supermarkets (Tesco, JS, Morrisons, Asda) to get the products they can’t buy elsewhere. This is going to be the biggest factor to consider. Packaging will play a big part in people’s shelf edge decisions (once price has been considered) but I think this is where perception and value for money come into the decision making process. A product that has a low price point but high end looking packaging will be seen as good value for money and so is more likely to be an impulsive shelf edge decision to pick up a bargain. People also like to stick to brands that they know and like, so endorsement from someone like Jamie Oliver will be seen as supporting a brand and making it stronger in people’s minds. However, I think this does fall slightly lower in the customer decision making process for a lot of people. Having said that, there must be something in celeb chef endorsements because everyone is doing it! Although it does seem to be a big shift away from celeb chefs at the moment to focus on sports stars (especially GB Olympians). 53

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4. Do you believe the way in which a food product is packaged can make a consumer think differently about purchasing a brand?

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Yes – absolutely! But I think this will apply more to luxury items and special purchases, and particularly with fresh food. For example, when people buy canned sweetcorn or baked beans, they will buy the brand they always buy (probably the one their mum used to buy) if that isn’t available they will switch to a similar priced brand that they feel offers the same value for money. However, if they are being fresh chicken, they will be sopping in a very different way; freshness will be a big driver, the quality of the food, the type of packaging and then the price. In this case the packaging will need to allow the customer to see as much of the product as possible, so the right packaging will play a big part in the decision making process here. We do have a lot of information about customer shopping habits, but I won’t be able to share this with you as its commercial info, however the above should give you a bit of an idea about the basic principles – I hope this is useful. The way we merchandise our shops is designed to follow the customer decision process, so just by looking at the shelves in one of our stores should give you an idea of how customers shop this. Stewart – are you able to provide a bit more insight here? 5. Can you give some examples of successful and unsuccessful brands that have used celebrity chefs from being in the food industry? This might sound silly, but I think the successful ones are the ones that people can tell you about (so maybe a bit of primary research to be done there?) and the not so successful ones are the ones you see on the supermarket shelves that you have never hear do for seen before. Maybe a good example of a bad endorsement is Lidl and Nick Nairn – I didn’t realise until about 6 weeks ago that Nick Nairn endorsed Lidl as a brand. Bear in mind I work in retail, this is probably not great for either Lidl or Nick Nairn. Let me know if you have any more questions Thanks Kim


Appendix E: Filip Wieckowski Studio Coordinator: Pearflisher Design From: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk To: filip@pearlfisher.com Sent: 21 November 2012 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Dear Filip Wieckowski, I am a final year BA(Hons) Graphic Design student studying at the Arts University College at Bournemouth, England. I am writing my dissertation on the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. I spoke to a colleague of yours on the phone and she mentioned that you have worked with a variety of celebrity chefs so you would have a great impact on my dissertation. I contact you to ask if you could please help me with my research within areas on food branding and packaging design. I am researching into lifestyle, food consumption, celebrity chefs and their unique selling points. I am interested in how celebrity chefs are created and communicated to audiences to attract consumer awareness. I would be very grateful if you could answer the following questions: 1. When designing for food products what are the main factors you consider in the branding? 2. When designing for food products what are the main factors you consider in the packaging for celebrity chefs? 3. How do you think celebrity chefs have come to be so important - and why are they a useful way of promoting food in our culture? 4. How does your brand select a particular celebrity chef and personality for the food products? 5. In what ways does a celebrity chef promote a certain lifestyle to consumers?

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study

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6. Can you give some examples of successful and unsuccessful brandings that have used celebrity chefs? Any help that you can offer will be very much appreciated and will be acknowledged accordingly. Thankyou. Yours sincerely, Rebecca Catley 56

118 Ensbury Park Road, BH9 2SL. Bournemouth. bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk 07800734630 From: filip@pearlfisher.com To: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk Sent: 22 November 2012 Subject: Rebecca Catley – Dissertation 1. When designing for food products what are the main factors you consider in the branding? Taste appeal, naturalness 2. When designing for food products what are the main factors you consider in the packaging for celebrity chefs? Create an image that “feels” like the style/brand image of the celebrity 3. How do you think celebrity chefs have come to be so important - and why are they a useful way of promoting food in our culture? It’s a trend and a way to add value/trust to brands and products.


4. How does your brand select a particular celebrity chef and personality for the food products? Thinking which type of celebrity they could be associated with would fit and benefit their own brand image. 5. In what ways does a celebrity chef promote a certain lifestyle to consumers? It reflects the image of the celebrity’s lifestyle and values. 6. Can you give some examples of successful and unsuccessful brandings that have used celebrity chefs? jme Filip Wieckowski Studio Coordinator Pearlfisher. 50 Brook Green London W6 7BJ T +44 (0)20 7603 8666 F +44 (0)20 7605 1888 www.pearlfisher.com

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Appendix F: Malcolm Proudlove Designer and Managing Director Partnership Design

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From: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk To: talk@partnershipdesign.co.uk Sent: 23 Spetember 2012 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Dear Malcolm Proudlove, I am a final year BA(Hons) Graphic Design student studying at the Arts University College at Bournemouth, England. I am writing my dissertation on the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. I contact you to ask if you could please help me with my research within areas on food branding and packaging design. I am researching into lifestyle, food consumption, celebrity chefs and their unique selling points. I am interested in how celebrity chefs are created and communicated to audiences to attract consumer awareness. I would be very grateful if you could answer the following questions: 1. When you are designing for a brand what are the main factors you consider? 2. Do you take into account the semiotics of type and image when designing the packaging for a brand? 3. Do you think clever packaging design can encourage consumers to rethink their relationship on purchasing a brand? 4. Why do you feel that when you are designing you should use a celebrity on the packaging? 5. What would you prefer to watch? Gordon Ramsay - ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ or Jamie Oliver - ‘Jamie at Home’ 6. Do you believe the brand has to match the right celebrity? Yes/No


7. Who do you feel has been more successful within their cooking and celebrity career? Gordon Ramsay or Jamie Oliver. 8. Which brand would you buy if you walked into the local supermarket? Gordon Ramsay or Jamie Oliver. 9. What characteristics do you think Gordon Ramsay and Jamie Oliver represent? 10. Which celebrity do you prefer? Gordon Ramsay or Jamie Oliver. 11. Why do you prefer that celebrity chef? Any help that you can offer will be very much appreciated and will be acknowledged accordingly. Thank you. Yours sincerely, Rebecca Catley 118 Ensbury Park Road, BH9 2SL. Bournemouth. bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk 07800734630 From: talk@partnershipdesign.co.uk To: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk Sent: 8 October 2012 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Re: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Hi Bex I’m really sorry to have taken so long to respond to you – I’m normally the original Mr Reliable but unfortunately my wife had an accident in the States, which has turned things upside down at home.

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study

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Below are my answers to your questionnaire, which I hope will help. Should you want to discuss it please call me and I’ll find time to talk. If you want me to expand on anything please let me know. Again, I’m sorry for the time it’s taken to respond to you. Kind regards. Malcolm 1. When you are designing for a brand what are the main factors you consider? 60 To portray the brand’s values to the consumer and to highlight the specific product’s benefits. This obviously applies not only to packaging but also to other forms of communication too. 2. Do you take into account the semiotics of type and image when designing the packaging for a brand? Yes, this is obviously closely aligned to brand identity, the visual recognition of colour, typography all of these aspects are the basic substance of brand communication. 3. Do you think clever packaging design can encourage consumers to rethink their relationship on purchasing a brand? Hopefully, yes. However, I think these days you have to be very careful not to go too far or be too clever, thus adding cost to a product simply to have a piece of smart packaging, which after all is there to protect the product itself. There are certain areas, though, where packaging almost becomes the ‘hero’ in attracting the consumer: cosmetics, gadgetry etc. 4. Why do you feel that when you are designing you should use a celebrity on the packaging? In this particular instance our association with Gordon Ramsay was to create a brand name for him and echo this across a range of packaging. It was not our choice to use Gordon Ramsay but Gordon Ramsay’s choice to use us through the confectionery company.


5. What would you prefer to watch? Gordon Ramsay - ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ or Jamie Oliver - ‘Jamie at Home’ Jamie Oliver, from a purely personal point of view. Gordon’s apparent aggressive nature and language kind of get in the way of the programme, whereas Jamie Oliver, once you’ve got used to his cheeky East End market chatter, is probably a slightly more enjoyable viewing. 6. Do you believe the brand has to match the right celebrity? Yes/No Yes. I think the choice of celebrity is essential to maintaining a brand’s credibility and in some cases could be highly detrimental to the brand’s values if the wrong one was selected. 7. Who do you feel has been more successful within their cooking and celebrity career? Gordon Ramsay or Jamie Oliver. I think you’re probably asking the wrong guy. I don’t see a great deal of TV and I don’t read Hello magazine and the like, but from what I do know Gordon Ramsay seems to have a more global presence than Jamie Oliver, but I think Jamie is working on it. 8. Which brand would you buy if you walked into the local supermarket? Gordon Ramsay or Jamie Oliver. I would depend entirely on the product and whether or not I was looking for a product of that type at the time. I guess that whichever one I chose would be influenced by the look and feel of it and the price rather than the personality. 9. What characteristics do you think Gordon Ramsay and Jamie Oliver represent? I think Gordon Ramsay is dedicated, tough, swears for attention and to be different, is an extremely shrewd businessman having built a virtual global brand. Jamie Oliver has a cheeky persona, the boy done well scenario, relies on his cooking skills, is in touch with today’s demands, school meals, helping mums cook etc, a clever guy who is interested more in cooking than building an empire. 61

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10. Which celebrity do you prefer? Gordon Ramsay or Jamie Oliver. For all the reasons above I guess I’d have to say Jamie Oliver. 11. Why do you prefer that celebrity chef? His chatter and banter are somewhat more acceptable than Gordon Ramsay’s presentation and language, which I find distracting.

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Appendix G: Vivienne Taylor Personal Assistant: Rick Stein From: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk To: feedback@rickstein.com Sent: 14 November 2012 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Dear Rick Stein, I am a final year BA(Hons) Graphic Design student studying at the Arts University College at Bournemouth, England. I am writing my dissertation on the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. I contact you to ask if you could please help me with my research within areas on food branding and packaging design. I am researching into lifestyle, food consumption, celebrity chefs and their unique selling points. I am interested in how celebrity chefs are created and communicated to audiences to attract consumer awareness. I would be very grateful if you could answer the following questions: 1. How do you communicate to consumers and want to be represented in the packaging design for a food product? 2. How does a brand select a particular celebrity chef and personality for the food products? Do food brands contact you to work with them? 3. What factors do you think attracts a consumer to purchase a particular brand? For example, characteristics/ personality differences of a celebrity chef, price, design of a food product, packaging etc. 4. Do you believe the way in which a food product is packaged can make a consumer think differently about purchasing a brand? 63

Rebecca Catley: Extended Investigative Study


5. Can you give some examples of successful and unsuccessful brands that have used celebrity chefs from being in the food industry? 6. What image do you try to portray to consumers to make a consumer purchase your food brand? Any help that you can offer will be very much appreciated and will be acknowledged accordingly. Thank you. Yours sincerely, 64 Rebecca Catley 118 Ensbury Park Road, BH9 2SL. Bournemouth. bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk 07800734630

From: viviennetaylor@rickstein.com To: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk Sent: 15 November 2012 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Dear Rebecca Catley, Thank you very much for your e-mail to Rick asking for input on food and packaging branding as part of your dissertation you are doing. As you can imagine Rick gets quite a few requests of this nature and as much as he’d love to be able to help, with his work commitments and other interests sadly there just aren’t enough hours in the day for him to be able to answer these questions, which are quite in-depth and would take some time to reply to in a measured way and he feels there isn’t any point and it wouldn’t be helpful to the students in question to not give them the attention they deserve.


I’m sorry we were unable to help but trust you will get some feed back that will help you with your dissertation. Kind regards,

Vivienne Taylor Personal Assistant The Seafood Restaurant Riverside Padstow PL28 8BY Tel: Mob: Email: Web:

01841 550 280 07966 626 113 viviennetaylor@rickstein.com www.rickstein.com

This e-mail and any attachments are confidential. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact us immediately and inform the sender. In no event should you disclose the contents of this email to any other person nor copy, use, print, distribute or disseminate it or any information contained in it. Although we do scan outgoing emails for viruses, it is possible that a virus may have become attached and it is your responsibility to scan incoming emails. Therefore, we do not accept responsibility for any errors or omissions that are present in this message, or any attachment, that have arisen as a result of e-mail transmission. The Seafood Restaurant (Padstow) Ltd Registered Office: Riverside, Padstow, Cornwall, PL28 8BY Registered in England and Wales No. 3031916

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Appendix H: Noreen Collins: Website Manager: Delia Online Delia Smith From: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk To: enquiries@deliaonline.com Sent: 14 November 2012 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation 66

Dear Delia Smith, I am a final year BA(Hons) Graphic Design student studying at the Arts University College at Bournemouth, England. I am writing my dissertation on the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. I contact you to ask if you could please help me with my research within areas on food branding and packaging design. I am researching into lifestyle, food consumption, celebrity chefs and their unique selling points. I am interested in how celebrity chefs are created and communicated to audiences to attract consumer awareness. I would be very grateful if you could answer the following questions: 1. How do you communicate to consumers and want to be represented in the packaging design for a food product? 2. How does a brand select a particular celebrity chef and personality for the food products? Do food brands contact you to work with them? 3. What factors do you think attracts a consumer to purchase a particular brand? For example, characteristics/ personality differences of a celebrity chef, price, design of a food product, packaging etc. 4. Do you believe the way in which a food product is packaged can make a consumer think differently about purchasing a brand? 5. Can you give some examples of successful and unsuccessful brands that have used celebrity chefs from being in the food industry?


6. What image do you try to portray to consumers to make a consumer purchase your food brand? Any help that you can offer will be very much appreciated and will be acknowledged accordingly. Thank you. Yours sincerely, Rebecca Catley 118 Ensbury Park Road, BH9 2SL. Bournemouth. bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk 07800734630 From: enquiries@deliaonline To: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk Sent: 20 November 2012 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation Thank you for your request to Delia. As I am sure you can imagine Delia, like all people in the public eye, receives hundreds of requests such as yours every year. I am sorry, but it is not possible for her to reply to them all and so regretfully we have to say no as it would not be fair to say yes to one and no to others. Thank you for thinking of Delia and best wishes. Kind regards

Delia Online 67

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Appendix I: Anthony Worral-Thompson Celebrity Chef From: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk To: antony@awtonline.co.uk Sent: 8 January 2013 Subject: Rebecca Catley - Dissertation 68

Dear Antony Worrall - Thompson, I am a final year BA(Hons) Graphic Design student studying at the Arts University College at Bournemouth, England. I am writing my dissertation on the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. I contact you to ask if you could please help me with my research within areas on food branding and packaging design. I am researching into lifestyle, food consumption, celebrity chefs and their unique selling points. I am interested in how celebrity chefs are created and communicated to audiences to attract consumer awareness. I would be very grateful if you could answer the following questions: 1. How do you see your role as a celebrity and a chef? 2. How do you communicate to consumers and want to be represented in the packaging design for a food product? What is your brand identity and how has it developed? 3. How does a brand select a particular celebrity chef and personality for the food products? Do food brands contact you to work with them? 4. What factors do you think attracts a consumer to purchase a particular brand? For example, characteristics/ personality differences of a celebrity chef, price, design of a food product, packaging etc. 5. Do you believe the way in which a food product is packaged can make a consumer think differently about purchasing a brand? 6. Can you give some examples of successful and unsuccessful brands that have used celebrity chefs from being in the food industry?


7. What image do you try to portray to consumers to make a consumer purchase your food brand? Any help that you can offer will be very much appreciated and will be acknowledged accordingly. Thank you. Yours sincerely, Rebecca Catley 118 Ensbury Park Road, BH9 2SL. Bournemouth. bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk 07800734630

From: antony@awtonline.co.uk To: bexcatley@hotmail.co.uk Sent: 5 February 2013 Subject: Rebecca Catley – Dissertation Thank you for contacting me. I endeavor to answer as many emails as possible, but can’t make any promises AWT
Antony Worrall Thompson
www.awtonline.co.uk

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Appendix J: Pechakucha Presentation: Graphic Design Symposium To extend my research methodology I carried out a presentation to develop my theme and idea generation.

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Appendix K: Poster Design I also carried out a poster design to visually express the relationship between celebrity chefs in contemporary food culture and food branding. By changing the colour of each celebrity chef, I wanted to show visually, that each celebrity chef represents something different in our contemporary culture and to his or her food brand, such as his or her personality. I also wanted to express that they stand out in our culture through their endorsements for their food brands. 72


Appendix L: Action Plan: Gant Chart

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The aim of this study is to find out the relationship between celebrity chefs, which are popular in contemporary food culture and food branding and to assess their validity. Our food culture is surrounded by celebrity chef food branding, which is a central aspect of our culture as it aims to create a place in the market, which attracts consumer awareness to celebrity chef food brands and therefore increases brand loyalty and promotion. Therefore, this study closesly analyses the strong branding and marketing techniques used to promote celebrity chefs, which attribute to the ways in which celebrity chefs achieve consumer recognition and success.

Design By Rebecca Catley

An Investigation into Celebrity Chef Packaging Design  

The aim of this study is to find out the relationship between celebrity chefs, which are popular in contemporary food culture and food brand...

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