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SITE CONDITIONS STREET SITE: 4 NULLARBOR PLACE, CAROLINE SPRINGS Latitude: 37.7450O S Longitude: 144.7400OE Outer Western Suburbs, Melbourne, Australia. S

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CLIENT PROFILE: MR & MRS PATEL The Patels are an elderly couple who are planning to move to Caroline Springs. They currently live in an apartment in the inner city of Melbourne, but require more space in their retirement and want to live nearer their children and grandchildren. Having grown up in Mumbai, the Patels do not like the cold Melbourne winter weather, and, being elderly they often become sick and need very effective heating, cooling and damp-proofing in their new home. They are keen to have an energy efficient house and want to utilise passive design strategies so as to lower their future energy bills too. They want their house to be sustainable, robust, and of high quality, as they plan to leave it to their children when they pass away. Mr and Mrs Patel have fourteen grandchildren, whom they babysit on weekdays. The grandchildren are all between 3 and 15 years old and so Mr and Mrs Patel need large conditioned indoor and outdoor spaces for them to play when they visit after school/kindergarten, and the ability to partition areas of the house in the evenings when the grandchildren are not around. Knowing the house (especially kitchen, bathroom, living areas and garden/patio) will have very high use by the grandchildren, and knowing that they have limited physical capacity to do a lot of repairs and cleaning, the Patels have a strong preference for robust interior finishes and a low maintenance garden.

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TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

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LANDSCAPING The site has been populated with deciduous trees that will provide privacy and noise reduction from neighbouring properties and the street. In the winter the trees will lose their leaves allowing maximum winter sun to penetrate the house; while in summer they will provide shade (especially to the northern face) and act to cool and slow down winds entering the house. Pergolas on the northern and westerns sides of the house have been planted with deciduous vines to the same effect. A small wetland with a pond and native reeds (fed by rainwater from the tank) has been created as a place for the grandchildren to play, and also as an eco reserve. Planting across the site also helps reduce mud and soil erosion, as the site experiences substantial rain during winter. Overall the garden is naturally regenerative and robust, requiring little upkeep, ideal for the elderly couple.

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LEGEND: Winter wind SCALE: 1:200 @A3

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Sewerage Electricity Gas Telecom Water

Solar panel Concrete driveway Gravel flowerbed

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ORIENTATION The house has been oriented 20O east of north to maximise solar heat gain from the north in the living spaces, while shielding the sleeping and service spaces to the east and south. An angle of 20O east allows the sun to directly heat key internal thermal mass walls while still exposing a significant area of glazing to the north for winter solar heat gain. The house has been placed in the centre of the site to avoid overshadowing form the two double story neighbouring houses. Key shading mechanisms have been placed on the northern and western faces to prevent excess summer sun entering and overheating the house. Strategic placement of windows and doors facilitates cross-ventilation to cool the house in summer.

ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036 SEMESTER 2, 2018

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SERVICES The house is connected to mains water, gas, electricity, land-line, broadband, and sewerage via underground pipes and cables. Sustainable measures, including a rainwater collection tank and solar panels, have also been installed in order to increase the self-sufficiency of the house and lower the Patels’ monthly bills. The house remains connected to the mains in case of a malfunction with either of these systems. This is important because the house will have high use by the grandchildren and, due to their age, Mr and Mrs Patel need the convenience of having water, power, gas etc. available continuously. They also require mains water supply to the kitchen and bathroom sinks. The rainwater tank will collect runoff from the roof and redirect it for use in the garden, laundry and bathrooms. Solar panels on the roof will be used to supply power for lighting and appliances.

REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058

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CLIMATE Wind: Warm northerly winter winds and cool southerly summer breezes prevail in Melbourne. These can be captured and utilised for cross-ventilation to naturally cool the house. Rain: Melbourne experiences an average yearly rainfall of 500ml. Water captured from the roof area can be stored and used to supply the garden, bathrooms and laundry especially during the dry summer months. Soil erosion from the water flow is prevented by planting. Temperature: Melbourne is characterised by hot dry summers (average high 26oC) and cold wet winters (average low 8oC). High quality insulation and thermal mass heating solutions will be ideal to maintain a stable internal environment for the Patels. Sun: Summer solstice 76O, winter solstice 29O. Horizontal louvres on the north face will be angled specifically to counter this. Ample shading required between 120O east and west (bounds of summer sunrise and sunset).

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PASSIVE DESIGN STRATEGIES Passive thermal design strategies have been integrated into the planning of the Patels’ house. In order for the house to have minimal environmental impact cross-ventilation, seasonal solar gain, and thermal mass principles have been applied. These take advantage of natural (and free) heating and cooling resources, therefore lowering the environmental impact the house will have, as well as lowering the Patels’ monthly energy bills. Mr and Mrs Patel are entering retirement so money is of concern to them. It is important that the house use minimal energy to run services (especially air-conditioning) as it regularly be incurring a substantial daytime load (Mr and Mrs Patel babysit their fourteen grandchildren on weekdays).

Winter: The low winter sun passes through the angled louvres and shines directly through the large window into the living space. It warms the concrete slab which acts as a thermal mass and releases this heat slowly through the night as temperatures drop, keeping the internal temperature stable. Heating is especially important for the Patels and this passive method proves effective.

Summer: Thermal mass of the Earth cools the concrete slab on ground, which in turn reduces the internal air temperature. As this air heats up it rises and is picked up and carried out by cross-ventilation breezes. Summer sun is blocked from entering the building by the pergola which acts as an eave. The vines filter some light through but block most of the unwanted heat.

SOLAR Sunlight can be captured and used (in conjunction with thermal mass) as a highly effective and free source of heating. Sunlight penetrates the house through the windows, admitting both light and heat. A well insulated building envelope will retain this heat, keeping the house warm. Materials with high thermal mass will also retain solar heat and release it slowly and the ambient temperature changes, maintaining a consistent temperature inside the house. By positioning large windows and living spaces to the north of the plan, maximum sunlight can be captured and utilised in key living and daytime use spaces. For the elderly Patels, sunlit living spaces are especially important as warm and cheery spaces. On plan, fewer and smaller windows have been located on the east and west faces to admit light (but not heat) to the bedrooms, and only openings required for cross-ventilation on the south. SHADING Shading mechanisms, eaves and pergolas, are necessary to block excessive and unwanted sun during summer, especially on the north, east and west faces. Eaves overhang (1200mm on the north, 700mm to the west, and 500mm to the east) cast shadow on the windows and block sun rays from high summer sun angles (76O) while admitting it from low winter angles (29O). Pergolas planted with deciduous vines and the surrounding vegetation also act to reduce sunlight during summer and admit it during winter when the plants lose their leaves. As well as being planted, the pergolas are constructed with fixed angled planks that act as louvres, assisting to block summer sun while the vines grow. VENTILATION Cooling summer breezes prevail from the south in Melbourne. To capture these breezes and use them as a natural cooling mechanism sliding doors and louvred windows have been located in the north and south walls creating openings in the building envelope and a passage for the breezes to travel through. Air flow through the house acts as an evaporative cooling system, flushing the building of warm air. Ceiling fans have been located in key positions in the main bedroom, and near the kitchen. These aid cooling by pushing warm air down from the ceiling so that it can be carried out on the cross-ventilation currents, or directed and expelled through other windows. The water mass of the pond located north of the main bedroom acts to cool hot northerly winds that ventilate the space. Similarly, the abundant surrounding vegetation also acts to further cool (and slow down) winds entering the house.

REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058

ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036

TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

SEMESTER 2, 2018

LEGEND:

SCALE: 1:100 @A3

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Thermally cooled air Cross-ventilation

Air warmed by sunlight Thermally heated air

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MATERIALS AND CONSTRUCTION ROOF The roof is a continuous attic construction using standard trusses. This configuration opens up attic space for services and creates a pitched roof for mounting PV and solar hot water panels, as the slope falls towards the north. The attic space is well insulated using batts both in between the rafters and purlins. See “Insulation” below. Roof is to be clad in light coloured corrugated Colourbond to aid water drainage and reflect harsh summer sun.

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WALLS External walls are to be a brick cavity construction. External and internal facing bricks (standard dimensions) provide thermal mass and are insulated using 112mm extruded polystyrene, which has a R-value of 4. Internal walls are standard plasterboard stud walls, also insulated with R4 extruded polystyrene. See section to left.

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INSULATION AND SEALING Walls are insulated with R4 extruded polystyrene. The slab is insulated as per diagram below. The roof/attic is insulated using Bradford Gold High Performance 290mm insulation batts. These have an amazing R-value of 7!!! As most heat loss from the building envelope occurs through he roof it is a worthwhile to invest in top quality insulation. Although this product is quite expensive, Mr and Mrs Patel are willing to handle the high capital cost for the saving it will yield in the long run.

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FLOOR The Patels’ house will be based on a concrete slab on ground floor construction system. This provides good insulation from the Earth and acts as a thermal mass in the north facing living rooms. The slab is fully insulated using 120mm EPS Expol ThermaSlab H Grade Concrete Floor Insulation, which has a R-value of 3.3. The insulation is placed above the levelling sand but below the concrete (as shown to left). This configuration still allows the slab to act as a thermal mass for passive heating and cooling. Floor finishes include timber, tiles and polished concrete. Timber in the bedrooms creates a warmer surface, tiles in the bathroom are resistant to water damage and are easy to clean, likewise, polished concrete in the main high traffic areas is both hard-wearing and easy to maintain. These finishes are ideal for the Patels who have limited capacity to do a lot of cleaning, in addition to the fact that their house takes a significant load imposed by the fourteen grandchildren. Image: http://www.expol.co.nz/underfloor-insulation/concrete-floor-insulation/expol-thermaslabvh-grade/ WINDOW SCHEDULE All windows in Mr and Mrs Patels home have argon fill, low emissivity, high solar gain double glazing. They are framed using timber. Double glazing and timber frames are used for their desirable thermal properties. The argon filled “air gap” between the two panes of glass reduces heat loss across the temperature differential between inside and outside. Likewise, timber has similar insulating properties. Louvre openings are used throughout. This allows for cross-ventilation to occur while not compromising the building’s security, especially at night. Sliding doors opening from the kitchen and living spaces (and the swing front door in the dining space) are flanked by narrow louvred windows as well, maximising the amount of cross-ventilation and taking advantage of existing breaks in the building envelope. High solar gain glazing on all windows allows maximum heat to enter the house enabling passive winter heating to occur. This is especially important for the elderly Patels. Image: https://www.windowsgeelong.com.au/products/timber-windows/timber-louvre-windows

REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058

ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036

TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

SEMESTER 2, 2018

LEGEND:

SCALE: 1:100 @A3

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Type: Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Louvre Sliding Swing Sliding

Dimensions: 500x2000 500x2000 350x2000 500x2000 500x2000 1000x600 1000x600 750x1500 1000x1500 1000x1500 750x1500 800x2000 1700x1200 1900x1200 2100x2000 900x2000 1200x2000

Orientation: NNE NNE NNE NNE NNE ESE ESE ESE SSW SSW WNW SSW WNW WNW NNE NNE SSW

Location: Living Living Dining Bedroom Bedroom Bathroom Bathroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Kitchen Kitchen Living Living Dining Kitchen

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Glazing: DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG DG Argon Fill Low-E High SG

Frame: Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber Timber

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ELECTRICAL AND TELECOM SMOKE ALARMS AND EXTRACTOR FANS As per standard practice, smoke alarms have been strategically placed in proximity to the kitchen and passage so as to wake sleeping occupants in the event of a fire. An exhaust fan has been installed in the kitchen above the stove to extract gases from gas and cooking. Exhaust fans have also been placed in the bathrooms to minimise moisture build up in these wet areas which can lead to mould and damage to the internal plasterboard.

Type: LED downlight LED downlight LED downlight LED downlight Heat lamp Heat lamp LED downlight LED downlight

Room: Kitchen/living/dining Bedroom 1 Bedroom 2 Bedroom 3 Bathroom 1 Bathroom 2 Laundry Passage

Area: 49m2 10m2 9m2 9m2 5m2 5m2 4m2 5m2 96m2

Number of downlights: 25 5 5 5 1 1 2 3 47

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LIGHTING Based on the required 5W/m2 of lighting required for residential indoors, 10W downlights have been installed throughout the house. Based on room area, one 10W downlight can supply 2m2. 10W (900lm) LED downlights (warm white) have been used throughout. These have a lifetime of 50000 hours. Additional task lighting, such as bedside lamps, as well as heat lamps in the bathrooms have also been installed. Bathroom heat lamps include a moisture extractor fan (see image). Additional internal lighting is provided by sunlight and windows. Lamp: https://woodenhomefurniture.com/modern-wood-table-lamps/ lamp Downlights: https://www.duglighting.com/products/10-pack-x-10w-led-downlight-ce-dimmable-90mm-cutoutcool-white-abutted-covered?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=googlepla&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI3uaz2_2O3QIViwYqCh1evAAsEAQYAyABEgLhFfD_BwE Bathroom heat lamps and exhaust: http://www.nulighting.com.au/garrison-2-high-airflow-bathroom-heat-lamp-and-exhaust-fan-ventair.html

Wattage: 250W 50W 50W 50W 375W + 50W halogen centre 375W + 50W halogen centre 20W 30W 1300W

SOLAR POWER The Patels have opted to install a small solar PV system in their home to assist with reducing their energy bills. Eight 250W polycrystalline panels have been mounted on the north facing roof at an angle of 37o to optimise sunlight exposure throughout the year. The PV panels, along with an AC/DC inverter and storage battery constitute a 2KW system. Although the Patels host their 14 grandchildren during the day on weekdays, their house actually has relatively low energy consumption (as all the services would run even if the grandchildren were not around because, as Mr and Mrs Patel are retired, they spend their time at home. In addition, they do not need to do the children’s laundry or bath them etc.). Any additional energy requirements will be sourced from the main grid, which has been connected as a backup system and for use at night during the winter months when sunlight harvesting is limited. The solar PV system will provide power for the lighting and other appliances; gas will be used for other requirements such as heating, cooking and hot water. Diagram: http://www.windandsun.co.uk/information/types-of-system/gridconnect-system-with-battery-storage.aspx#.W4dFH-gzZ3g Image: https://www.gumtree.co.za/a-other-electronics/ northgate/original-255w-solar-panels-poly-at-very-cheapprice/1002268451100911008086909

REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058 TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

LEGEND:

ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036 SEMESTER 2, 2018

SCALE: 1:100 @A3

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WATER AND GAS SUPPLY Mr and Mrs Patel’s house is connected to mains gas and water. They do, however, have other systems in place to complement and subsidize the amount of resources they draw from the grid. They have installed an on-site rainwater collection and filtration system which will allow them to harvest rainwater from the roof of their house and store this for use in the bathrooms and laundry. This decreases will decrease both their monthly water bills as well as their impact on the environment both of which are important to the couple. As a general household tactic, gas has been preferred over electricity. Gas appliances are cheaper to run and obviously work even if there is a power outage. In the case of hot water, cooking and heating, it is especially important to the Patels that they have an uninterrupted supply. Where electricity is required, the Patels have installed solar PV panels as an environmental solution.

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RAINWATER COLLECTION AND DISTRIBUTION Mr and Mrs Patel have opted to collect rainwater from the roof of their home, and use this for the showers and in the laundry. Their total roof area is 115m2 which, given Melbourne’s average rainfall of 400ml a year, gives them the potential to harvest up to 46000L of water! Water will drain form the roof into the guttering system which runs the perimeter of the house, into a first flush filtering system, then into the tank. Mr and Mrs Patel have opted for a 5000L tank which will provide enough water storage for the amount of rain collected per day for use in parts of the house. The storage tank is drained to the legal point of discharge and is connected to the mains water as well, in case of drought. Before use, the water is pumped through a cartridge filter to remove any fine contaminants not captured by the gutter guards or first flush. For health reasons, tank water will not be used in the sinks, all potable water will be sourced from the mains. The hydronic heating system will likewise require mains water. Filtered tank water can be fed to showers and mixed with hot water for use. Once tank water has been used it will be recycled as grey water and used for flushing the toilets and to feed the outdoor pond, after which it will be drained out as sewerage (see page 6 WATER RECYCLING AND DRAINAGE).

HOT WATER SYSTEM A Rinnai 20 continuous flow hot water system will be installed to provide instant hot water for use in the kitchens and bathrooms. This system operates using gas and can provide up to 24 litres of hot water per minute. Continuous flow hot water systems are also more reliable than those with storage tanks, as with these there is the risk of running out of hot water. The fourteen grandchildren who spend the day at the Patels’ house will naturally increase the daily household water consumption and it is therefore important that adequate hot water be available. A continuous flow system also ensures that the Patels are not wasting money and resources heating water when it is not needed, for example on the weekends when the grandchildren are not around. The heating unit requires a water inlet (cold) and outlet (hot) and a gas supply to fuel the burner. Diagram: http://www.tomlinsonplumbing.com.au/ continuous-flow-hot-water-units-systems-geelongtorquay-anglesea-barwon-heads-ocean-grove-surfcoast-bellarine/

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GAS Mrs Patel like to cook with gas. Gas stoves are more effective and accurate than electrical ones, and will also still work if there is a power outage. The house is therefore connected to mains gas which is used in the kitchen, for the hydronic heating system (see HEATING), and for the hot water system. Standard gas systems are reliable, efficient and have low running costs, which is important to the retired couple.

REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058 TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

LEGEND:

ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036 SEMESTER 2, 2018

Connection Pipe under/over

SCALE: 1:100 @A3

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WATER RECYCLING AND DRAINAGE Both water harvesting and recycling take place on Mr and Mrs Patel’s property. Rainwater collected from the roof drains into a storage tank and is then directed to supply the laundry and showers. Grey water drains from these locations and is then circulated through a filter and cleaned naturally by being cycled through the pond system in the garden. This has been planted with rushes and reeds to this effect. The grey water can also be used to irrigate the garden. The only limitation with this system lies in the types of soaps and detergents used in the bathrooms and laundry. These will need to be bio-compatible, free of boron and contain minimal chlorine and salts so as not to kill the plants. Besides its functional aspect, this pond/wetland area provides outdoor space for the Patels’ grandchildren to play! Once water has been filtered through the pond it is directed back to the bathrooms to be used for flushing the toilets. Once it has been used here it becomes black-water, and is drained from the property via the sewerage system. Using the same freely sourced volume of water multiple times allows the Patels to significantly reduce their monthly water bills and maintain a positive environmental attitude towards their lifestyle by reducing their overall water consumption. LPD

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WATER RECYCLING Rainwater is collected from roof drainage in the tank; which is backed up by the mains water. Tank water is then pumped and filtered to laundry and showers. Drainage from laundry and showers constitutes grey-water, which is filtered through the garden pond system and then used for flushing toilets. From the toilets it drains from the property as black-water (sewerage).

REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058

ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036

TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

SEMESTER 2, 2018

LEGEND:

SCALE: 1:100 @A3

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HEATING

HYDRONIC PANELS Different sized panels have been used in different areas of the house. In the main kitchen/living/dining space DeLonghi Type 22 Double hydronic panels have been used. Three of these (each sized 1000x600x100) have an output of 2.25KW of heating, constituting the 6KW needed to heat this large area. Each bedroom is fitted with one Type 22 600x600x100 panel placed under a window (to prevent condensation) where possible, or against an interior thermal mass wall. These panels have an output of 1.2KW of heating, appropriate for the room area. In the laundry and bathrooms small 400x400x60 DeLonghi Type 11 Single panels have been used. These have an output of 0.3KW. The panels work by radiating heat that is supplied in the form of hot water, which is circulated through a maze of tubes and then drained as it cools. The water that runs through the panels will be heated using the instantaneous gas hot water system. Maximum heating KW capacity of the hydronic panels operate assuming a temperature differential of 60OC (80OC water with the room temperature being 20OC). Temperature output can be controlled from each individual panel using the associated thermostat. Individual panels can also be turned on or off, depending on whether the room needs to be heated at a certain time or not. This allows the Patels to effectively zone their house, as they requested in their brief. Image: http://www.callmercury.com.au/hydronic-heating-products-panels-steel/

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Effective heating is paramount in the design for Mr and Mrs Patel’s new house. Not only do they struggle through Melbourne’s cold winters, being originally from tropical Mumbai, but, being elderly, the couple often become sick. They therefore require a very good heating system for their new home. Alongside passive design strategies including the use of thermal mass and high quality insulation, an active heating system has also been installed. A hydronic panel heating system warms rooms within the home to this effect. For the elderly Patels, it is not just a matter of maintaining ambient air temperature above 22oC to constitute “heating”. Although ambient air temperatures must remain raised to maintain biological comfort levels, it is also important that within rooms there is a physical source of radiant heat, for psychological comfort. Another very important aspect of Mr and Mrs Patel’s design brief was the ability to be able to zone rooms. This is important because, during the day, the house is occupied by themselves AND their fourteen grandchildren; however, in the evenings and on weekends just Mr and Mrs Patel are at the house, and so need the ability to be able to select which areas to heat at different times of the day and week. A hydronic panel system allows them this flexibility, using the hot water system to run hot water through panels located in specific rooms, which are individually controlled by “on” and “off” knobs as well as thermostats.

INTEGRATION OF ACTIVE AND PASSIVE HEATING SYSTEMS Active and passive system scan work together. In the Patels’ house, hydronic panels and thermal mass constitute the heating mechanisms. In the living room and dining room in particular, these systems work together. Sunlight is allowed to enter this space and it warms the concrete slab and double brick thermal mass wall. Heat gains during the day are released at night. In addition to sunlight, positioning the radiator panels on the thermal mass walls also provides additional heat gains. Warm air radiates from the panels warming both the air and wall. This additional heat is also released at night, maintaining a more stable internal temperature. The slab and walls are also well insulated and sealed, reducing temperature loss across thermal bridges as well.

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ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036

TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

SEMESTER 2, 2018

LEGEND:

SCALE: 1:100 @A3

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REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058

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COOLING INTEGRATION OF ACTIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING SYSTEMS Although the design for the Patels’ house has focused more on heating, as this is their major need, several cooling strategies have also been incorporated into the design. Alongside the passive strategy of cross-ventilation, ceiling fans, night purging and a small air conditioner have also been implemented to help keep the house cool. In extreme heat, the AC unit can be switched on to blow icy air into the main living space (requiring the most amount of cooling at 350MJ). With the windows shut to prevent this cool air being blown out the window, the ceiling fans can help to circulate it and cool the space. This could also actively be done with natural cross-ventilation. AC AC

CEILING FANS Ceiling fans have been placed in order to circulate air movement, by pushing warm air down from the ceiling where it can be cooled and flushed from the building. Fans also create an evaporative cooling effect without the need for additional resource heavy equipment. Image: https://www.brilliantlighting.com.au/products/air-movement/ceiling-fans/atrium/

THERMAL MASS AND NIGHT PURGING As thermal mass can be used to store heat, it can also be used to transfer cool air by conduction, particularly through the floor and contact with the Earth. During the day warm air builds up in the building and, by simply leaving the louvered windows open at night, this hot air can be flushed from the building creating a cooling effect. Similarly, thermal mass will re-radiate its stored heat energy during the night, also creating a cooling effect. Diagram: https://knowledge.autodesk.com/search-result/caas/simplecontent/content/night-purge-ventilation.html

AIR CONDITIONING Typically thought not to be the best solution to cooling problems, the Patels have agreed to install a small split system air conditioner in their main living space. This they plan to use only during the hottest week of summer in mid January. As mentioned in their client profile, although they are used to the heat and prefer being warm to cold, they do still require base comfort levels to be maintained throughout the year. Their Toshiba Single Split 2KW air conditioning unit will assist with this during periods of extreme heat. Image: https://www.jimsheatingcooling.com.au/toshiba-wall-split-system-air-conditioning/

REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058

ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036

TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

SEMESTER 2, 2018

LEGEND:

SCALE: 1:100 @A3

Ceiling fan

AC

Air conditioning outside unit

Connection pipes

Power supply

AC

Air conditioning indoor unit

Cross-ventilation


DESIGN FOR RESILIENCE

Mr and Mrs Patel have started to develop health problems during heat waves in their current house. They have learnt that the occurrence of heat waves will increase in the future and they have become deeply worried about their health. They would like some suggestion for ways to keep their house cool and comfortable during a heatwave. INTERVENTIONS

AREAS OF WEAKNESS

THERMAL MASS 1. Internal thermal mass wall can be removed to alleviate any unnecessary heat transfer to the main bedroom. 2. The water tank can be buried to keep the water inside it cool, this water can then be pumped through the walls of the bedroom to ensure a comfortable sleeping space for the elderly Patels. This will act, in some ways, like a vertical hydronic slab cooling system. In the event of a water shortage, the pond water could also be used to this effect. 3. It may also be worthwhile to research how the extruded polystyrene insulation will respond to extreme heat, and in the worst case, bushfires...

REBECCA ANDRÉ 920058

LEGEND:

ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS ABPL20036

Circulated tank water

Area for solution Vegetation

TUTOR: HOLLY TEPPER (T08)

SEMESTER 2, 2018

SCALE: NTS

Low SHGC glazing

WINDOWS AND SHADING 1. Windows to all be fitted with awnings, which will block 90%+ of sunlight. This will reduce the amount of sunlight (and thereby heat) allowed to enter the building. 2. Glazing on all non-critical solar heat gain windows (on the south, east and west faces) to be changed to have low SHGC glazing. This will prevent unnecessary heat from entering the bedrooms and kitchen. 3. Non-critical cross-ventilation windows to be altered. Could be resized or removed entirely. 4. All external walls (but especially the northern face) can be more heavily shaded with deciduous plants. These must vary in height so as to shield all areas of the wall at all times of the day. More extensive garden planting will reduce the thermal mass of the house’s surroundings as well as reducing the urban heat island effect. Image: https://www.blindsonthenet.com.au/view_ product/auto-spring-awning-in-solarview-sunscreen/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI69XjmNmc3QIVymkqCh1_lA_3EAQYBSABEgIVQPD_BwE Image: https://www.australianoutdoorliving.com. au/amazing-australian-native-garden-designs

Awnings over windows


ENERGY ASSESSMENT Project Information

Walls

Mode

New home

Ty pe

Climate

21 Melbourne RO

Brick Cavity

4.0

135.3

Site Exposure

Suburban

Internal Plasterboard Stud Wall

4.0

69.6

Client Name

Mr & Mrs Patel

Rated Address

4 Nullarbor Place, Caroline Springs

Accredited Rater

Rebecca André

Date

3 September 2018

Type

Insulation

CSOG: Slab on Ground

M ode

Energy (M J/ m2)

Total

29.1

Heating

25.6

Cooling

3.4

Ventilation

3.3

Areas

Insula tion

10.4

Garage Area

0.0 (garage fully detached)

A rea (m2)

7.0

95.3

Ty pe

Unconditioned Room Area

95.3

Windows

Size (m2) 84.9

)

2

Roof/Ceiling Cont: Attic - Continuous

Net Conditioned Floor Area (NCFA)

Area (m

encl

Ty pe

A rea

A rea (m2)

Floors

Energy Usage

U-value

TIM-006-03 W Timber B DG Argon Fill High Solar Gain Low - E Clear

Zones Zone

Insula tion

SHGC

2.0

0.31

A rea (m2) 25.47

Window Directions Area (m 2)

Heating (MJ/m2)

Total Heating (MJ)

Cooling (MJ/m2)

Total Cooling (MJ)

Kitchen/Dining/ Living

46.8

12.5

586.5

7.5

350.3

Bedroom 1

9.6

67.6

651.6

0.2

1.9

Bedroom 2

10.1

59.7

605.5

0.2

1.6

Bedroom 3

9.2

47

434.5

0.0

0.0

WC

NA

Laundry

3.9

94.5

367.3

0.0

0.0

Ensuite

4.8

NA (undonditioned)

Bathroom

5.7

NA (unconditioned)

Hallway

5.1

29.4

Student Name: Rebecca André

151.1

Direction ESE

Area (m2) 2.3

Direction

Area (m 2)

Direction

Area (m 2)

Direction

Area (m 2)

SSW

7.0

WNW

5.4

NNE

10.7

Roof/Ceiling Penetration Type

Location

Quantity

Sealed

Exhaust fan

Kitchen

1

Y

Exhaust fan

Bathroom

2

Y

2.1

Student Number: 920058

Final Star Rating: 8.9 Stars

Area (m2)

Profile for Rebecca André

Environmental Building Systems Residential Exercise  

Environmental Building Systems Residential Exercise  

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