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Go from strength to strength Whether you’re a quick thinker, a good talker or a creative spark, it’s your individual strengths we’re interested in, not just what you’re studying. People who do what they’re naturally good at in their careers go further, faster, and have a more enjoyable time getting there. If you want to go from strength to strength, working in a team that helps our clients solve some of the most interesting challenges in business, then get in touch. We have graduate and undergraduate opportunities available now in Assurance, Tax, Corporate Finance and Advisory. Find out more at www.ey.com/uk/careers

© Ernst & Young 2011. Ernst & Young is an equal opportunities employer and welcomes applications from all sections of the community. The UK firm Ernst & Young LLP is a limited liability partnership and a member firm of Ernst & Young Global Limited.


CONTENTS | WHAT’S INSIDE?

CONTENTS

08

04 06 08

12 14 15

16 17

23

18 20

23 24

28

WHERE DO GRADUATES GO

//AND HOW MUCH DO THEY MAKE WHEN THEY GET THE 5.5%

16%

7%

1%

CAN

BEL LUX

ESP CHE

0.1%

18

2.9%

ITA

CHN

TUR

TUN

CYP

GHA

TGO

BFA

EGY

NER

SDN

CAF

CMR GAB

AGO

COG

UGA

MLI

DZA LBY

SLE CIV LBR

BRA ZIL

ROM BGR

NGA

GIN

ERI

RWA

BDI

SOM KEN

A

NAM ZWE BWA

ZAF

2.9% 1.9%

2.9%

1.9%

MDG

MWI

ZMB

MOZ

COD TZA

1.3%

5%

1.6%

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£32,352.61

H

ETH

SWZ

UK STUDENTS ABROAD AFTER GRADUATION (%)

HUN

TDC

GNB

£32,352.61

CZE SVK

IND

MAR ESH SEN

£25,000.00

AUT

MLT

MRT

£2,417.58 £176.65

DEN

NED

FRA DEU

MEX

£29,200.06

FIN

GBR

IRL

POL

USA

£31,151.57

1.1%

3.8%

NOR SWE

9.2%

USA

5.1%

PRT

BY COUNTRY, THE PERCENTAGE OF UK GRADUATES EACH YEAR EITHER STUDYING OR WORKING ABROAD

34

24

AVERAGE GRADUATE SALARY BY COUNTRY AND AVERAGE SALARY PER (PA) COUNTRY

32

17%

Editorial News The Interview Comedian Josie Long fights for the Arts All the fun of the fair The lighter side of careers fairs Case studies Careers fairs What recruiters are thinking Be in the know Study abroad special Let us show you the way See more overseas Where to go and what to take Where do graduates go? Our map might surprise you Things you just can’t do in the UK The courses that are off the beaten track Further reading James Caan, microchallenges and starting a social enterprise How does a postgraduate think differently And where it will take them The Spring Project Spring Project training Training courses with a difference TV presenter, flight attendant, hypnotist, what’s next for you? Directory Where the career fairs will be in town this summer

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£32,352.61

£26,004.31

£21,585.16

£389.98 £989.38

£13,488.48

£10,448.21

£1,436.91

£4,000.00 £312.00 £1,872.78 £1,206.15 £260.46


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Editorial | welcome

EDITOR’S LETTER Editorial Publisher: Johnny Rich Editor: Jon Madge Sub-editor: Jen Clark Writer-Researchers: Terri Sturman, Shereen Ali, Jessica Harvey

Sales Andrea Moretti

Marketing and Distribution Manager James Munday

GRAPHIC DESIGN Luke Merryweather

Client Services Manager Marie Tasle

FOUNDER

WHAT’S A DEGREE WORTH? It’s an oldie but a goodie nonetheless, especially as it’s been brought into question recently. Funding cuts to institutions like the Arts Council don’t just affect those considering postgraduate study. When they come from the government, as part of an exercise to cut unnecessary national spending, they give employers the message that arts degrees are less valuable than other degrees. All of which is pretty depressing if you just spent three years working to get one. Blogging on the website ‘creative society’, Kit Friend, chair of culture for the Conservative Party’s Bow Group, argued that arts degrees aren’t less useful but they have to be treated as a business commodity, telling arts graduates to give up the attitude of “’I know it’s not a career but I love doing it’. This used to be an acceptable approach but maybe that attitude is dying: RIP the casual creative, all hail the arts professional.” Josie Long, this issue’s guest interviewee (P.8), sees it differently. She’s spoken out in defence of arts degrees for their own sake. Her argument is that getting the degree improves your skill set and more importantly makes you a better person. And that should be good enough for society and for employers. It’s not all doom, gloom and arguing the toss, however. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport recently saw the last round of high profile Arts organisation bidding to give Arts graduates opportunities. On a local scale, schemes like the Spring Project (P.28) are redefining the way graduates are recruited. Now is certainly a time of rapid change for graduates but one thing can always be relied on, the next issue of Real World is here. Jon, Editor jon@realworldmagazine.com

Darius Norell

Real World 22-26 Albert Embankment, London SE1 7TJ Tel: 020 7735 4900 info@realworldmagazine.com www.realworldmagazine.com Copyright © 2011 Cherry Publishing. No part of this publication may be reproduced or stored in a retrieval system without the written permission of the publisher. We cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs or for material lost or damaged in the post. The views in this publication or on our website are not necessarily those held by the publisher.

WWW.REALWORLDMAGAZINE.COM Real World doesn’t end here, we’ve got more news, advice and exciting competitions on our website.

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Make a life, not just a living At Real World we believe you should have a job that you want to get out of bed for. You should be doing something that’s going to inspire you, reward you and challenge you for the next 50 years. We help you do what you enjoy and enjoy what you do. We want to be the ones to tell you about the job opportunity that’ll change your life. And we want to help you to get that job and then succeed without limits. Real World is more than just a magazine. We’re leaders in graduate employment research. We train people how to raise their game. Everything we do is about helping you understand your career, kick-starting it and developing it. After all, apart from sleeping, you’ll spend more time working than doing anything else in your life. We want you to make a good living, but we also want you to make a good life in the process. No sugar-coating and no dry job jargon – Real World tells it like it is. Just the best facts, advice and opportunities.


Section | topic

SUMMER VIRTUAL CAREERS FAIR JULY 2011

The University of Brighton and the University of Sussex are holding a Joint Virtual Careers Fair for our graduating students this summer. The fair is also open to students and graduates from other universities. This virtual (online only) fair will be a fantastic opportunity for you to access a wide range of local, regional and national employers who are seeking to recruit you. The Fair will open on 11 July and a list of exhibitors will go live on this day. Bookings taken so far include Accenture Technology Solutions, American Express, Bank of England, GCHQ (Government Communications Head Quarters), FDM Group, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Majestic Wine Warehouse, Santander and The College of Law. The Fair will run for 3 weeks (until 31 July), you will be able to visit at any time of the day or night, and you don’t have to register any details in order to enter. For further information go to the Events and News section of our website

www.brighton.ac.uk/careers

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news | what’s happening

NEWS

news*advice*strategies

Change of class for 2011 Trends for the ‘class of 2011’ show that university-leavers are changing what they do and where they go, and its painting a different picture of graduates than you might expect. Despite the profession being public damned in recent years, investment banking is now a popular choice again. Interest in these sort of careers is at the expense of public-sector jobs, in which fewer graduates are showing interest than in previous years. These are the findings of the High Fliers UK Graduate Careers Survey 2011. Other noticeable trends are that one in four graduates now say they want to continue studies with a postgraduate degree. Those that are expecting to enter into the world of work have salary expectations of more than £25,000 for their first job.

IN graduates go onto study at postgrad level. Source: High Fliers UK Graduate Careers Survey 2011

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Find the gap Graduates may struggle to find gap year opportunities as demand for gap years dries up and travel companies look elsewhere. This year’s graduates might have very few gap year opportunities because of lack of interest from students trying to escape the new tuition fees. Some gap year travel companies, like Trekforce, the adventure tour company, are now offering shorter trips as a way to combat the impact this will have. Some are expect to be as short as 10 days. Other organisations, like Raleigh International, are expecting post-university travel, which has risen 78 per cent in the last

two years, to carry on growing. Tom Griffiths, founder of gapyear.com observed that “The UK recession seems to be fuelling the ‘Gap Year Travel’ market. Less Graduate jobs combined with high redundancies amongst 18 to 35 year olds has resulted in unusually high traffic figures on experiential travel sites like ours.” Dr. Peter Slowe, founder and Director of Projects Abroad said: “In a climate where graduates in particular face fierce competition in the job market and need every opportunity to stand out, we should be encouraging young people to embrace the idea of gap year travel.”


news| what’s happening

Can you talk for England? Having an extra language under your belt is a CV-bonus, but how about being awarded the title of ‘most multilingual student in Britain’? The competition has been launched by Collins and Livemocha, to find the person who can parler, habla or speak the most languages. Part of the reasoning behind the search is to dispel the belief that we’re just not that good at languages in the UK. Entrants just have to live in the UK and be aged between 16 and 22 but the bar has been set very high by last year’s search for the ‘most multilingual adult in the UK’.

Ray Gillon, one of the two winners of last year’s competition explains why he think graduates can benefit from speaking multiple language. “Languages are a passport which opens many doors and opportunities. I hope that our current government enables our potential talents to spread their wings and bring more business to this country through refined language skills.” The closing date for entries is 1st November 2011, with the winners announced in December. Lucky applicants will be tested on their skills either over skype or in a meet up with one of the competitions judges.

Need a job? Go abroad?

For full info go to realworldmagazine.com/mostmultilingual or collinsmostmultilingual.com

If finding a job is proving difficult then maybe it’s time to pack the suitcase, stick the degree in on top and start searching abroad. If you are considering it, you wouldn’t be alone. Based on a survey of graduates that have left university in the last three years, 36% were considering going abroad to get a better salary. Salary isn’t the only factor that motivates graduates, more than a third were happy to go abroad just to get better opportunities. Sean Howard, vice-president of SHL, the company that conducted the suvey, blamed a lack of opportunities in the UK at the moment. “The UK is failing its graduates,” he said, “UK employment options are bleak.” Europe and North America are the most popular destinations for graduates from the UK, closely followed by Australia. Going abroad might not be such a bad idea, however. A survey by the Council for Industry and Higher Education suggested graduates that do go abroad stand to make more money and be more attractive to large organisations.

Temporary workers, is it a permanent move? More organisations are getting in temp staff as recruiters prepare to change their priorities when it comes to recruiting staff, according to a recent survey. The research, carried out by de Poel, shows that the level of temporary agency workers has risen by more than a fifth since April last year. As well as proving more popular with recruiters, temporary agency workers have seen a 22.5% increase in the number of hours they work since last month. This shift towards a greater reliance on temporary workers reflects the trying economic times. Temporary

workers are more in keeping with the uncertainty about the future that recruiters are suffering from. However, the news comes alongside research by professional consultancy Towers Watson which shows that recruitment priorities are changing. According to the research, two of the three most important factors for recruiters are now acquiring the best talent and a redesign of ‘the employee value proposition’. This means that the most talented graduates have the opportunity to make greater demands of recruiters than they have previously.

www.realworldmagazine.com/news for all the latest graduate news including: • • • •

The future of post-uni gap years Getting your job hunt on TV How going green can put you in the black Finding your next job on facebook

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Section | TOPIC

The INTERVIEW: josie long

STAND-UP AND BE COUNTED IT’S AN ARTS EMERGENCY

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interview | josie long

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JOSIE LONG IS A COMEDIAN, ACTOR AND WRITER. SHE’S BEEN DOING STAND UP SINCE SHE WAS 16 AND IS THE PROUD OWNER OF PERRIER AND IF.COM BEST NEWCOMER AWARDS. DESPITE BEING KNOWN AS ONE OF THE FRIENDLIER COMEDIANS, SHE’S BARED HER TEETH IN HER LATEST ROLE AS DEFENDER OF THE ARTS DEGREE. SHE REVEALS TO US WHY A B.A. ISN’T JUST GOOD FOR THE CV, IT’S GOOD FOR THE SOUL. OSIE TALKS PASSIONATELY ABOUT WHAT UNIVERSITY CAN GIVE YOU, and she doesn’t just mean the piece of paper, “It completely shaped me, it taught me to read and think critically. I feel like it gave me the space to develop as a writer too. I also met loads of bright, funny people and got to write and perform with them all of the time.” Despite stand-up comedy not having a graduate recruitment scheme, she does feel that her time studying gave her the skills to better pursue her career. “It also gave me the confidence to pursue standup without fear or compromise,” she says “There were so many confident people there it made me think ‘why shouldn’t I do what I’d like to do’”. “Yes as I did stand up at 16,” Josie adds, “but I definitely wouldn’t be the same person I am now if I hadn’t gone to uni.” This is undoubtedly part of the reason Josie has gone public in her defence of Arts degrees. Cuts to the Arts Council and other funding bodies, as well as higher fees are scaring some students away from studying Bas, and there’s a worry that that could affect how employers look at graduates who already have them. Josie says she thinks the way people think about Arts degree is changing, “a lot of people now view education as a driver of short term profit, and the skills people want are those that aid this through business and industry.” “Some of the most valuable and dynamic engines of the UK economy, like media, culture and information, are all underpinned by historically strong investment in the arts and humanities, we want to stand up for these subjects and make people realise how important they are in so many ways.” Seeing a degree as solely preparing you for work misses out all the other reasons why you should go to university. “There are so many reasons why,” Josie enthuses. “Society benefits from having highly

educated citizens. Plus, if you go, you have three amazing years of just developing as a person, of finding new things and mixing with new people – you can’t put a price on those things.” Ironically, these are all things that will benefit future employers as well. Although Josie’s reasons for taking pride in your degree are much simpler than that, “anyone who has a talent and passion for any subject should be encouraged to pursue those studies to the highest possible level.” So what does she think graduates should be doing with their degrees? “It’s important to know what you can do with your degree, the different paths you can go down career wise and all of those options – as for what you should be doing with your degree, that’s entirely up to you.” Josie’s never been content with doing things anything other than her way. When the likes of Frankie Boyle and Jimmy Carr were touting their cruel comedy on TV, she took a show called ‘trying is good’ to Edinburgh. This is why she wasn’t content

lottery’ and, hopefully, every month one person will win up to £16,000 paid off of their outstanding debt. That’s important as we think having large debts so young really impacts on your life choices.” Josie, along with fundraiser and her friend Neil Griffiths, decided that now was the time to give Arts graduate and students the support they need. “We’re working really hard right now to be ready for national launch in January 2012, it’s a genuine emergency for higher education in the arts and humanities.” “An Arts degree is not a luxury” is the organisation’s slogan. The arts and humanities are important to every aspect of life and, whilst it not be the main reason for studying an arts degree, that includes employment. “Degrees in the Arts and Humanities provide society with adults who have skills to think critically and communicate sensitively and articulately,” explains Josie, adding, “On top of this you have the fact that BA grads have so many

to moan about Arts grads getting a raw deal and took action, launching Arts Emergency to support them. “We’re a not-for-profit organisation working with talented students from lowerincome backgrounds as they study for arts and humanities degrees,” Josie explains. “We are going to be setting up a ‘graduate

different skills that can be applied to any situation – the fact 43% of the Government Cabinet and 65% of the Shadow Cabinet are arts graduates shows how vital these subjects are.” This is a serious topic but that doesn’t mean Josie’s trademark sense of fun is missing. It’s quite visible in ideas like their

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interview | josie long

play on the old boys network, traditionally only available to Oxbridge, Etonian bankers. “Once we launch officially all arts graduates can join our ‘Alternative Alumni’, which is like our own democratic, creative response to the famous old boys’ network. It’s all about giving people the opportunity to share experience and knowledge.” The organisation hopes to provide mentoring and support to students, particularly from lower-income backgrounds, as well as their ‘graduate lottery’. This isn’t just a great opportunity for graduates to benefit, but also for them to give back as Arts Emergency are looking for graduate speakers to visit schools and talk about the benefits of an arts or humanities degree. CV-conscious graduates might see this as a chance to gain some public speaking experience but it’s also an opportunity to stand up and be counted in defence of the

degree you worked hard to get. Josie is determined to make a stand in support of Arts degrees, and Arts Emergency does just that. But for her it seems to be part of something more integral, the idea that university is the beginning of a process not something that is over in three years. “Don’t compromise about what you’d like to do with your life and don’t make decisions because you are afraid,” is her advice, before adding “You will be ok.” “Also, keep your subject with you for life, you don’t stop learning once you leave University, you are actually better placed to learn more and more and more.”

For more information on Arts Emergency, go to: www.arts-emergency.org Follow them on twitter: @artsemergency

‘Now is a genuine emergency for higher education in the arts and humanities.’

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ON TOUR When she’s not fighting for the arts, Josie can be found on stage being funny. Here’s where you can find her this summer. 13th June - Charity Night at the Bloomsbury Theatre, London thebloomsbury.com/event/run/1554 16th June - Holmfirth Arts Festival holmfirthartsfestival.co.uk/eventdetail/event-14-27.html 22nd July - Tringe Festival get-stuffed.biz/tringe/josie-long-androbin-ince/ 4th - 29th August - Josie will be performing her new show ‘The Future Is Another Place’ at the Pleasance Dome in Edinburgh every day at 7pm. edfringe.com


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GRADUATE RECRUITMENT

www.lattitude.org.uk

„ Over 150 exhibitors with hundreds of graduate jobs plus some postgraduate course places „ Different exhibitors each day – attend both days

15 & 16 June 2011 10.30am–4.00pm

„ Free entry, free careers advice and free fair guide

The Armitage Centre, Manchester

www.manchester.ac.uk/careers/graduatefair Organised by the Careers Service

In association with

Graduates from any university welcome


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Section | TOPIC consultancy | what do they do?

FUNNY STORIES FROM THE OTHER SIDE OF THE CAREERS FAIR TABLE MEETING POTENTIAL EMPLOYERS WITH ONLY ONE MINUTE, YOUR WITS AND A FOLDER FULL OF CVS TO IMPRESS THEM, CAREERS FAIRS ARE A BIG PART OF JOBHUNTING. NOT WANTING TO ADD TO THE PRESSURE, REALWORLD WENT LOOKING FOR THE LIGHTER MOMENTS OF THESE GRADUATE-RECRUITER GET-TOGETHERS.

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careers fairs | the lighter side

Andrew Scherer and Alex Tambly from Inspiring Interns

You do meet some interesting graduates who maybe don’t realise they’re talking to a potential employer and it is worth making a good impression. You do get some who amble up to you and mumble “whatsthisabout?”, which never creates the best impression. There’s also a lot of CVs going around with ridiculous pictures on them, like something taken from a facebook drunken night out or, bizarrely, we get quite a few that don’t look like them. Then you get wondering whether it’s actually their CV. If we’d give one piece of advice to graduates it’s try to show some charisma, dungarees and grunting are probably best left at home.

Aaron is currently recruiting for Lidl UK

Today’s career fair has been good, the graduates have been a hell of a lot better in their preparedness and the research they’ve put into knowing what it is they want to do. The worst approach I’ve ever had from a student was someone who just came from the back to ask me a question. Because Lidl does give some of their senior positions company cars this fella’s question was “Oi mate, what sort of car you got?” which isn’t a great start to a potential employer. I’d say to graduates going to careers fair, prepare some questions, whether they’re specific to an employer or more general and don’t just go over and ask for a job.

Alun Baker is the Founder of WYGU, a careers social network. Steve is the company’s Community Referral Manager Most people we’ve talked to haven’t made a choice about what career they want to do yet, they think they know what they want and we can help confirm that. A lot of people have a perception of what they want to be but don’t actually know what that involves. We’ve had a few people who have been told they should be a lawyer when what they really want to do is to work outdoors. But that’s the thing, what people think they’re good at isn’t necessary what they are good at.

Usha Tyagi is a Consultant with recruitment agency Redman

When we come to these sort of events we’re really just looking for someone who’s confident, who’s genuine about what they want for the future. For us that’s someone who’s interested in a career that’s performance based. My advice would be to look up each company online beforehand, that way you’ll know who everyone is, what they are, what they do. That way when you talk to them it makes more sense.

Jenny Mann is from Delaware North Companies

We’re a catering and hospitality company and we’ve found that most of the students are really good. A lot of them are smartly dressed, in suits, although a few come in late so some seem not bothered but some seem really enthusiastic about getting a job. We had a recruitment fair not so long ago and we had a bowl of sweets on the stand. A group of young men came over and they picked up the bowl, poured all the sweets into a bag and walked off. I’d say probably don’t do that if you want to make an impression on a future employer. Being enthusiastic and interested, on the other hand, will help you. Inspired? Find a full list of careers fairs on P.34

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case studies | careers fairs

Amy O’Sullivan is a Sociology graduate and Lisa O’Garran is studying Journalism and Creative Writing

Emily Lei is studying for a BA in Psyhcology

I like PR because I’m very outspoken and like people, and I don’t like having the same routine, I want to meet new people, get to understand them and learn what to do and what not to do. I also like events and fashion so PR brings that all together, so that’s what I want to do. The careers fair today is pretty informative but there aren’t many recruitment companies here, most of them are recruitment sites social sites to help you. Which is good in a way but I think people who come here might want to find out more about future employers and what it is they want, to get a better understanding of your employability, to know what the future holds and what the employment market is like.

hasn’t been very good. I guess if companies are going to invest money they want full time people because they want to see a return on their investment so maybe they don’t want an intern. Today I brought five copies of my CV and I had to go and print out more and then come back again. Careers fairs are a good opportunity to get CVs out there but they’re also about social networking, where you find out where to go, what to do and how to get there and all that. So do your research really, really early.

Before I came here, for the past three or four months, I’ve been looking online for loads of internships and placement with PR firms, fashions magazines, fashion houses but the response

For more real life graduate case studies go online to realworldmagazine.com/case-studies

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Everyone at the careers fair seemed friendly and people were willing to talk, so it’s been really useful. Our strategy was to suss it all out and only approach people we were really interested in talking to. There are a lot of IT roles and management roles here and I was looking more at the health sector or teaching and a lot of careers fairs haven’t really geared towards that. It’s not really very varied, especially for the creative side of students. They don’t cater for every avenue of students. It’s a good idea to secure a part time job as soon as possible, even something like temping, because it gives that experience employers are looking for. It’s something good to stick on the CV and you can do that while you’re still researching what you’d like to do.


careers fairs | the other side

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Section | TOPIC

d a l o a r i b c a e p y s d u t S Wh e the n the So tough job m a g nex et ah get go rket g t se ead ing ets … v o rou e f a P.1 n t b h p r 7 age e ga oad gh, All . s: me o P.1 abroad n th 8 e Wh

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e P.2 re do 0 gra Thi dua n tes the gs yo go? UK u ju st c an’ t st udy in


study abroad | start your search

All abroad

Thinking of studying abroad? Do your homework first. hile studying overseas does hold a great many attractions, lower fees, prestige, a chance to travel and get qualified and more material for your burgeoning C.V., it is not always an easy thing to do. We’re somewhat spoiled in the UK with our centralised UCAS system and looking abroad at a welter of differing visa regulations, application dates, feescales and support systems can be very daunting and ultimately off-putting. While RealWorld sadly can’t point out a secret centralised application process that only the few know about, we can bring you the best resources to help you make the move abroad.

Where should I study? Deciding where and what to study is a huge deal. How do you find out where offers a good engineering degree, or what courses are taught in Kyoto? With answers to all these problems, and a few more, enters www.topuniversities.com. With a whole host of ranking tables covering individual subjects, geographical regions as well as the bog standard best universities in the world lists, this site is invaluable to make sure you end up with a degree or masters that is respected globally. It also features a very nifty personalised scorecard systemby choosing a mix of what you want to study and where, it’ll give you the top ten universities that meet your requirements. However, it isn’t perfect, and its main downside is that it doesn’t cover every country - those hoping to study in Bolivia or Jamaica, for example, have to look elsewhere. Other rankings tables that might help you pick out where you want to study are the annual rankings published by Times Higher Education: www.timeshighereducation. co.uk/world-university-rankings. Again, these are searchable by subject and region, but only cover the top two hundred universities, so anyone looking to study somewhere more low-key is unlikely to find it listed. A new table published this year claims to rank universities by their reputation (www.timeshighereducation. co.uk/world-university-rankings/2010-2011/ reputation-rankings.html), seen by some as a far more important feature of a degree than the actual teaching received.

Where can I study? Unfortunately, not everyone can get into the world’s best universities, not least because that many subscribers would ensure they weren’t the best universities for long. Geographical, financial and linguistic barriers all exist, as well as personal preferences. It doesn’t matter how many times Harvard tops the league tables, it doesn’t guarantee you’ll like it there. When it comes to helping you figure out some of the more practical sides of choosing where to study, www.findamasters.com does a good job. While you unfortunately can’t search by fees, it does tell you how much each university charges. www.iiepassport.org is also a helpful website, giving you the chance to search by the languages a uni teaches in. By far the best website for those wanting to study within the EU though is www.mastersportal. eu. You can search by country, course, language and price, and it will get you excited about courses you never knew existed in countries you never thought about visiting. Studying in the EU may not seem as exotic, or to offer the same culture change, as heading off to Korea might but it is remarkably simple to do. No extra visas required, no restrictions on working while there and often benefits and loans are transferable.

And for those of you who aren’t entirely digital, there is almost certainly going to be a copy of the invaluable ‘Universities, Scholarships, Awards & Bursaries’ by Brian Heap in your local library. It covers international awards, and has a fantastic indexing system, but the latest edition is a couple of years old, so it’s always worth double checking any information you find. If thumbing pages or sifting the internet for awards to fund your studies isn’t for you, you can always apply for a Career Development Loan. www.Direct.gov.uk has good information available on who’s eligible and how to apply, but don’t forget it is a loan and will need repaying after you qualify. They are open to people studying anywhere in the world, but only if your chosen course is not also offered within the EU. www.Ec.europa. eu also have excellent information for those staying within the EU, from contact details for any governmental departments you might need to country profiles documenting financial aid offered.

How can I study? Here is really where you need the initiative that your CV boats your time abroad gave you. There is no one site to show you all the help that is available to international students. The best advice is to use the websites above to create your own shortlist of where you’d like to go, and then trawl through the individual university websites. They will all have a section for international students, although sometimes well hidden, that will tell you their requirements, both academic and linguistic, whether they offer accommodation, how much they charge and if loans are available. Other good places for information are embassy websites, and any other group the country in question might be a part of. For example, the Association of Commonwealth Universities (www.acu. ac.uk) has information on scholarships available as well as contact information for all participating universities.

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17%

W 5.5%

16%

7%

USA

9.2%

CAN

GBR

3.8%

USA

IRL

FRA D

B

ESP CHE

PRT

MEX

M

SEN GNB

GIN

DZ

MLI

MAR ESH

MRT

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AVERAGE GRADUATE SALARY BY COUNTRY AND AVERAGE SALARY PER (PA) COUNTRY

0.1%

UK STUDENTS ABROAD AFTER GRADUATION (%)

BY COUNTRY, THE PERCENTAGE OF UK GRADUATES EACH YEAR EITHER STUDYING OR WORKING ABROAD

5.1%

2.9%

£31,151.57

£29,200.06

£2,417.58 £176.65

£25,000.00

£32,352.61

£29,200.06

£32,352.61

2.9% 1.9%

£32,352.61

£26,004.31

2.9

£


WHERE DO GRADUATES GO? //AND HOW MUCH DO THEY MAKE WHEN THEY GET THERE? 1%

3.9%

6.4%

FIN

NOR SWE

1.1%

POL

DEN

NED

BEL LUX

DEUCZE

ITA

AUT

SVK

HUN

ROM BGR

CHN

TUR

CYP

IND

TUN

MLT

SDN

CMR

UGA

CAF

ERI

HKG

ETH

SOM COG BDI KEN COD TZA SWZ

NAM ZWE BWA

ZAF

1.9%

£21,585.16

£389.98 £989.38

NZL

1.3%

5%

£13,488.48

AUS

MDG

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MOZ

RWA

MWI

GAB

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TGO

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TDC

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EGY

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JPN

£10,448.21

£1,436.91

1.6%

4.5%

£4,000.00 £312.00 £1,872.78 £1,206.15 £260.46 £403.39 £406.48

1.8%

£29,723.76

£21,904.82


study abroad | widen your horizons

Things you just can’t study in the UK

F at rom th th e de e r gr are ee t s ot yo he u ha rid ve icu to lou pa s, ck w a e ta ba k g ea to st loo ud k y

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“Studying abroad can give you a broader perspective on the world in general,” says Joshua C Irons of the website studyabroad.com, “You’re able to find things outside the classroom that you won’t be able to find inside it.” He’s right, there are loads of reasons to study abroad, you’ll get a further qualification and, if you pick up a foreign language then you’ll be first pick on the list to go on any business class trips to exotic lands after you graduate. But as well as all those good reasons, there’s the simple fact that there are some things that you just can’t study here. RealWorld found out what some of them are.


study abroad | widen your horizons

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Folklore at the University of California (Berkeley)

Acoustics at Penn State University

Oriental Medicine at Kyung Hee University

Level: Masters (MA)

Level: M.Eng, MSc and PhD

Level: Masters and PhD

Length: 2 years (6 to PhD)

Length: 1-5 years

Length: 2 and 3 years

As well as looking at modern aspects of folklore, this programme has elements of Anthropology, Sociology and looks at the various forms folklore can take, a module that is consistently oversubscribed.

The programme mixes a number of different disciplines in the study of acoustics, giving graduates a great chance to specialise in the acoustical field that most interests them.

anthropology.berkeley.edu/programs/ graduate/folklore.php

http://www.acs.psu.edu/

With the ambitious aim of combining eastern and western medicine, the postgraduate courses in Oriental Medicine take a comprehensive look at these two disciplines, including medical nutrition and medical science.

Blacksmithing at Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Rural Sociology at Penn State University

Modern Nordic Architecture (MONARCH) at University of Oulu

Level: Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

Level: MSc and PhD

Level: Masters

Length: 2 years average

Length:

Carbondale’s Metalsmithing courses take in more than just technique. They teach aesthetic values, critical thinking and claim to inspire a ‘commitment to the craft’, which you’d like to think master’s students might already have.

Previous graduates have gone into academia, government and research-based NGOs and the course is tailored towards those kinds of industry. There are four focuses: food, development, demography and natural resources.

This course is taught in English and combines elements of urban planning and design as well as field trips in Finland and Scandinavia. Applications must be accompanied by a portfolio of works.

http://artanddesign.siuc.edu/programs/ metalsmithing.html

http://ruralsociology.aers.psu.edu/

Then there are the courses that reflect the ethos of where they are taught. There’s something quirky, original and fun about an MA in Folklore that makes it seem right at home being taught in California. And where could be more appropriately named than Carbondale for teaching a postgraduate fine arts degree in Blacksmithing?

“Quirky, original, an MA in Folklore just seems Californian”

kyunghee.edu/academics04_01.php

Of courses, some degrees are only taught in one place because they’re rather niche. Everyone that’s been to uni has encountered at least one ‘eccentric’ lecturer, and sometimes they can turn their eccentricities into courses. The fun thing about studying in these programmes is that as, because they’re rare, you can quite quickly become a world expert in your subject. One example of this is the graduate programme in Acoustics at Penn State University. Lots of engineering and physics programmes include acoustics modules and specialisations but Penn State has an entire graduate programme, and lots of cool equipment, dedicated to the subject. Penn State has more than its fair share of these specialist courses, Rural Sociology is another that they have an entire graduate programme for.

Length: 3 years

webcgi.oulu.fi/ark/content.php?page=28

Some courses are always going to be best taught in a particular country. You don’t have to be in Norway or Finland to study Nordic Architecture, for example, but it’s quite likely to help. For one thing, you’d have more than just books to look at for examples. Likewise, Kyung Hee University in Korea is probably one of the better places to study Oriental Medicine.

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study abroad | widen your horizons

Graduate programme in Science Writing at MIT Length: 1 year The graduate programme mixes introductory scientific study, with the opportunity to specialise, with writing technique and style. The course ends in a 10,000 to 12,000-word thesis on subject chosen by the student. http://web.mit.edu/sciwrite/

Mining Engineering at Melbourne University and the University of New South Wales Level: Master of Mining Engineering Length: 2 years full time, also available part time This course is available at a number of universities in Australia. They’re principally vocational courses to set the students up for all the good mining-related careers. You can specialise in things like ventilation, strata

“Gaining unique specialisms in another country can turbo-charge your career prospects”

control and geomechanics. Gaining unique specialisms in another country can turbo charge your career prospects. If there’s a job you want to do and having a degree has made you eligible to do it, then having a postgraduate degree, and one that gives you rare skills that are directly relevant, will put you so far ahead of the competition you’ll be interviewing them. One example of this is MIT, the US University. They offer a worldleading graduate programme in Science Writing, teaching journalists and other graduate writers how to write for scientific publications. This is a really sought after skill as being able to understand cutting edge physics and having a way with words aren’t always complimentary skills.

www.eng.unimelb.edu.au/Postgrad/ postProf/grad_mme.html

Wildlife and Wildlands Conservation at Brigham Young University Level: MSc Length: 2 years The emphasis of this course is on developing critical thinking and management skills, as well as applying the scientific method to the topics of ecology and conservation. Handily they teach you to write essays in the style of academic journals and encourage you to submit them for publication. www.byu.edu/gradstudies/catalog/ department.php?program=20

Studying abroad also gives you the chance to benefit from the way different nationalities do things differently. That’s not to say you can do a PhD in laying in the sun in the Bahamas but things like Mining and Wildlands Conservation, which are uncommon enough professions here, are on offer as postgraduate degrees with great career prospects in other countries.

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Sacred Music at Luther Seminary Level: Master of Sacred Music (MSM) Length: 1 year The course covers everything you’d expect: historical, biblical and musical studies with an opportunity to elect a major in either organ music or conducting. Entry to the course does involve an audition. www.eng.unimelb.edu.au/Postgrad/ postProf/grad_mme.html

Some degrees, however, are only taught in one place because there’s only a limited demand. Not that that’s a bad thing, it means if you want to get on the course then the odds are in your favour. Luther Seminary’s Master of Sacred Music course is just this, aimed as it is at wannabe Lutheran pastoral musicians. But if that’s you then you know where to go.


Further reading

EXAMS OVER? NOW READ THIS

A looming graduation doesn’t just mean robes being cleaned and mortar boards straightened, it means a new crop of graduates is about to burst onto the job market. So here’s what to read to get so far ahead of the game you’re writing the rules.

Business secrets James Caan

The social entrepreneur’s handbook Rupert Scofield WHEN THE CAREER MARKET’S TOUGH and it’s hard to find a job, why not start your own business? Well, there are lots of reasons but it’s not impossible to do. In fact, more graduates are taking matters into their own hands than ever before. So, if you’re that way inclined, you’ll need some business advice. Fashioning itself as ‘part business guide, part memoir’, this is an in-depth guide into starting, running and making a success of a social enterprise. It’s heavy reading, as it goes into every detail you’ll need to know, from how to develop your vision through to finer points like recruiting and marketing. Handily it’s ring-bound, making it an easy book to pick up, leaf through then discard for the moment, which is probably how it’s best read. The author is President and CEO of the foundation for international community assistance, so he knows what he’s talking about. Unfortunately that means he sometimes has to talk about things at great length.

Put Your Mindset to Work James Reed and Paul G. Stoltz THE SUBTITLE OF THIS BOOK IS ‘The one asset you really need to win and keep the job you love’, which pretty much explain what it’s trying to do. Filled with tasks, games and ‘microchallenges’, it’s surprisingly interactive for a book and focuses very much on guiding you through the lessons it has to teach. Continuing this theme, the book also contains a code to set up a special 3G account to work on ‘putting your mindset to work’. Written by a PhD holding, best-selling author and the chairman of recruitment giant Reed, it’s hardly a shock revelation that ‘Put Your Mindset to Work’ is easy to read and contains some 24 carat nuggets of information. To get the most out of it you have to persevere with all the exercises but if that gets you your ideal job it’s probably worth it.

WHO BETTER TO OFFER UP ADVICE ON BUSINESS AND CAREERS than one of the stars of TV’s Dragons Den? Nobody we could think of, that’s why we’re quite excited that successful businessman extraordinaire James Caan has launched an app. No more will you have to sleep outside his house or go through his bins to learn the secrets of Caan’s 30 years of experience and success. “Not only does it include written advice and tips, but there is video, where I offer 1-2-1 mentoring on a variety of topic areas,” the entrepreneur told Real World, “and because it is an app the information is available to you on demand.” The app is proving pretty darn popular, especially as it’s free for a limited time only. Our advice? Go and download it now.

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Section | TOPIC

More study: Think it’s worth it? WILL A POSTGRADUATE DEGREE PUT YOU ON THE RIGHT PATH OR IS IT A SIDE TRACK?

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POSTGRAD | IS IT FOR YOU?

A POSTGRADUATE DEGREE IS A HUGE UNDERTAKING. EVEN IGNORING THE COST, THE TIME AND THE WORK YOU HAVE TO PUT IN, IT CAN TURN YOU INTO A SPECIALIST. THAT’S GREAT. YOU MIGHT THINK. BUT DO EMPLOYERS ALWAYS SEE IT THAT WAY? FIVE POSTGRADUATES TOLD US HOW GOING BACK TO UNIVERSITY CHANGED THEIR LIVES AND JOB PROSPECTS.

JANET CHU IS STUDYING AT THE LONDON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND FINANCE FOR AN MSC IN DIGITAL MARKETING

Her postgraduate degree helped to fill the gaps in Janet’s interests, giving her a skillset that employers really value. “Originally from a more technical background, I made a living doing freelance productions and events,” Janet told us. “Since having started the PG course at LSBF it has definitely helped me match practicals with theories” Postgraduate degrees can drill down to the finer points of a subject in a way undergraduate degrees just don’t. Janet had a lot of experience before she even started her degree but there was one area where her skills were lacking. “I had an understand about most things digital but my basic understanding in web analytics has held me back in terms of career potentials. My course included a module in Web Analytics, it’s definitely helped consolidate the foundation of my professional portfolio.”

Like a lot of graduates, Janet felt her undergraduate studies had left her with some answered questions. “For me, undergraduate studies wasn’t really studying as I had two essays a year and no exams ever, so comparatively, I prefer undergrad. But all jokes aside, I think when you do decide to undertake postgraduate studies, you have a much more focused approach to your area of key interests. With the increased number of bachelor graduates walking the streets nowadays, masters in a specialist area really helps you better define your portfolio of skills and discover your genuine area of interest.” “The course has benefitted me in several ways, from actually having a formal qualification in a relatively new field to my increased understanding of it from a more academic perspective everything starts to fit together. I still have some eureka moments but I feel much more comfortable within this industry having taken the course.”

MARK HARRINGTON HAS AN MA IN ADVERTISING FROM BUCKS NEW UNIVERSITY. Mark used his postgraduate degree to prepare himself for the career he wanted to move into. Before his degree “I didn’t know anything about advertising,” says Mark, “beyond superficially, and at the end I had a very good understanding of all aspects of it.” Using a masters to reposition you for a careers is a great way to transform a less vocational degree into something employers will immediately recognise the value of. Having not studied advertising as an undergraduate, Mark found this difficult but ultimately rewarding. “It was a struggle throughout my studies because it encouraged a different way of thinking. It was billed as creative planning and it used a lot of techniques that were, ‘unconventional’ shall we say, to teach you to think in the way planners are supposed to. It trained the mindset necessary for the role of strategic planner.” As well as training him in how to do the job of a strategic planner, Mark’s MA opened up the world of advertising for him, making his decision to get a job in the industry much more informed. “The year was simultaneously frustrating as well as instructional,” he told us. “Did I come out with a better idea of what the job entailed yet? Yes. Did I lose a bit of naïve enthusiasm for advertising? Yes.” It’s an experience he’d recommend to others but only if it included the level of industry-contacts he received. “I’d recommend an MA in Advertising but only from a very few schools. If you’re going to go theoretically into advertising it’s not worth it. You need a very industry-focused course, you need a lot of links with industry, a lot of opportunity to engage with industry. Otherwise you could read all the theory at home.”

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POSTGRAD | IS IT FOR YOU?

EMILIA VILLEGAS AND KATRIINA KUUSELA ARE STUDYING FOR AN MSC IN MARKETING AT THE LONDON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND FINANCE

EMANUELE TESTI IS STUDYING FOR AN MA IN ACTING FOR TV, FILM AND RADIO As a postgraduate, traditionally the expectation is now on you to do your own research and study independently a lot more. In my particular course, because the emphasis is more on practice than academia, that doesn’t quite apply. You have all-day classes every day and most of them are practical. I didn’t do a practical undergraduate course so it’s been quite a sharp career move. I think History of Art, which was my undergrad, was quite a broad subject. It wasn’t ever going to take me straight into a career, while the course I’m on now is very much a vocational course. Acting was something I wanted to do since before my undergraduate so when I thought about what to do next, towards the end of my course, I was directed back towards my original passion. My undergrad degree was slightly out of my hands because I chose through clearing so I went for the course that was closest to drama. I did BA visual and performing arts but the drama wasn’t practical so I took the minimum number of drama classes. My situation is quite atypical because most people think of taking a Masters as a continuation of their studies. I felt like I didn’t have very good career prospects at the end of university so my postgraduate has certainly tuned my skills towards a certain industry. Acting isn’t the easiest industry to get into so hopefully my degree has given me some options and some direction.

For Katriina and Emilia, their undergraduate degrees introduced them to the world of marketing but it took a masters for them to find where they fitted into that world. “In my first degree I studied marketing as a whole,” says Emilia, “we didn’t look at all the pathways into careers. It can get a bit confusing; you don’t know what digital marketing or PR is. I always wanted to go into PR and having an overview of the industry, you can learn to plan. It definitely completes your understanding.” Katriina had a similar experience, “When I started my degree I thought I wanted to be a marketing manager but as the course went on I realised I wanted to be a global brand manager. It gave me an opportunity to see what the different sides involved.” Postgraduate degrees don’t just give a greater understanding of how you can use your degree but they also give you a chance to specialise in the areas that really get you excited. “When you’re an undergraduate you might have to study things you’re not as interested in but as a postgraduate you can choose your own direction,” says Emilia, adding, “You’re more focused because you’re really studying what you want.”

More real life stories from postgraduates and graduates at work at realworldmagazine.com/case-studies

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THE REAL NEWS POSTGRADUATES: LOTS OF LOLLY So, what does £9,000 get you these days? WELL, according to one particular search engine, either a 325 carat gold watch, a timeshare of a luxury villa in Mallorca, or a second hand ice-cream van. There’s also the answer most school-leavers would worry about; an undergraduate degree. Yet, at least undergraduate students are supported by the government until they are able to pay back those costs. What about the fees for postgraduate degrees where you have to pay up front? Is your only hope to sell that 325 carat gold watch back, leaving your wrist unbearably bare once more? Well, in truth is the picture is not that clear. With government legislation not affecting postgraduate degrees directly, fees will not rise as uniformly as for undergraduate courses. Some fees may rise only at the rate of inflation, while others may reach that £9,000 figure and beyond. However, some commentators have suggested universities are raising their fees because to not do so suggests they don’t value the education they provide as much as others. If that’s true, and with their undergraduate degrees costing three times as much, might some not start to think their postgrad degrees look worryingly cheap? It’s essential, therefore, that you do your research before, as well as during, your postgraduate degree. The right course can broaden your horizons, while the wrong choice could leave your bank account looking squeezed beyond measure. Despite cuts, postgraduate funding is still available. Finding it just means going beyond the traditional suppliers. Websites like studentcashpoint.com can provide a good introduction, whilst charities and trusts like the Wellcome Trust, Leverhulme Trust and Winston Churchill Foundation all provide alternative sources of income to the traditional ones like begging and mortgaging your shoes. A postgraduate degree can be a massively rewarding, engaging investment in learning, but that doesn’t mean all of them are. Consider the possibility of studying abroad, where costs may be far more reasonable and scholarships more prevalent. And if you still can’t find the right course, you could do worse than investing in that ice cream van you’ve always dreamed of.


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Section | topic

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THINKING ABOUT POSTGRAD? CHOOSE THE UNI NOT JUST THE COURSE 

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TO GET WHAT YOU WANT, SOMETIMES YOU JUST HAVE TO…

We all know that being a student is about a whole lot more than your course. So, if you’re thinking about studying a postgrad, why not take an hour, just an hour to find a uni that suits you? After all, if you’re smart enough for a postgrad, you’re smart enough to know the importance of good research. Using over 200 factors, Push’s unique Uni Chooser lets you create a shortlist of unis ranked by what’s important to you.

That’s some serious search power. Not bad, hunh? But it’s not all. Push.co.uk has the most detailed profiles of every uni in the UK, covering the stuff you actually want to know. There’s insider advice on everything from how to give your application the edge to how and where to get funding. What’s more, it’s all ruthlessly independent and tells it like it really is. No jargon. No bull.

             WWW.REALWORLDMAGAZINE.COM RW 27

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Section | TOPIC

IT’S GRADUATE TRAINING BUT NOT AS YOU KNOW IT ILLUSTRATIONS: Tim Casswell Anna Riccardi Mark Nicoll Lara Popovic

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Section | topic

IF YOU LEAVE VAUXHALL STATION AND WALK ACROSS THE PARK sandwiched between the sheep and cows of Vauxhall City Farm and the imposing edifice of MI6 you’ll find, there next to the Black Dog pub, a Victorian mattress factory. This is the home of the Spring Project. It might seem like an unlikely setting but this is where a group of dedicated people are trying to change the face of graduate training forever. They hope to bridge the gap between what graduates go job-hunting with and what recruiters are looking for in prospective employees. The emphasis of the Spring Project is on training people for the jobs they really want, while helping them discover what those jobs are. It’s an unfortunate truth that there are tens of thousands of unemployed graduates in the UK and, at the moment, their main route out of that is firing off CVs and hoping for the best. The founders of the Spring Project wanted to change this, doing away with a system of rejection, dejection and faceless recruiting. Instead, trainees get to work on projects which not only give them experience but which also pay for their training, and can even pay them. This makes it sustainable and ties its success and the trainees’ together. The trainees get a taste of real work with real employers and how they can be useful to them. In the process, they get a clearer idea of their own aims and whether they fit

with what the employer is offering and what they stand for. Meanwhile, the employers get a glimpse of what the trainees could do for them. The result is a happier matching of companies and workers. And even those trainees who don’t find jobs, go away better trained and with a better idea of where their strengths and interests lie. “With the Spring Project, we’re really trying to look after the trainees’ interests – interests they may not even have realised they have when they start out,” says Andrew Armes, Co-founder of the Spring Project. “We can’t get it right all the time but the Spring Project tries to provide training that edges people towards being more fulfilled – if it doesn’t, we don’t do it. Our experience is that quite a lot of training doesn’t set itself such rigourous standards. At best it can be a waste of time and money. At worst, it’s damaging.” With newspapers reporting an average of 70 applications for each vacancy on graduate recruitment programmes, many degree-holders are looking to build up their CVs with training schemes or internships. The Spring Project purports to provide the same benefits as these sorts of schemes: some work experience and an extra line of type on the CV. Where it differs from other training is that the people behind it believe that’s just the very beginning. Asked what the ethos of the Project is, Armes told us, “In one word, ‘mindfulness’. To create an environment where people can drop the barriers that get in the way of

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them bringing their full contribution to the world, whatever they may be.” So how does it all work? “It’s about developing how people think and feel as well as what they can do,” Armes says. The Project’s creators have tried to keep ‘experiential learning’ – doing and seeing what happens – at its heart. Another way it’s different to other training schemes – one that might make most graduates and the guardians of their wallets pay attention – is that the Spring Project also sets out to create jobs for its trainees. Armes explains, “Creating value is a key tenet of the Spring Project. That means trainees are helped to recognise how their contribution can be really worth something, such that wherever they go, whatever they do, they’re worth employing. Indeed, we hope some will even come up with valuable projects for themselves. Value can – and usually is – measured financially, and that’s not wrong, but it’s only one of the ways the Project encourages trainees to think about what they can contribute.” After nearly two years of preparation and the transformation of a dusty warehouse to a brand new training centre, the Spring Project has seen its first cohorts of trainees. Some have left with jobs but all have left with a new approach to job-hunting. Interested? You can find out more about the Spring Project at springproject.co.uk or read the stories of others over the page. >>

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Section CASE STUDIES | TOPIC | SPRING TRAINING

Jess Harvey was one of the first people to take part in The Spring Project training. She came into the process wanting a job and left, not only wanting a different one but having been offered it too.

Will Williams studied Management and Marketing at university. After the Spring Project training he got a position on the D&AD awards traineeship.

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HAVING STUMBLED ACROSS AN OPPORTUNITY for a ‘D&AD Awards Production Traineeship’ in one of the many daily job emails that used to flood my inbox, I was surprised to find I wasn’t being asked for my CV or to even fill out an application form, I was simply being invited to turn up to what I assumed would be a job interview. It all seemed a little ominous but I didn’t have anything to lose. I arrived for the first session at the address on the ‘invite’. It wasn’t, as I’d initially expected, in a formal office setting, although maybe the email advising me to “wrap up warm” should have shifted my expectations little. Instead I was standing in a vast, slightly overwhelming, empty warehouse. A few others huddled around a tea urn at the far end, looking as bemused as I felt. The next few hours unravelled to explain that we were here to be selected for a number of positions at D&AD, however, this was recruitment unlike anything we’d previously experienced. No panic buying of interview outfits, being asked pointless questions: “if you were a tree, what would you be..?” or the dreaded “we regret to inform you”. It was to be based around development not rejection, and regardless of whether or not you were selected you would come out at the other end in a better place from where you started; with a clearer understanding of your skillset, drastically improved self awareness and a bunch of wonderful new friends, to go debrief with over a pint at the end of the day.

In my first session there were about 40 of us in a warehouse playing games with chairs. I wasn’t sure how this would help us become more employable or develop our skills at all. It was weird. But everything came together and made sense in the end (I think it was much more organised than we were lead to believe). One of the key lessons of the training was dealing with uncertainty and believing that you can handle anything that the world throws at you. Towards the end we were all much more confident as individuals and as a unit. The transformation was remarkable. It was different to other training in terms of the independence we were given. It wasn’t about sitting and listening. It was about using our minds and learning how to do by

The day-to-day running of the building and the managing of the tasks quickly fell onto us to organise. It was refreshing to be told, when faced with a challenge, ‘to go figure it out’ instead of being dictated the answer and eventually everyone stopped asking and just ‘did’. We were however, guided along the way, constantly receiving positive yet slightly ‘brutal’ feedback, but nothing to make you weep into your pillow as you fell asleep. By the end of the two weeks, we had formed such a productive, well oiled team machine; there was a unified, quite overwhelming sense of achievement and pride in the work we’d all done. It then came to decision time. When my name wasn’t called out it was disappointing, but every person standing in that line had every right to be where they were. The disappointment was that the training was now over and that these people would get to continue working with one another. The job just seemed like a bonus. Since finishing the training, I’ve realised that I’m not yet in the position to be able to decide what it is I want to spend the rest of my life doing. I’ve been given the opportunity to continue working with the training facilitators and have continued to be challenged. The training was such an invaluable process I’ve taken so much from that I almost feel it should be mandatory for graduates, or even school leavers, to help with the daunting process of entering the world of work.

doing. Experiential learning is much more effective than classroom teaching in my opinion. There was also a much stronger bond between everyone involved. It wasn’t a room full of strangers, as you’d expect. After a week or two we were like a family, which makes for a more pleasant environment to be in. Since finishing the training I’ve been working for D&AD, assisting the production team on the awards this year. I got the position through the training so I know that it helped. With the confidence and awareness I had gained from the training though, I’m sure I could have found a position quickly if I had needed to.


CASE STUDIES | SPRING Section TRAINING | topic

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Aylin Pashayan studied marketing at Kingston University confident and, in terms of networking, I was better. You had to work with different people in different groups. This meant you left with a different perspective to that you came in with. I haven’t been to any other training schemes so I can’t compare the Spring Project to those but I can say it had ups and downs. But at the end of the day all of us learned something and now we’re all like a group. We’re always together and we all like each other and know each other really well. I think the training helped me to be more aware of myself and see more opportunities for me to do what I’m good at.

Jamal Kendal Campbell studied conceptual media practice university of Westminster. He went on from the training to a D&AD awards traineeship and is now a video editor for Future Productions.

I CAN SAY THE TRAINING WAS A REALLY GOOD EXPERIENCE and I learned a lot but the whole process was a bit surprising, at least some parts, because we didn’t know what to expect. I was expecting it to be more formal on the first day but there were games and stuff, and we had to grade ourselves from one to ten, which was a new experience. It was a really good experience. It helped every one of us develop our abilities and talents. You can believe in who you are and what you have but when you’re in a group with people in the same situation it’s an opportunity to be more open about that. After the training I was more self-

THE TRAINING, IT WAS DIFFERENT TO OTHER RECRUITMENT THAT I’VE BEEN. IT WAS VERY EMOTIONALLY DRAINING BUT I ENJOYED IT. It was very unique, most recruitment training that I’ve been on people are competing. But on this one people weren’t against each other, we were all helping each other along. That was partially down to the people but also the training, it somehow made us all want to achieve one goal. I got the D&AD traineeship at the end and the training did prepare me for that job in a way; the early starts and late finishes. It was nice to work with people for four weeks and then

start a new job. You were already out of your shell when you started at D&AD. It’s helped me a lot because before I did the training I was working in a bar. It helped me to give up the bar work and pursue a career and not worry about not having a job. I guess it made me more courageous and confident, which got me to where I am now, as a video editor. I’d recommend the training to others, it helps to open up your mind. Everyone says that they enjoy working as a team but it’s not normally in the way that we did. It makes you think not just about the working environment but the team as well.

‘‘It helped me to give up the bar work and pursue a career’’

WANT TO KNOW MORE? ANDREW ARMES THE SPRING PROJECT 100 VAUXHALL WALK LONDON SE11 5EL +447912431530 SPRINGPROJECT.CO.UK ANDREW@SPRINGPROJECT.CO.UK

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TRAINING | FANCY SOMETHING NEW?

Training courses with a difference JUST DECIDED MEDICINE IS YOUR CALLING? IT DOESN’T HAVE TO TAKE ANOTHER SEVEN YEARS

Degree? Check. Job? Ah, well, you see they’re still a little scarce. So you may have a few weeks to kill while you’re firing off CVs to employers. You can either spend your afternoons on Facebook or you can supercharge your skill set by getting some training. With a lot of courses to choose from, here’s our pick of those that are just a little bit different.

Stop watching TV and train to get on it Company: Aspire Presenting Entry Requirements: None Cost: Prices begin at £195 Further info: www. aspirepresenting.com

Fancy yourself the next Dermot O’Leary? Aspire Presenting offer one, two and four day training courses or one-to-one coaching for hopeful TV presenters. Classes are led by experienced media trainers and cover things like autocue prompts, vocal delivery and studio and location training. At the end you get to take away your own fully-edited HD show reel and receive careers guidance as part of the course. Warning, this probably won’t make you the next Davina but if you’ve already got it then it’ll give you the show reel.

Start your own business and be the boss Company: My Own Business Entry requirements: None Cost: Free Further info: www.myownbusiness.org

If you’re an avid fan of The Apprentice and fancy yourself as a bit of an entrepreneur, why not take a course in starting a new business? My Own Business is a not-for-profit organisation with a mission to

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help people start their own businesses. Established for 18 years, their two online courses are packed full of helpful information and cover more topics than most other organisations, so much so that their course content is used in the World Bank’s SME (Small to Medium Enterprises) Toolkit.

Join the jet set as a flight attendant

Entry requirements: A – C grade GCSE English Cost: Varies depending on which training organisation you choose. Virgin Atlantic charges £99 for a one day course. London Community College of Education charges £375 for a two week course. Being a flight attendant isn’t just for travel and tourism graduates. It’s a CV booster all round, not to mention a cheap gap year option. You’ll get to travel the world for free, get discount flights and gain an understanding of the tourism market. Virgin Atlantic offers one


TRAINING | FANCY SOMETHING NEW?

day courses and provides course notes and recruitment advice, with training on board a mock-up of a Virgin Atlantic aeroplane. London Community College of Education offers a two-week course that covers the airline industry and practical training like first aid, disembarking with passengers and emergency landings. These aren’t graduate-only courses but most of the trainees will be grads.

assistants work in special units for people dealing with eating disorders, personality disorders, stress-related illnesses or substance abuse. City Gate Training offers one day intensive courses and then helps place you in a role where you can practise what you have learnt. The courses are accredited by OCR (Oxford & Cambridge & RSA Examination Board).

Hypnotherapy, how does that make you feel?

Company: Media Trust Entry requirements: None Cost: Prices begin at £75 Further info: www.mediatrust.org

Company: Thoughtitude Entry requirements: None Cost: Each module costs £257 Further info: www.thoughtitude.co.uk

Want to get off the sofa and onto the couch? Thoughtitude offers Diplomas in professional and clinical hypnotherapy. There are six modules to choose from and they cover topics from NLP (neuro-linguistic programming) to stress, anxiety and addictions. The courses are validated by the General Hypnotherapy Register and The General Hypnotherapy Standards Council.

Give your career some first aid

Company: City Gate Training Entry requirements: Mental healthcare training requires basic healthcare training first. Cost: Varies depending on your age and status. Call directly to get a quote. Further info: www.cgtraining.org.uk If you only decided after graduating that medicine was your calling, it doesn’t have to be another seven years ahead. You can get some basic healthcare training in nursing skills or as a mental healthcare assistant (psychiatric assistant). Basic healthcare training covers how to look after patients, while psychiatric

Get chatty with some communications training

Gaining, er, thingies in, whatsitcalled, communication is important. In business there’s the maxim ‘people buy from people they like’ and it applies to everything from going for a job interview to meeting new people. Media Trust draws together experts from the media, marketing, communications and charity sectors and has a calendar of events and seminars throughout the year. They also have volunteers who will mentor you free of charge and cover almost anything from looking over a press report to PR.

Communication is the key

Company: You Never Can Tell Entry requirements: None Cost: Varies. Call directly to get a quote Further info: www.younevercantell.co.uk You Never Can Tell has clients including candidates standing in General Elections and Premiership League footballers. Their focus is on teaching people not how to communicate effectively but how to communicate to stand out. They offer one-on-one or group coaching and fees are negotiable. There’s also a CV service which includes a one hour consultation and a rewriting of your CV to give you more control in interviews. If you’re still at uni, you can ask either your student union or your faculty to set up classes run by You Can Never Can Tell at your university.

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Section | TOPIC

CAREERS FAIRS THE WHENS AND WHERES

JUNE OCT

FOR GRADS

NOV FOR POSTGRADS

14th June 2011 – Spot light on Graduates at Cardiff, Cardiff City Hall. 15th – 16th June 2011 – The Graduate Recruitment Fair, Manchester University. 16th June 2011 – Jobs Fair, London School Of Economics and Political Science. 23rd June 2011 – Graduate Recruitment Fair, Oxford Town Hall. 5th October 2011 – Banking, Finance and Consultancy Fair, City University, London. 5th October 2011 – UCL Management Consultancy Fair, London. 5th October 2011 – University Of Birmingham Autumn Fair, Birmingham. 6th October 2011 – Consultancy Fair, London School of Economics and Political Science, London. 11th October 2011 – University of Edinburgh Careers Fair, Edinburgh. 11th October 2011 – Bank & Financial Services Fair, London School of Economics and Political Science. 12th October 2011 – Engineering and Technology Fair, City University, London. 13th October 2011 – UCL Engineering Fair, London. 13th October 2011 – Graduate Fair, University of Warwick. 14th October 2011 – University of St Andrews Graduate Management and Finance Fair. 17th October 2011 – The University of Leeds Autumn Fair, Leeds. 17th October 2011 – UCL Investment Banking Fair, London. 19th October 2011 – University of East Anglia Fair, East Anglia. 20th October 2011 – UCL IT and Technology Fair, London. 20th October 2011 – Swansea University Careers Fair, University of Swansea. 20th October 2011 – York Finance And Management Fair, University of York. 20th October 2011 – Advertising, Marketing & PR Fair, London School Of Economics and Political Science. 21st October 2011 – University Of St Andrews Science and Technology Fair, St Andrews. 24th October 2011 – I.T and Technology Fair, Queen Mary University, London. 25th October 2011 – Finance and Economics Fair, UCL, London. 25th October 2011 – CCCU Teacher Recruitment Fair, Canterbury Christ Church University. 26th October 2011 – Careers Fair, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen. 26th October 2011 – Working in The West Midlands Fair, Aston University. 27th October 2011 – Graduate recruitment Fair, Hull. 1 November 2011 – Engineering, Science and I.T Graduate Recruitment fair, University of Sheffield 1 November 2011 – Public Sector and Policy Fair, London School of Economics and political science. 2nd November 2011 – Science, engineering and IT fair, University of Sussex, Brighton. 2nd November 2011 – Job Fair 2011, Canterbury Christ Church University. 2rd November 2011 – Law Fair, University of York. 3rd November 2011 – University of Brighton Careers Fair, Brighton. 3rd November 2011 – Business and Management Fair, London School of economics and political science. 3rd November 2011 – Careers and Recruitment Fair, Elliot College, University of Kent, Canterbury. 4th November 2011 – Teeside University Careers Fair, Middlesbrough. 7th November 2011 – Brunel Autumn Placement and Careers Fair. Brunel, Uxbridge. 8th - 10 November 2011 – Law fair, London School of Economics and Political Science. 8th November 2011 – Sussex Business, Finance and Law Fair, University Of Sussex, Brighton. 9th November 2011 – Property Design and Construction Fair 2011, City Campus Nottingham. 9 November 2011 – Graduate Recruitment and Placement Fair, University of Portsmouth. 14th – 15TH November 2011 – UCL Law Fair, UCL, London.

OCT

10th – 11th October 2011 - University of Ulster, Jordanstown. 25th October 2011 – Teacher Recruitment Fair, Canterbury Christ Church University. 25th October 2011 – Careers Fair, Kings College, London. 26th October 2011 – Teacher Recruitment and Education Fair, University of Plymouth. 9th November 2011 – Business Placements and Graduate Recruitment Fair, University of Plymouth. 9th November 2011 – Graduate Recruitment and Placement fair, University of Portsmouth. 16th November 2011 – Meet Your Future 2011, University College Falmouth. 34 RW WWW.REALWORLDMAGAZINE.COM 23rd November 2011 – The Postgraduate Study Fair, University of Manchester.

NOV


Whatever you want to gain from Postgraduate study, you’ll find it here at Middlesex University. All of our courses are built around the realities of the professional world and you’ll have lots of contact with companies and leading figures in your field of study. In short, everything’s designed so that you’re perfectly prepared to reach your career goals. Our flexible study options mean you can either study full-time or part-time or gain your degree in the workplace via Work Based Learning. To experience Middlesex for yourself register for our open evening by calling 0800 069 6100 or visit our website.

I WANT TO ENHANCE MY CAREER OPPORTUNITIES POSTGRADUATE OPEN EVENING: WEDNESDAY 6 JULY 2011

WWW.MDX.AC.UK/PG2011

MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY, LONDON

[WITH US, YOU CAN]

In today’s competitive world you need to prepare well if you are going to graduate into employment. You must have the type of skills and experiences that employer’s value and you need to have a clear plan. Jobs & Careers can help you by providing careers advice, information and the opportunity to earn cash, gain valuable skills and apply for graduate jobs.

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? For more information, help, advice, guidance & our own extensive list of job opportunities keep checking Leeds Metropolitan Jobs & Careers website. www.leedsmet.ac.uk/ jobsandcareers

Come to our recruitment fairs! Part Time Recruitment Fair - 23rd September 2011 Autumn Graduate Recruitment Fair - 27th October 2011

If you want to find work as a student or graduate then we can provide: • Casual, temporary or part time opportunities within the university and the local community • A variety of roles with competitive rates of pay. • Permanent opportunities for graduates, locally, regionally and nationally. • The opportunity to gain valuable work experience.


www.pwc.com/uk/careers

Being the one to inspire peer group envy

Helping create value through: Assurance Consulting Tax Financial Advisory Actuarial

You need a 2:1 or above in any degree discipline. From 300 UCAS tariff or equivalent. We value diversity in our people

Nationwide Opportunities, Spring and Autumn 2011 Build a CV others envy. Our graduate training gives you breadth as well as depth of knowledge. Learn from expert practitioners, earn professional qualifications, work with great clients and experience different roles to ensure you always stand out from the crowd. We work with our clients to measure, protect and enhance what matters most to them. So if you’re serious about a career in business we don’t think anyone else could give you a better start. Students agree: we’re proud they’ve voted us number one in The Times Top 100 Graduate Employers survey for the last seven years. To build real value into your CV, contact us. Visit www.pwc.com/uk/careers. Text ‘pwc’ to 85792 to find your nearest PwC event.*

© 2011 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. All rights reserved. “PricewaterhouseCoopers” refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (a limited liability partnership in the United Kingdom) or, as the context requires, the PricewaterhouseCoopers global network or other member firms of the network, each of which is a separate legal entity. *Texts charged at your standard network rate.


June 2011