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H A W A I ` I


This issue is dedicated to two special people, a very special dog and their APPLAUSE. Thank you for believing in what we do. Your kindness and generosity will help to keep opportunities alive for the people in our community and we are so very grateful. We will continue to spread a positive message and we pledge to someday pay this forward. ~Cheryl DeAngelo , editor

Ehu photography: Thomas Kuali`i w w w. r e a l w o r d m a g a z i n e . com




contents.

FEATURES

YOUNG ARTISTS 24

Mikaela Tallett

25

Kendall Tacon

25

Jesse Velasquez

08

Lieutenant Governor James R. “Duke” Aiona, Jr.

10

Malia Utoafili

12

Charles Souza

14

Formula

the Art of Thought

44

Erika Swartzkopf

17

Na Hoa

45

Mapuana Cornell

18

Shane Victorino

45

Charity Yoro

22

Pacific In Vitro Fertilization Institute

46

Suzie Hansen

26

Kaleo del Sol

48

Erin McCullough

Honi to the Left, Right?

50

Holly Kitaura

28

Rani Hanohano

51

Mark Mira

31

Sam Gray

51

Carly Philips

39

Kaleo Pilanca

52

Marina Miller

a Bright Future Full of Opportunities

I Believe . . .

SUBMISSIONS

Perpetuating Traditional Hawaiian Music

the Spirit of the Laugh

34Thomas Kuali`i



Issue 1.1


Publisher/Editor Publisher Associate Editor Creative Director Copy Editor Sales Executive Editorial Photographer Editorial Assistant

Cheryl DeAngelo cheryl@realwordmagazine.com Fred DeAngelo fdeangelo@realwordmagazine.com Doris Bitonio doris@realwordmagazine.com Christopher Marquez chris@realwordmagazine.com Ikaika Hashimoto ikaika@realwordmagazine.com TC Chun tc@realwordmagazine.com Malia Johnson maliajohnsonphotography.com Desireè Ouchi des@realwordmagazine.com

Contributing Artists Lieutenant Governor James R. “Duke” Aiona, Jr. Ikaika Arnado Mapuana Cornell Kaleo del Sol

Marina Miller Mark Mira Na Hoa Pacific In Vitro Fertilization Institute

Julie Dunn

Bruce Omori

Donald Ewing

Sam Owens

Sam Gray

Carly Philips

Rani Hanohano

Kaleo Pilanca

Suzie Hansen

Kanani Souza

Imagesbyjeffrey.com

Charles Souza

Kaveh Kardan

Erika Swartzkopf

Holly Kitaura

Kendall Tacon

Thomas Kuali`i

Mikaela Tallett

Kirk Malanchuk (Formula)

Malia Utoafili

Cherie Marquez (Formula)

Jesse Velasquez

Erin McCullough

Shane Victorino

Joe Marquez

Irvin Yamada Charity Yoro

Please send all ADVERTISING inquiries to: info@realwordmagazine.com P. O . B o x 8 9 4 8 5 2 , M i l i l a n i , H a w a i i 9 6 7 8 9

P R I N T E D

I N

H A W A I ` I

© 2010. All Rights Reserved. Real Word Magazine is published bimonthly by Fred and Cheryl DeAngelo. No part of this magazine shall be printed and/or altered without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher reserves the right to refuse any submissions and/or advertising matter. The articles and opinions in this publication are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. Although it is intended to be accurate, neither the publisher nor any other party assumes liability for loss or damage due to reliance on this material.

Front Cover, Back Cover, Contents photography: Thomas Kuali`i

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Heroes. . . They are all around us. In this issue of Real Word Magazine, we celebrate these special individuals for being a positive influence in our community. They represent a talented group of people from our islands, such as entertainers, government employees, teachers, entrepreneurs, and artists. Collectively, everyone we showcase has a common thread that ties all heroes together – Passion. It’s safe to say that people don’t do things to their fullest unless they love what they’re doing. When was the last time you asked yourself: “what do I love doing?” This is something we should ponder everyday. And if you don’t know the answer to it, you need to find it. Doing what you love opens you up, allows your talents to grow despite doubts and “what if’s.” Don’t hold back. Someone once told me that LIFE stands for Letting It Flow Effortlessly. This is such a true statement. A job is never a job if you love what you’re doing. Getting compensated for it is just a bonus. And because you choose to live this way, you move through life with a happy heart, an open mind, and a peaceful soul. Why? Because of Passion. All our heroes in this issue of Real Word Magazine represent the strength, vision, focus, and determination to succeed. They all looked up to their own heroes growing up and acquired the inspiration to succeed. Everyone can be inspired. You just need to open your hands and heart to it. Their solid values and unyielding desire to attain their personal and career goals are what makes all of our feature stories unique. I could easily engage you and tell you their stories, but it’s always better in their own words. We have captured their words for you, so that you may be inspired to share your own. “Follow your bliss. Find where it is, and don’t be afraid to follow it.” — Joseph Campbell

— Doris Bitonio, associate editor P.S. I’d love to hear from you. Please email me and share with me your passion.

inspire. live. laugh.

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The first time I remember showing my appreciation for someone was when I was in kindergarten at Nana’ikapono Elementary School. It was Christmastime. I bought a box of Pearson Nips for my teacher, Mrs. Faustino. Although it probably only cost about $0.59, it’s a big purchase when you’re five - especially when you have $5 to buy a gift for everyone on your list. I thought Mrs. Faustino was special and I wanted her to know it. I must’ve spent hours trying to wrap it and curl that ribbon (I don’t even think I knew how to use scissors that well) - I was so excited to see her face when I gave it to her. I stared intently. She smiled. Really big. It made me happy. When I got older, each year during the holidays, my stepdad, Vinnie, would buy a case of beer to give to our “garbage man”- “Do you think he’ll like Miller Lite or Heineken?” I’d hear him say to my mom. On the last trash day before Christmas, he would go out to the curb, give him the beer and say “thank you.” I would peer out the window for a chance to see our trash man’s face light up. When I worked at Side Street Inn as a bartender, I found myself on the receiving end of appreciation time and time again from our loyal customers, our “regulars”- “Drew” would thank all of us at the end of the night with origami frogs and fishes - made carefully from dollar bills. Others would bake cookies, bring in crack seed or give us small red Chinese envelopes when the New Year came around. I always remembered those that looked me in the eyes and simply said “thank you.” They genuinely meant it. And with just two words, they made me feel like my job was one of the most important jobs in the world. At our magazine’s launch party, as I looked in the crowd while delivering a speech during one of the highest points in my life, I could see my family, my stepdad, Vinnie, and many “regulars” from my Side Street days: Damon, Jr., Brains and Skippy, to name a few - and once again, I was happy and I was grateful for the wonderful people I’ve had in my life. I realize that although we’ve all gotten older, started families and businesses, and even made a whole new set of friends, we share a special bond because of this thing called gratitude. In this issue, we are proud to feature a few of the professionals in our community that we should all be thankful for: from Malia Utoafili, a dental hygienist that insures the health of our teeth, to Lieutenant Governor “Duke” Aiona, who insures the health of our beautiful state of Hawai`i. Whether it’s to a kindergarten teacher, a trash man or a bartender, take the time to look someone in the eye, say “thank you” and genuinely mean it. You may just see their face light up. It’s so worth it.

~ Cheryl DeAngelo, publisher/editor

hope. gratitude. respect. n o has forgotte “The person wh p lee as n lle fa s ha to be thankful .” life of t in the mids Stevenson ~Robert Louis



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lieutenant governor.

James R. “Duke” Aiona, Jr.

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a Bright Future Full of 0pportunities words: Lieutenant Governor James R. “Duke” Aiona, Jr. Hawai`i’s unique culture, diverse population and abundant natural resources position our state to have a powerful voice with many of today’s important public policy issues, including securing clean energy resources, protecting our environment and providing world-class health care and education to our residents. As a result, I believe the State’s future is ripe with the potential to be a leader the rest of the country can emulate in tackling these critical issues. For instance, Hawai`i remains the most fossil fuel-dependent state in the Nation. We are nearly 90 percent dependent on oil from all over the world and our reliance on fossil fuels compromises our environment, our economy and our security. While it is not realistic, feasible or even economically viable to make the switch from fossil fuels to renewable energy over night, Hawai`i is taking a strategic and graduated approach to accelerate the generation of clean energy through energy efficiency and such renewable resources as wind, solar, ocean, bioenergy and geothermal. By 2030, Hawai`i will generate 70 percent or more of our power from clean energy. Additionally, as an island state, land is one of our most precious resources. Our `aina – our land – is truly a special asset with significance not only to every visitor, but also to all of Hawai`i’s people. In addition to the natural beauty and cultural significance, Hawai`i’s environment is fundamentally and historically linked to our economic well-being. The tourism industry exists largely because of Hawai`i’s natural beauty, Spirit of Aloha and favorable climate, and all of Hawai`i’s agriculture depends on limited natural resources. In order to ensure that these significant economic industries have a firm foundation, we must continue to conserve our land and environment. These efforts stem from a responsibility and obligation to those who came before us and those who will come after us to be good stewards.



Lieutenant Gover nor James R. “Duke” Aiona, Jr.

Another important issue that is vital to our resident’s quality of life is health care. The wisdom of the old adage, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” still rings true even today. Our current health care system and societal approach to health focuses on the pound of cure, rather than the ounce of prevention. Addressing root causes of health problems is key to reducing health care costs and improving the quality of life for Hawai`i’s citizens. Our people deserve to have a greater number of quality healthcare options, which in turn fuels competition, lowers prices for consumers and increases quality. Similarly, our education system directly affects our state’s future. Education is the cornerstone of the modern economy, particularly in the 21st century. And, as a parent of four children, I believe mediocrity is not an option when it comes to the development of our children. Hawai`i spends more money on educating children than most places in the United States. Yet, for too long, our citizens have accepted a system that even the Department of Education acknowledges is broken. With public support, we can seize the opportunity to empower and reward teachers, create a supportive and safe environment conducive to learning, and ensure that money is spent directly at the school-pupil level. I envision a system that addresses each child’s needs, incorporates the family and community as a central part of education, allows parents the freedom and flexibility to decide how best to raise their children, and prepares our children for an ever-changing world. States across our nation are struggling with many of these same issues, especially with governments and agencies at all levels facing budget challenges. However, Hawai`i is in a position to be a leader within these areas due to our unique geography, culture and history. Most of all, our residents have the power to make a difference, and I am committed to serving them and our Hawai`i.

Issue 1.1


dental hygenist.

Malia Utoafili

words: Malia Utoafili photography: Malia Johnson

Malia grew up in Pearl City and has been working in the dental field I came to the wonderful realization that I would never be stuck in a bad for 18 years. She has been married to her husband Tai for 11 years and situation, ever! I will always have the opportunity to do something to make they have a nine year old daughter named Sera. She enjoys photography, my situation better, either physically or mentally. If I can’t physically change quality family time and watching Sera play softball. my circumstances, I can always change my attitude and the way I feel. How empowering! I feel so fortunate to be able to genuinely say that I love my job. And With this newfound knowledge, I was determined to create a new to think that it all happened by chance – or did it? future for myself and my family. When my daughter was two years old, I My first job in the dental field came as a suggestion by my high school embarked on a journey to become a dental hygienist. Five years later, I counselor during my senior year. A nearby dental office was looking for earned a Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene from the University of some help and I was looking for a few extra dollars and the opportunity Hawai`i at Manoa. I definitely worked hard for that degree, but I will never to get out of school early. Little did I know that accepting this job would forget to thank D for teaching me to believe in myself. literally change my life. It was at this particular office that I met my current As a dental hygienist, I am continuously inspired by D – to become the employer, Dr. Derek Ichimura. “D,” as he is affectionately known, made best I can be. He encourages us to treat our patients like members of our work fun and interesting. Everything was exciting and new and I was own family. Each patient initially walks in a stranger but often leaves with eager to learn. But the most valuable things I learned had nothing to do a feeling of trust and belonging. Getting to really know our patients and with dentistry at all. As I struggled through personal issues, D always had celebrating the uniqueness of each and every one of them is the best part insightful advice for me. He would say, “Malia, remember that you are of my job. From the Harley-Davidson-riding, power lifter grandma to the in control of your life. Only you can make it what you want it to be. If RC plane-flying, ping-pong champion, each patient holds a special place things don’t go as planned, you have the power to make it better.” Being in my heart. After 18 years I can still honestly say that I love what I do and 17 years old, it was difficult for me to understand these new concepts. look forward to going to the office every day. I am extremely fortunate to When things went wrong I always wanted to blame someone else. Taking be a part of D’s staff and want to thank him for giving me the opportunity responsibility for the bad was difficult – until I realized that if I did accept to be the best that I can be. I sometimes wonder what my life would have responsibility, I also had the power to change the outcome. At that moment been like had I not taken that job my senior year in high school…

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Malia Utoafili

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“With this newfound knowledge, I was determined to create a new future for myself and my family.“


math teacher.

Charles Souza Charles was born and raised on O`ahu and currently resides in Hawai`i Kai with his wife, Cheryl and 10 year old son, Chase. He has been a math teacher at Stevenson Middle School for the past 13 years, where he is also the math department chairperson and middle school coordinator. He is one of three state finalists for the prestigious Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. Results will be announced later this year.

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I Believe . . . wo

rds :

Cha r

l es

Sou

za

I believe that I have the greatest job in the world. I don’t make millions of dollars. I work countless hours of overtime without getting paid. I deal with clients from all walks of life, and every year I am expected to raise production so that no one is left behind. Why would anyone want my job? What job is that? I am a teacher. Not only am I a teacher, I am a math teacher. Not just a math teacher, but a middle school math teacher. When I tell people that I am a middle school math teacher they often cringe and look at me as if I am crazy. For many people, being a teacher does not seem like it would be the greatest job in the world, but for me it is. I believe that I make a difference every day. I touch the lives of hundreds of people every year. My students know that I truly care about each and every one of them. I want them all to succeed, not only in school, but also in life. I encourage them to be positive and work hard to meet their goals. Students in my class are respectful of each other at all times and provide each other with a safe, comfortable learning environment. I believe that all of my students want to learn. Some students are more motivated than other students. Some students have better study habits or a higher IQ. Some students have more support at home. Even though they come from different backgrounds and different situations, I believe that all of my students want to learn and that they all enjoy being in my class. I have one student in particular this year that has something positive to say every time I see him. The other Monday he tells me, “Hey Mr. Souza, I’ve been looking forward to your class all weekend. I couldn’t wait to get here this morning. I learn so much in your class. Your class is like breakfast for my brain.” It’s comments like this that make me believe I have the greatest job in the world. I believe that all students can achieve and do well in school. I have high expectations for all of my students and try my best to hold students accountable for their own learning in a positive way. If students do not finish their homework, I don’t punish them for not doing it. I work out a plan with them to find out when they are going to do it. Maybe they had a family emergency. Maybe they had to babysit their younger siblings all night. Maybe they didn’t understand the assignment. I cannot control what happens outside of school, however I can provide them with the love, care and support they need in school. When students come to class without a pencil, I give them one of mine. They don’t have to call home. They don’t have to do detention or write an essay on what it means to be responsible. They get a pencil and I tell them that I am giving them the pencil because I want them to do well in school. Now they have a pencil and can bring it with them to class everyday and focus on doing well in school. When the student says, “Thank you,” I know I have the greatest job in the world. photographs provided by: Charles Souza I believe that I am truly blessed. I have the greatest wife who is also my best friend. She is supportive of everything I do and is always very proud of my accomplishments. I have a wonderful son that looks up to me, loves me unconditionally and always puts a smile on my face. I have a special group of friends that will do anything for me no matter what the circumstances are. All of these people make it possible for me to have the greatest job in the world.

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Charles Souza

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bloggers.

the Art of Thought words and photography: Cherie Marquez and Kirk Malanchuk Thought stimulates talk. Talk stimulates action. Do you find yourself asking more questions when a question is raised? A thought or an opinion can be philosophical or controversial. It opens the door to discussion, but is there a right or wrong? We look around us and the world is full of thoughts and opinions, but the form in which we express them is what differs among us all. The things we do in our daily lives and the things we come across are absorbed in all sorts of ways. We surf the web and find something interesting, eat out to find the food is succulent and the service is exceptional, disagree with what may be going on in the headlines of the newspapers or look for recommendations on a relaxing retreat on the next vacation. These are queries from our minds, views we form and stories we want to express. And after thinking enough within ourselves, we ask the question – why not think out loud? This is a small example of how we process things and a big reason why we consider ourselves “Antagonists of Thought”. This is how FORMULA was founded. What is

What we Feature?

Architecture Food TV/Film Photography Places Print Product Fashion People

?

Formula is a catalogue of interesting stories of the people, places, and things that surround us. We are observers and experiencers of life’s wonders. Our methods of communication are diverse and our approach is collaborative.  — Our Formula is simple but the content is intricate. Like many others, we take our curiosity to other levels based on our own current situation. Much of what we talk about is really what we encounter in our daily lives. Although we narrow down some topics we feature, there is no specific criteria or limitation on what we address. Maybe we want to share a simple story on our weekly dish of the “Adventures of the City Bus”. Maybe we want to share life’s pains and challenges and encourage others to do what they can to make a difference or raise awareness of a problem. Maybe we want to give an update on our latest traveling installation project. Or maybe we are simply promoting an event we are working on with other creative minds to help stimulate the art of thought.

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Formula is an opportunity to share ideas, thoughts, stories, happenings, projects and such with a broader community. We have an opportunity as young writers, designers, builders, and thinkers to shift the current trend of thought. We are not trying to change what is, but rather be mindful of what could be. We want to promote good stories and good people. Formula puts emphasis on the process, as it is the process which sometimes leads to the story, or in fact, is the story. For this reason we welcome our viewers to watch our process as we build our website. We have an outcome in mind, and though we may make mistakes along the way, we intend to learn from them. The stories we tell are not just ours, they are everyone’s. Formula is based out of Honolulu, Hawai`i but our influences come from all over the world. We want you to hear our stories - visit us to find out what we’re thinking about! www.formu-la.com

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Formula officially launched on January 30, 2010. They wanted to celebrate their launch by having a photography competition centered around the topic, “Mundane is Beautiful,� to bring out exactly what Formula is about: simple but intricate content. To the artist, photography is visually telling a story or giving an opinion of a story that they wish to share. To an audience, photography is a way to look deep into an image to read what the photographer was trying to capture - an endless means of a story. The winners of the competition will be featured in Issue 1.2 of Real Word. Magazine.

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For mula

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Formula was formed in 2009 by Kirk Malanchuk and Cherie Marquez in hopes to share life’s observations with others. Kirk hails from Winnipeg, Canada. He’s called Hawai`i his home for about 3 years now. He received a degree in environmental design from the University of Manitoba. Kirk has a passion for all areas of design and often finds himself in lengthy conversations with strangers. Cherie is originally from Hawai`i, but sometimes calls Los Angeles, California her hometown. She attended the University of Washington and UCLA and has over 10 years of experience in television and film. Cherie has traveled all over the world and her hero is her daughter.

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Na Hoa:

entertainers.

Perpetuating Traditional Hawaiian Music

photography: Joe Marquez

words: Kanani Souza High-pitched falsetto voices whimsically singing traditional Hawaiian tunes bring forth images of our island’s nonpareil history and scenic terrain. Falsetto singing is an integral component and trademark of traditional Hawaiian music, which is the genre that Keoni Souza (bass), 25, Ikaika Blackburn (`ukulele), 27, and Hale Seabury-Akaka (guitar), 26, have diligently worked hard to perpetuate over the years. Together they form the group Na Hoa, simply meaning “friends” in Hawaiian. Young men playing songs of Hawai`i’s past is a rarity, given the new-age music in which most of their peers engage. Moreover, as they acknowledge the importance of their heritage and pay tribute to the decorated musicians that went before them, they are filled with a tranquil sincerity and obligation which is unmatched. Each of the three group members plays music all over the world, individually or as a group, for select halau who showcase their hula in competitions or concerts at different locales. The most frequently visited destination for the trio is Japan, where the market for traditional Hawaiian music is potent with demand. Souza’s most notable performance was at the prestigious Carnegie Hall in New York City. Other destinations that have been entranced with Na Hoa’s music include: New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and California. Aside from their passion of being professional musicians, each has a niche as professionals in other realms. Souza is a 2002 graduate of Kamehameha Schools and a flight attendant for Hawaiian Airlines. He is also a part-time real estate agent.

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Blackburn graduated from Baldwin High School in 2001 and is employed as a firefighter with the Maui Fire Department. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Hawaiian Studies and Hawaiian Language from the University of Hawai`i at Manoa, where he was also a member of the Warrior football team. Seabury-Akaka is a 2002 St. Louis High School graduate and is a student at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa. He is the son of renowned entertainer Hau`oli Akaka. The group officially started back in 2002. However, Souza and Seabury-Akaka were playing music together since their days in the Kamehameha Schools’ Hawaiian Ensemble and Concert Glee Club. They kept in touch even after Seabury-Akaka went to St. Louis High School, as both played music in their free time. Blackburn met Souza through a mutual friend. The three united after this point and formed Na Hoa, originally performing at Kona Brewing Company in Hawai`i Kai. Since then, they have been fortunate to build their friendship through their devotion to music. The band currently serenades audiences at such places as the Pacific Marina Hotel, Aku Bone, and various restaurants and hotels on the island. Due to Blackburn’s job on Maui, he is not always accessible for gigs on O`ahu with the group, but they find ways of playing music together as often as possible. Much of their knowledge about traditional Hawaiian music has stemmed from the ties to their distinguished mentors. These mentors include Ainsley Halemanu, `Ihilani Miller, and the late Kawai Cockett, among many others. Na Hoa attributes their success to these people, as they play from the heart and reinforce the value of humility and respect. Na Hoa has remained humble through all of their experiences and they continue to be role models for young musicians. Traditional Hawaiian music is in the veins of these astounding male figures. Their undying fondness for their music is directly related to their reverence for their culture, as all of the members are of Hawaiian descent. The group is in the studio at the moment recording their first CD to be completed sometime in 2010. For more information about where Na Hoa is making appearances, please visit www.foreelmedia.com. Issue 1.1


professional baseball player.

Shane Victorino

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words: Cheryl DeAngelo I was thrilled when I received the call that Shane Victorino would “talk story” with me. Just a few weeks earlier, he played in the World Series. We would meet three days after he married his bride, Melissa, and just four days before his celebrity golf tournament took place on Maui. He was a busy man that everyone in media wanted to talk to. I was grateful that he was taking the time to chat with me. There was a lot of buzz about Shane. His name was mentioned everywhere: on ESPN, in tabloids, various magazines (and even in a conversation between two men in a sports bar that I eavesdropped on). Outfielder for the Philadelphia Phillies. All-Star. Recipient of the Rawling’s Golden Glove Award in the outfield — twice consecutively. As I prepared for our meeting, I’m not sure what I really expected. Sometimes fame and fortune change a person. Sometimes natural talent makes you cocky. And I read somewhere that he has a hot temper at times. I was a little intimidated by the large group Shane arrived with, but once he greeted me with the familiar “Aloha,” and a Hawaiian-style embrace, I was at ease. He is as down-to-earth as they come and very humble. He spoke fondly of his family, his Hawai`i roots and his connection with fans. He embraces the fact that he may be a role model to some and takes it very seriously. “If one child learns something from me that helps them succeed, I’m happy; I’m a winner,” he says. As we sit and talk, a fair amount of passersby take notice of Shane, whisper to each other, smile and walk on by. He enthusiastically addresses them by saying, “Hi. I’m Shane. Have a good day.” They are shocked and startled at first; it probably made their day. Shane goes on to mention that he wishes Hawai`i people would be more open and not worry so much about “bothering.” He wishes we would ask him to speak at schools, community events or even just ask for that Kodak moment. “All I can do is say ‘no.’ If you don’t ask, you get zero. Just ask.” Shane Victorino is that spectacular athlete that deserves and works hard for all the accolades he receives. But I found another side of him that is equally, if not more, impressive. He is a true philanthropist: recipient of the 2009 Phi Delta Theta International Lou Gehrig Memorial Award, given annually to the Major League Baseball player who best exemplifies the giving character of Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig. He is a member of the Philadelphia Action Team, a national young volunteer initiative by the Major League Baseball Trust and Volunteers of America.

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Shane Victorino

On November 17th, 2009, the Second Annual Shane Victorino Celebrity Golf Classic was held at Makena Beach & Golf Resort. Participating in the event were his teammates Joe Blanton and Ryan Howard, along with Huston Street from the Colorado Rockies, Chad Gaudin from the New York Yankees and Neil Everett, anchor for ESPN’s Sports Center. In its first year, the golf classic raised $100,000 for the Alzheimer’s Association Aloha Chapter. This year, proceeds benefitted the Hawai`i Children’s Cancer Foundation. Hawai`i is blessed to have a hometown hero in Shane Victorino: he is truly an inspiration, on and off the field. Although I didn’t know what to expect when I met him, there were several things I knew when we parted: he has used his fame and fortune to help others — in a big way; natural talent made him confident, not cocky; and as far as having a hot temper, I never witnessed a trace of it. But most local boys have a little spark in them, don’t they? As our meeting came to a close, I expressed my gratitude for his time and for giving me a glimpse into his life. And before I left, I shamelessly took out a baseball mitt and two balls for him to sign. My nephew Cole’s third birthday party was the next weekend, and he is an avid baseball fan. This would mean so much. Shane happily signed it and even called over his friend, MVP Ryan Howard, to sign it too. And all I had to do was ask.

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photography: Irvin Yamada

imagesbyjeffrey.com

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Was it difficult to move to the mainland? No. I live in Las Vegas. I can go to the California Hotel and I’ll see someone that I never saw back in Maui for ten years there.

Any pre-game rituals? I gotta shower. I have to go in clean, even though I just get dirty. I also get to the field before a lot of people — between noon and 1 p.m. for a 7 p.m. game. I just hang out. Talk story with anyone walking into the clubhouse. Have fun. Stretch at 4:20. The only time I’ll break that ritual is if family comes in to town. I want to spend time with them. Do you chew gum on the field? Yes. Wrigley’s Spearmint or Doublemint.

Tell us about being in the Eagle Scouts. It prepared me for life: how to overcome failure, to succeed, to survive. My mom took so much pride in making sure I was an Eagle Scout. One of her proudest moments was when I received my Eagle Scout award. She would go camping in the wilderness with me — just to make sure I got it done. I remember the time we went to Lana`i. Willie K was playing, so I ran away to watch him. When I came back, I got busted! She really stayed on me, always by my side. She even made me wear those green shorts — IN HIGH SCHOOL!

Who are your heroes? I never looked up to a celebrity or professional athlete. My heroes were right in front of me — my dad & my brother.

What traits do you have from your dad? The kind of person I am is definitely from both my dad and my mom. We speak the same, we yell the same, we do everything the same.

What is your biggest accomplishment? It wasn’t making it to the big leagues. It wasn’t playing in the World Series or even getting the Golden Glove Award. My biggest accomplishment is becoming a father. My daughter is #1 in my life. She’s my angel. My everything.

What is the most important thing in a marriage? Standing hand in hand. Being supportive. It’s hard to do it alone.

What is your favorite flavor of shave ice? Rainbow. With ice cream.

How do you like your steak done? Medium.

Do you enjoy MMA (Mixed Martial Arts)? Who is your favorite fighter? Big fan. BJ Penn and Chuck Liddell.

If you could be anywhere in the world right now, where would you be? No place like home — Maui.

What was the last magazine you read? Real Word. This is a magazine I want to read — inspirational stories. I may get something out of it that will help me in my career and help me be successful in what I’m doing.

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miracle workers.

Pacific In Vitro Fertilization Institute is Hawai`i’s first and most experienced in vitro fertilization clinic. Currently the largest IVF clinic in the state with over 2,700 babies born to couples struggling with infertility, Pacific In Vitro first made headlines in 1985 for the birth of Hawai`i’s first IVF baby, and will be celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2010. At Pacific In Vitro we realize what a challenging process IVF can be; from deciding if IVF is an option for you, to enduring the many appointments and procedures involved, we provide a supportive environment with resources available to put couples at ease. The Pacific In Vitro family is a diverse, supportive group comprised of medical and office staff. In addition to our doctors, embryologists, and laboratory staff, our team consists of a shopaholic, an arts and crafts master, an avid sports fan, a master baker, a veteran world traveler and two crazy car buffs, all of whom have years of experience working within the medical field. Couples who enter Pacific In Vitro are first greeted by our receptionists, Debbie and Desiree, and are put at ease from the moment they walk through our door. These two women have many years experience working as medical office receptionists and understand the journey of the stressful process couples face. As our resident fashion expert, Desiree is also on hand for any style tips – especially anything to do with handbags and shoes, while Debbie can teach you how to make ribbon lei and does creative bead work when time permits. If you want to know the latest news and updates on NFL or U.H. football teams, just ask our financial coordinator, Donna. She works with all of our patients and their health insurance companies by filing claims and answering all of the financial questions that may arise. To ease the stress of financial concerns, we work closely with patients as they go through IVF treatments. Donna is the office chef and regularly brings in new dishes for the office staff to sample. Patients of Pacific In Vitro will immediately feel comforted and assured by our three nurse coordinators, Hong, Laura and Adrian who have nearly 70 years of nursing experience combined, specializing in OB/GYN and infertility. Our world traveler, Hong, was born in Vietnam, raised in France and moved to the United States in 1986. She regularly visits her family in Canada and plans to retire one day on the island of Maui. Hong knew from an early age that she wanted to be in the medical field and has over 18 years of experience in nursing. She migrated towards IVF because she wanted to help families where no other option was available. Laura has been nursing for over 35 years and chose infertility and OB/GYN as her specialty because she likes the patient interaction and having the ability to help couples achieve their dream of having children. She is also our master baker whose signature dishes are orange rolls, cupcakes and brownies. Adrian has 15 years of experience in the infertility field, and has firsthand experience of IVF treatments. Having gone through IVF, she can empathize with what the patients and their families are going through. Adrian has two children and is the proud owner of a 1955 Chevy Bel Air and a 2008 Dodge Challenger. Our behind-the-scenes person, Mari, ensures that all day-to-day operations run as smoothly as her rebuilt 1966 Mustang. She is on hand to ensure that patients are provided with everything they need to go through the IVF process. What really touches each of us is that since our first delivery in 1985, we have not only been an important part of the beginning of a family’s life together, but we continue to be a part of those lives. We are happy to celebrate birthdays, high school graduations and now, even college graduations for babies that were born with Pacific In Vitro’s help. Our team is here to help build families. We strive to create a supportive and comforting feeling from the moment patients enter Pacific In Vitro and become a part of our extended family.

photography: Malia Johnson w w w. r e a l w o r d m a g a z i n e . com

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Note from Cheryl DeAngelo, editor: I am so grateful to Pacific IVF, the team of professionals that were instrumental in my journey towards motherhood almost three years ago. During one of the most challenging times of my life, I found comfort in their genuine kindness and their endless words of encouragement. I relied on their smiles and compassion each day I visited the office and I looked forward to hearing their friendly voices over the phone. Today, my husband and I are proud parents to Maya Rose, who gives us the greatest joy one could ever imagine. As I reminisce about the moment I found out I would be a mother, flashes of the faces above dance in my mind. I am so very grateful.

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young artists.

a photographic exploration of the five senses

mikaela tallett. age 4 Le Jardin Academy

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kendall tacon. age 15 `Iolani School

The Button . Filled with joy I run to the button. The magical button that opens a lot of doors. Going up, down, left, or right. Taking me anywhere I want to go inside. I reach for the button, then slowly push it. Click. The noise dances through my head. The magic begins as it lights up. Which door? Which door could it be? My excitement gets bigger and bigger. It’s the left, no the right. My mind fights. Ding. The light above the left door shines. The metallic doors slowly open up, unveiling a land of wonder. I slowly walk inside to take in all of its marvels. It’s even better than I had hoped. Inside holds the most magical part of all. An entire canvas of buttons, waiting to be pushed.

jesse velasquez. Jesse was born and raised in Honolulu and is a junior at Waipahu High School. He is 16 years old and creates legal graffiti art. Taking notice of tagging being done by his classmates, Jesse was inspired to do the same, but in a respectful manner. The piece featured below is located on the back wall of his house with permission from his grandparents.

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musician.

Honi to the Left, Right? words: Kaleo del Sol photography: Malia Johnson Amy Hanaiali`i just kissed me. On the lips. It’s a warm Thursday evening in a dimly lit restaurant overlooking Honolulu Harbor. I think she’s blushing, but I don’t know for sure. It feels like I am. Amy. And me? Never. It could never work. Even if we could manage to get past the age difference, she’s just too high-profile. And she makes more money than I do. Besides, I hardly know a thing about her. Like, what’s her favorite ice cream? Does she enjoy bike rides at sunset? How does she feel about kids? Does she have any? If so, how many? And exactly how many Hoku Awards has she accumulated in all her years as a recording artist here in Hawai`i? Slow down. Slow down. We just met. Just a minute ago she was walking offstage here at Kincaids. In fact I wouldn’t have noticed her if the band hadn’t pointed her out and called her up to do a few numbers. I was sitting with some friends and family from out of town when Amy walked past us to her table just five feet away. “Who’s that?” asked Adinah, my cousin visiting from Florida. “That’s Amy Hanaiali`i. You know that award I didn’t get this year? She has like, twenty.” It was my first time seeing her live, and I’d never actually met her before, so I hopped up as she returned to her seat. “Hi, before you get too comfortable, would you mind if I took a picture with you?” I asked. “Sure, not at all,” she said. As Adinah got her camera ready, Amy and I talked about the Hoku Awards and she told me how awesome my record was and how I really should’ve won Jazz Album of the Year (okay, not really), and then we posed for a couple shots. Short, sweet, and classy. End of story, right? Just honi and exit ... But pulling off the ol’ honi (Hawaiian cheek/air kiss) with local celebrities can be a little tricky – you never know what you’re gonna get. When I met Danny Kaleikini, he grabbed my face, kissed both my cheeks twice and went full-blown Polynesian, nose-to-nose, “ha” in, “ha” out for what felt like twenty minutes. So with Amy, I do what I normally do ... what most people normally do: lean and pucker left. Everybody knows this. Even with hugs, both heads go left every time, over the opposite party’s right shoulder. Amy went right. Three inches from her face, I still had time to adapt. I darted right as well, but Amy, realizing her own error and not anticipating my ninjalike reflexes, corrected to her left at the same time. Strike two. We slowly turned our heads back to center until ... Pow. Right in the kisser. Immediately, I lower my eyes and blink … twice … and then a third time for no apparent reason, but somehow it’s more intentional than the first two. Pretending nothing happened, I smile graciously and return to my seat. Taking the camera from my cousin, I ask, “Did you get it?” “Yeah,” she says with a smirk, “Did you?”

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Kaleo del Sol Kaleo’s musical ear began to develop at the age of eight as a member of the Honolulu Boy Choir. Raised in Pupukea on O`ahu’s North Shore, he graduated from Waialua High, and studied blues and gospel at the University of Oregon. In 2004, he broke into the entertainment business as lead singer of the Krush. His debut release Aloha Monday features eleven all-original songs, from sweet and simple acoustic ballads to jazz-infused R&B, garnering a nomination from the Hawai`i Academy of Recording Arts for Jazz Album of the Year. Kaleo currently resides in Hawai`i Kai and sits on the Board of Directors for the Hawai`i Kai Chamber of Commerce. He is also the Director of the Diamond Head Gospel Choir.

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police officer.

Rani Hanohano Rani was born and raised in Nanakuli and is a Police Officer for the Honolulu Police Department. She currently works in the Information Technology Division. With 10 years of service, she continues to inspire, lead and mentor others. Rani enjoys coaching volleyball for Tita Ahuna’s Volleyball Academy during her spare time.

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words: Rani Hanohano It’s almost 10 years ago that I made a decision that would not only change my life, but also the lives of those around me. I am a Honolulu police officer. Some may perceive this occupation as a thankless job due to the long hours and high propensity for danger, but I am thankful to be a part of the police force, where I am able to serve and protect the community. Though I grew up with a lot of distractions, there were two significant people in my life who always kept me focused and steered me in the right direction. They were my grandparents, Joseph “Papa” and Rosamond “Grandma” Hanohano. Papa and Grandma taught me to work hard, study harder, respect others, love unconditionally, and be humble. But most of all, they taught me to do things from the heart and be myself. And in my heart, all I wanted to do was help others. Papa graduated from Kamehameha School and later retired from the Honololu Fire Department. He was very intelligent and a down-to-earth, easygoing man. It didn’t take a lot to make him happy: just a simple, “Papa, I love you,” would bring a smile to his face. He had a reason for everything and that’s what I loved about him. I wanted to be just like him. So with that in mind, I would always follow him around wherever he went. If he was cooking in the kitchen, I was there being the guinea pig: “Enough coconut milk?” he would ask. I would say, “I need a little bit more, can’t really taste it.” He would give me another scoop. Then about five scoops later, he would say, “You should be full by now, since you ’tasted‘ just about a bowl-size already.” Papa made the most awesome squid lu`au. Broke the mouth. If Papa was fixing his truck, I was there under the hood with him. When Papa would ask me to pass him a tool, I would be rubbing engine oil on my hands to pretend that I was productive and working hard too. Of course Papa would tell me, “Huh boy, hard to find good help these days.” I would just crack up laughing and Papa would get a kick, too. I really miss those times being an `opihi to Papa. Grandma was a very sweet and gorgeous woman. She loved to dance, sing, crack jokes, and was just a joy to be around. She also danced and taught hula. She was tall, slender, and gracious. On May 1, 1957, at the age of 19, Grandma was chosen out of 19 candidates, to reign as Queen of the Honolulu Lei Day Celebration. What an honor and blessing it was; since she was chosen as Lei Day Queen, Grandma portrayed Princess Ka`iulani for a painting that still hangs in the Princess Ka`iulani Hotel. One thing I remember my Grandma doing was scaring the grandchildren with her false teeth. Whenever the kids were naughty and would “act up,” she would make her teeth come out and show them her gums. That was the funniest sight to see – the grandkids were quick to shape up. She would also grab her stomach and sing, “… jelly don’t shake like thaaaaat.” It was hilarious and fun to just be laughing and horsing around. I loved those memorable times.

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Those fond memories of my grandparents live so vividly in me. I remember their core values and knowing it made me study and work harder in everything I did. Like my grandfather, I attended The Kamehameha Schools where I played four years of varsity volleyball, golf, and track and field. I graduated in 1991 with academic and athletic honors. I then went to college at Hawai`i Pacific University, playing volleyball for the Lady Sea Warriors. Here I achieved academic-athletic honors and obtained my Bachelors of Arts degree in Justice Administration. While attending college, I volunteered for the Hawai`i Family Court System assigned to the Guardian Ad Litem Program. Here I was appointed by the court to represent the best interests of a child in a child abuse or child neglect case, working 25 hours a month. It was very intense and highly emotional most of the time, but gratifying in the sense that justice was being done. I also committed my summers to at-risk youth, particularly in the Leeward area. This was one of my most rewarding tasks: it meant reaching out to our troubled youth and being a positive role model in their lives. It really pushed them to believe in themselves, to never give up and to live out their dreams because life is not always wine and roses. At times it can be winos and roaches.

But it’s what you make out of it that is the deciding factor. And so I didn’t ever stop believing in myself: I continued on to obtain my Masters of Science Degree in Criminal Law at Chaminade University of Honolulu. While attending school, I volunteered at neighboring churches, homeless shelters, community affairs, non-profit events, and even found time to referee Police Athletic League (PAL) ball games. Whatever time and energy I could spare, I dedicated it to helping others. It was one thing I was passionate about. During my years on the police force, I volunteered and dedicated my spare time to various community organizations around the island. I participated in many community services projects such as Lend a Hand to Keep our Land, Big Brothers Big Sisters, American Diabetes Association, Waianae Coast Comprehensive Center, and the American Red Cross, just to name a few. This period has been the greatest years of my life because I made my Papa and my Grandma proud. They meant the world to me, so in return, I wanted to give them the universe. All it took was their unconditional love, guidance, and appreciation. I loved them very much. Ten years later, I find myself a part of the Honolulu Police Department `ohana. Entering the department in January 2000, I was living out my passion for helping people and saving lives – that’s what I always wanted to do. Thanks Papa and Grandma, for making me believe in who I am and supporting me every step of the way. I’ll cherish you both forever.

“And in my heart, all I wanted to do was help others.”

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entrepreneur.

Sam Gray

Sam Gray pioneered the first locally owned and authorized shop in Skippy, Moon, Mel, and Jerome. Sam played the pakini bass. Hawai`i to service diesel fuel injection. Little did he did know how much Recently, he was informed that the Makaha Sons of Ni`ihau will it would turn his life around. Who exactly is Sam Gray? be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2010 Na Hoku Sam was born and raised on the west side of O`ahu, in the heart Hanohano Award ceremony for their contribution to music in the islands. of Makaha. He was a shy kid who found himself among influences, both After his music career, he and his wife, Momi, ventured into a new good and bad. It was at this point that Sam discovered that music was one business that was rare to the islands at that time – the servicing of diesel of his many talents. Sam found himself in the company of great musicians, fuel injection. In 1989, he opened the doors to his own shop, Precision the Makaha Sons of Ni`ihau: the legendary Israel Kamakawiwo`ole, Fuel Injection, in Keaau, on the Big Island. words: Doris Bitonio

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What is your biggest challenge? Like all businesses, we were being challenged with the advancement of technology, new and innovative ways to service diesel fuel injection components, and we were finding that the Internet was becoming a competitor. Mainland companies were promising low cost. Customers started to mail their equipment and parts to the mainland for service and repair. They did it because there appeared to be a cost savings. Soon enough, the customers quickly realized the service they got from the mainland is exactly what they paid for. Not much. That’s when they would come to see me, to correct the problem – the right way.

How did you get started in your career?

What does Precision Fuel Injection (PFI) do?

I was 17 years old and worked for a company in Campbell Industrial that specialized in the undercarriages of heavy equipment. Years later, my wife and I took a leap of faith and opened our business. It was the best thing that happened to me. People believed in my abilities and invested in the company. Soon, our business flourished and we opened another shop in Maui as well.

We service everything that runs the heart of the diesel engine‌ from ground moving equipment, boats, trucks, and stationary engines. Simply, a diesel engine is the opposite of a gas engine that has a carburetor and spark plugs. A diesel engine is a high combustion engine which is powered by a high pressure injection pump, injectors and sometimes a turbo charger. These components are what we specialize in.

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What do you most remember about your early years with the Makaha Sons of Ni`ihau? What is your competitive advantage? My heritage. I’m local. I’m about serving everyone. Whether it be the large corporations or my “rubbah slippah” customers… the farmers and fishermen, I call them the “rubber slippahs.” (chuckles) Don’t get me wrong, the value of a dollar is bar none. But, fresh fish from the ocean and fresh vegetables from the farm, it can’t get any better than that. More importantly, it’s the unconditional gratitude that the “rubbah slippah” customers show me. Time and time again, they come back to see me.

Playing under the banyan tree with the pakini bass, guitars, and `ukulele. Someone heard us playing across the street. We were then invited to play music at a doctor’s vacation house in Makaha. Word got out, then Skylark Rossetti gave us our first break, [performing] at the Muscular Dystrophy telethon.

Are there other shops like yours in Hawai`i? There is only one other authorized shop in Hawai`i, which is mainland based. In the mainland, shops like mine are a dime a dozen. In Hawai`i, that’s what makes my field rare on the islands. It’s a good thing. In 2007 we decided to make a physical move from Hilo to Honolulu. When we were on the Big Island, business came from all directions. We serviced the entire What’s your business philosophy? state of Hawai`i, Guam, Tahiti and all the other islands in the Pacific Ocean, I am what I am now because of my “scrape knuckle” experiences. Today, including the Micronesian Islands. Our decision to relocate was a strategic its necessary to attend trainings and to be up-to-speed with our industry since move. We are now located right across Target in Salt Lake. We needed to advancements to machinery and transportation are done in leaps. Back then, adjust to how business is being done now. We had to adapt to the changing we didn’t have all the training that is available now. I learned my business economic times and also be more accessible to our clients at anytime. We by doing and learning on the job. It’s great to have all the training, but you moved the business to O`ahu to be centralized. Hilo is still home for us. need to be passionate. This will keep you motivated, dedicated, and your business will thrive. Also, building relationships is most important to me. It’s these relationships that have made my business profitable over the past 20 years. This is what makes an honest business. I’d rather be poor and sleep with two eyes closed versus rich with one eye open.

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war veteran.

Thomas Kuali‘i Thomas is an Equipment Operator for the County of Hawai`i’s Highway Division and also owns a photography company, Extreme Exposure, with business partner and friend Bruce Omori. Thomas is the father of four girls and lives in Hilo.

photography: Bruce Omori w w w. r e a l w o r d m a g a z i n e . com

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words and photography: Thomas Kuali`i I am a proud island son, born and raised in Hilo on the Big Island of Hawai`i. My first introduction to the professional use of a camera was at the University of Hawai`i at Hilo and Hawai`i Community College. I took a number of art classes, one of which was a photography class taught by renown artist Linus Chao. In 2004, I was deployed to Iraq. I vividly remember the day I left, looking at my children, thinking it might be the last time I would see them. It broke my heart to have to force my youngest daughter off my leg while she cried. I could never forget seeing my children cry as I left. I couldn’t hold my heart in. And I cried. Photography helped me while I was on deployment, and it was there that I discovered how fascinating and captivating it truly was. I spent my “down time” searching for beauty amid the chaos of war. Armed with a “Canon” of a different sort, I exposed grand sunsets and fluid waves of endless sand. I stilled the movement of animals and insects unfamiliar

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to a native Hawaiian such as myself. Most importantly, I encouraged and captured smiles on faces that otherwise expressed fear and sorrow. Photography got my mind off of being in the heart of war and I spent many hours between work and missions learning about it. Having a lifelong fascination with fighter jets and combat helicopters, I was in awe when photographing them. One particular photograph of a row of resting Apache helicopters nestled among protective barricades on an airfield in Balad won the grand prize in a photo contest, and I was awarded a custom-built Harley Davidson upon my return home to Hawai`i. I also brought back memories of being there and suffered from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a term that us veterans refer to as “post traumatic war syndrome.” It tore apart my life in many ways, and lack of sleep still lingers with me, but I am slowly getting better. Recently, our unit was called to be deployed again. Once again, I sat down and told my daughters that Daddy is going back to Iraq. Seeing them

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quietly shed a tear broke my heart – I thought of all the experiences I faced in war and realized that nothing could ever compare to leaving my family, knowing that I may not ever see them again. With that heartfelt feeling, I announced my retirement after 22 years of service to my country. I carry on some of the same routine since being back, still trying to get better and still trying to capture eye-catching images – I focus on nature, with a passion for Kalapana, the vast playground of goddess Pele. I find a connection with my roots as a native Hawaiian, as a descendant of native kings and warriors of old. Walking and talking with goddess Pele has given me an opportunity to create images of her beauty that only a few in this world would experience. I trek over sacred, treacherous, unpaved landscapes in the heart of darkness, relying only on a higher power, and it takes me away from all that I went through. It keeps me in the present, connected to something so powerful, yet serene. I am grateful for those quiet moments alone, calming and spiritual. I am grateful for the gift of photography.

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Kalapana, Hawai`i photography: Thomas Kuali`i

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comedian.

Kaleo Pilanca Kaleo is Hawai`i’s “feel good” emcee, a standup comedian and personality on the morning radio show for 102.7FM Da Bomb. He can be seen in many local island commercials and on OC16’s, “Da Braddahs and Friends.”

the Spirit of the Laugh words: Kaleo Pilanca photography: Malia Johnson Butterflies are kicking in, as I prepare to take the stage. I have done this so many times before, so why is my stomach swirling like a tornado? My palms are glistening with sweat, I cannot seem to keep still as I pace back and forth. I cannot feel my legs, they seem to just move on their own, my heart is beating a million miles an hour plus infinity, I feel like a class 5 hurricane is about to brew, my adrenaline is flowing, blood boiling and the only thing on my mind is...Will I make them laugh? Uh-oh! I hear my name, that’s me they are calling. Why do I put myself through this? Is it the euphoria? This is it! No turning back now, the moment I been waiting for, almost there and I hear them clapping, cheering and some are even heckling. No worries, that’s why I’m here to cheer them up. I do my ritual sign of the cross to the big man upstairs, praying for the right words, praying I make it through. Now I’m at the microphone and there they are. All I see are big, white gazing eyes and extra focused ears. It’s time for battle, time to ride the waves, it’s time to rock the mic. This is where it all begins! On the other hand, this could be the end! I gotta make them see, I gotta make them hear, I gotta make them feel the spirit I have inside: “the Spirit of the Laugh.”

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where me and my relatives continue to stand strong to keep the country what it should always be — country! It’s green with good vibes and great people who love to laugh. Growing up here in Waiahole, we have everybody of all nationalities living in harmony: Hawaiian, Filipino, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Samoan, Tongan, “Pocho”guese, Guamanian, Caucasian and the list goes on. You name it, we got it! And it’s all good. We live Hawaiian style. Not everyone has Hawaiian blood, but we care for each other by preserving the spirit and culture of being Hawaiian: the people, the land, the streams, the oceans, the animals, the music and the good fun stories. I gotta take you back 36 years ago to when I was born and how I To me age is just a number... lived up until I was 18 years old. My hale (house) is located about two I stopped counting a long time ago... miles up from the main road. The road was a very rocky dirt road with no Keeps me young forever... street lights - one way in and one way out; our family car was lucky if the I originally come from the eastside of O`ahu, from a place called “no shocks lasted a year; no cable lines for TV and no mail man. Even HPD electricity” Waiahole valley. If you don’t know where this sacred valley road who came up to check were usually the ones who lived in the area; the rest is located, you may be familiar with the song “Sweet Lady of Waiahole.” knew this place was dark and a little bit spooky so they stayed away as It’s about a very little old Japanese lady by the name of Mrs. Matayoshi much as possible. My closest neighbors growing up were a quarter mile up who pushed her wheel barrel with passion and sold her valley fruits on the and a quarter mile down. Our house stood alone amidst the crisp country air. The trees formed a tunnel all the way up from the main road into the side of the main road everyday to make ends meet. Or maybe you’re familiar with the old Waiahole poi factory! All I can valley. So at night, everything was pitch dark and very country. In this sacred valley we all lived as fisherman, farmers, hunters, say is when you come to my hometown, do not blink because you will miss this road. I have lived here all my life and I still live here today. It’s a place gatherers, builders, surfers, and musicians - living off the land. Most of Aloha, my name is Kaleo Pilanca. The industry says I’m a comedian, radio & TV personality, host, and an emcee. Others call me the funny man, the jokester, the prankster or a clown! All of which are definitely a blessing to me. Whatever title you give me...I feel I’m just a country boy who loves making people laugh. I am the laugh maker. It’s my natural high, my passion, my love, the reason I exist. If you want to know where my true laughing spirit comes from, I suggest you journey with me and continue to read on and find out where my style and passion for laugh-making derived. Here is how I have become Braddah Kaleo “KP” Pilanca, “Hawai`i’s feel good emcee.”

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Kaleo Pilanca

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When we sang, we sang beautifully. When we ate, we ate until the opu (stomach) was full, and When we laughed, we laughed like it would be our last laugh! You know the kind of laugh that made your face cramp. Some cried laughing, some got sore stomach, or shi shi their pants, even got side pain — guaranteed. Everybody had a joke or some good fun story to share. We all took turns, the aunties and uncles, papa, tutu, keiki (children), mo`opuna (grandkids), real cousins and calabash — everyone shared, everyone laughed, and we all lived 100% in the moment. Maybe we laughed to hide behind the fact that we all didn’t have much. You know, like no television or radio, but we had each other to wala`au. Also the ukulele, the pakini (a broom stick with a string connected to a metal washtub for a base instrument) and I’m the one who played the Ruffles® bag or spoons for music just to feel included and for the laughs. The constant good fun stories, and all this took place under the mango tree. For some reason we would always would come together under a tree. In case rain, never need tent. One thing I will never forget is we always ended our family gatherings with our heartwarming island song called “Hawai`i Aloha.” Everybody stood up holding hands, squeezing ever so tightly, singing at the top of their lungs, the wahine (women) singing the high notes and the men sang the low notes. If you couldn’t sing you just never sing... ha ha! And often a tear would fall down a cheek or two for the family who wasn’t with us anymore. It kept everyone connected to each other, from keiki to kupuna, reminding us all that the laughs and good times for that night would be done, but we will be back to do it all over again the next time. Today we still wala’au under the same tree and although many `ohana (family) have passed and made their journey to that beautiful glowing castle in heaven, we still eat, sing, hug, honi honi (kiss), say howzit, play music, but most of all we keep “the Spirit of the Laugh” alive. So when you see me around don’t be alarmed if I come up to you first and say howzit, hug you and honi honi you on the cheek, that’s the aloha in me... it’s built in. And ladies, don’t mistake my aloha for flirting, because yes, I’m actually flirting. Ha ha!

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Kaleo Pilanca

photography: Sam Owens

all we were all storytellers. We didn’t have much, but what we did have, we either grew, caught, or raised with our bare hands and we shared everything with each other... as family. Sharing was the key to all of our survival. When one family didn’t have, another family helped. “We never have much... but we were happy.” We had just enough, and our parents taught us to take care of everything and each other. Treat others with respect, always kokua (help), and care unconditionally. We made time to have good fun talk story sessions. Hawaiians call this wala`au. Everybody brought ono (broke the mouth) food, ice cold inu (drinks), and their instruments for the chicken-skin music. All of us took turns leading the Hawaiian songs from the days of old, but it was in between the songs when the jokes would come out — jokes and feel good stories that made everybody crack up. That’s what it was all about and this is where my style of laugh-making comes from. I call it the feel good kine. You know you got it when you feel the chicken-skin all over your body, your hair stands up and it makes you forget all the pilikia (problems) of the world — no can go wrong!

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real word .

magazine

1 1 . 2 7 . 0 9 t h e W a t e r f r o n t a t A l o h a T o w e r

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photography: Ikaika Arnado, Kaveh Kardan, Joe Marquez, Julie Dunn, Sam Owens, Suzie Hansen, Donald Ewing.


submissions. Real Word. Magazine features original work that give our readers a view of life in Hawai`i. We

welcome you to submit inspiring pieces that embrace respect, honor, pride, philanthropy, and gratitude.

www.realwordmagazine.com submit@realwordmagazine.com

erika swartzkopf.

Underwater Trip Garden watercolor

www.swartzko.com

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Originally from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Erika Swartzkopf has lived in Hawai`i since 1989. Her bright, abstract watercolors have been stimulated by the natural beauty of the islands and she enjoys playing with color and light and fuzing them into new, organic shapes and forms. She received her B.A. in Art History from Washington College.

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mapuana cornell. Waves of Memories Mapuana Cornell resides in Honolulu and works as a Management Analyst for the State of Hawai`i Department of Taxation. She has one son and three grandchildren. She began writing poetry in the third grade. Much of her inspiration comes to her in dreams, her surroundings, all things that have breath and life’s never fading experiences.

As the waves rush upon the shore, To open arms that long for more…. The rhythm of the ocean’s swell, Speak volumes that only the heart can tell. The pounding surf, soothes the soul, Like a sunny day on a grassy knoll. In every morsel grain of sand, Are countless memories cupped in my hands. But, as the ebb tide’s flow would be, The morsels of sand return to the sea. Free to roam the great divide Ocean of tears, in which I confide.

Mana`o: Inspired by life!

Like sand is to the ocean and sea, Endless waves of memories.

charity yoro. Lanikai An original Kaneohe girl living in South Korea, Charity Yoro is an English teacher, a freelance writer, and a gypsy. Words that describe her best are a saying by Anthony Bourdain: “I write. I eat. I travel. And I’m hungry for more.”

Your fineness sticks to every sea-soaked surface every crevice to towel frays and toenails and the condensation on plastic containers of tako poke or tubs of salsa from Safeway Even a good rinse can’t rid you from naked skin and your fineness flavors every bite of dipped corn chip In the laundry next Sunday I will find grains of you—ground to pure white powder from lifetimes of grating wave and coral stem and broken glass Find you in the bottom of jean skirt pockets hold you to my nostrils and breathe you in hungrily to taste what it means to be invincible.

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suzie hansen.

Hali`a Hali`a is a beautiful girl I met while working at a school. I remember the first time I met her and saw her beautiful blue eyes. I was totally mesmerized and taken by how beautiful she was. As time went on, her sweet kindred spirit just touched my heart and I thought, I would love to just photograph this child! I wanted to just capture her innocence and simplicity of what makes her Hali`a.

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Suzie Hansen lives in Kapolei, O`ahu with her husband Mark, daughter Maykeila (11), and son Dylan (8). She is a unique individual full of love, life and creativity. She loves to read, sing and spend quality time with her family and her true passion is photography. Every photographic encounter that she experiences is truly a gift of love that will never cease or expire. Her passion and love for photography is driven by people. Through them, she connects, laughs, cries, feels, learns and loves. She believes God has given everyone a gift within themselves. She is blessed to have an artistic gift to help capture one’s moment of love, life, journey and vision.

www.hicrushpics.com

Westside Westside was taken at Yokohama’s on the island of O`ahu. It was one of those perfect-timing sunset pictures that was just heaven sent. I kept focusing on God’s natural creation and thought, this is amazing. Beauty is all around us, we need to slow down and take it all in.

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Suzie Hansen

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erin mcCullough.

Erin McCullough is a resident of Honolulu. Currently a skills trainer at Loveland Academy, she enjoys creating art that gives the viewer an opportunity to experience shifting light and shadow at any given moment. Now, utilizing her deepest parts where inspiration lives for her, she is most interested in developing a greater consciousness of and connection to the world.

Kapahulu Lights oil on canvas 4’ x 2 1⁄2’

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www.erinmcculloughart.com

I was fascinated by the eyes of a man I saw day after day as I rode my bike to the beach. One day, with camera in hand, I finally approached him and asked if I could take his picture. I offered him money or some beer in exchange. Instead, he asked if I could take a picture to send to his mom. I returned a week later with the picture and a watercolor postcard for him to write a message. As he wrote, he talked about how much he missed his mom. He said she would be turning 90 soon and he hoped the card would make it to her for her birthday. Later that day I mailed the picture and card.

Jon oil on canvas 3’ x 1 1⁄2’

The man’s name was Jon. When I saw him a year later, he looked lost and sad and he didn’t recognize me. It was a privilege becoming acquainted with this man, who happened to be homeless and living on the beach. Rather than fitting my preconceived notions of what would be valuable to a person in his position, he reminded me of something that my dad used to tell me - that beauty, or value, is in the eye of the beholder. He didn’t want my money. He wanted his mom to know that he loved her. For once, my naive curiosity paid off and I was rewarded with the reminder of how much humanity can be gained by looking deeper than the surface of people.

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Erin McCullough

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holly kitaura.

Holly Kitaura grew up in Massachusetts, but found her paradise at the age of seventeen during a vacation to Hawai`i. The natural beauty inspired her to paint the colors of the rainbow and capture a whimsical view of life in the Hawaiian Islands. Although never formally trained, Holly has grown into a unique style of painting and remains passionate about her lifelong love with creating art. Each of Holly’s works expresses her vibrant fun-loving disposition and her extraordinary vision of the world.

Bamboo watercolor, acrylic, and ink

http://hollyvision.biz http://hollyvisionart.etsy.com

11” x 14”

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mark mira.

Born and raised in Hawai`i, Mark Mira knows where to get the best shots using his Olympus SP-500 UZ Digital Camera. The photo above is a view of Waikiki at sunset taken from Tantalus lookout. As a flight attendant for Hawaiian Airlines, Mark has the opportunity to see the Islands from a different height.

Serenity of My Being Once again I sit in silence In a place of calmness and serene I shut out the world’s violence Where I am to dream Reflecting on the past And all of my life’s choices I envision my new path With the help of my inner voice

carly philips. Writing, cooking, and spending the day at the beach are some of Wahiawa resident Carly Phillips’ interests. But her loves are her three children Rashawn, Dorian, & Roman, her partner, Jonah and all of her family and friends. It was this love that inspired her to write a poem in honor of her Aunty Chris. She has helped keep Carly on track and is an awesome person to know. She says, “Carly, no matter what challenges we face in life always find joy in all you do!”

Uplifted is my spirit Empowering my every being Radiant is the light you can clearly see it I embrace my life of a new beginning Thankful for the blessing in every shape and form I hold my head high with inner beauty, style and grace Just as beautiful as the rainbow after every storm So now I’ve chosen to stay in this wonderful new place I will take each step with confidence Unleashing the power and beauty within My creation of a whole new life And now my journey begins…

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marina miller.

Finding her inspiration from growing up on the North Shore, Marina Miller tries out a new creative vision in the shores of O`ahu. While just a novice to underwater photography, she has proven herself a seasoned talent in the wedding industry. Blending the worlds of sophistication, romance, and fun is the main goal when she hits the water in her yellow swim fins.

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www.redheartphoto.com

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Marina Miller

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Real Word.Magazine is a bi-monthly publication that showcases art, photography, poetry and short stories from the people of Hawai`i. It is a collection of positive thoughts and serves as a venue for all things creative and inspiring.

info@realwordmagazine.com MEDIA KIT AVAILABLE ONLINE www.realwordmagazine.com “Real Word will be a means by which we can enjoy the islands’ diversity of voices; perpetuate our cherished traditions; preserve those qualities that make us unique; and encourage the expression of those ideas that stimulate our intellects and inspire our spirits.” Mayor Mufi Hannemann, City and County of Honolulu



real word. magazine Issue 1.1